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Nyheder2018juni18

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NYT > Science

Trump Orders Establishment of Space Force as Sixth Military BranchDonald Trump Space ForceThe idea has troubled lawmakers and even some members of the administration, who have cautioned that it could create unnecessary bureaucratic responsibilities for a military burdened by conflicts.
5h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

New study explores cell mechanics at workIt's a remarkable choreography. In each of our bodies, more than 37 trillion cells tightly coordinate with other cells to organize into the numerous tissues and organs that make us tick.
1h
Ingeniøren

Blå blok bakker op om udskældt speed pedelec-forsøgsordningDen heftigt kritiserede bekendtgørelse for speed pedelecs træder i kraft om under tre uger, men den er ikke blevet præsenteret for politikerne. Alligevel er transportordførerne fra Venstre og Dansk Folkeparti sikre på, at Færdselsstyrelsen har lavet en fornuftig forsøgsordning.
4h

LATEST

Science | The Guardian

William Hague calls for Theresa May to legalise cannabisEx-Conservative leader says policy is ‘inappropriate, ineffective and out of date’ William Hague, the former leader of the Conservative party, has urged Theresa May to legalise cannabis, saying the UK’s drug policy is “inappropriate, ineffective and utterly out of date” and “this battle is effectively over”. Lord Hague said issuing orders to the police to stop people smoking cannabis were “about
24min
New Scientist – News

Colony ship to nearest star only needs crew of 100 to surviveA mission to Proxima Centauri b, the closest Earth-like exoplanet, would take over six thousand years – but you only need a small crew to get started
24min
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Jilted Fujifilm sues Xerox for $1bn after aborted mergerJapanese technology giant Fujifilm said Tuesday it was suing US firm Xerox, seeking more than $1 billion in damages after a merger between the two firms was scrapped last month.
27min
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Family ties make Faroese women Europe's top baby makersGunnhild Helmsdal's mailbox has six names printed on it and will soon add a seventh: having a big family is nothing unusual in the Faroe Islands where women have the most babies in Europe despite also having the highest rate of employment.
33min
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Japan start-up Mercari soars in first day of Tokyo tradeJapanese flea market app Mercari soared Tuesday as it debuted on the Tokyo Stock Exchange, a major success for the rare example of a Japanese "unicorn"—a start-up valued over $1 billion.
45min
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Apple fined millions for Australia false iPhone claimsApple was Tuesday fined Aus$9 million (US$6.7 million) by an Australian court for making false claims about consumer rights when refusing to fix faulty iPhones and iPads previously repaired by a third party.
57min
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

US Senate votes to reimpose ban on China's ZTE, shares plungeZTE Senate Trump USThe US Senate defied President Donald Trump on Monday by voting to overrule his administration's deal with Chinese telecom firm ZTE and reimpose a ban on hi-tech chip sales to the company.
57min
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Sacred snappers: The village where crocodiles are welcomeCrocodiles may be one of the deadliest hunters in the animal kingdom, but in a small village in Burkina Faso it is not unusual to see someone sitting atop one of the fearsome reptiles.
57min
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

World's oldest Sumatran orangutan dies aged 62The world's oldest Sumatran orangutan, which had 11 children and 54 descendants spread across the globe, has died aged 62, Australian zoo officials said Tuesday.
1h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

California lawmakers debate creating regional electric gridA contentious proposal to link oversight of California's electric grid with other western states faces a crucial test Tuesday in a state Senate committee.
1h
NYT > Science

ScienceTake: The Elephant’s Superb NoseElephants’ trunks are not only large and strong, they house one of the best mammalian smelling systems.
1h
NYT > Science

Inside the Nose of an ElephantElephants have a keen nose. They have more smell receptors than any mammal – including dogs – and can sniff out food that is several miles away. A new study tests their ability to distinguish between similar smelling plants.
1h
Science-Based Medicine

H.O.P.E.: A Movie Promoting VeganismH.O.P.E., a movie promoting veganism, is short on science and long on appeals to emotion.
1h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Most protein info ever captured from a single cell thanks to new 'nanoPOTS' technologyScientists have obtained a slew of key information about proteins, the molecular workhorses of all cells, from single human cells for the first time.
1h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Entrepreneurs seek to quantify pressure applied during manual therapyPhysical and occupational therapists, athletic trainers, chiropractors, veterinarians, and other medical professionals could improve the outcomes of manual therapy to treat soft-tissue injuries by using patent-pending, handheld instruments being developed by IUPUI entrepreneurs.
1h
Feed: All Latest

Now the Computer Can Argue With YouIBM shows off an artificial intelligence program that can engage in a debate, possibly pointing the way to the future of talking machines.
2h
BBC News – Science & Environment

Puan, oldest known Sumatran orangutan, dies in AustraliaPuan left an "incredible legacy" of descendants for the critically endangered species, keepers say.
2h
Ingeniøren

IBM-projekt i Forsvarsministeriet fire år forsinket og dobbelt så dyrt som planlagtManglende funktionalitets- og performancetest og en HR-opgave, der er mere kompleks at digitalisere end først antaget, har gjort nyt planlægningssystem i Forsvarsministeriet dyrere.
2h
Science | The Guardian

Out of their minds: wild ideas at the ‘Coachella of consciousness’An annual conference on consciousness in the Arizona desert takes an anything-goes approach to some seriously wacky theories By Tom Bartlett Start with Noam Chomsky, Deepak Chopra and a robot that loves you no matter what. Add a knighted British physicist, a renowned French neuroscientist and a prominent Australian philosopher/occasional blues singer. Toss in a bunch of psychologists, mathematici
3h
Viden

5 gode råd: Sådan stopper du digital mobningMobning på nettet fordobler risikoen for selvmordsforsøg og selvskade, viser ny forskning. Få fem gode råd til, hvordan du fjerner digital mobning.
3h
Viden

Digital mobning fordobler risikoen for selvskade og selvmordsforsøg16-årige Nanna Jensen blev mobbet på nettet. Hun er en af de unge, der har en øget risiko for at selvskade og forsøge selvmord, viser ny undersøgelse.
3h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

Study on social interactions could improve understanding of mental health risksInvestigators have released the results of a study that outlines how age, socioeconomic status, and other factors might contribute to social isolation and poorer mental health.
3h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

Often overlooked glial cell is key to learning and memoryGlial cells surround neurons and provide support — not unlike hospital staff and nurses supporting doctors to keep operations running smoothly. These often-overlooked cells, which include oligodendrocytes and astrocytes, are the most abundant cell types in the central nervous system. But these cells do more than support neurons.
3h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

'Artificial blubber' protects divers in frigid waterA treatment that infuses a conventional neoprene wetsuit with a heavy inert gas can improve a diver's survival time in frigid waters by a factor of three, according to scientists.
3h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

Factor important for ZIKA Virus host species restrictionIn 2013 and 2015, devastating outbreaks of ZIKA captured world attention. The virus is often transmitted from wild animals — probably non-human primates — via mosquitos to humans. This is the first comprehensive study to investigate which mammal species may host the ZIKA virus (ZIKV).
3h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Ground-breaking discoveries could create superior alloys with many applicationsMany current and future technologies require alloys that can withstand high temperatures without corroding. Now, researchers at Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden, have hailed a major breakthrough in understanding how alloys behave at high temperatures, pointing the way to significant improvements in many technologies. The results are published in the highly ranked journal Nature Materials.
3h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Combining different malaria vaccines could reduce cases by 91 percentUsing two experimental anti-malarial vaccines, which work in different ways, can greatly reduce the number of malaria infections in animal studies.
3h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Twenty-five per cent of seafood sold in Metro Vancouver is mislabelledA new UBC study used DNA barcoding to determine that 70 of 281 seafood samples collected in Metro Vancouver between September 2017 and February 2018 were mislabelled.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Children's immune system could hold the key to preventing sepsisScientists have identified the key response that children use to control infections.
3h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Opioid dependence in patients with degenerative spondylolisthesis: More likely to occur before than after surgeryResearchers investigated risk factors for the development of opioid dependence in patients undergoing surgery for degenerative spondylolisthesis (DS). They found that, overall, patients were more likely to have a dependency on opioid medications before surgery than afterward.
3h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Good relationships with siblings may buffer the effects of family conflictA new longitudinal study finds that having a good relationship with a sibling may help buffer the distress of ongoing hostility between parents.
3h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Parents' explanations of peer interactions affect how children interpret peers' behaviorNew research in the journal Child Development shows that parents can help their children perceive less hostility in their social world by framing social situations in a positive way, and thus, reduce their likelihood of behaving aggressively.
3h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

RFK's assassination: A medical analysis of his injuries and neurosurgical careCovers the assassination of Robert F. Kennedy. The authors 'review the eyewitness reports of the mechanism of injury, the care rendered for three hours prior to the emergency craniotomy, the clinical course, and, ultimately, the autopsy.' The discussion of autopsy findings is supplemented by an artist's depiction of the extent of Senator Kennedy's head injury.
3h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

Reduction in sulfur emissions from power plants in ChinaAir pollution has smothered China's cities in recent decades. In response, the Chinese government has implemented measures to clean up its skies. But are those policies effective? Now scholars show that one of China's key antipollution laws is indeed working — but unevenly, with one particular set of polluters most readily adapting to it.
3h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

Overuse of agricultural chemicals on China's small farms harms health and environmentThe size of farms in China is a key contributor to the overuse of agricultural chemicals, and as a result they may be too small to be environmentally sustainable, a new study has found.
3h
BBC News – Science & Environment

Will Norway's electric plane take off?A battery-powered plane that could mean guilt-free travel is part of a plan to tackle climate change.
4h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

Increased risk of birth defects in babies after first-trimester exposure to lithiumResearchers have found an elevated risk of major congenital malformations in fetuses after first-trimester exposure to lithium, in the largest study ever to examine the risk of birth defects in lithium-exposed babies.
4h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

Carbon nanotube optics provide optical-based quantum cryptography and quantum computingResearchers are exploring the enhanced potential of carbon nanotubes as single-photon emitters for quantum information processing.
4h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

Phoneme project creates new haptic communications futureCommunication could step beyond reading a cellular phone screen with a new technique by engineering researchers to learn and read messages through a person's sense of touch.
4h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

Local interventions boost coral's resilience to bleachingLocal conservation actions can significantly boost coral's resilience to, and recovery from, climate-induced thermal bleaching by reducing other energy-sapping stresses the coral faces, a new study finds. Scientists found they could reduce the extent of bleaching by half if they removed or reduced populations of coral-eating snails from affected reefs. The coral's recovery from bleaching was also
4h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

Why being left-handed matters for mental health treatmentTreatment for the most common mental health problems could be ineffective or even detrimental to about 50 percent of the population, according to a radical new model of emotion in the brain.
5h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

Coral reef 'oases' offer glimmer of hopeScientists have discovered small communities of corals that are flourishing against the odds while so many around the world are dying.
5h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

Scientists isolate protein data from the tiniest of caches — single human cellsScientists have captured the most information yet about proteins within a single human cell, giving scientists one of their clearest looks yet at the molecular happenings inside a human cell. The team detected on average more than 650 proteins in each cell — many times more than conventional techniques capture from single cells.
5h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

The force is strong within us: New study explores cell mechanics at workA research team focused on measuring the stiffness, bending, twisting and viscosity of individual cells — focused on a breast cancer cell line — using all of the most state-of-the art technology at their disposal. How both healthy and cancerous cells respond to this environment — and whether there are key differences that can be identified for future diagnostic applications was of keen interest
5h
New on MIT Technology Review

This AI program could beat you in an argument—but it doesn’t know what it’s sayingIBM Project DebaterThe latest human-versus-machine matchup involves an argumentative AI system.
6h
Feed: All Latest

Trump Hasn't Signed a Space Force Into Being—YetA brand-new sixth military branch lacks political support.
7h
Science : NPR

Summer Melt: Why Aren't Students Showing Up For College?As many as 40 percent of students who intend to go to college don't show up in the fall. Education researchers call this phenomenon "summer melt," and it has long been a puzzling problem. (Image credit: Hill Street Studios/Getty Images/Blend Images)
7h
The Atlantic

The Trump Administration’s Shifting Story on Family SeparationsThe Trump administration struggled to contain the fallout as outrage over migrant children being separated from their parents at the border accelerated on Monday. As more and more disturbing stories and images have come out in recent days showing the children’s plight, the administration has been unable to get its story straight on the matter, with different officials offering different, even fal
7h
New Scientist – News

Trump has directed the US military to establish a Space ForcePresident Trump has announced the creation of a Space Force, the first new US military branch since 1947, but it’s not yet clear what this new corps will do
7h
Scientific American Content: Global

AI, Robotics and Your HealthAt the second Science Meets Congress event, AI, Robotics and Your Health, experts from academia and the private sector talked with Scientific American Editor in Chief Mariette DiChristina about the… — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
8h
Feed: All Latest

Microsoft's Ethical Reckoning Is HereRevelation of contract with US immigration agency sparks criticism amid family separations
8h
NYT > Science

A Troubling Prognosis for Migrant Children in Detention: ‘The Earlier They’re Out, the Better’The longer children remain in institutional settings, the greater their risk of depression, post-traumatic stress and other mental health problems.
8h
Futurity.org

Rare mutation sheds light on the brain’s wiringThe study of a Québec family with an unusual gene provides new insight into how our brain is built and offers a better understanding of psychiatric disorders such as depression, addictions, and schizophrenia, researchers say. Very little is known about how the human brain wires itself. Mouse studies have previously shown that the gene DCC helps dopamine producing cells in the developing adolescen
8h
Futurity.org

Cosmic ‘Frisbees’ hint at our solar system’s originsScientists have imaged a cluster of protoplanetary disks in the Orion Nebula and discovered that they are smaller than those previously studied in closer, less-dense regions. Protoplanetary disks—cosmic ‘Frisbees’ of gas and dust orbiting young stars across the galaxy—spin out new planets. But the size of those planets depends on just how much material these disks have to give. The smallness of t
8h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Coral reef 'oases' offer glimmer of hopeAn international team of scientists have discovered small communities of corals that are flourishing against the odds while so many around the world are dying.
8h
Futurity.org

Floridians were more vigilant about Zika, but there’s work to doFlorida residents felt more susceptible than others in the United States to getting the Zika virus in 2016, were more knowledgeable about it, and were more likely to support taking community action against it, according to a new study. Floridians were nearly twice as likely as non-Floridians to say they took steps to protect themselves from Zika. Whether or not they felt personally susceptible to
9h
Futurity.org

Cement-free material paves the way for ‘green’ concreteEngineers have developed a composite binder made primarily of fly ash—a byproduct of coal-fired power plants—that can replace Portland cement in concrete. The material is cementless and environmentally friendly, the engineers say. The current concrete manufacturing process contributes 5 to 10 percent of carbon dioxide to global emissions… Fly ash binder does not require the high-temperature proce
9h
Feed: All Latest

The Pepper v. Apple Supreme Court Case Will Decide If Apple's App Store Is a Monopoly*Apple Inc. v. Pepper* could have wide-reaching implications not only for the Cupertino giant, but also for other companies like Amazon.
9h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Coral reef 'oases' offer glimmer of hopeThe identification of small 'oases' in the world's oceans, where corals appear to be thriving, could offer vital insights in the race to save one of the world's most threatened ecosystems.
9h
Futurity.org

HPV vaccine is working to reduce cancer riskThe HPV vaccine is working to reduce the risk of cervical cancer, according to a new study. “It is the first study in the world to test the Gardasil-4 vaccine on a population level. The childhood vaccination [program], which includes the HPV vaccine, is targeted at the entire population. Therefore, it is important to look at the entire population and the effect of the vaccine after the first scre
9h
The Atlantic

A Choice Between Cruelty and Mercy“The man the city sets up in authority must be obeyed in small things and just but also in their opposites,” declares the tyrannical king in the ancient Greek tragedy Antigone . The plan to which he demands obedience calls for separating a brother and a sister across the city’s border—an act terrible in its cruelty but, he argues, necessary for security. The king wants to reestablish order in the
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The Atlantic

Watch the U.S. Turn Away Asylum Seekers at the Border“The [narcos] threatened to kill every last person in our house—even the dog,” says Wayner Berduo, a young Guatemalan asylum seeker at the U.S.-Mexican border, in a new documentary from The Atlantic . Berduo says he lost his left eye and the use of his right arm in a violent attack late last year. Like thousands of Central American families, the Berduos say they’re seeking legal protection in the
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Futurity.org

In just a few years, Antarctic ‘ice loss’ tripledThe amount of ice lost from Antarctica has tripled since 2012 and increased global sea levels by 0.12 inch in five years, according to new research. “We are observing the effects of climate change.” Scientists studied the change in mass of the Antarctic ice sheet from 1992 to 2017 and found the ice losses have increased global sea levels by 0.3 inches. The research reveals a sharp uptick in ice l
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Science | The Guardian

Tattoo health warning for people with weakened immune systemsA woman with cystic fibrosis and lung transplants suffered chronic pain for three years after she had a tattoo on her thigh Getting a tattoo if you have a weakened immune system could put you at risk of complications, doctors have warned. The caution comes after a woman with cystic fibrosis and lung transplants developed thigh and knee pain after having body art inked on her leg. Doctors say thos
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Keyhole may trump robotic surgery for mitral valve repairKeyhole surgery for heart valve repair may trump robotic surgery, because it is associated with lower rates of subsequent heart flutter and blood transfusions, and a shorter hospital stay, reveals research looking at the pros and cons of different surgical approaches, published online in the journal Heart.
9h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Beware of getting a tattoo if your immune system isn't up to scratch, doctors warnGetting a tattoo may have some unexpected complications if your immune system isn't up to scratch, warn doctors in the journal BMJ Case Reports.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Marriage may protect against heart disease/stroke and associated risk of deathMarriage may protect against the development of heart disease/stroke as well as influencing who is more likely to die of it, suggests a pooled analysis of the available data, published online in the journal Heart.
9h
Popular Science

A pack of wolves is about to save this national parkEnvironment With any luck, a boatload of predators is headed to Isle Royale. After years of debate, the National Park Service announced its final decision to reintroduce 20 to 30 wolves to Isle Royale, a remote island in Lake Superior.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

Two new creatures discovered from dawn of animal lifeEarth's first complex animals were an eclectic bunch that lived in the shallow oceans between 580-540 million years ago.
10h
The Atlantic

The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: Zero Tolerance-Written by Elaine Godfrey ( @elainejgodfrey ) Today in 5 Lines During a meeting of the National Space Council, President Trump ordered the Pentagon to create a “space force,” which would be the sixth branch of the U.S. military. Department of Homeland Security Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen defended the Trump administration’s “zero tolerance” immigration policy amid mounting pressure from Democrats
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The Atlantic

The Atlantic Daily: Moral ReckoningWhat We’re Following Immigration Policy: The Trump administration’s policy of separating migrant children from their parents at the U.S–Mexico border continued to provoke outrage over the weekend. Evangelical leaders, members of Congress, and former First Lady Laura Bush added their voices to what Krishnadev Calamur calls a “national moral reckoning.” The children are being detained in chain-link
10h
The Atlantic

How Exactly Do You Establish a Space Force?At about 8 a.m. on Monday, reporters called into a press conference with White House officials to discuss the day’s main event: a meeting of the National Space Council at noon. The conference was convened to discuss a spate of new proposals by the administration for, among other things, improving management of satellite traffic and cleaning up debris in Earth’s orbit. Not exactly thrilling stuff.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

BPA can induce multigenerational effects on ability to communicatePast studies have shown that biparental care of offspring can be affected negatively when females and males are exposed to bisphenol A (BPA); however, previous studies have not characterized how long-term effects of BPA exposure in grandmothers and grandfathers might affect offspring communication ability.
10h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Researchers plunge into ocean 'twilight zone' to explore ecosystem carbon flowA large multidisciplinary team of scientists, equipped with advanced underwater robotics and an array of analytical instrumentation, will set sail for the northeastern Pacific Ocean this August. The team's mission for NASA and the National Science Foundation (NSF) is to study the life and death of the small organisms that play a critical role in removing carbon dioxide from the atmosphere and in t
10h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Purdue phoneme project creates new haptic communications futureCommunication could step beyond reading a cellular phone screen with a new technique by Purdue College of Engineering researchers to learn and read messages through a person's sense of touch.
10h
Live Science

Rare 1,000-Year-Old Amulet with Arabic Blessing Found in JerusalemArchaeologists discovered a 1,000-year-old clay amulet about the size of a dime at one of the oldest historical sites in Jerusalem. The tiny amulet belonged to a man named Kareem and is inscribed with a personal prayer.
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Live Science

The Oldest DNA from Giant Pandas Was Just Discovered in a Cave in ChinaScientists analyzed mitochondrial DNA to prove that a fossil belonged to an unknown, ancient cousin of modern pandas.
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Popular Science

Last week in tech: Look at all these new video gamesTechnology E3 2018 is in the books. Catch up on all the cool new game titles and the rest of the tech news you may have missed. Check out the latest episode of the Last Week in Tech podcast.
10h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Checking China's pollution by satelliteAir pollution has smothered China's cities in recent decades. In response, the Chinese government has implemented measures to clean up its skies. But are those policies effective? Now an innovative study co-authored by an MIT scholar shows that one of China's key antipollution laws is indeed working—but unevenly, with one particular set of polluters most readily adapting to it.
10h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Overuse of agricultural chemicals on China's small farms harms health and environmentThe size of farms in China is a key contributor to the overuse of agricultural chemicals, and as a result they may be too small to be environmentally sustainable, a new study has found.
10h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Study finds reduction in sulfur emissions from power plants in ChinaAir pollution has smothered China's cities in recent decades. In response, the Chinese government has implemented measures to clean up its skies. But are those policies effective? Now an innovative study co-authored by an MIT scholar shows that one of China's key antipollution laws is indeed working — but unevenly, with one particular set of polluters most readily adapting to it.
10h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Methadone and buprenorphine decrease mortality after nonfatal overdosenew study out of Boston Medical Center's Grayken Center for Addiction on opioid overdose survivors indicates that two FDA approved medications to treat opioid use disorder save lives, but only three out of 10 overdose survivors receive them.
10h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Diagnosing Diabetes from a single blood sampleDiagnosing type 2 diabetes in clinical practice may require only a single blood sample, according to a study led by researchers at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health.
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Science : NPR

The Science Behind South Korea's Race-Based World Cup StrategySouth Korea's men's soccer team tried to confuse scouts from Sweden's team by swapping jerseys so their opponent couldn't tell the players apart. But could a strategy like that actually work? (Image credit: Clive Mason/Getty Images)
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Science : NPR

Trump Calls For 'Space Force' To Defend U.S. Interests Among The StarsDonald Trump Space ForceThe president wants a "separate but equal branch" of the military to watch over the final frontier, but only Congress can make it happen. (Image credit: Michael Stonecypher/USAF)
10h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Local interventions boost coral's resilience to bleachingLocal conservation actions, like rounding up predatory snails, can significantly boost the resilience of corals to climate-induced bleaching, according to a study led by Duke University researchers.
10h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Two new creatures discovered from dawn of animal lifeEarth's first complex animals were an eclectic bunch that lived in the shallow oceans between 580-540 million years ago.
10h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

Scientists learn more about how gene linked to autism affects brainNew preclinical research shows a gene already linked to a subset of people with autism spectrum disorder is critical to healthy neuronal connections in the developing brain, and its loss can harm those connections to help fuel the complex developmental condition. Scientists report their data clarify the biological role of the gene CHD8 and its protein CHD8 in developing oligodendrocytes, cells tha
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

Faster, cheaper, better: A new way to synthesize DNAResearchers have pioneered a new way to synthesize DNA sequences through a creative use of enzymes that promises to be faster, cheaper, and more accurate. DNA synthesis is a fundamental tool in the rapidly growing field of synthetic biology, in which organisms can be engineered to do things like decompose plastic and manufacture biofuels and medicines. This discovery could dramatically accelerate
10h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

Chemists achieve major milestone of synthesis: Remote chiral inductionChemists have addressed one of the most formidable challenges in synthetic chemistry by inventing a method for enabling the making of chiral molecules that were previously difficult or impossible to synthesize.
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The Scientist RSS

Opinion: Constrain Speculation to Protect the Integrity of ScienceWhat we can know about biology before the last universal common ancestor is limited-and we should be circumspect in filling in the gaps.
11h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

360 degrees, 180 seconds: New technique speeds analysis of crop traitsA potted nine-leaf corn plant sits on a Frisbee-sized plate. The tandem begins rotating like the centerpiece atop a giant music box, three degrees per second, and after two minutes the plant has pirouetted to its original position.
11h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Power starved Nigeria on the brink after six plants closedNigerian officials were working Monday to prevent the "collapse" of the electric grid after they had to close down six power plants following a pipeline failure and "technical issues" at Shell gas wells.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Egypt's shrinking 'Pharaonic Sea' has fishermen worriedEgypt's shrinking freshwater "Pharaonic Sea" has residents in its nearly 50 surrounding fishing villages worried.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Biotech billionaire takes over at Los Angeles Times, new editor namedBiotech billionaire Patrick Soon-Shiong took over Monday as the new owner of the Los Angeles Times and immediately named respected journalist Norman Pearlstine as top editor.
11h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Studies show groundwater holding own against drilling boomNew research suggests drinking water supplies in Pennsylvania have shown resilience in the face of a drilling boom that has turned swaths of countryside into a major production zone for natural gas.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Tesla shares up despite viral video of sedan on fireElon Musk Tesla EmployeeTesla Motors was under another round of scrutiny on Monday after a homemade video of a Tesla sedan on fire went viral but the incident did not weigh on shares.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Tests confirm mystery animal shot in Montana was a wolfThe mystery is over: Wildlife officials have confirmed that an unusual-looking animal shot in central Montana was a gray wolf.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Carbon nanotube optics poised to provide pathway to optical-based quantum cryptography and quantum computingResearchers at Los Alamos and partners in France and Germany are exploring the enhanced potential of carbon nanotubes as single-photon emitters for quantum information processing. Their analysis of progress in the field is published in this week's edition of the journal Nature Materials.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

After brief wait, Beyonce, Jay-Z take album to SpotifyBeyonce and Jay-Z on Monday brought their surprise joint album to all platforms including Spotify after a wait of little more than a day, relenting on keeping an exclusive for their fledgling Tidal service.
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Big Think

Study: Trump voters show high levels of ‘sexual disgust’Past research on ‘disgust sensitivity’ show it’s linked to political orientation, but the new study is the first to explore exactly how it’s linked to voting behavior. Read More
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The Atlantic

The Unlabelling of an ‘Anti-Muslim Extremist’The Southern Poverty Law Center, the venerable civil-rights organization, has issued a formal apology to British political activist Maajid Nawaz and will make a $3.4 million payment over his inclusion in a 2016 list of “anti-Muslim extremists.” The settlement is the culmination of a bitter battle between the two sides that has stretched nearly two years. As I wrote when SPLC’s original report, A
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Science | The Guardian

We must have American dominance in space, says Donald Trump – videoDonald Trump has announced his plans to create an ambitious space programme in the US. Space Force will become a new branch of military that aims to ensure American's dominance in space. Trump wants America to return to the moon and land on Mars Continue reading…
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

22,000-year-old panda from cave in Southern China belongs to distinct, long-lost lineageResearchers who've analyzed ancient mitochondrial (mt)DNA isolated from a 22,000-year-old panda found in Cizhutuo Cave in the Guangxi Province of China — a place where no pandas live today — have revealed a new lineage of giant panda. The report shows that the ancient panda separated from present-day pandas 144,000 to 227,000 years ago, suggesting that it belonged to a distinct group not found t
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

Targeting the engine room of the cancer cellResearchers have developed a highly innovative computational framework that can support personalized cancer treatment by matching individual tumors with the drugs or drug combinations that are most likely to kill them.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

Daily fasting works for weight loss, finds report on 16:8 dietDaily fasting is an effective tool to reduce weight and lower blood pressure, according to a new study that examines the effect of time-restricted eating on weight loss in obese individuals.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

Meeting Paris climate targets will require a substantial reallocation of global investmentA new analysis by an international team of scientists shows that low carbon investments will need to markedly increase if the world is to achieve the Paris Agreement aim of keeping global warming well below 2°C.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

Scientists create continuously emitting microlasers with nanoparticle-coated beadsResearchers have found a way to convert nanoparticle-coated microscopic beads into lasers smaller than red blood cells. These microlasers, which convert infrared light into light at higher frequencies, are among the smallest continuously emitting lasers of their kind ever reported and can constantly and stably emit light for hours at a time, even when submerged in biological fluids such as blood s
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

Odors are perceived the same way by hunter-gatherers and WesternersPrevious research has shown the hunter-gatherer Jahai are much better at naming odors than Westerners. They even have a more elaborate lexicon for it. New research by language scientists show that despite these linguistic differences, the Jahai and Dutch find the same odors pleasant and unpleasant.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

Electrical wire properties of DNA linked to cancerNew research finds a connection between a cancer mutation and electron-mediated DNA repair.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

Bolder targets needed to protect nature for people's sakeResearchers argue that the world needs more diverse, ambitious and area-specific targets for retaining important natural systems to safeguard humanity.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

When it comes to weight loss in overweight and obese adults with knee osteoarthritis, more is betterOverweight and obese individuals with knee osteoarthritis can reduce pain and significantly improve function and mobility with weight loss. New research reveals that a 20% or more weight loss has the added benefit of continued improvement in physical health-related quality of life along with an additional 25% reduction in pain and improvement in function.
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Inside Science

The Many Factors Behind Getting Food to People After a DisasterThe Many Factors Behind Getting Food to People After a Disaster Nutrition, food safety and local norms among many considerations that aid groups weigh before and during disaster response. Foodaid.jpg Image credits: michelmond/ Shutterstock Culture Monday, June 18, 2018 – 16:00 James Gaines, Contributor (Inside Science) — In the wake of a natural disaster a cascade of additional problems may emer
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

BPA can induce multigenerational effects on ability to communicatePast studies have shown that biparental care of offspring can be affected negatively when females and males are exposed to bisphenol A (BPA. In a study published today in the journal PLOS One, researchers at the University of Missouri found that mice pups whose grandparents had been exposed to BPA, had different vocalization patterns. This, in turn, could also affect the amount of parental care th
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Why being left-handed matters for mental health treatmentTreatment for the most common mental health problems could be ineffective or even detrimental to about 50 percent of the population, according to a radical new model of emotion in the brain.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Princeton scientists uncover a factor important for ZIKA Virus host species restrictionIn 2013 and 2015, devastating outbreaks of ZIKA captured world attention. The virus is often transmitted from wild animals — probably non-human primates — via mosquitos to humans. This is the first comprehensive study to investigate which mammal species may host the ZIKA virus (ZIKV). 'We systematically tested the ability of ZIKV to infect cells from humans, great apes, New World and Old World m
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NYT > Science

Global Health: The Man Who (Almost) Wiped Out the Guinea WormsDr. Ernesto Ruiz-Tiben has saved tens of millions of people from painful parasitic infections.
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NYT > Science

Global Health: Nearly Eradicated in Humans, the Guinea Worm Finds New Victims: DogsFor 30 years, scientists have fought to eliminate a horrifying parasite. Suddenly, it has begun infecting dogs in Chad, threatening to undo decades of progress.
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Apple's Latest iOS 12 Feature Will Save Lives by Pushing Your Location to 911Forget memoji. Apple's push to transmit instant, accurate locations during emergency calls will have a profound effect for first responders.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

Adolescent binge drinking disrupts mouse memory in adulthoodExcessive drinking during adolescence may interfere with the activity of brain cells needed for sustaining short term memory, according to new research in adolescent male mice.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

How a moderate dose of alcohol protects the heartResults suggest the effect is associated with activation of the enzyme ALDH2, which helps rid the organism of an aldehyde which is a toxic byproduct of alcohol digestion as much as it is a byproduct of heart cells submitted to stress.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

Risky opioid prescriptions linked to higher chance of deathMost people who misuse opioids are first exposed to the drugs through prescriptions so improving prescribing is targeted as one way to help curb the nation's opioid abuse epidemic. A new study identified six types of risky opioid prescriptions and found that all were linked to a higher chance of death, including fatal opioid overdoses. The study found more than 6 percent of Massachusetts adults re
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

Organic crystals twist, bend, and healCrystals are brittle and inelastic? A novel class of smart, bendable crystalline organic materials has challenged this view. Now, scientists have engineered a molecular soft cocrystalline structure that bends and twists reversibly and without disintegration when stimulated by high temperature, mechanical force, or under UV light. This multifunctional quality makes it a robust candidate for advance
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

Novel information about the effects of in vitro fertilization on embryonic growthIn vitro fertilization affects the regulatory region of genes essential for placental and embryonic growth, as well as the birth weight. A new study suggests that the effects depend on genetic variation inherited from the parents. This information could be useful in development of assisted reproduction technologies.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

Best evidence of rare black hole capturedScientists have been able to prove the existence of small black holes and those that are super-massive but the existence of an elusive type of black hole, known as intermediate-mass black holes (IMBHs) is hotly debated. New research shows the strongest evidence to date that this middle-of-the-road black hole exists, by serendipitously capturing one in action devouring an encountering star.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

Neuroscientists map brain's response to cold touchNeuroscientists have mapped the feeling of cool touch to the brain's insula in a mouse model. The findings provide an experimental model that will advance research into conditions like pain and hypersensitivity to cold and help researchers to continue to unravel the multifaceted ways touch is represented in the brain.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

Cementless fly ash binder makes concrete 'green'Engineers have developed a composite binder made primarily of fly ash, a byproduct of coal-fired power plants, that can replace Portland cement in concrete.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

Novel combination as potential therapy for high-risk neuroblastomaResearchers at VCU Massey Cancer Center in Richmond, Virginia, have identified a promising target to reverse the development of high-risk neuroblastoma and potentially inform the creation of novel combination therapies for the disease.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

'Slow earthquakes' on San Andreas Fault increase risk of large quakesA detailed study of the California fault has discovered a new kind of movement that isn't accounted for in earthquake forecasting.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

'Artificial blubber' protects divers in frigid waterA treatment that infuses a conventional neoprene wetsuit with a heavy inert gas can improve a diver's survival time in frigid waters by a factor of three, according to scientists and others.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Often overlooked glial cell is key to learning and memoryGlial cells surround neurons and provide support — not unlike hospital staff and nurses supporting doctors to keep operations running smoothly. These often-overlooked cells, which include oligodendrocytes and astrocytes, are the most abundant cell types in the central nervous system. But these cells do more than support neurons. They also actively influence them, University of California, Riversi
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First delivery episiotomies may require repeat procedures — Ben-Gurion U. researchersAfter studying more than 43,000 deliveries at Soroka over 24 years (1991-2015), researchers found that 17.5 percent of mothers who had an episiotomy during their first delivery required repeat procedures, while only 3.1 percent of those who did not have an episiotomy the first time required one.
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Theranos Leaders Indicted For FraudFederal prosecutors filed criminal charges that allege the company's promise to revolutionize blood testing swindled investors out of hundreds of millions of dollars and put patients in danger.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

Rare mutation of gene carried by Quebec family gives insight into how the brain is wiredThe study of a Quebec family with an unusual gene provides novel insight into how our brain is built and, according to scientists, offers a better understanding of psychiatric disorders such as depression, addictions and schizophrenia.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

Algorithm speeds up process for analyzing 3D medical imagesResearchers describe a machine-learning algorithm that can register brain scans and other 3D images more than 1,000 times more quickly using novel learning techniques.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

Laser-sonic scanner aims to replace mammograms for finding breast cancerFor women over 40, mammography is a necessary yet annoying procedure to endure every year or two. The technique, while valuable for reducing breast cancer deaths, is less than ideal because it exposes patients to X-ray radiation and requires their breasts to be painfully squished between plates. The plates flatten the breast so the X-rays can more easily pass through it and produce a clear image.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

When consumers don't want to talk about what they boughtOne of the joys of shopping for many people is the opportunity to brag about their purchases to friends and others. But new research found one common situation in which people would rather not discuss what they just bought: when they're feeling like money is a little tight. In a series of studies, researchers found that consumers who felt financially constrained didn't want to talk about their pur
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

Nature programs could put a spring in your stepA new study shows that watching films set in a natural environment boosts body image.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

Large outdoor study shows biodiversity improves stability of algal biofuel systemsA diverse mix of species improves the stability and fuel-oil yield of algal biofuel systems, as well as their resistance to invasion by outsiders, according to the new findings.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

New 3D imaging analysis technique could lead to improved arthritis treatmentAn algorithm to monitor the joints of patients with arthritis, which could change the way that the severity of the condition is assessed, has been developed by a team of engineers, physicians and radiologists.
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New on MIT Technology Review

Apple’s next update will help emergency responders find you
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Live Science

People Are Doing Ridiculous Things with Elon Musk's FlamethrowersNew owners of the first 1,000 flamethrowers distributed by Elon Musk's The Boring Company are using them like you'd expect.
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Big Think

‘Stay safe’: why women are enraged by advice to steer clear of violent menIn the wake of yet another tragic loss of a woman’s life, police predictably advised people to “stay safe” by engaging in a range of “protective” strategies. Why is this a problem? Read More
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Big Think

WHO classifies 'gaming disorder' as a mental health conditionIn the 11th Revision of the International Classification of Diseases, a new one has appeared: Gaming Disorder. Read More
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TED Talks Daily (SD video)

The surprising science of alpha males | Frans de WaalIn this fascinating look at the "alpha male," primatologist Frans de Waal explores the privileges and costs of power while drawing surprising parallels between how humans and primates choose their leaders. His research reveals some of the unexpected capacities of alpha males — generosity, empathy, even peacekeeping — and sheds light on the power struggles of human politicians. "Someone who is bi
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Viden

Kampen om ilten: Vores fælles forfisk har defineret evnen til at trække vejretVi vandt storhed og styrke, da vi lærte at trække vejret med luft. Vores lunger er geniale, men vi går stadig i fisk, når vi fx skal bestige bjerge.
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Latest Headlines | Science News

Venus’ thick atmosphere speeds up the planet’s spinVenus’ thick atmosphere can push on mountains on the surface, changing its rotation period by a few minutes every day.
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BBC News – Science & Environment

How hats were placed atop the Easter Island statuesIt took only small teams using ramps and ropes to cap the giant statues of Rapa Nui, a new study says.
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Big Think

How free market ideology perverts the vocabulary of democracyFree market ideology uses democratic vocabulary as propaganda, obscuring a non-democratic reality. Read More
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Popular Science

Inside the controversial new surgery to transplant human wombsScience Pioneering surgeons have made it possible to transplant a human uterus that can bear children, offering hope to millions of women who never thought they could give birth. Pioneering surgeons have made it possible to transplant a human uterus that can bear children, offering hope to millions of women who never thought they could give…
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

Constructing new tissue shapes with lightConstructing biological tissues, such as skin, muscle, or bone, in customized shapes is now one step closer. Researchers have succeeded in guiding the folding and thus shape of tissues with optogenetics: a technique to control protein activity with light.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

Genomics offers new treatment options for infants with range of soft tissue tumorsThe genetic causes of a group of related infant cancers have been discovered by scientists. Whole genome sequencing of tumours revealed mutations which are targetable by existing drugs used to treat lung cancer and melanoma. The results have implications for clinical practice and the diagnosis of rare cancers in infants, and could lead to new, targeted treatment options for these children.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

Devastating plant virus is revealed in atomic detailThe complex 3D structure of one of the world's most lethal families of plant viruses has been revealed in unprecedented detail by scientists.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

Rising sea temperatures threaten survival of juvenile albatrossChanges in sea surface temperature affect the survival of albatross during their first year at sea, resulting in a reduced population growth rate when temperatures are warmer than the current average, a new study has revealed.
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The Atlantic

Why Are Rich, White Girls Struggling in Math?In recent years, the common wisdom has been that girls are dominating when it comes to academic achievement . In reading in particular, girls have consistently outperformed boys . Some studies have also found that in a typical U.S. school district, girls have all but caught up in math —a subject in which they had historically underperformed and from which they’d been discouraged thanks to persist
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Big Think

Novel transmitter protects wireless data from hackersDevice uses ultrafast “frequency hopping” and data encryption to protect wireless signals from being intercepted and jammed. Read More
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Local interventions boost coral's resilience to bleachingLocal conservation actions can significantly boost coral's resilience to, and recovery from, climate-induced thermal bleaching by reducing other energy-sapping stresses the coral faces, a Duke-led study finds. Scientists found they could reduce the extent of bleaching by half if they removed or reduced populations of coral-eating snails from affected reefs. The coral's recovery from bleaching was
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Study on social interactions could improve understanding of mental health risksMcLean Hospital investigators have released the results of a study that outlines how age, socioeconomic status, and other factors might contribute to social isolation and poorer mental health.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

How to track and trace a protein: Nanosensors monitor intracellular deliveriesResearchers at the University of Basel's Biozentrum have developed a method for tracing the movement of proteins within the cell. They tagged proteins with tiny nanosensors, so-called nanobodies, which enable the scientists to live track and trace the proteins' pathway through the cell. The method described in the current issue of PNAS is suitable for a wide range of research purposes.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Overuse of agricultural chemicals on China's small farms harms health and environmentThe size of farms in China is a key contributor to the overuse of agricultural chemicals, and as a result they may be too small to be environmentally sustainable, a new study has found.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Scripps Research chemists design 'miniecosystems' to test drug functionScientists take on a major bottleneck in drug development.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Study finds 'hidden harvest' in world's inland fisheriesA new study published today in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences says we are dramatically underestimating the role inland fisheries play in global food security.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Synthetic receptors can rewire cell functions and minimize side-effectsEPFL and US scientists have developed a computational method that can design synthetic cell receptors that can be used to isolate how drugs work in a cell, minimize or even altogether prevent side effects and redirect their action.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

UMass Amherst biologists identify a genetic mechanism in the evolution of novel traitsThere has long been a debate among biologists over whether the evolution of new traits requires new genes to evolve or whether they can arise simply from the recruitment of existing genetic pathways, says developmental biologist Craig Albertson at UMass Amherst. Now his lab reports evidence that novel traits can come from expanding gene-regulatory modules that have always existed in an organism.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Marine reserves are vital — but under pressureA massive study of nearly 1,800 tropical coral reefs around the world has found that marine reserves near heavily populated areas struggle to do their job — but are a vast improvement over having no protection at all.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Microglia protect sensory cells needed for vision after retinal detachmentA research team at Massachusetts Eye and Ear has shown that microglia, the primary immune cells of the brain and retina, play a protective role in response to retinal detachment.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

Are smarter animals bigger troublemakers?A new paper examines whether smarter animals might be better at learning to live in cities — but, at the same time, also may come into more conflict with humans.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

Virtual reality headsets significantly reduce children's fear of needlesAlmost anyone can relate to being afraid of needles and injections. A pilot study is the first to use a 3D virtual reality headset to test this tool as a distraction method in a pediatric setting. Children were given the choice of a roller coaster ride, helicopter ride or a hot-air balloon ride. Results show that anticipated versus actual pain and fear were reduced in 94.1 percent of the pediatric
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

Childhood sibling dynamics may predict differences in college educationThe effects of sibling relationships may go beyond childhood bickering and bonding, according to researchers who found that these relationships may predict similarities and differences in siblings' education later in life.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

Pesticide-free way to combat mosquitoes and West NileResearchers may have discovered a new, pesticide-free way to limit mosquito populations in some area and reduce the spread of the West Nile virus.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

Explosive volcanoes spawned mysterious Martian rock formationExplosive volcanic eruptions that shot jets of hot ash, rock and gas skyward are the likely source of a mysterious Martian rock formation, a new study finds. The new finding could add to scientists' understanding of Mars's interior and its past potential for habitability, according to the study's authors.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

Silence is golden when it comes to how our brains workIt's the comparative silence between the firing spikes of neurons that tells what they are really up to, scientists report.
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Science | The Guardian

'Space force': Trump orders new branch of US militaryTrump claims plan will keep US ahead in space race, prompting fears over militarisation of space Donald Trump said on Monday he would direct the Pentagon to create a “space force” as a new branch of the US military to shore up American dominance in space. Trump claimed that the plan will ensure that America, which plans a return to the moon and a mission to Mars, stays ahead of China and Russia i
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The Atlantic

Migration Is Down, Crime Is Low, but Merkel Is in TroubleAsylum applications are sharply down in Germany. So is crime. Yet Chancellor Angela Merkel’s hold on power is again under threat over the issue of migration—one which has upended politics throughout Europe and across the Atlantic. On Friday, Merkel clashed with her political allies in the Christian Social Union in Bavaria, and appeared on the verge of losing her coalition and potentially stepping
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NYT > Science

Trilobites: Sea Stars Started Dissolving. What Helped Some of Them Survive?Researchers say they’ve detected genetic differences that might help explain why some of these creatures on California’s coast survived a deadly plague.
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NYT > Science

Was Autism a Nazi Invention?In “Asperger’s Children,” Edith Sheffer explores the roots of autism, first diagnosed in Nazi Germany as the regime engaged in a program of child euthanasia.
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NYT > Science

It Was Supposed to Be an Unbiased Study of Drinking. They Wanted to Call It ‘Cheers.’Buried in a new N.I.H. report are disturbing examples of coordination between scientists and the alcohol industry on a study that could have changed America’s drinking habits.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

The force is strong within us: New study explores cell mechanics at workAn ASU research team focused on measuring the stiffness, bending, twisting and viscosity of individual cells — focused on a breast cancer cell line — using all of the most state-of-the art technology at their disposal. How both healthy and cancerous cells respond to this environment — and whether there are key differences that can be identified for future diagnostic applications was of keen int
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Study finds 'hidden harvest' in world's inland fisheriesA new study published today in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences says we are dramatically underestimating the role inland fisheries play in global food security.
13h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Biologists identify a genetic mechanism in the evolution of novel traitsThere has long been a debate among biologists over whether the evolution of new traits requires new genes to evolve or whether they can arise simply from the recruitment of existing genetic pathways, says developmental biologist Craig Albertson at the University of Massachusetts Amherst.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Chemists design 'miniecosystems' to test drug functionScripps Research scientists have solved a major problem in chemistry and drug development by using droplet-sized 'miniecosystems' to quickly see if a molecule can function as a potential therapeutic.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Synthetic receptors can rewire cell functions and minimize side-effectsOne of the challenges of modern pharmacology is specificity. Despite therapeutic effects, drugs can often have side effects. The biological basis for this has to do with the proteins and receptors that the drug targets and binds to. Many target receptors are connected to more than one biochemical pathway or more commonly, the drug is not specific enough to exclusively bind one particular receptor.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Marine reserves are vital—but under pressureA massive study of nearly 1800 tropical coral reefs around the world has found that marine reserves near heavily populated areas struggle to do their job—but are a vast improvement over having no protection at all.
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Scientific American Content: Global

Controversial Alcohol Study Cancelled by U.S. Health AgencyAn investigation by the U.S. National Institutes of Health finds missteps that put the industry-funded project’s credibility in doubt — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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The Atlantic

The Supreme Court Would Prefer Not ToA 1960s novelty toy consisted of a small plastic box with a jointed lid and a switch. When the switch was turned on, a hand emerged, grabbed the switch and turned it off, then retreated back into the box. Big fun. The Supreme Court’s October 2017 term, which will lurch to its end next week, has, to a surprising extent, come to seem like that novelty toy. Though last October promised a crop of blo
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The Atlantic

Partisan Gerrymandering Stands, for NowWhat anti-gerrymandering activists across the country wanted was a landmark ruling from the Supreme Court, determining once and for all that political maps could be held unconstitutional for partisan bias, and dictating how. What those activists got, however, was a punt. “The case is remanded to the District Court to give the plaintiffs an opportunity to prove concrete and particularized injuries
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Popular Science

Yes, a tax bill can—and likely will—spoil America’s most pristine wildlife refugeEnvironment The public can submit comment until June 19. The Arctic National Wildlife Refuge is the largest swath of undeveloped land in the United States—a pristine frontier boasting unparalleled biodiversity and natural…
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

Scientists find potential disease-fighting 'warheads' hidden in bacteriaA new study suggests scientists could build better drugs by learning from bacteria-derived molecules called thiocarboxylic acids.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

Great white sharks dive deep into warm-water whirlpools in the AtlanticTracking data from two great white sharks reveals that they spend more time deep inside warm-water eddies, suggesting that's where they like to feed.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

Observation of anisotropic magneto-Peltier effectFor the first time in the world, scientists have observed an anisotropic magneto-Peltier effect — a thermoelectric conversion phenomenon in which simple redirection of the flow of a charge current in a magnetic material induces heating and cooling.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

Flexible blue vertical micro LEDsA research team developed a crucial source technology that will advance the commercialization of micro LEDs. Engineers have developed a low cost production technology for thin-film blue flexible vertical micro LEDs (f-VLEDs).
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

'Be personal and appreciative': Research shows effective responses to online feedbackAs more patients leave feedback on online platforms including social media, new research shows how health and social care organizations can offer value in their response.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

First birth cohort to receive HPV vaccine: The vaccine worksGirls in the first birth cohort to be offered and receive the HPV vaccine showed a lower degree of dysplasia which may eventually lead to cervical cancer than a birth cohort from 1983.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

New way to determine protection of Men B vaccine against different strainsA new approach is being assessed by Public Health England for its potential to routinely test all meningococcal disease cases.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

Life in the fast lane: Ecologist says dispersal ability linked to plants' life cyclesEcologists say seed dispersal is an essential, yet overlooked, process of plant demography, but it's difficult to empirically observe, measure and assess its full influence.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

Genomic testing for the causes of stillbirth should be considered for routine useThe use of whole genome and whole exome sequencing can uncover the cause of unexplained stillbirth and neonatal deaths. In addition to providing an explanation to bereaved parents, it can help the understand whether a recurrence in future pregnancies is likely.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

New technique provides accurate dating of ancient skeletonsA new way of dating skeletons by using mutations in DNA associated with geography will avoid the difficulties and inaccuracies sometimes associated with existing dating methods. The technique will enable a better understanding of historical developments from the beginning of the Neolithic period, through the Bronze and Iron Ages.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

Gut microbes may contribute to depression and anxiety in obesityLike everyone, people with type 2 diabetes and obesity suffer from depression and anxiety, but even more so. Researchers now have demonstrated a surprising potential contributor to these negative feelings — and that is the bacteria in the gut or gut microbiome, as it is known.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Scientists isolate protein data from the tiniest of caches — single human cellsScientists have captured the most information yet about proteins within a single human cell, giving scientists one of their clearest looks yet at the molecular happenings inside a human cell. The team detected on average more than 650 proteins in each cell — many times more than conventional techniques capture from single cells.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

360 degrees, 180 seconds: Technique speeds analysis of crop traitsResearchers from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln have devised a new LiDAR-based approach for automatically and efficiently gathering data about a plant's phenotype: the physical traits that emerge from its genetic code. The approach could allow researchers to better compare crops that have been bred or genetically engineered for specific traits – ideally those that help produce more food.
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The Atlantic

Are Children Being Kept in 'Cages' at the Border?It’s hard to think of something more tangible than a child incarcerated in a tent city or a former Walmart building—and yet as the story of families being separated at the border mushrooms, one of the central questions has been a semantic one: whether the migrant children are being kept in cages. Here’s what no one disputes: When the children are separated from their parents, they’re sent to faci
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New on MIT Technology Review

Keeping America first in quantum computing means avoiding these five big mistakesPotential pitfalls include putting the military in charge and spraying too much money around.
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cognitive science

Enhancing the Ecological Validity of fMRI Memory Research Using Virtual Realitysubmitted by /u/aliendude93k [link] [comments]
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Purdue phoneme project creates new haptic communications futureCommunication could step beyond reading a cellular phone screen with a new technique by Purdue College of Engineering researchers to learn and read messages through a person's sense of touch.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Two new creatures discovered from dawn of animal lifeUCR researchers have discovered two new Ediacaran era fossil animals. Their names honor President Barack Obama and Sir David Attenborough.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Carbon nanotube optics provide optical-based quantum cryptography and quantum computingResearchers at Los Alamos and partners in France and Germany are exploring the enhanced potential of carbon nanotubes as single-photon emitters for quantum information processing. Their analysis of progress in the field is published in this week's edition of the journal Nature Materials.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Deaths from cardiac arrest are misclassified, overestimatedForty percent of deaths attributed to cardiac arrest are not sudden or unexpected, and nearly half of the remainder are not arrhythmic — the only situation in which CPR and defibrillators are effective — according to an analysis by researchers at UC San Francisco and the City and County of San Francisco Office of the Chief Medical Examiner.
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New on MIT Technology Review

Donald Trump has ordered the Pentagon to create the US Space ForceDonald Trump Space Force
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Big Think

Study shows the detrimental long-term effects of helicopter parentingLet kids be kids. Watching over your children's every move is a bad idea, and the long-term effects of helicopter-parenting are far worse than thought. Read More
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Popular Science

The President just called for a new branch of the military called the Space ForceDonald Trump Space ForceSpace It's not clear how this will fit into existing exploration efforts. Today President Trump announced he was directing the Department of Defense to create a military “Space Force.”…
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Scientific American Content: Global

Asteroid Battle: Tech Entrepreneur Doubles Down on Critique of NASA MissionNathan Myhrvold argues that the scientific approach of the landmark NEOWISE space-rock mission is deeply flawed — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Live Science

This Towering Plant Is Invading the US, and It’s Causing Serious SunburnsHow does a plant cause sunburn?
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Live Science

In Photos: Intricately Carved Stone Balls Puzzle Archaeologists3D models of intricately carved stone balls, which are considered some of the most enigmatic objects from Europe's late Stone Age, are now online.
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New Scientist – News

HIV prevention drugs could delay diagnosis if you get infectedHIV tests may be giving incorrect results for people taking PrEP to avoid getting the virus, meaning they may be HIV positive for months without knowing
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Science | The Guardian

Archaeologists in Cambridgeshire find graves of two men with legs chopped offExclusive: men believed to be from late Roman or early Saxon period were found in pit being used as rubbish dump The graves of two men whose legs were chopped off at the knees and placed carefully by their shoulders before burial have been discovered by archaeologists working on a huge linear site in advance of roadworks in Cambridgeshire. The best scenario the archaeologists can hope for is that
14h
The Atlantic

The End of Civil RightsThe fires on the streets of Ferguson, Missouri, had barely stopped burning when the Department of Justice released an extraordinary report on the city’s police department. In the findings of the 2015 investigation of the Ferguson Police Department, the DOJ’s Civil Rights Division detailed how a municipality had built its social contract on a slow-rolling racist heist. Activists hoped that the Fer
14h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Adolescent binge drinking disrupts mouse memory in adulthoodExcessive drinking during adolescence may interfere with the activity of brain cells needed for sustaining short term memory, according to new research in adolescent male mice published in JNeurosci. The study could help scientists better understand the development of alcohol use disorders in adults.
14h
The Atlantic

Mirror, Shoulder, Signal and the Struggle of Changing GearsThe Danish writer Dorthe Nors likes to subject her characters to “the battle that you experience on the brink of something new,” she explained in a 2014 interview in The Paris Review . For the 40-something protagonist of her latest novel—the first to appear in English, and a finalist for the Man Booker International Prize last year—the battle is learning to drive. Shifting gears is a challenge fo
15h
Big Think

Early birds are less likely to develop depression, new study findsA new study on more than 32,000 nurses explores how chronotype may influence women's chances of developing depression. Read More
15h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Scientists use neutrons to take a deeper look at record boost in thermoelectric efficiencyNeutron facilities at Oak Ridge National Laboratory are aiding scientists in research to boost the power and efficiency of thermoelectric materials. These performance increases could enable more cost-effective and practical uses for thermoelectrics, with wider industry adoption, to improve fuel economy in vehicles, make power plants more efficient, and advance body heat–powered technologies for wa
15h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Five things to know about VW's 'dieselgate' scandalVolkswagen's emissions cheating scandal, for which Audi chief executive Rupert Stadler was arrested on Monday, has had repercussions for the car industry around the world.
15h
Scientific American Content: Global

Sally Ride's Legacy Lives On35 years after making history as the first American woman in space, the late astronaut’s story is still inspiring young women to embrace science and engineering — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
15h
New on MIT Technology Review

Facebook used AI for an eye-opening trick
15h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Trump wants to dominate space, Moon and Mars (Update)President Donald Trump boasted Monday of the US commercial space industry's deep wallet and enterprising spirit, and vowed US dominance in exploration of the Moon and Mars, as well as any future space race.
15h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

YouTube extends music streaming service to EuropeYouTube extended its music streaming service to Europe Monday a month after it launched in North America and parts of Asia.
15h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

UK debit cards overtake cash for first time: studyCash is no longer king in Britain—and has been usurped by debit cards, thanks to rapid changes in technology and consumer behaviour, new research showed Monday.
15h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Peek at the future: Electric plane cruises skies over NorwayNorway's transportation minister and the head of the Scandinavian country's airport operator took off Monday for a short flight … aboard a Slovenian-made two-seater electric airplane.
15h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Unique immune-focused AI model creates largest library of inter-cellular communicationsNew data published in Nature Biotechnology, represents the largest ever analysis of immune cell signaling research, mapping more than 3,000 previously unlisted cellular interactions, and yielding the first ever immune-centric modular classification of diseases. These data serve to rewrite the reference book on immune-focused inter-cellular communications and disease relationships.
15h
The Atlantic

The American Who Says He’s Been the Target of Five Air StrikesHe was born Darrell Lamont Phelps. He grew up in Mount Vernon, New York, moved down to the city, tried his hand at comedy, and later converted to Islam, adopting the name of Bilal Abdul Kareem. Now 46 years old, he lives in the Middle East, where he has a wife, five children, and a controversial freelance-journalism career focused on Islamist fighters in the Syrian civil war. In his estimation, t
15h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Study identifies challenges and opportunities to safeguard one of Mesoamerica's last forest blocksThe Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS) and Yale University have created a plan to preserve one of the last intact forest strongholds for the jaguar and other iconic species in Central America: the Moskitia Forest Corridor.
15h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Unique immune-focused AI model creates largest library of inter-cellular communicationsNew data published in Nature Biotech, represents the largest ever analysis of immune cell signaling research, mapping more than 3,000 previously unlisted cellular interactions, and yielding the first ever immune-centric modular classification of diseases. These data serve to rewrite the reference book on immune-focused inter-cellular communications and disease relationships.New Data Published by N
15h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Targeting the engine room of the cancer cellResearchers at Columbia University Irving Medical Center (CUIMC) have developed a highly innovative computational framework that can support personalized cancer treatment by matching individual tumors with the drugs or drug combinations that are most likely to kill them.
15h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Plant-based diets improve cardiometabolic risk factors in diabetes patientsNew review in the journal Clinical Nutrition finds that plant-based diets improve cardiometabolic risk factors in those with type 2 diabetes.
15h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Addgene keeps flow of CRISPR plasmids fast and affordableAs a key global enabler of the revolutionary genome editing technology known as CRISPR, the nonprofit organization Addgene has made available more than 100,000 CRISPR plasmids (circular DNA fragments) to 3,400 laboratories worldwide. The origins, goals, global reach, and success of Addgene in democratizing CRISPR, which his dramatically changing medical research, are described in a Perspective art
15h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Researchers capture best ever evidence of rare black holeESA's XMM-Newton observatory has discovered the best-ever candidate for a very rare and elusive type of cosmic phenomenon: a medium-weight black hole in the process of tearing apart and feasting on a nearby star.
15h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

NASA finds Tropical Depression Carlotta's strong storms over Mexico, Eastern PacificTropical Depression Carlotta continues to hug the coast of southwestern Mexico and drop heavy rainfall. NASA's Aqua satellite provided a look at cloud top temperatures through infrared imagery to find out where the most powerful parts of Tropical Depression Carlotta were located.
15h

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