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Nyheder2018juni17

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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Gut microbes may contribute to depression and anxiety in obesityLike everyone, people with type 2 diabetes and obesity suffer from depression and anxiety, but even more so. Researchers at Joslin Diabetes Center now have demonstrated a surprising potential contributor to these negative feelings — and that is the bacteria in the gut or gut microbiome, as it is known.
16h
Live Science

Jumping Soccer Fans Triggered a Small Earthquake in MexicoThe World Cup is literally shaking the world.
18min
Ingeniøren

Banedanmark skal betale for køreledninger, politikerne måske slet ikke vil haveTo ud af de ti strækninger, som Banedanmark har underskrevet en kontrakt om at elektrificere, vil regeringen slet ikke bruge penge på. Men intet tyder på, at staten kan slippe ud af kontrakten og slippe for at betale.
6h

LATEST

Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Researchers explore whether smarter animals are bigger troublemakersYou have probably encountered a raccoon raiding the trash in your neighborhood, seen a rat scurrying through the subway or tried to shoo away birds from your picnic. But have you ever wondered what makes these animals so good at living in suburbs and cities, and whether these same traits also make them such a nuisance?
2min
The Atlantic

Do Beyoncé Fans Have to Forgive Jay-Z?Jay-Z and Beyoncé find their way to each other at the water’s edge. On Beyoncé’s last surprise record, the landmark 2013 self-titled visual album awash in references to her husband, the two are “Drunk in Love” by the third track. She writhes in the sand while singing about her now-famous “surfbordt”; he joins her for his verse, rapping away from both the camera and his companion. In Lemonade , Be
3min
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Organic crystals twist, bend, and healCrystals are brittle and inelastic? A novel class of smart, bendable crystalline organic materials has challenged this view. Now, scientists have engineered a molecular soft cocrystalline structure that bends and twists reversibly and without disintegration when stimulated by high temperature, mechanical force, or under UV light. This multifunctional quality makes it a robust candidate for advance
8min
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

'Slow earthquakes' on San Andreas Fault increase risk of large quakesGeologists have long thought that the central section of California's famed San Andreas Fault—from San Juan Bautista southward to Parkfield, a distance of about 80 miles—has a steady creeping movement that provides a safe release of energy.
8min
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

UNH researcher captures best ever evidence of rare black holeScientists have been able to prove the existence of small black holes and those that are super-massive but the existence of an elusive type of black hole, known as intermediate-mass black holes (IMBHs) is hotly debated. New research coming out of the Space Science Center at the University of New Hampshire shows the strongest evidence to date that this middle-of-the-road black hole exists, by seren
8min
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

NASA finds Tropical Depression Carlotta's strong storms over Mexico, Eastern PacificTropical Depression Carlotta continues to hug the coast of southwestern Mexico and drop heavy rainfall. NASA's Aqua satellite provided a look at cloud top temperatures through infrared imagery to find out where the most powerful parts of Tropical Depression Carlotta were located.
8min
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Novel information about the effects of in vitro fertilization on embryonic growthIn vitro fertilization affects the regulatory region of genes essential for placental and embryonic growth, as well as the birth weight. A new study suggests that the effects depend on genetic variation inherited from the parents. This information could be useful in development of assisted reproduction technologies.
8min
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Addgene keeps flow of CRISPR plasmids fast and affordableAs a key global enabler of the revolutionary genome editing technology known as CRISPR, the nonprofit organization Addgene has made available more than 100,000 CRISPR plasmids (circular DNA fragments) to 3,400 laboratories worldwide.
8min
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Graphic warning labels linked to reduced sugary drink purchasesWarning labels that include photos linking sugary drink consumption with obesity, type 2 diabetes, and tooth decay, may reduce purchases of the drinks, according to a new study by researchers from Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health and Harvard Business School
8min
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Pancreatic cell size linked to mammalian lifespan, finds zoo animal analysisAncient Greek philosopher Aristotle observed that larger animals tend to live longer than smaller ones. On June 18 in the journal Developmental Cell, scientists report that it's cell size, not body size, that intrinsically correlates with and perhaps affects lifespan. By examining the pancreases of 24 mammalian species — including shrews, humans, and tigers — researchers found that animals with
8min
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Rewiring plant defence genes to reduce crop wastePlants can be genetically rewired to resist the devastating effects of disease—significantly reducing crop waste worldwide—according to new research into synthetic biology by the University of Warwick.
14min
New Scientist – News

A robot has performed eye surgery on humans for the first timeFor the first time, six people have had eye surgery performed by a robot that was able to filter out the tremors from a surgeon's hand
17min
Science | The Guardian

Did you solve it? Mirror, mirror on the wallThe solution to today’s puzzle Earlier today I set you a puzzle about a mirror : A man is facing a mirror hanging on a wall 1m in front of him. Continue reading…
17min
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Chemists achieve major milestone of synthesis: Remote chiral inductionChemists at Scripps Research have addressed one of the most formidable challenges in synthetic chemistry by inventing a method for "enantioselective remote meta-CH activation," which enables the making of chiral molecules that were previously difficult or impossible to synthesize.
20min
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Risky opioid prescriptions linked to higher chance of deathMost people who misuse opioids are first exposed to the drugs through prescriptions so improving prescribing is targeted as one way to help curb the nation's opioid abuse epidemic. A new study identified six types of risky opioid prescriptions and found that all were linked to a higher chance of death, including fatal opioid overdoses. The study found more than 6 percent of Massachusetts adults re
29min
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Neuroscientists map brain's response to cold touchCarnegie Mellon neuroscientists have mapped the feeling of cool touch to the brain's insula in a mouse model. The findings provide an experimental model that will advance research into conditions like pain and hypersensitivity to cold and help researchers to continue to unravel the multifaceted ways touch is represented in the brain.
29min
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Researchers explore whether smarter animals are bigger troublemakersA new paper in the journal Animal Behaviour examines whether smarter animals might be better at learning to live in cities — but, at the same time, also may come into more conflict with humans.
29min
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

New method to preserve boy cancer patient fertility being developed at Ben-gurion U."Our results demonstrate, for the first time, the presence of biologically active SPGCs in testicular biopsies of chemotherapy-treated PCPBs, and their capacity to develop in vitro to different stages of spermatogenesis, including the generation of sperm-like cells," according to lead researcher Prof. Mahmoud Huleihel, a member of BGU's Shraga Segal Department of Microbiology, Immunology and Genet
29min
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Compilation of research discussed at the Global Forum On Nicotine: Warsaw June 16 2018Below is a summary of the new and recent research discussed at this conference.
29min
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Organic crystals twist, bend, and healCrystals are brittle and inelastic? A novel class of smart, bendable crystalline organic materials has challenged this view. Now, scientists have engineered a molecular soft cocrystalline structure that bends and twists reversibly and without disintegration when stimulated by high temperature, mechanical force, or under UV light. This multifunctional quality makes it a robust candidate for advance
29min
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Pancreatic cell size linked to mammalian lifespan, finds zoo animal analysisMore than two thousand years ago, Greek philosopher Aristotle observed that larger animals tend to live longer than smaller ones. On June 18 in the journal Developmental Cell, scientists report that it's cell size, not body size, that intrinsically correlates with and perhaps affects lifespan. By examining the pancreases of 24 mammalian species—including shrews, humans, and tigers—researchers in I
32min
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

Hunting molecules to find new planetsIt's been impossible to obtain images of an exoplanet, so dazzling is the light of its star. However, astronomers have the idea of detecting molecules that are present in the planet's atmosphere in order to make it visible, provided that these same molecules are absent from its star. Thanks to this innovative technique, the device is sensitive to the selected molecules, making the star invisible a
49min
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

In the gaping mouth of ancient crocodilesA new study has endeavoured to further explore the mouth of one of the earliest occurring and least understood groups of crocodilians, the shartegosuchids.
49min
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Research shows how a moderate dose of alcohol protects the heartResults published in Cardiovascular Research suggest the effect is associated with activation of the enzyme ALDH2, which helps rid the organism of an aldehyde which is a toxic byproduct of alcohol digestion as much as it is a byproduct of heart cells submitted to stress.
51min
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Violence against women significantly more likely after high-risk sexA study of the victimization of women who were living in areas of high poverty and HIV prevalence in multiple cities across the US has shown that high-risk-sex, characterized by one or more HIV risk factors, was associated with a significantly greater likelihood of physical violence against the female participant within the subsequent six months.
51min
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Researchers create novel combination as potential therapy for high-risk neuroblastomaResearchers at VCU Massey Cancer Center in Richmond, Virginia, have identified a promising target to reverse the development of high-risk neuroblastoma and potentially inform the creation of novel combination therapies for the disease.
51min
TED Talks Daily (SD video)

Can home cooking change the world? | Gastón AcurioWhen Gastón Acurio started his now world-famous restaurant Astrid & Gastón in the 1990s, no one suspected that he would elevate the Peruvian home-cooking he grew up with to haute cuisine. Nearly thirty years and a storied career later, the chef wants the rest of us to embrace our culinary roots and transform the world with the meals we prepare each day. (In Spanish with English subtitles)
57min
The Atlantic

Beijing Wants to Remake the InternetIt’s never been a worse time to be a Chinese telecom company in America. This evening, the Senate is set to vote on whether to restore a ban on U.S. company sales to prominent Chinese telecom player ZTE, a penalty for its illegal shipments to Iran and North Korea. The bill also includes a measure that would ban U.S. government agencies from buying equipment and services made by ZTE and Huawei, on
59min
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

'Uber for lawn care' launches in Kansas City, connects homeowners and landscapersNeed a ride at the drop of a hat or a late-night bite? Uber's got you. Wag! can walk your dog.
1h
Scientific American Content: Global

Sea Level Rise Will Threaten Thousands of California HomesChronic flooding will impact areas around San Francisco and Los Angeles by 2035 — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
1h
New Scientist – News

Male peacocks can make females’ heads vibrate at a distancePeahens have fan-shaped crests on their heads, and it seems males can make these crests resonate by making a specific noise with their tails
1h
Quanta Magazine

Four Is Not EnoughSuppose you want to cover a standard 8-by-8 chessboard entirely with rectangular dominoes that each cover two squares on the board. It’s easy to imagine how you might do it: You could line the dominoes up horizontally, four in a row, or vertically, four in a column. You could arrange them like stairs, concentric squares or gnashing teeth. There are nearly 13 million ways to do it, and each arrang
1h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

BIDMC researchers develop decision-making tool to benefit patients with HCVBIDMC researchers led a retrospective analysis of four randomized clinical trials focused on the effects of DAA therapies in patients with HCV-associated liver failure, and developed a new means of predicting improvement in liver function in response to DAA treatment.
1h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Algorithm speeds up process for analyzing 3D medical imagesIn a pair of upcoming conference papers, MIT researchers describe a machine-learning algorithm that can register brain scans and other 3D images more than 1,000 times more quickly using novel learning techniques.
1h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Rare mutation of gene carried by Quebec family gives insight into how the brain is wiredThe study of a Quebec family with an unusual gene provides novel insight into how our brain is built and, according to the McGill-led team of scientists, offers a better understanding of psychiatric disorders such as depression, addictions and schizophrenia.
1h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Daily fasting works for weight lossA new study shows that daily fasting is an effective tool to reduce weight and lower blood pressure. The study is the first to examine the effect of time-restricted eating on weight loss in obese individuals.
1h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Hunting molecules to find new planetsIt's impossible to obtain images of an exoplanet, so dazzling is the light of its star. However, astronomers led by UNIGE have the idea of detecting molecules that are present in the planet's atmosphere in order to make it visible, provided that these same molecules are absent from its star. Thanks to this innovative technique, the device is sensitive to the selected molecules, making the star inv
1h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Chemists achieve major milestone of synthesis: Remote chiral induction'This new method should allow us to explore a large 'chemical space' that had been essentially off-limits.'
1h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Bolder targets needed to protect nature for people's sakeUniversity of Queensland researchers have found that humanity is at risk without more diverse, ambitious and area-specific conservation targets. Associate Professor Martine Maron, Dr. Jeremy Simmonds and Professor James Watson from UQ's School of Earth and Environmental Sciences say current targets lack the scope required to support the critical services that nature provides.
1h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

'Slow earthquakes' on San Andreas Fault increase risk of large quakes, say ASU scientistsA detailed study of the California fault has discovered a new kind of movement that isn't accounted for in earthquake forecasting.
1h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Bolder targets needed to protect nature for people's sakeUniversity of Queensland (UQ) and Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS) researchers argue that the world needs more diverse, ambitious and area-specific targets for retaining important natural systems to safeguard humanity.
1h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Electrical wire properties of DNA linked to cancerNew research from the Barton lab finds a connection between a cancer mutation and electron-mediated DNA repair.
1h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Recent clinical trial finds tamsulosin not effective in kidney stone passageResearch published in JAMA Internal Medicine found that tamsulosin does not significantly effect patient-reported passage or capture of kidney stones.
1h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Dietary supplement use in children, adolescentsAbout one-third of children and adolescents in the United States use dietary supplements.
1h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Scientists create continuously emitting microlasers with nanoparticle-coated beadsResearchers have found a way to convert nanoparticle-coated microscopic beads into lasers smaller than red blood cells. These microlasers, which convert infrared light into light at higher frequencies, are among the smallest continuously emitting lasers of their kind ever reported and can constantly and stably emit light for hours at a time, even when submerged in biological fluids such as blood s
1h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Use of alternative medicines has doubled among kids, especially teensSince 2003, the use of alternative medicines among children has doubled. An increased use of omega-3 fatty acids and melatonin among adolescents ages 13 to 18 as the primary driver of the change.
1h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Study suggests well-known growth suppressor actually fuels lethal brain cancersScientists report finding a potentially promising treatment target for aggressive and deadly high-grade brain cancers like glioblastoma. Publishing online June 18 in Nature Cell Biology, the study also reports the current lack of a drug that hits the molecular target keeps it from being advanced for testing as a therapeutic strategy for patients with few treatment options. The researchers point to
1h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Meeting Paris climate targets will require a substantial reallocation of global investmentA new analysis by an international team of scientists led by IIASA shows that low carbon investments will need to markedly increase if the world is to achieve the Paris Agreement aim of keeping global warming well below 2°C.
1h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Faster, cheaper, better: A new way to synthesize DNAResearchers at the Department of Energy's Joint BioEnergy Institute (JBEI) based at Berkeley Lab have pioneered a new way to synthesize DNA sequences through a creative use of enzymes that promises to be faster, cheaper, and more accurate. DNA synthesis is a fundamental tool in the rapidly growing field of synthetic biology, in which organisms can be engineered to do things like decompose plastic
1h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

New DNA synthesis technique promises rapid, high-fidelity DNA printingToday, DNA is synthesized as an organic chemist would, using toxic chemicals and error-prone steps that limit accuracy and thus length to about 200 base pairs. UC Berkeley and Berkeley Lab researchers have adapted a human enzyme that makes DNA in water to a repetitive process for adding base pairs. Initial tests show that the technique promises to make oligonucleotides 10 times longer, the size of
1h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Electrically stimulating the brain may restore movement after strokeUC San Francisco scientists have improved mobility in rats that had experienced debilitating strokes by using electrical stimulation to restore a distinctive pattern of brain cell activity associated with efficient movement. The researchers say they plan to use the new findings to help develop brain implants that might one day restore motor function in human stroke patients.
1h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Scientists learn more about how gene linked to autism affects brainNew preclinical research shows a gene already linked to a subset of people with autism spectrum disorder is critical to healthy neuronal connections in the developing brain, and its loss can harm those connections to help fuel the complex developmental condition. Scientists report in Developmental Cell their data clarify the biological role of the gene CHD8 and its protein CHD8 in developing oligo
1h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

22,000-year-old panda from cave in Southern China belongs to distinct, long-lost lineageResearchers who've analyzed ancient mitochondrial (mt)DNA isolated from a 22,000-year-old panda found in Cizhutuo Cave in the Guangxi Province of China — a place where no pandas live today — have revealed a new lineage of giant panda. The report, published in Current Biology on June 18, shows that the ancient panda separated from present-day pandas 144,000 to 227,000 years ago, suggesting that i
1h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Everything you need to know about SnapchatIf you have tweens or teens, you know about Snapchat. And if you can't figure out how it works, you're probably over 25. One of the most popular social media apps out there, Snapchat gives kids and teens what they really want: a simple way to share everyday moments while simultaneously making them look awesome. And unlike Facebook and Twitter, which record and broadcast everything you do, Snapchat
1h
Popular Science

Why your brain loves mac and cheese more than macaroni or cheese aloneHealth The culinary sum of fat and carbs is greater than its parts Researchers found that our brain’s reward pathways value the combination of fats and carbs so much that we perceive the hybrid mix as having more calories than a fat or…
1h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

Helicopter parenting may negatively affect children's emotional well-being, behaviorIt's natural for parents to do whatever they can to keep their children safe and healthy, but children need space to learn and grow on their own, without Mom or Dad hovering over them, according to new research. The study found that overcontrolling parenting can negatively affect a child's ability to manage his or her emotions and behavior.
1h
Ingeniøren

Atmosfæriske bølger ændrer døgnlængden på VenusKoblingen mellem atmosfæren og overfladen på Venus er så kraftig, at den kan ændre længden af døgnet på vores naboplanet.
1h
Ingeniøren

Denne cement spiser CO₂Et fejlslået eksperiment satte forskeren David Stone på sporet af en jernbaseret miljøcement.
1h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Amazon to create more than 1,000 new jobs in IrelandAmazon will create more than 1,000 more jobs in Ireland over the next two years, it said Monday, vastly increasing its presence in the eurozone country.
1h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Bolder targets needed to protect nature for people's sakeUniversity of Queensland (UQ) and Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS) researchers argue that the world needs more diverse, ambitious and area-specific targets for retaining important natural systems to safeguard humanity. The findings are published in Nature Ecology and Evolution.
1h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Electrical wire properties of DNA linked to cancerOne of the biggest helpers in our bodies' ongoing efforts to prevent DNA mutations—mutations that can lead to cancer—is actually rather tiny. Electrons, as it turns out, can signal proteins that repair DNA to patch up DNA damage. More specifically, the movement of electrons through DNA, traveling between repair proteins bound to the double helix, helps our cells scan for mistakes that regularly ar
1h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

White House aims to reduce satellite clutter in spaceThe White House is establishing a new policy for reducing satellite clutter in space.
1h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Scientists create continuously emitting microlasers with nanoparticle-coated beadsResearchers have found a way to convert nanoparticle-coated microscopic beads into lasers smaller than red blood cells.
1h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

22,000-year-old panda from cave in Southern China belongs to distinct, long-lost lineageResearchers who've analyzed ancient mitochondrial (mt)DNA isolated from a 22,000-year-old panda found in Cizhutuo Cave in the Guangxi Province of China—a place where no pandas live today—have revealed a new lineage of giant panda. The report, published in Current Biology on June 18, shows that the ancient panda separated from present-day pandas 144,000 to 227,000 years ago, suggesting that it belo
1h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

New DNA synthesis technique promises rapid, high-fidelity DNA printingScientists at the University of California, Berkeley, and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory have invented a new way to synthesize DNA that promises to be easier and faster, does not require the use of toxic chemicals and is potentially more accurate.
1h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Meeting Paris climate targets will require a substantial reallocation of global investmentA new analysis by an international team of scientists led by IIASA shows that low carbon investments will need to increase markedly if the world is to achieve the Paris Agreement aim of keeping global warming well below 2°C.
1h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Small businesses vulnerable to cyberattacks, then don't actSmall businesses suffered a barrage of computer invasions last year but most took no action to shore up their security afterward, according to a survey by insurer Hiscox.
1h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

New study suggests ovarian hormone may make drug withdrawal symptoms worse for womenResearchers found that a form of the estrogen hormone can contribute to drug relapse in females by worsening withdrawal symptoms. The study looked at the interaction of the female sex hormone estradiol and methamphetamine.
1h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Cementless fly ash binder makes concrete 'green'Rice University engineers have developed a composite binder made primarily of fly ash, a byproduct of coal-fired power plants, that can replace Portland cement in concrete.
1h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Rewiring plant defence genes to reduce crop wastePlants could be genetically rewired to better resist disease, helping safeguard crop yields worldwide according to new research by the universities of Warwick and York. Defensive feedback control system developed enables plants to strengthen their defenses to withstand attack by re-wiring existing gene connectionsThe system uses same approach as aircraft autopilots use to counteract turbulence.
1h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Odors are perceived the same way by hunter-gatherers and WesternersPrevious research has shown the hunter-gatherer Jahai are much better at naming odors than Westerners. They even have a more elaborate lexicon for it. New research by language scientist Asifa Majid of Radboud University shows that despite these linguistic differences, the Jahai and Dutch find the same odors pleasant and unpleasant.
1h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Using gold nanoparticles to trigger sequential unfolding of 3D structuresResearchers have developed a technique that takes advantage of gold nanoparticles to trigger the sequential unfolding of three-dimensional structures using different wavelengths of light.
1h
Big Think

Why 'digital video portraits' should scare youDigital Video Portraits are already beating out deepfakes for creepy cultural dominance. Read More
1h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

In the gaping mouth of ancient crocodilesThe mouth of today's crocodilians inspires fear and awe, with their wide gape and the greatest known bite force in the vertebrate animal kingdom. However, this apex predator of today and its modus of attack (its mouth) had humble beginnings.
1h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

When consumers don't want to talk about what they boughtOne of the joys of shopping for many people is the opportunity to brag about their purchases to friends and others.
1h
Live Science

The Really Strange Way a Tick Bite Could Harm Your Heart (Hint: It Involves Red Meat)People with a rare red meat allergy may have a higher risk of heart disease, a new study suggests.
1h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

In the gaping mouth of ancient crocodilesA new study by a team of international experts, led by University of Witwatersrand Ph.D. candidate Kathleen Dollman and Professor Jonah Choiniere published today in the American Museum Novitates, endeavoured to further explore the mouth of one of the earliest occurring and least understood groups of crocodilians, the shartegosuchids.
1h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

How the brain plays a role in rheumatoid arthritis inflammationA new study from researchers at Michigan Medicine explores links between chronic joint inflammation and cognitive impairment.
1h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

New material for splitting waterSolar energy is clean and abundant, but when the sun isn't shining, you must store the energy in batteries or through a process called photocatalysis. In photocatalytic water splitting, sunlight separates water into hydrogen and oxygen, which can then be recombined in a fuel cell to release energy. Now, a new class of materials — halide double perovskites — may have just the right properties to
1h
Futurity.org

Survey may have gotten Florida’s obesity rate wrongFlorida’s obesity rate may be higher than originally thought, according to a new study. A widely used national health survey puts the overall obesity rate in the state at 27.8 percent, but a new study based on an analysis of a robust clinical data repository shows a rate of 37.1 percent—nearly 10 percentage points higher. The researchers calculated obesity rates in Florida by analyzing data from
1h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Promising new material has the right properties to capture solar energy, split water into hydrogen and oxygenSolar energy is clean and abundant. But when the sun isn't shining, you must store the energy in batteries or through a process called photocatalysis—in which solar energy is used to make fuels. In photocatalytic water splitting, sunlight separates water into hydrogen and oxygen. The hydrogen and oxygen can then be recombined in a fuel cell to release energy.
1h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Nature programmes could put a spring in your stepA new study shows that watching films set in a natural environment boosts body image.
2h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

When consumers don't want to talk about what they boughtOne of the joys of shopping for many people is the opportunity to brag about their purchases to friends and others. But new research found one common situation in which people would rather not discuss what they just bought: when they're feeling like money is a little tight. In a series of studies, researchers found that consumers who felt financially constrained didn't want to talk about their pur
2h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Cell technology used to treat osteochondral knee defectAs the publication describes, autologous cells of stromal vascular fraction were transplanted to a 36-year-old man with the use of fibrin matrix. The patient, whose injury had been caused by a fall, then has been under supervision for two years.
2h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Trojan Horse: How a killer fungus unleashes meningitis and brain infectionIn a world first, Australian researchers have revealed how a deadly fungus and primary cause of life-threatening meningitis exploits the immune system like a 'Trojan Horse' to promote infection.
2h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

New articles in The CRISPR JournalThe CRISPR Journal, a new peer-reviewed journal from Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers, announces the publication of its third issue.
2h
New Scientist – News

The first Americans had pet dogs 1000 years earlier than thoughtThere were domestic dogs in North America 10,200 years ago, according to a re-examination of an ancient dog skeleton that looks like a small English setter
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Japan, SKorea ban Canadian wheat imports over bioengineered plantsThe world's sixth largest wheat producer sought to reassure trading partners on Monday that genetically modified wheat plants discovered on an Alberta farm were few and posed no food safety risks, after Japan and South Korea halted Canadian wheat imports.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Supreme Court to take up iPhone app lawsuitThe Supreme Court will consider whether the purchasers of iPhone apps can sue Apple over allegations it has an illegal monopoly on the sale of the apps.
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Science : NPR

'Cutting-Edge' Program For Children With Autism And ADHD Rests On Razor-Thin EvidenceWith 113 locations in the U.S., Brain Balance says its drug-free approach has helped tens of thousands of children. But experts say there's insufficient proof for its effectiveness. (Image credit: Hokyoung Kim for NPR)
2h
The Atlantic

‘I Wanted to Take My Body Off’: DetransitionedIn October 2012, Carey Callahan began a course of bimonthly intramuscular testosterone injections. After years of harassment and discomfort in her female body, she had made the decision to transition to being male. In the short term, she was happy. But she soon discovered that life as a transgender man was not what she had expected. Her discomfort persisted, as did the harassment. Nine months aft
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Lifting of Saudi Arabia's ban on women driving poses policy challengesThis month Saudi Arabia will put an end to its ban on women driving, opening the way for millions of new drivers to navigate a country three times bigger than Texas. While the policy shift provides relief to women who lacked freedom of mobility, the long-term effects of ending the ban are far from clear and will present the Saudi government with several policy challenges, according to an issue bri
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Feed: All Latest

This Tug of War With a Lion Isn't About Strength—It's About FrictionIf you want a fair fight between a lion and a human playing tug of war, you should give the lion a pair of tennis shoes.
2h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Lots of news and lots of contacts at ZPID Twin ConferenceThe Leibniz Institute for Psychology Information (ZPID) had organized the two conferences from June 7-12 at its seat in Trier, Germany.
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Futurity.org

4 U.S. states beat all others at cutting opioid dosagesPrescription drug monitoring programs in Kentucky, New Mexico, Tennessee, and New York have significantly reduced opioid dosages and the number of opioid fills, according to a new study. While most states currently have prescription drug monitoring programs, not all are created equal, says Rebecca Haffajee, assistant professor of health management policy at the School of Public Health at the Univ
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Dagens Medicin

Mere fleksible arbejdsgange skal mindske overbelægning i SjællandNy analyse for Region Sjælland peger på, at mere fleksible arbejdsgangene og en genindførelse af projektet ‘Sikkert Patientflow’ vil kunne mindske overbelægningen på regionens medicinske afdelinger.
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Dagens Medicin

Tolkecenter på vej i Region SyddanmarkRegion Syddanmark er på udgik efter de første tolke til regionens kommende tolkecenter, der skal stå for tolkning på regionens sygehuse.
2h
Dagens Medicin

#43 Når din verden vælterStetoskopet sætter i denne podcast fokus på, når alvorligt syge børn bliver patienter.
2h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

New approach in VR redirected walking presentedIn the burgeoning world of virtual reality (VR) technology, it remains a challenge to provide users with a realistic perception of infinite space and natural walking capabilities in the virtual environment. A team of computer scientists has introduced a new approach to address this problem by leveraging a natural human phenomenon: eye blinks.
2h
Big Think

This is what God's face looks like, according to American ChristiansIs God an old white guy with a majestic, flowing beard? A new study has a surprise for you. Read More
2h
Big Think

Why everything you know about the Stanford Prison Experiment might be wrongThe most famous study in psychology turns out to be theater, and the lead researcher is over defending his myth. Read More
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The Atlantic

Trump’s Immigration Policy Gets Its Moral ReckoningOutrage over family separations at the U.S.–Mexico border intensified over the weekend, with two first ladies—Melania Trump and Laura Bush—both weighing in, and tension escalating on the ground. The United States government has separated some 2,000 migrant children from their parents in the last six weeks, according to the Department of Homeland Security. The Trump administration’s policy of sepa
2h
The Atlantic

The Atlantic’s July/August Issue Health Report Now at TheAtlantic.comWashington, D.C. (June 18, 2018)—The next issue of The Atlantic magazine features The Health Report , with investigations that probe three of the most complex subjects facing Americans today. All three reports are published now at TheAtlantic.com; The Atlantic’s July/August 2018 issue will appear on newsstands and online in full next week. The cover story, “ When a Child Says She’s Trans ,” by wr
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Popular Science

How to improve your postureDIY Start by tossing out the idea that you need to sit perfectly straight. Posture is a common boogeyman in modern medicine. It may not be the root of all your problems, but you can still improve your position and reduce back pain.
2h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Study examines first birth cohort to receive HPV vaccine: The vaccine worksGirls in the first birth cohort to be offered and receive the HPV vaccine showed a lower degree of dysplasia which may eventually lead to cervical cancer than a birth cohort from 1983. This is the conclusion of a new study conducted by researchers at the University of Copenhagen, who have been the first to study the vaccine's effect on the general population.
2h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Research finds new way to determine protection of Men B vaccine against different strainsThis approach is being assessed by Public Health England for its potential to routinely test all meningococcal disease cases.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

New radiological procedure for the diagnosis of liver diseaseResearchers from Charité — Universitätsmedizin Berlin have successfully tested a new technology for use in the assessment of overweight adolescents with liver disease. Known as 'time-harmonic elastography' (THE), the technology enables physicians to determine the disease's severity without having to resort to invasive liver biopsies. The results of this research have been published in Radiology.
2h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

'Be personal and appreciative': Research shows effective responses to online feedbackAs more patients leave feedback on online platforms including social media, new research shows how health and social care organisations can offer value in their response. The study was led by University of Plymouth researcher Rebecca Baines and colleagues in collaboration with James Munro at online platform Care Opinion, and they will be sharing the full findings at a webinar on Thursday, June 21.
2h
The Atlantic

The Glorious, Bizarre History of Soccer and FashionRobbie Williams’s performance at the opening ceremony for the 2018 World Cup was a lot of things, but first and foremost it was fitting. In Moscow, Williams—the 44-year-old former wild child, pop musician, and soccer fanatic—wore a shiny, skintight crimson suit with a leopard-print pattern, black patent loafers, and a black shirt unbuttoned to mid-chest, revealing body tattoos and a massive silve
3h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Observations identify three different activity periods in the quasar 3C 279An international team of astronomers has conducted multi-wavelength photometric and spectropolarimetric observations of the quasar 3C 279, which revealed three different activity periods in this object. The finding is reported in a paper published June 5 on the arXiv pre-print repository.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Using gold nanoparticles to trigger sequential unfolding of 3-D structuresResearchers from North Carolina State University have developed a new technique that takes advantage of gold nanoparticles to trigger the sequential unfolding of three-dimensional structures using different wavelengths of light.
3h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Heart disease sufferers not exercising enoughEvidence shows that people with existing heart problems or who are at risk of developing them, are ignoring medical advice and not taking enough exercise. New medical treatments have helped people to live longer despite these health problems, but this is causing an escalating burden on public health systems worldwide.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

KAIST team develops flexible blue vertical micro LEDsA KAIST research team developed a crucial source technology that will advance the commercialization of micro LEDs.Professor Keon Jae Lee from the Department of Materials Science and Engineering and his team have developed a low cost production technology for thin-film blue flexible vertical micro LEDs (f-VLEDs).
3h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Great white sharks dive deep into warm-water whirlpools in the AtlanticTracking data from two great white sharks reveals that they spend more time deep inside warm-water eddies, suggesting that's where they like to feed.
3h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Virtual reality headsets significantly reduce children's fear of needlesAlmost anyone can relate to being afraid of needles and injections. A pilot study is the first to use a 3D virtual reality headset to test this tool as a distraction method in a pediatric setting. Children were given the choice of a roller coaster ride, helicopter ride or a hot-air balloon ride. Results show that anticipated versus actual pain and fear were reduced in 94.1 percent of the pediatric
3h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

New approach in VR redirected walking to be presented at SIGGRAPH 2018In the burgeoning world of virtual reality (VR) technology, it remains a challenge to provide users with a realistic perception of infinite space and natural walking capabilities in the virtual environment. A team of computer scientists has introduced a new approach to address this problem by leveraging a natural human phenomenon: eye blinks.
3h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Helicopter parenting may negatively affect children's emotional well-being, behaviorIt's natural for parents to do whatever they can to keep their children safe and healthy, but children need space to learn and grow on their own, without Mom or Dad hovering over them, according to new research published by the American Psychological Association. The study, published in the journal Developmental Psychology, found that overcontrolling parenting can negatively affect a child's abili
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Lifting of Saudi Arabia's ban on women driving poses policy challengesThis month Saudi Arabia will put an end to its ban on women driving, opening the way for millions of new drivers to navigate a country three times bigger than Texas. While the policy shift provides relief to women who lacked freedom of mobility, the long-term effects of ending the ban are far from clear and will present the Saudi government with several policy challenges, according to an issue bri
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Diamond watch componentsSNSF-funded researchers have developed a new technique for carving materials to create micromechanical systems. In particular, they have created a miniscule watch component out of synthetic single-crystal diamond.
3h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

MXene's tour de forceIs there anything MXene materials can't do?
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Great white sharks dive deep into warm-water whirlpools in the AtlanticIt's always good to know where great white sharks are likely to be swimming. That's true if you're a nervous beachgoer, a fishing boat trying to avoid illegal bycatch, or a marine biologist hoping to conserve this vulnerable species.
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Science | The Guardian

Leave those kids alone: 'helicopter parenting' linked to behavioural problemsChildren with over-controlling parents aged two struggled to manage their emotions later in life, study finds Children whose parents are over-controlling “helicopter parents” when they are toddlers, are less able to control their emotions and impulses as they get older apparently leading to more problems with school, new research suggests. The study looked at to what degree mothers of toddlers do
3h
Ingeniøren

Digitale tvillingeskibe optimerer dansk søfartSoftwaremodeller af skibe skal for alvor sætte gang i digitaliseringen af Det Blå Danmark, hvor cloud, sensorer, big data og AI skal gøre det muligt at optimere design, drift og vedligehold af søfarten herhjemme.
3h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Theranos collapse offers three big lessons for companiesLess than three months after being charged by the US Securities and Exchange Commission(SEC) with "massive fraud" and barred from being the CEO of a public company for ten years, entrepreneur Elizabeth Holmes is reportedly on the hunt for investors for a new company.
3h
Feed: All Latest

The Most Promising Indie Games That Showed Up at E3, From 'Sable' to 'NeoCab'Sure, the gaming event is a showcase for triple-A blockbusters, but a surprising number of small, thoughtful gems piqued our interest.
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Feed: All Latest

Star Wars News: No, Kathleen Kennedy Isn't Leaving Lucasfilm'Solo: A Star Wars Story' underperformed, but it's not a career-ender.
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Feed: All Latest

How Square Made Its Own iPad ReplacementSquare has always made hardware, but its new Android-based tablet shows it’s serious about controlling the payments experience.
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Scientific American Content: Global

Too Small for Big Muscles, Tiny Animals Use SpringsElastic springs help tiny animals stay fast and strong. New work is finding what size critters must be to benefit from the springs — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Latest Headlines | Science News

Phone apps are helping scientists track suicidal thoughts in real timeResearchers are using smartphones to tap into the ups and downs of suicidal thinking that occur over hours and days, hoping to help prevent suicides.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Why a minor change to how EPA makes rules could radically reduce environmental protectionSince the Reagan administration, federal agencies have been required to produce cost-benefit analyses of their major regulations. These assessments are designed to ensure that regulators are pursuing actions that make society better off.
3h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Bitcoin could 'bring internet to a halt': BISThe Bank for International Settlements in a report warned digital currencies like bitcoin could overwhelm and break the internet if they continue to grow.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

How emotions shape work lifeJochen Menges, an expert in organisational behaviour, thinks that emotions matter profoundly for employee performance and behaviour. His studies bring nuance to our understanding of how employees wish to feel at work.
3h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Observation of anisotropic magneto-Peltier effectFor the first time in the world, NIMS and Tohoku University jointly observed an anisotropic magneto-Peltier effect–a thermoelectric conversion phenomenon in which simple redirection of the flow of a charge current in a magnetic material induces heating and cooling.
3h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Laser-sonic scanner aims to replace mammograms for finding breast cancerLihong Wang, Caltech's Bren Professor of Medical Engineering and Electrical Engineering, has developed a laser-sonic scanning system that can identify breast tumors quickly and safely.
3h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

MXene's tour de forceIs there anything MXene materials can't do? Since the discovery of a large new family of two-dimensional materials by Drexel University researchers in 2011, continued exploration has revealed their exceptional ability to store energy, block electromagnetic interference, purify water and even ward off bacteria. And, as recent research now suggests, MXenes are also very durable — the strongest mate
3h
Discovery (uploads) on YouTube

Kamikaze | Street Outlaws: Crash CourseHe took The Slut from a retired shed dweller to a serious List contender. Check out the highs and lows of Kamikaze and the heavy '81 El Camino he inherited from his best friend Flip. Full episodes streaming now on DiscoveryGO: https://discovery.com/tv-shows/street-outlaws/ Binge watch all Street Outlaws: Crash Course now! https://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/street-outlaws-crash-course/ Subscribe t
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Science | The Guardian

Evil spirit that haunts scary movie Hereditary is the gene genieAri Aster’s horror triumph feeds off suppressed fear that we cannot escape our biological fate – leaving audiences unnerved Warning: contains spoilers On the face of it, Hereditary is a slice of silly supernatural hokum replete with the threadbare tropes of the genre. However, Ari Aster’s debut scarer has nonetheless struck a nerve : it seems to linger in the minds of those who see it. Why? Many
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Image: Juice thermal development model and the sun simulatorA view of the Juice thermal development model inside the Large Space Simulator at ESA's technical heart in the Netherlands.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Monitoring molten steel by laser – steel experts' invention could save industry millionsSteelworkers will be able to monitor in real time the temperature and chemical composition in molten metal furnaces, saving each steel plant up to £4.5 million a year, thanks to a new laser technology developed by a Swansea University spin-out company.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

A new, digitised era for European manufacturingManufacturing in the EU is heading to another level that will make it more competitive than ever, thanks to better service models and to innovations such as digitisation, Big Data and the Internet of Things.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Cementless fly ash binder makes concrete 'green'Rice University engineers have developed a composite binder made primarily of fly ash, a byproduct of coal-fired power plants, that can replace Portland cement in concrete.
3h
Ingeniøren

Grønlandsk ingeniøruddannelse skal ud og fiskeCenter for Arktisk Teknologi i Grønland etablerer sammen med DTU Aqua en ny diplomingeniøruddannelse i fiskeriteknologi.
3h
Futurity.org

Carb and fat combo makes food extra irresistibleFoods that have both fat and carbohydrates are more rewarding, calorie for calorie, than foods with either energy source alone, according to new research. Fatty foods like cheese trigger one pathway of signals to reward centers in the brain while carb-loaded foods like grain or a lollipop take another route, says Dana Small, professor of psychiatry at Yale University and senior author of a new pa
3h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Holistic approach increases safety for two-wheeled vehiclesIf we are to make the best use of urban transport, we need to increase safety for the most vulnerable users – especially those on two wheels. As well as new vehicle technology, this also needs improvements to rider behaviour and protective equipment.
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BBC News – Science & Environment

'Dumpling-shaped' space rock comes into viewA Japanese space probe has been sending back images as it approaches its target, the asteroid Ryugu.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Insightful research illuminates the newly possible in the realm of natural and synthetic imagesA pair of groundbreaking papers in computer vision open new vistas on possibilities in the realms of creating very real-looking natural images and synthesizing realistic, identity-preserving facial images. In CVAE-GAN: Fine-Grained Image Generation through Asymmetric Training, presented this past October at ICCV 2017 in Venice, the team of researchers from Microsoft and the University of Science a
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Professor says people are turning to 'socially mediated vigilante justice' to right perceived wrongsThe internet loves creating villains: People get caught on camera or social media behaving badly, the post or video goes viral and anyone with a computer or smartphone piles on and fans the flames.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Bringing the heat out of the cityHeat waves are increasing worldwide—and that includes Switzerland. Cities in particular suffer as a result: the temperature difference between city and countryside can amount to several degrees. A new water tunnel at Empa could help to alleviate these urban heat islands in the future—for example by cities ensuring lower temperatures locally through vegetation, water surfaces and brighter materials
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Dana Foundation

SfN Launches New Brain Facts BookCredit: Society for Neuroscience Interested in learning more about how your brain works? Whether you’re looking for information about psychiatric disorders, the developing brain, addiction, or other brain topics, the Brain Facts book by the Society for Neuroscience (SfN) has got you covered. Produced in partnership with The Kavli Foundation and the Gatsby Foundation, Brain Facts gives an overview
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Control unit motor system for human-powered bikesA new initiative to fill the gap between bicycle and car is taking shape in the form of a super bike that offers several advantages to users. The technology can also be applied to scooters and skateboards.
4h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Tiny quantum device to redefine ampereEU-funded scientists have succeeded in redefining the ampere in terms of fundamental constants of physics. Based on the electron charge, the newly developed microscopic device has been reported as the most accurate technique for making measurements of tiny currents to date.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

An exoskeleton for paraplegicsRobotic devices are increasingly being used to assist patients with impaired motor functions. Through a novel adaptable exoskeleton, the Symbitron project hopes to revolutionise rehabilitation of patients.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Bees get stressed at work too (and it might be causing colony collapse)Ever been overworked, tired and felt muddle-headed? Research now shows honey bees suffer from the same thing – and we understand why.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

A meteoroid smashed into the side of a crater on Mars and then started a landslideIn 2006, NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) established orbit around the Red Planet. Using an advanced suite of scientific instruments – which include cameras, spectrometers, and radar – this spacecraft has been analyzing landforms, geology, minerals and ice on Mars for years and assisting with other missions. While the mission was only meant to last two years, the orbiter has remained in op
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

'Face-to-face, humans are not good at violence': Randall Collins in conversation with Michel WieviorkaTen years ago, two major work about violence came out: "Violence: A Micro-Sociological Theory," by Randall Collins (Princeton University Press, 2008) and "Violence: A New Approach," by Michel Wieviorka (Sage, 2009). The two sociologists meet today to discuss their theories and renew the debate for The Conversation France.
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Popular Science

How the new World Cup ball was designed to not influence the gamesScience The quest for the perfect soccer ball continues. Every four years there’s a new ball for the World Cup—and every four years players are unhappy with it. Maybe it’s too light and has too much lift, like the 2002…
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The Scientist RSS

Image of the Day: Landing BlowsThe smashing mantis shrimp is strategic in its attack on sea snails.
4h
New on MIT Technology Review

China is creating a huge carbon market—but not a particularly aggressive oneThe biggest test of cap-and-trade to date may be too timid to make much of a difference for the world’s largest carbon polluter.
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Scientific American Content: Global

Weird Low-Light Bacteria Could Potentially Thrive on MarsThe photosynthetic organisms subsist on redder, lower-energy light than other species, and could be a new source of fuel and air for interplanetary outposts — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Feed: All Latest

How Volvo's Making the Polestar 1 From an Old ConceptFive years after showing off the Concept Coupe, Volvo has resurrected the much-loved design as the first offering from its newly electric-focused brand, Polestar.
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Feed: All Latest

12 Best Tablets for Every Budget in 2018: iPad, Android, Fire HD, SurfaceNo matter if you prefer Android, iOS, Chrome, or Windows—these are the best tablets we've tried.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Volgograd—how a dam on the mighty Volga almost killed off the caviar fishThe floodlights will soon be turned on at the newly built Volgograd Arena for the first World Cup match to be held there, between England and Tunisia.
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Dagens Medicin

Nye anbefalinger skal forbedre behandling af funktionelle lidelserSundhedsstyrelsen lægger bl.a. op til, at mennesker med funktionelle lidelser skal have specialiseret behandling, og at forankre tværfaglige teams for svære funktionelle lidelser i det somatiske sygehusvæsen.
4h
Big Think

Intolerant white people more willing to ditch democracy and accept authoritarianismA study finds a link between intolerant attitudes among some Americans and support for anti-democratic measures and army rule. Read More
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Nyheder – Forskning – Videnskab

Forsker i genmodificering: Politikerne er døve over for befolkningens bekymringer om etikNyt studie fra Københavns Universitet viser, at de politiske diskussioner om genmodificerede fødevarer…
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Scientific American Content: Global

Volcanic "Pele's Hair" Could Contaminate Drinking Water in HawaiiThe glassy shards from Kilauea’s eruption may be dangerous to humans and animals if consumed — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
5h
Live Science

Enigmatic Stone Balls from 5,000 Years Ago Continue to Baffle ArchaeologistsThe balls are carved with intricate spiral patterns, but scientists can't figure out their meaning.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Why ordinary people must have a say in water governanceMost emerging democracies in Africa have implemented decentralisation in some form since the 1990s. In the water sector, decentralisation aims to share responsibility for managing water resources and services. It shifts responsibility from national government to include lower-level governmental and community organisations.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Physicists probing ever deeper into the stuff of the universeUniversity of Virginia physicists have recently played key roles in new particle physics discoveries. The scientists are involved with large international collaborations using major facilities designed for expanding our knowledge of the most intimate details of how the smallest known pieces of atoms may have given birth to the universe.
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The Atlantic

When Children Say They’re TransClaire is a 14-year-old girl with short auburn hair and a broad smile. She lives outside Philadelphia with her mother and father, both professional scientists. Claire can come across as an introvert, but she quickly opens up, and what seemed like shyness reveals itself to be quiet self-assuredness. Like many kids her age, she is a bit overscheduled. During the course of the evening I spent with C
5h
Latest Headlines | Science News

The most ancient African baobabs are dying and no one knows whyScientists aren’t sure what’s killing the oldest African baobabs, nine of which have lost big chunks or died in the last 13 years.
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Live Science

The 4th Flavor? Scientists Close in on a New Kind of NeutrinoThe history behind the discovery is a fascinating tale with twist and turns that would make Agatha Christie's head spin.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Why reducing antibiotics in farm animals isn't as easy as it seemsThe use of antibiotics in meat production is a rapidly emerging issue in food discourse. The conversation around meat, eggs and dairy has focused on animal welfare over much of the past five years, but it's now moving to other elements of production.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Integrated approach is the best way to manage urban growth, expert saysUnwise government policy has given the Netherlands a serious traffic problem. For decades, spatial planning policy-makers have failed to take adequate account of the impact of individual travel behaviours, and of private car use in particular.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

The secret to measuring the energy of an antineutrinoScientists study tiny particles called neutrinos to learn about how our universe evolved. These particles, well-known for being tough to detect, could tell the story of how matter won out over antimatter a fraction of a second after the Big Bang and, consequently, why we're here at all.
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Feed: All Latest

You'll Have to Look Closer to Understand These Tiny WorldsPhotographer Frank Kunert photographs miniature scenes of modern life—with a bizarre twist.
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Feed: All Latest

Fake Video Will Complicate Viral JusticeOpinion: Videos provide transformative new avenues for justice, often summoning well-deserved Twitter mobs. Deep fakes could change all that.
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Feed: All Latest

The Collapse of a $40 Million Nutrition Science CrusadeThe Nutrition Science Initiative promised to study obesity and diabetes the right way. Now it’s broke, president-less, and all but gone.
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Feed: All Latest

The End of DyslexiaInnovations in brain research and AI-fueled assistive technologies could level the playing field for those with language-based learning disabilities.
5h
New on MIT Technology Review

The productivity paradox
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New on MIT Technology Review

AI could wreak economic havoc—we need more of itArtificial intelligence is offering an amazing opportunity to increase prosperity, but whether or not ­we will seize it is our choice.
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Scientific American Content: Global

Could Multiple Personality Disorder Explain Life, the Universe and Everything?A new paper argues that the condition now known as “Dissociative Identity Disorder” might help us understand the fundamental nature of reality — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Science | The Guardian

Britain’s drug laws are in the dark ages. Billy Caldwell’s case proves it | Simon JenkinsHow can Sajid Javid deny long-term access to the cannabis oil that would control this boy’s epilepsy? This cruelty must end What kind of country gets a politician rather than a doctor to prescribe medicine for a sick child? When the home secretary, Sajid Javid, decided at the weekend to allow 12-year-old Billy Caldwell “one bottle” of cannabis oil, his spokeswoman said it was an exceptional case t
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Science | The Guardian

Cannabis oil: cabinet appears divided as Hunt calls for reviewPM appears to be at odds with health secretary, who says government has not got law right on medicinal use of substance Theresa May appeared at odds with her cabinet on Monday as she played down the prospect of a full-scale review into the medical use of cannabis oil despite Jeremy Hunt admitting that the government had not got the law right. The health secretary said he backed the use of the sub
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Dagens Medicin

HPV-vaccinerede får fald i svære celleforandringerDen første årgang af piger, der fik tilbudt og tog imod HPV-vaccinen, havde færre svære celleforandringer, som i sidste ende kan føre til livmoderhalskræft, end en årgang fra 1983, viser ny undersøgelse.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Meet the skyrmions—exotic quasiparticles could revolutionise computingUnique physical properties of these "magic knots" might help to satisfy demand for IT power and storage using a fraction of the energy.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Apple aims to solve problems locating 911 calls for helpApple is trying to drag the U.S.'s antiquated system for handling 911 calls into the 21st century.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Rising tide: Floating device one step closer to generating green powerAn ocean energy technology project that will harness tidal power has successfully produced electricity during towing tests.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Germany will fail 2020 climate goals, now eyes 2030 targetGermany's environment minister says the country will likely miss its target of cutting carbon emissions by 2020, an embarrassment for a government that wants to lead the charge on limiting climate change.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Audi boss arrested in diesel probe (Update)Audi Rupert StadlerAudi chief executive Rupert Stadler was arrested Monday in connection with parent company Volkswagen's "dieselgate" emissions cheating scandal, with prosecutors saying they feared he might try to destroy evidence.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Odors are perceived the same way by hunter-gatherers and WesternersPrevious research has shown the hunter-gatherer Jahai are much better at naming odors than Westerners. They even have a more elaborate lexicon for it. New research by language scientist Asifa Majid of Radboud University shows that despite these linguistic differences, the Jahai and Dutch find the same odors pleasant and unpleasant.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Google's new principles on AI need to be better at protecting human rightsThere are growing concerns about the potential risks of AI – and mounting criticism of technology giants. In the wake of what has been called an AI backlash or "techlash", states and businesses are waking up to the fact that the design and development of AI have to be ethical, benefit society and protect human rights.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

The privacy problem with camera traps: you don't know who else could be watchingWe use remotely activated cameras – known as camera traps – to study the ecology and population responses of wildlife and pest species in management programs across Australia.
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Scientific American Content: Global

Weeds Are Winning in the War against Herbicide ResistanceHerbicides are under evolutionary threat. Can modern agriculture find a new way to fight back? — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

The science behind pickled battery electrolytesBattery researchers at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Argonne National Laboratory have discovered an important chemical reaction that resembles the method used to make pickles. The reaction provides key insights into the behavior of a common electrolyte additive used to boost performance.
5h
Viden

Forsker: Nej, fodboldfans skabte ikke et jordskælvDet var ”kulturel støj” og ikke jordskælv, som to jordskælvsmålere registrerede i Mexico City under en VM-kamp.
6h
New Scientist – News

Following trends and easy answers isn’t the way to a good lifeVegan clothes, biofuel and wood-burning stoves have all been offered up as ethical, environmental choices – but the evidence behind them is much more murky
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Ingeniøren

Techtopia #57: Ansvarlige algoritmerHvordan påvirker algoritmerne vores beslutningskraft, vores interesser og vores politiske holdninger? Og hvad skal vi stille af krav for at modvirke de værste fejl og misforståelser?
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Ingeniøren

Novos restaffald leverer naturgas til 5000 husstande300.000 ton restprodukter fra Novo Nordisk og Novozymes omdannes nu i Østdanmarks største biogasanlæg.
6h
NYT > Science

The New Health Care: Why the Medical Research Grant System Could Be Costing Us Great IdeasFunding is harder to find in general, and the current approach favors low-risk research and proposals by older scientists and white men.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Proposed CAESAR mission to return a sample from comet 67P/Churyumov–GerasimenkoA proposed space mission known as the Comet Astrobiology Exploration Sample Return (CAESAR) could expand the knowledge of the origin and history of the comet 67P/Churyumov–Gerasimenko. If selected by NASA, it will return a sample from this comet to Earth, enabling scientists to study the leftover material from the formation of our Solar System.
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Feed: All Latest

The Blockchain: A Love Story—And a Horror StoryCryptomania isn’t just a mad rush of scams and speculation. It’s a utopian dream. And a living nightmare.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Genetic engineering researcher: Politicians are deaf to people's ethical concernsWhile a many Danes question whether genetically modified foods are unnatural, this concern is much less apparent among politicians, according to Professor Jesper Lassen at the University of Copenhagen's Department of Food and Resource Economics. Lassen has investigated Danish attitudes about genetically modified foods since the early 90's.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

New technique provides accurate dating of ancient skeletonsInterest in the origins of human populations and their migration routes has increased greatly in recent years. A critical aspect of tracing migration events is dating them. However, radiocarbon techniques commonly used to date and analyse DNA from ancient skeletons can be inaccurate and difficult to apply. Inspired by the Geographic Population Structure model that can track mutations associated wi
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Better safe than sorry—economic optimization risks tipping of Earth system elementsOptimizing economic welfare without constraints might put human well-being at risk, a new climate study argues. While being successful in bringing down costs of greenhouse gas reductions, the concept of profit maximization alone does not suffice to avoid the tipping of critical elements in the Earth system that could lead to dramatic climate change. Scientists at the Potsdam Institute for Climate
6h
Ingeniøren

Californien vil tvinge it-branchens overvågning frem i lysetEt lovforslag skal tvinge firmaer til at offentliggøre, hvilke typer af informationer de indsamler, samt give borgere mulighed for at fravælge salg af informationer om dem. Lovforslaget modarbejdes dog af it-giganter, som smider penge efter modstandere af forslaget.
6h
Ingeniøren

Apple satser på Augmentet RealityApple satser stort på augmentet reality og har lanceret en række værktøjer, for at gøre det lettere for applikations udviklere, at integrere AR apps med diverse Apple-enheder.
6h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Novel method for investigating pore geometry in rocksBased on persistent homology theory, researchers from Japan's Kyushu University presented a new parameter and a new method for evaluating the heterogeneity of porosity
6h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Scientists discover how to control the 'excitation' of electronicsAn international team of scientists, including NUST MISIS's Professor Gotthard Seifert, has made an important step toward the control of excitonic effects in two-dimensional van der Waals heterostructures. In the future, this research could contribute to electronics with more controlled properties. The research has been published in Nature Physics.
6h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Scientists find potential disease-fighting 'warheads' hidden in bacteriaA new study by Scripps Research, published today in Nature Communications, suggests scientists could build better drugs by learning from bacteria-derived molecules called thiocarboxylic acids.
7h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

New 3D imaging analysis technique could lead to improved arthritis treatmentAn algorithm to monitor the joints of patients with arthritis, which could change the way that the severity of the condition is assessed, has been developed by a team of engineers, physicians and radiologists led by the University of Cambridge.
7h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Devastating plant virus is revealed in atomic detailThe complex 3D structure of one of the world's most lethal families of plant viruses has been revealed in unprecedented detail by scientists at the University of Leeds.
7h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Genomics offers new treatment options for infants with range of soft tissue tumorsThe genetic causes of a group of related infant cancers have been discovered by scientists at the Wellcome Sanger Institute, the University of Wuerzburg and their collaborators. Whole genome sequencing of tumours revealed mutations which are targetable by existing drugs used to treat lung cancer and melanoma. The results have implications for clinical practice and the diagnosis of rare cancers in
7h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Constructing new tissue shapes with lightConstructing biological tissues, such as skin, muscle, or bone, in customized shapes is now one step closer. Researchers at EMBL have succeeded in guiding the folding and thus shape of tissues with optogenetics: a technique to control protein activity with light. Nature Communications publishes their results, with implications for regenerative medicine, on June 18.
7h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Studying heart disease after death can help the livingAutopsy findings provide valuable information about causes and natural history of overall cardiovascular disease. Several papers in a special issue of Circulation offer insight into how autopsy contributes to answers about the causes of sudden cardiac death, information from implantable device to improve heart function, and identifying the original cause of atherosclerosis.
7h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Gene editing technology may improve accuracy of predicting individuals' heart disease riskGene-editing technology may help scientists discern whether genetic variations with undetermined effects are harmless or dangerous. Researchers used the technology to assess a genetic variant suspected to have a role in enlarged hearts. Gene editing may help assess a person's individual disease risk and improve the quality and predictive abilities of precision medicine.
7h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Intravenous acetaminophen has limited benefit for colectomy patients, Mount Sinai study findsResults do not support routine use of this expensive drug.
7h
Ingeniøren

Plugin hybrid-biler lever slet ikke op til lovet brændstofforbrugKørestil og testcyklus ser ud til at bære skylden.
7h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Constructing new tissue shapes with lightConstructing biological tissues, such as skin, muscle, or bone, in customized shapes is now one step closer. Researchers at EMBL have succeeded in guiding the folding and thus shape of tissues with optogenetics: a technique to control protein activity with light. Nature Communications publishes their results, with implications for regenerative medicine, on 18 June.
7h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Devastating plant virus is revealed in atomic detailThe complex 3-D structure of one of the world's most lethal families of plant viruses has been revealed in unprecedented detail by scientists at the UK's University of Leeds.
7h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Scientists find potential disease-fighting 'warheads' hidden in bacteriaBacteria found in soil may harbor a potential game-changer for drug design. A new study by Scripps Research, published today in Nature Communications, suggests scientists could build better drugs by learning from bacteria-derived molecules called thiocarboxylic acids.
7h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Google to invest $550 million in China e-commerce giant JD.comGoogle JD.com JD ChineseGoogle will invest more than half a billion dollars in China's second-largest e-commerce company JD.com as part of a move to expand retail services around the world, the companies said Monday.
7h
Ingeniøren

Ny rapport: Vikingeskibsmuseet bliver meget dyrt at reddeNiras har for kulturministeren vurderet, at det vil koste 55-65 mio. kr at reparere Vikingeskibsmuseet i Roskilde. Den høje pris styrker dem, der vil affrede museet
7h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Global warming cooks up 'a different world' over 3 decadesWe were warned.
8h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Bumblebee blues: Pacific Northwest pollinator in troubleHundreds of citizen scientists have begun buzzing through locations across the Pacific Northwest seeking a better understanding about nearly 30 bumblebee species.
8h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

James Hansen wishes he wasn't so right about global warmingJames Hansen wishes he was wrong. He wasn't.
8h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Landslides, flash floods as monsoon batters southern MyanmarFlooding in southern Myanmar has caused a landslide at a famed Buddhist pagoda, submerged homes and displaced hundreds of people as monsoon rains batter the country.
8h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

France air traffic responsible for third of Europe delays: reportHindered by strikes and outdated equipment, French air traffic control is responsible for a third of aviation delays in Europe, Le Parisien said Monday, citing a senate finance committee report.
8h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Property crisis looms due to sea level rise, experts warnAlong Florida's sun-splashed shorelines, home prices are on the rise, developers are busy building new complexes, and listings just blocks from the beach describe homes that are "not in a flood zone," meaning no flood insurance is required.
8h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

AP Was There: The age of climate change beginsOn June 23, 1988, a top NASA scientist told Congress and the world that global warming had arrived. NASA scientist James Hansen predicted that 1988 would be the world's hottest year on record, thanks to the burning of fossil fuels that released heat-trapping gases.
8h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

US property crisis looms as sea level rises, experts warnAlong sun-splashed shorelines in the US state of Florida, home prices are on the rise, developers are busy building new complexes, and listings just blocks from the beach describe homes that are "not in a flood zone," meaning no flood insurance is required.
8h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Autonomous Waymo vehicle involved in 5-car crash in ArizonaPolice in a Phoenix suburb say a self-driving Waymo vehicle was among five cars involved in a collision, but no serious injuries were reported.
8h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Chesapeake Bay: Larger-than-average summer 'dead zone' forecast for 2018 after wet springEcologists from the University of Michigan and the University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science are forecasting a larger-than-average Chesapeake Bay "dead zone" in 2018, due to increased rainfall in the watershed this spring.
9h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Rising sea temperatures threaten survival of juvenile albatrossEcologists from Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution in the US and the French National Center for Scientific Research (CNRS) studied a population of black-browed albatross at Kerguelen Island, part of the French Southern and Antarctic Lands, where 200 breeding pairs have been monitored annually since 1979.
9h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Explosive volcanoes spawned mysterious Martian rock formationExplosive volcanic eruptions that shot jets of hot ash, rock and gas skyward are the likely source of a mysterious Martian rock formation, a new study finds. The new finding could add to scientists' understanding of Mars's interior and its past potential for habitability, according to the study's authors.
9h
Science-Based Medicine

ASCO endorses the integration of quackery into breast cancer careIn 2014, the Society for Integrative Oncology first published clinical guidelines for the care of breast cancer patients. Not surprisingly, SIO advocated "integrating" dubious therapies with oncology. Last week, the most influential oncology society, the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO), endorsed a 2017 update to the SIO guidelines, thus endorsing the "integration" of quackery with onc
9h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Large outdoor study shows biodiversity improves stability of algal biofuel systemsA diverse mix of species improves the stability and fuel-oil yield of algal biofuel systems, as well as their resistance to invasion by outsiders, according to the findings of a federally funded outdoor study by University of Michigan researchers.
9h
Science | The Guardian

Can you solve it? Mirror, mirror on the wallA puzzle to reflect on UPDATE: The solution to the puzzle can be read here Hi guzzlers Here’s a puzzle about something we do every day: gaze at ourselves in the mirror. Who says maths is not relevant to the real world? In fact, You may have often pondered this question without realising it when trying on clothes. Continue reading…
10h
Science | The Guardian

'Smoke and mirror' tactics of drink-drive defence teams criticisedForensic science regulator launches investigation into a number of expert witnesses The “smoke and mirror” tactics of defence lawyers in drink-driving cases have been criticised by the government’s forensic science regulator, who has launched an investigation into the work of a number of expert witnesses. The review was triggered by a recent high court judgment that raised concerns about defence
10h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Large outdoor study shows biodiversity improves stability of algal biofuel systemsA diverse mix of species improves the stability and fuel-oil yield of algal biofuel systems, as well as their resistance to invasion by outsiders, according to the findings of a federally funded outdoor study by University of Michigan researchers.
10h
Ingeniøren

Region H vil outsource hele sin it-infrastruktur: Er i dialog med indisk gigantRegion H planlægger at outsource hele sin it-infrastruktur. Men det er uklart, om regionens it-setup er standardiseret nok – og hvordan outsourcing vil påvirke driftskvaliteten for sygehusene.
10h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Americans view child abuse and neglect as a serious public health problemA strong majority of Americans view child abuse and neglect as a public health problem in the United States, a sentiment shared across populations with 81 percent of Hispanics, 76 percent of non-Hispanic whites, 74 percent of African-Americans and 67 percent of Asians in agreement, according to a new survey commissioned by Research!America and the National Foundation to End Child Abuse and Neglect
11h
Feed: All Latest

'Westworld' Recap, Season 2 Episode 9: The Many Lives of the Man in BlackAs the series's second season wraps up, the wall between his real-life self and Westworld persona comes crashing down.
11h
Viden

Børn vil hellere chatte end snakke om mobning, selvskade og sorgFlere og flere børn chatter i stedet for at ringe, når de skal have hjælp. Teknologien gør børnene mere trygge, siger Børns Vilkår.
11h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Silence is golden when it comes to how our brains workIt's the comparative silence between the firing spikes of neurons that tells what they are really up to, scientists report.
12h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Study finds a pesticide-free way to combat mosquitos and West NileResearchers at the University of Waterloo may have discovered a new, pesticide-free way to limit mosquito populations in some area and reduce the spread of the West Nile virus.
12h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Explosive volcanoes spawned mysterious Martian rock formationExplosive volcanic eruptions that shot jets of hot ash, rock and gas skyward are the likely source of a mysterious Martian rock formation, a new study finds. The new finding could add to scientists' understanding of Mars's interior and its past potential for habitability, according to the study's authors.
12h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Childhood sibling dynamics may predict differences in college educationThe effects of sibling relationships may go beyond childhood bickering and bonding, according to Penn State researchers who found that these relationships may predict similarities and differences in siblings' education later in life.
12h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Valuing gluten-free foods relates to health behaviors in young adultsIn a new study featured in the Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, researchers found that among young adults valuing gluten-free foods could be indicative of an overall interest in health or nutrition. These young adults were more likely to engage in healthier behaviors including better dietary intake and also valued food production practices (e.g., organic, non-GMO, locally sourced
12h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Rising sea temperatures threaten survival of juvenile albatrossChanges in sea surface temperature affect the survival of albatross during their first year at sea, resulting in a reduced population growth rate when temperatures are warmer than the current average, a new study published in the Journal of Animal Ecology has revealed.
12h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Diabetes may be an early manifestation of pancreatic cancerA new study in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute indicates that recent-onset type 2 diabetes may be early expression of pancreatic cancer. Diabetes was associated with a more than twofold higher risk of pancreatic cancer in African-Americans and Latinos, but recent-onset diabetes was associated with a 2.3-fold greater increase in risk of pancreatic cancer than long-standing diabetes.
12h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

When it comes to weight loss in overweight and obese adults with knee osteoarthritis, more is betterResearchers previously showed that overweight and obese individuals with knee osteoarthritis can reduce pain by 50 percent and significantly improve function and mobility with a 10 percent or more weight loss over an 18-month period.
12h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Researchers find a promising new approach for treating liver cirrhosisIn a study in The American Journal of Pathology, investigators report that treatment with aleglitazar, a dual peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-alpha/gamma (PPARα/γ) agonist, reduced inflammation, vasoconstriction, angiogenesis, mucosal disruption, and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α overproduction in cirrhotic rats with PH. This suggests a promising new approach for treating liver cirrhosi
12h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

One in 5 parents did not talk to kids about what to do if they got lost at an amusement parkNew report indicates several opportunities to reduce safety risks for children in the amusement park environment.
12h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Sensitive new assay finds abnormalities in tumor cells that other techniques may missRNA-Seq, a new next-generation assay, can detect gene fusions in solid tumor cells with high accuracy and excellent reproducibility. According to a new report in The Journal of Molecular Diagnostics, the assay detected 93 percent of gene fusions identified by currently available methods with no false positives. Importantly, gene fusions missed by other techniques were found, including 18 that had
12h
Ingeniøren

Nu bliver også elektrificeringen af jernbanen kulegravetTransportministeriet har bestilt en ekstern konsulentundersøgelse af elektrificeringen, efter at første strækning blev både forsinket og fordyret.
13h
BBC News – Science & Environment

Hong Kong's fish are eating plastic – and people could be tooA lot of Hong Kong's fish contains tiny bits of plastic that could end up on your plate.
13h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

The same characteristics can be acquired differently when it comes to neuronsDistinct molecular mechanisms can generate the same features in different neurons, a team of scientists has discovered. Its findings enhance our understanding of brain cell development.
14h
The Atlantic

Westworld: Who Cares About the Man in Black?Every week for the second season of Westworld , three Atlantic staffers will discuss new episodes of HBO’s cerebral sci-fi drama. David Sims: Well, after last week’s fascinating journey into the psyche and backstory of Akecheta and Ghost Nation, this week we got the same treatment for that dastardly Man in Black himself. That’s a little bit of a comedown. For one, this season has spent so much ti
14h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Diabetes diagnosis may signal early pancreatic cancer in older African-Americans, LatinosA new study from the Keck School of Medicine of USC shows that African-Americans and Latinos who are diagnosed with diabetes after age 50 have a more than threefold risk of developing pancreatic cancer.
16h
The Atlantic

Beyoncé and Jay-Z’s Marriage of ConquestThe marriage rate remains low , but Jay-Z and Beyoncé are doing their best to keep wedlock fashionable. On Everything Is Love , the joint album the couple surprise-released on Saturday, their union again glitters as a luxury item as covetable as their Alaïa boots and Aruba vacations. Even the fact that they nearly broke up comes off as a form of conspicuous consumption. “He went to Jared , I went
16h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Life in the fast lane: USU ecologist says dispersal ability linked to plants' life cyclesUtah State University ecologist Noelle Beckman says seed dispersal is an essential, yet overlooked, process of plant demography, but it's difficult to empirically observe, measure and assess its full influence.
17h
Scientific American Content: Global

Jupiter Crackles with Polar LightningJuno spacecraft data suggest lightning on Jupiter is much more common than we thought—but it congregates near the poles, not the equator as on Earth. Christopher Intagliata reports. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
17h
Science | The Guardian

Cambridge zoology museum to reopenSir David Attenborough to tour new premises that showcase the extinct moa bird’s feathers When Sir David Attenborough opens the University of Cambridge’s zoology museum this week, the proud curators will show him their fabulous discovery. It’s fair to say the casual visitor might wonder why they are so excited by the scruffy frame containing a few cobwebby grey-brown wisps, discovered during a £4
17h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Life in the fast lane: Ecologists say dispersal ability linked to plants' life cyclesThough mostly rooted in the ground, plants have a number of innovative ways to disperse their seeds and get on with the business of propagation. They drop seeds or release them to the wind. Or they fling seeds with a dramatic mechanical detonation. Or they rely on seed transport by water or hitching a ride on a traveling animal (including humans).
17h
Futurity.org

Analysis totally rewrites the history of ancient turquoiseNew research overturns more than a century of thought about the source of turquoise that ancient civilizations in Mesoamerica used. For more than 150 years, scholars have argued that the Aztec and Mixtec civilizations, which revered the precious, blue-green mineral, acquired it through import from the American Southwest. However, extensive geochemical analyses reveal that the true geologic source
17h
cognitive science

Stress in early childhood leads to faster development of the brainsubmitted by /u/davyeminy [link] [comments]
17h
Futurity.org

Antipsychotics for ADHD may put kids at risk for diabetesChildren and adolescents who take antipsychotics for as little as 12 weeks experience significant gains in body fat and also become less sensitive to insulin, according to a new study. Although originally developed and approved to treat conditions such as pediatric-onset schizophrenia, many youths who don’t respond to stimulant medications, such as Ritalin, receive prescriptions for antipsychotic
17h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

New technique provides accurate dating of ancient skeletonsA new way of dating skeletons by using mutations in DNA associated with geography will avoid the difficulties and inaccuracies sometimes associated with existing dating methods. The technique will enable a better understanding of historical developments from the beginning of the Neolithic period, through the Bronze and Iron Ages.
18h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Genomic testing for the causes of stillbirth should be considered for routine useThe use of whole genome and whole exome sequencing can uncover the cause of unexplained stillbirth and neonatal deaths. In addition to providing an explanation to bereaved parents, it can help the understand whether a recurrence in future pregnancies is likely.
18h
NYT > Science

Video Game Addiction Tries to Move From Basement to Doctor’s OfficeGaming disorder is being recognized for the first time by the World Health Organization. But of the few treatment options available, most are uninsured and unproven.
18h
Futurity.org

How the events of 1968 stick with the U.S. todayFifty years after the assassination of Martin Luther King Jr. and Robert Kennedy and the period of chaos and confusion afterwards, the events of 1968 still shape our lives today, New York University’s Tim Naftali and Nikhil Pal Singh argue. Naftali, a clinical associate professor of public service and of history, and Singh, associate professor of social and cultural analysis and history, say the
18h
Science : NPR

Stay-At-Home Dads Still Struggle With Diapers, Drool, Stigma And IsolationIt's hard to find other stay-at-home dads to hang out with, and working men worry you'll hit on their stay-at-home wives. Meanwhile, bosses still expect new fathers to work full-time. What's changed? (Image credit: Martín Elfman for NPR)
18h
Nyheder – Forskning – Videnskab

Den ’bløde’ udslusning fra fængslet kan være en hård omgangEn del indsatte i danske fængsler afslutter deres afsoning i en udslusningspension, som skal lette…
19h
Science | The Guardian

Starwatch: time to look for noctilucent clouds at the edge of spaceThe highest known clouds in Earth’s atmosphere can be seen soon after sunset in late spring and early summer The late spring/early summer is a good time to look for noctilucent clouds. These are the highest known clouds that form in Earth’s atmosphere. They exist at a height of about 80km; to all intents and purposes this is the edge of space. The clouds glow as white or pale blue tendrils across
19h
Big Think

10 documentaries that will make you a lot smarter about moneyThere’s no escaping its vast power and utility for the human enterprise. Stories, great tales, and songs have all been written about the all-mighty dollar. Here's 10 documentaries that we think you'll enjoy. Read More
19h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

Primates in perilPrimates are fascinating. They are intelligent, live in complex societies and are a vital part of the ecosystem. Lemurs, lorises, galagos, tarsiers, monkeys and apes are our closest biological relatives and just like them, humans are also primates. However, while the human population spread to all corners of the earth, many of our closest relatives are under serious threat.
22h
Scientific American Content: Global

The Erosion of RealityThe most immediate AI threat may be the distortion of truth; something we, and other species, have been doing for a long time — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
23h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

New York puts its rats on iceA snout and two little black eyes pop out from the hole, too late: A foot already covers them and the hole will be quickly filled with dry ice.
1d
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

GE facing millions in penalities over French job pledgeUS conglomerate General Electric will have to pay millions of euros in penalties in France if it fails to uphold its pledge to create 1,000 new jobs by year end, a government official said Sunday.
1d
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Scientist launches hunt for Loch Ness 'monster DNA'Tales of a giant creature lurking beneath the murky waves of Loch Ness have been around for more than 1,500 years—and one academic hopes the marvels of modern science can finally unravel the mystery.
1d
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Mount Everest, the high-altitude rubbish dumpDecades of commercial mountaineering have turned Mount Everest into the world's highest rubbish dump as an increasing number of big-spending climbers pay little attention to the ugly footprint they leave behind.
1d
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Last of the Jayer wine goes on sale in GenevaThe last batch of late legendary winemaker Henri Jayer's Burgundies—which include some of the world's most expensive wines—went on sale in Geneva Sunday expected to rake in up to $13 million.
1d
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Like 'Star Trek': voice shopping seen as new frontierHey, Google, order a large pizza! Alexa, I need vitamins!
1d
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Ford: Detroit train station key to autonomous vehicle plansBill Ford looks past the tons of paint, plaster and steel needed to remake Detroit's blighted Michigan Central train station and sees more than just an iconic building in desperate need of a makeover.
1d
Big Think

Did Jesus use cannabis oil to perform miracles?As marijuana grows more acceptable in the US, fringe groups and experts are beginning to consider its role in the Christian faith. Could cannabis oil have helped Jesus perform miracles? Read More
1d
Live Science

The Weirdest Fireworks Injuries EverFizz…Bang!… OUCH
1d
Live Science

5 Weird Ways Hot Tubs Can Make You SickIn rare cases, danger may lurk under those soothing bubbles.
1d
Big Think

Supercomputer Aurora 21 will map the human brain, starting in 2021Aurora 21 will help the US keep pace among the other nations who own the fastest supercomputers. Scientists plan on using it to map the connectome of the human brain. Read More
1d

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