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Nyheder2018juni19

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The Atlantic

The Outrage Over Family Separation Is Exactly What Stephen Miller WantsWhen the news stories began to surface last month of sobbing young migrant children being forcibly removed from their parents at the border, many close White House watchers instantly suspected Stephen Miller was behind it. Though he keeps a relatively low profile compared to the cast of camera-muggers and Twitter warriors in President Donald Trump’s orbit, the 32-year-old speechwriter and senior
4h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Controlling magnetic spin with electric fieldsEPFL physicists have found a way to reverse electron spins using electric fields for the first time, paving the way for programmable spintronics technologies.
2h
Ingeniøren

Kognitiv teknologi kårer Spanien som fodboldmestreTakket være machine learning og 100.000 simulationer af verdensmesterskabet tør tyske forskere godt sætte nogle af deres sparepenge på udfaldet af alle kampene på grønsværen.
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LATEST

Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Teachers view immigrant, minority parents as less involved in their children's educationTeachers view parental involvement differently for different students, believing that mothers and fathers of immigrant or minority students are less involved in their children's education, according to research from the University of Pennsylvania and New York University published in Social Science Research. Such perspectives hamper the academic trajectory of those students, leading to lower grades
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

When photons spice up the energy levels of quantum particlesQuantum particles behave in mysterious ways. They are governed by laws of physics designed to reflect what is happening at smaller scales through quantum mechanics. Quantum state properties are generally very different to those of classical states. However, particles finding themselves in a coherent state are in a kind of quantum state which behaves like a classical state. Since their introduction
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Climate action can limit Asia's growing water shortagesEven "modest" action to limit climate change could help prevent the most extreme water-shortage scenarios facing Asia by the year 2050, according to a new study led by MIT researchers.
6min
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Study: Tax havens and limited regulation increase risk for shareholdersSome large, publicly held companies are incorporated in tax haven countries, ostensibly to increase value for shareholders. But new research from North Carolina State University and the University of Arkansas finds that many such companies—particularly those headquartered in countries with limited shareholder protections—are more likely to engage in practices that benefit executives at the cost of
6min
New on MIT Technology Review

Muscular dystrophy could be the next disease to get whacked by gene therapy[no content]
6min
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Ocean's heat cycle shows that atmospheric carbon may be headed elsewhereA Princeton University-led study in the journal Nature Geosciences examined the global carbon cycle and suggests that scientists may have misgauged how carbon is distributed around the world, particularly between the northern and southern hemispheres. The results could change projections of how, when and where the currently massive levels of atmospheric carbon will result in environmental changes
9min
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Genes associated with infantile forms of schizophrenia identifiedScientists at the Montreal Neurological Institute and Hospital (The Neuro) and McGill University have identified novel genes associated with a specific form of schizophrenia.
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Science | The Guardian

Urgent need to prepare for manmade virus attacks, says US government reportReport warns that swift progress in our ability to manufacture viruses is making us vulnerable to biological attacks The rapid rise of synthetic biology, a futuristic field of science that seeks to master the machinery of life, has raised the risk of a new generation of bioweapons, according a major US report into the state of the art. Advances in the area mean that scientists now have the capabi
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

360 degrees, 180 seconds: Technique speeds analysis of crop traitsResearchers have devised a new LiDAR-based approach for automatically and efficiently gathering data about a plant's phenotype: the physical traits that emerge from its genetic code. The approach could allow researchers to better compare crops that have been bred or genetically engineered for specific traits – ideally those that help produce more food.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Scientists reveal how gut microbes 'recover' after antibiotic treatmentNew insight on how antibiotics affect the gut microbiome—the community of microbes that live inside us—has been published in the journal eLife.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Futuristic data storage based on controlling the interactions between nanodots magnetic 'mood' twirlsThe magnetisation of nanometric square material is not fixed. It moves around in a helical motion. This is caused by the electron whose degree of freedom, referred to as spin, which follows a precession motion centred on the middle of a square nano-magnet. To study the magnetisation of such material, physicists can rely on two-dimensional arrays of square nanomagnets.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Drones could be used to detect dangerous 'butterfly' landmines in post-conflict regionsDrones could be used to detect dangerous "butterfly" landmines in remote regions of post-conflict countries, according to new research from Binghamton University, State University at New York.
12min
Scientific American Content: Global

Gravitational "Echoes" Could Reveal Colliding WormholesA unique signature in gravitational wave observations could show that hypothetical tunnels through space-time actually exist — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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New on MIT Technology Review

Congress to Trump: Don’t go soft on China’s ZTEZTE Senate Trump US[no content]
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

The fingerprints of harmful molecules could be detected noninvasively via black silicon.A group of physicists experimentally confirmed that molecular fingerprints of toxic, explosive, polluting and other dangerous substances could be reliably detected and identified by surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) using black silicon (b-Si) substrate.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Nuclear power shutdowns won't spike power pricesDespite economic woes that could shutter two of Pennsylvania's nuclear power plants — which generate 6 percent of the state's power — power prices will remain steady due to low natural gas prices, according to Seth Blumsack, associate professor of energy policy and economics, Penn State.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Mild problem-solving task improves brain function after a concussion, new study suggestsA mild problem-solving task improves brain functioning after a concussion, according to a new study conducted at Southern Methodist University, Dallas. Currently there are many questions about rehabilitation and treatment options, with absolute rest often the go-to treatment. But the new study suggests that a simple cognitive task as early as four days after a brain injury activates the region tha
23min
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

NASA examined Tropical Cyclone Bud's rains in the US southwestBeneficial rainfall from hurricane Bud's remnants has spread into the US Desert Southwest after making landfall in western Mexico and moving north. NASA added up the rainfall using satellite data to provide a full picture of the rainfall.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Liberals do drink more lattes, but maybe not for the reasons you thinkDo liberals really drink more lattes? According to a new study from the Annenberg School for Communication at the University of Pennsylvania, liberals in America are indeed more likely than conservatives to drink lattes. The researchers believe this is because liberals are more open to globalization and products associated with other countries.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Researchers gain insight into infant handling by young bonobosUniversity of Oregon anthropologist Klaree Boose followed her intuition about her observations of bonobos at a US zoo. She now theorizes that young females of the endangered ape species prepare for motherhood and form social bonds by helping mothers take care of infants.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Success of blood test for autism affirmedOne year after researchers published their work on a physiological test for autism, a follow-up study confirms its exceptional success in assessing whether a child is on the autism spectrum.
23min
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Army plans to license nanogalvanic aluminum powder discoveryThe U.S. Army Research Laboratory plans to license its discovery of a nanogalvanic aluminum powder for hydrogen generation.
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Viden

Fyldt med gode argumenter og masser af viden: Ny computer kan slå os i debatterIBM har præsenteret en computer, der kan debattere komplekse emner på overbevisende maner.
25min
Live Science

7 Plants You Can Eat If You're Stranded in the WildOn the off chance that you find yourself stranded in the wilderness on your next camping trip or hike, don’t panic — there are plenty of things to eat once you’ve run out of trail mix.
25min
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Rush hour metro crowd governed by people's eagerness to go homeEver found yourself crushed in a metro station at rush hour? The mathematician Carlo Bianca and physicist Caterina Mogno, both from the engineering research lab ECAM-EPMI in Cergy-Pontoise, France, have developed a new model to study the movement of crowds exiting a metro station. In a recent study published in EPJ Plus, they have for the first time employed models typically used to study gases co
30min
New Scientist – News

Special cells could let you control your diabetes with coffeeA cup of coffee after a meal might be enough to keep diabetes under control, thanks to caffeine-triggered cells that have been engineered to release insulin
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New Scientist – News

IBM’s debating robot argues it out with human for first timeIBM's AI has taken on humans in a public debate. Though it made some very robot-like errors, the AI won one debate and lost the other, based on a crowd vote
33min
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Terra satellite sees Tropical Depression Carlotta weakening over MexicoNASA Terra satellite captured an image of Tropical Depression Carlotta as it was making landfall in southwestern Mexico where it weakened into a remnant low pressure area.
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The Atlantic

Trump Says Immigrants Are Trying to ‘Infest’ GermanyOne of the paradoxes of modern-day American politics is that white identity politics can be a potent political platform, as long as you don’t call it that. Policies with racist effects are often popular; explicit racism is verboten. Thus Donald Trump can win the presidency while running, as my colleague Adam Serwer documented , on a program of discrimination, but when Corey Stewart, a Republican
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

NASA's Terra satellite sees Tropical Depression Carlotta weakening over MexicoNASA Terra satellite captured an image of Tropical Depression Carlotta as it was making landfall in southwestern Mexico where it weakened into a remnant low pressure area.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

An unlikely marriage among oxidesSebastian Siol is looking for new materials with unusual properties that were so far not accessible in experiments. To do this, he connects partners who don't really fit together: One partner forces the other into a state that would not be possible without the unlikely pairing. Siol also makes sure that the crystal bonds last in everyday life. Only then are they interesting for industrial applicat
45min
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Tackling bullying could help reduce depression in autistic teensTeenagers with difficulties in social communication, including autism, have higher rates of depressive symptoms, especially if they are being bullied.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Could this material enable autonomous vehicles to come to market sooner?A new material developed by scientists at the USC Viterbi School of Engineering and the University of Wisconsin along with researchers from Air Force Research Laboratories, University of Missouri, and J.A. Woollam Co. Inc, might show promise for such infrared detection applications as autonomous vehicles, emergency services and even manufacturing.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

New model for gauging ice sheet movement may improve sea-level-rise predictionsUniversity of Kansas researchers discovered friction — or 'basal drag' — between ice sheets and the hard bed underneath has no influence on how fast glaciers flow.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Study shows approach can help English learners improve at math word problemsUniversity of Kansas education professors have published a study showing that a comprehension-based strategy can help English learners improve their math word-problem solving abilities. The approach boosts reading comprehension and problem solving as well.
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Latest Headlines | Science News

On Jupiter, lightning flashes from storms swirling at the polesAfter almost 40 years, scientists have discovered that Jupiter has lightning that is similar to lightning on Earth — it just happens in a different place.
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Scientific American Content: Global

Trump Orders "Space Force," Signs Space-Traffic PolicyThe President’s proposal could create a new branch of the armed services meant to assure “American dominance” in space — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Live Science

This Speedy Genetic Tool Might Soon Let Scientists Create New Genes 'Overnight'Two graduate students developed a method for synthesizing DNA that could make it much faster, cheaper and easier for biologists to create synthetic DNA sequences.
50min
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Rush hour metro crowd governed by people's eagerness to go homeEver feared rush hours in a metro station? Carlo Bianca and Caterina Mogno from the French engineering research lab ECAM-EPMI have developed a new model to study the movement of crowds exiting a metro station. In a recent study published in EPJ Plus, they have for the first time employed models typically used to observe the interactions of gas molecules to assess the consequences of interactions b
1h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Teachers view immigrant, minority parents as less involved in their children's educationA study from the University of Pennsylvania revealed that such perspectives from educators can end up hampering the academic trajectory of the students involved.
1h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

When photons spice up the energy levels of quantum particlesFor the first time, a team of mathematical physicists from Togo and Benin, call upon supersymmetry to explain the behaviour of particles that have received a photon and are subjected to particular potential energies known as shape-invariant potentials. In a paper published in EPJD, Komi Sodoga and colleagues affiliated with both the University of Lomé, Togo, and the University of Abomey-Calavi, in
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Montana burial site answers questions about early humansScientists have shown that at the Anzick site in Montana – the only known Clovis burial site – the skeletal remains of a young child and the antler and stone artifacts found there were buried at the same time, raising new questions about the early inhabitants of North America, says a Texas A&M University professor involved in the research.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Futuristic data storageThe development of high-density data storage devices requires the highest possible density of elements in an array made up of individual nanomagnets. The closer they are together, the greater the magnetic interactions between them. In a paper published in EPJ B, P. Kim from the Kirensky Institute of Physics, associated with the Russian Academy of Sciences, Russia, and colleagues have devised a new
1h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Drones could be used to detect dangerous 'butterfly' landmines in post-conflict regionsDrones could be used to detect dangerous 'butterfly' landmines in remote regions of post-conflict countries, according to new research from Binghamton University, State University at New York.
1h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Deep Brain Stimulation showing promise for patients with mild Alzheimer's disease over 65An age group analysis of data from the ADvance trial has shown that participants over the age of 65 continue to derive the most benefit from Deep Brain Stimulation of the fornix (DBS-f), as observed in the data from the phase 2 findings (12 – 24 months) of the Phase II trial.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Creating a new composite fuel for new-generation fast reactorsJoint research efforts of a team of scientists at Lobachevsky University of Nizhny Novgorod (UNN) comprising chemists, physicists and engineers are currently focused on solving the problems of handling plutonium and minor actinides (MA) accumulated over many years. To this end, they are studying composite ceramics-ceramics (Cer-Cer) and ceramics-metal (CerMet) materials on the basis of mineral-lik
1h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Study: Climate action can limit Asia's growing water shortagesEven 'modest' action to limit climate change could help prevent the most extreme water-shortage scenarios facing Asia by the year 2050, according to a new study led by MIT researchers.
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Live Science

How a Python Ate a Woman Whole and Left Hardly a Trace of the Fierce AttackNews of a pickup-truck-size reticulated python killing and swallowing a woman whole in central Indonesia, eating even her clothes, has made headlines around the world. But how often do these snakes eat people?
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Viden

Besat af Counter-Strike? Få en diagnose på din gaming-afhængighedWHO har sat afhængighed af computerspil på listen over verdens diagnoser. Spilforsker er kritisk.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Light pollution a reason for insect declineClimate change, pesticides and land use changes alone cannot fully explain the decline in insect populations in Germany. Scientists from the Leibniz-Institute of Freshwater Ecology and Inland Fisheries (IGB) have now discovered that regions that have experienced a sharp decline in flying insects also have high levels of light pollution. Many studies already suggest that artificial light at night h
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

New study shows how a single binge drinking episode affects gene that regulates sleepNew findings from the University of Missouri School of Medicine explain how a single episode of binge drinking can affect the gene that regulates sleep, leading to sleep disruption in mice. The finding may shed light on how sleep problems can contribute to alcoholism in humans.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Kids grasp that you get what you pay forFrom a young age, children have a nuanced understanding of fairness.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Scientists reveal how gut microbes 'recover' after antibiotic treatmentNew insight on how antibiotics affect the gut microbiome — the community of microbes that live inside us — has been published in the journal eLife.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Are you sticking to your diet? Scientists may be able to tell from a blood sampleAn analysis of small molecules called 'metabolites' in a blood sample may be used to determine whether a person is following a prescribed diet, scientists at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health have shown.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Study: Tax havens and limited regulation increase risk for shareholdersSome large, publicly held companies are incorporated in tax haven countries, ostensibly to increase value for shareholders. But new research finds that many such companies — particularly those headquartered in countries with limited shareholder protections — are more likely to engage in practices that benefit executives at the cost of their shareholders.
1h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Cell type and environment influence protein turnover in the brainScientists have revealed that protein molecules in the brain are broken down and replaced at different rates, depending on where in the brain they are.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Mayo Clinic discovers gene mutations linked to pancreatic cancerSix genes contain mutations that may be passed down in families, substantially increasing a person's risk for pancreatic cancer. That's according to Mayo Clinic research published in the June 19 edition of the JAMA. However, because researchers found these genetic mutations in patients with no family history of pancreatic cancer, they are recommending genetic testing for all pancreatic cancer pati
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Monash research provides insights into why older people respond poorly to cancer treatmentResearchers may have found a group of immune cells that increase in number with age but are too worn out to fight diseases. The accumulation of dysfunctional virtual memory T cells, in addition to the loss of true naïve T cells, may explain why older people have reduced immune responses to cancer and vaccines, why cancer immunotherapy is less successful in the elderly, and may help to tailor cance
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Sodium- and potassium-based batteries hold promise for cheap energy storageResearchers at the Georgia Institute of Technology have found new evidence suggesting that batteries based on sodium and potassium hold promise as a potential alternative to lithium-based batteries.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Article examines guideline for glycemic control in adults with type 2 diabetesA JAMA Clinical Guidelines Synopsis article examines the American College of Physicians' (ACP's) 2018 guidance statement on HbA1c goals in nonpregnant adults with type 2 diabetes, including the possible effect of a recommended HbA1c level between 7 percent and 8 percent for most patients with type 2 diabetes, a range that is higher than other guidelines.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Having stress-related disorder associated with increased risk of developing autoimmune diseaseStress-related disorders brought on by traumatic or stressful life events were associated with increased risk of developing an autoimmune disease.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Studies examine differences in demographics, urban vs. rural rates of obesity in USTwo studies used national survey data to examine differences in rates of obesity and severe obesity among children, teens and adults based on demographic factors (including sex, age, race, education) and whether people lived in urban or rural areas of the United States.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

WSU researchers see human immune response in the fruit flyWashington State University researchers have seen how both humans and fruit flies deploy a protein that a plays a critical role in their immune responses to invading bacteria. The discovery gives scientists evolutionary insight and a model organism with which to explore ways to boost the human immune system and create infection-fighting medicines.
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Ingeniøren

Fodboldkampe forhaler forskning med radioaktive stofferRussiske biokemikere og Crispr-forskere er frustrerede over, at de under verdensmesterskaberne i fodbold er tvunget til at annullere forsøg på grund af et omfattende forbud imod salg og transport af farlige kemiske eller biologiske stoffer.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Verizon to end location data sales to brokersVerizon is pledging to stop sales through intermediaries of data that pinpoints the location of mobile phones to outside companies, the Associated Press has learned.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Museum collection reveals distribution of Carolina parakeet 100 years after its extinctionWhile 2018 marks the centenary of the death of the last captive Carolina parakeet—North America's only native parrot, a team of researchers have shed new light on the previously known geographical range of the species, which was officially declared extinct in 1920.
1h
Scientific American Content: Global

World Has Only 20 Years to Meet Ambitious 1.5C Warming ThresholdBut a new calculation suggests that timeframe provides more room than thought to rein in carbon emissions — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Science : NPR

Report For Defense Department Ranks Top Threats From 'Synthetic Biology'A committee of experts examined about a dozen different synthetic biology technologies that could be potentially misused. For each, they considered how likely it was to be usable as a weapon. (Image credit: Dr. Hans Gelderblom/Visuals Unlimited/Getty Images)
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The Atlantic

The Making of a Moral CrisisChildren as young as 2 have been pulled from their parents and moved to facilities that are, as Laura Bush put it , “eerily reminiscent” of the Japanese American internment camps of World War II. Families are being separated. Kids are sleeping under foil blankets inside cages. The main reason that this story has received so much attention is simple: It is awful. Of course most of the American vot
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Scientists see human immune response in the fruit flyWashington State University researchers have seen how both humans and fruit flies deploy a protein that a plays a critical role in their immune responses to invading bacteria. The discovery gives scientists evolutionary insight and a model organism with which to explore ways to boost the human immune system and create infection-fighting medicines.
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Science | The Guardian

Could coffee replace insulin injections for diabetics?Scientists have developed an implant which releases diabetes medication when it senses caffeine in the blood The days of the insulin pen may be numbered. According to researchers in Switzerland, the future of diabetes treatment will not be a shot in the arm after a meal, but a shot of espresso instead. The scientists hope to transform the lives of diabetics who need regular jabs with an implant t
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New on MIT Technology Review

US military wants to know what synthetic-biology weapons could look likeRe-created viruses, toxic bacteria top new ranking of risks.
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TED Talks Daily (SD video)

Technology that knows what you're feeling | Poppy CrumWhat happens when technology knows more about us than we do? Poppy Crum studies how we express emotions — and she suggests the end of the poker face is near, as new tech makes it easy to see the signals that give away how we're feeling. In a talk and demo, she shows how "empathetic technology" can read physical signals like body temperature and the chemical composition of our breath to inform on
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Hypnosis may help reduce fear of cancer treatment in childrenHypnosis could help to reduce the fear of medical procedures in children and young people with cancer.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Mysterious IceCube event may be caused by a tau neutrinoTheoretical physicists from Maint and Stanford calculate the origin of a high-energy particle track captured by the IceCube Neutrino Observatory.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Responses of the tropical atmospheric circulation to climate changeAn international team describes the climate change-induced responses of the tropical atmospheric circulation and their impacts on the hydrological cycle. It also depicts the theoretically predicted changes and diagnose physical mechanisms for observational and model-projected trends in large-scale and regional climate.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Is the sky the limit?What stops a species adapting to an ever-wider range of conditions, continuously expanding its geographic range? The biomathematician Jitka Polechová, an Elise Richter Fellow at the University of Vienna, has published a paper in PLoS Biology which explains the formation of species' range margins. The theory shows that just two compound parameters, important for both ecology and evolution of specie
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

World's first intra-operative MRI-guided robot for bilateral stereotactic neurosurgeryA HKU Mechanical Engineering team led by Dr. Kwok Ka-wai recently designed the first neurosurgical robotic system capable of performing bilateral stereotactic neurosurgery inside a magnetic resonance imaging ('MRI') scanner. The team also conducted pre-clinical validation of the system with CUHK neurosurgeons, Dr Danny Chan Tat-ming and Professor Poon Wai-sang. This innovative technological breakt
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Futurity.org

Give up on ‘finding your passion’ and try this insteadThe advice to “find your passion” might undermine how interests actually develop, according to new research. In a series of laboratory studies, researchers examined beliefs that may lead people to succeed or fail at developing their interests. Mantras like “find your passion” carry hidden implications, the researchers say. They imply that once an interest resonates, pursuing it will be easy. But,
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Lion conservation research can be bolstered by input from a wide-range of professionalsThe conservation of lions, while maintaining the well-being of people that live around them, is a complex problem that should be addressed by a wide-range of professionals working together, suggests a new review published in the open-access journal Frontiers in Ecology and Evolution. Rather than focusing solely on human-lion interaction, factors such as the environment, wild prey and domesticated
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Researchers use machine learning to search science dataAs scientific datasets increase in both size and complexity, the ability to label, filter and search this deluge of information has become a laborious, time-consuming and sometimes impossible task, without the help of automated tools.
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New Scientist – News

Alien preppers could hoard stars to survive in a doomed universeDark energy is accelerating the expansion of the universe, meaning eventually all galaxies will be inaccessible, but aliens could be working on a solution right now
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Ingeniøren

Her er systemet, der giver besked, hvis dækkene er slidt nedEn sensor ved udkørslen til et parkeringshus i Oslo scanner dækkene automatisk og tilsender bilisterne en tilstandsrapport, hvis de ønsker det.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Warnings to texting pedestrians may not eliminate risks, but they can helpHuman factors researchers at the University of Iowa have been looking at ways to harness technology to prevent fatalities among pedestrians who are struck by vehicles while texting. In their latest study in Human Factors, "Harnessing Vehicle-to-Pedestrian (V2P) Communication Technology: Sending Traffic Warnings to Texting Pedestrians," Pooya Rahimian and colleagues simulated a busy roadway to dete
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

World's first known manta ray nursery discoveredA graduate student at Scripps Institution of Oceanography at the University of California San Diego and colleagues from NOAA's Office of National Marine Sanctuaries have discovered the world's first known manta ray nursery.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Diagnostics of genetic cardiac diseases using stem cell-derived cardiomyocytesA new study by Professors Martti Juhola and Katriina Aalto-Setälä of the University of Tampere in Finland demonstrates that with the use of artificial intelligence and machine learning, it is possible not only to accurately sort sick cardiac cell cultures from healthy ones, but also to differentiate between genetic cardiac diseases.
2h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Lion conservation research can be bolstered by input from a wide-range of professionalsThe conservation of lions, while also maintaining the well-being of people that live around them, is a complex problem that should be addressed by a wide-range of professionals working together. Rather than focusing solely on human-lion interaction, other factors such as the environment, wild prey and domesticated livestock need to be considered to get a full evaluation of the problem. This approa
2h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Museum collection reveals distribution of Carolina parakeet 100 years after its extinctionWhile 2018 marks the centenary of the death of the last captive Carolina parakeet — North America's only native parrot, a team of researchers have shed new light on the previously known geographical range of the species. Their data paper, published in the open access Biodiversity Data Journal, is the most comprehensive occurrence dataset for the species ever produced.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Mechanism controlling multiple sclerosis risk identifiedWhile the DNA sequence remains the same throughout a person's life, the expression of the encoded genes may change with time and contribute to disease development in genetically predisposed individuals. Researchers at Karolinska Institutet have now discovered a new mechanism of a major risk gene for multiple sclerosis (MS) that triggers disease through epigenetic regulation. They also found a prot
2h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Spintronics: Controlling magnetic spin with electric fieldsEPFL physicists have found a way to reverse electron spins using electric fields for the first time, paving the way for programmable spintronics technologies.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Bees love blue fluorescent light, and not just any wavelength will doResearchers at Oregon State University have learned that a specific wavelength range of blue fluorescent light set bees abuzz.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Deep-sea marine sponges may hold key to antibiotic drug resistanceDrug resistance to antibiotics is on the rise and there is an urgent need to develop new drugs to treat infectious diseases that are a major threat to human health globally. Researchers from Florida Atlantic University's Harbor Branch Oceanographic Institute may have a solution to this problem using sea sponges collected from the ocean depths.
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BBC News – Science & Environment

Rover test: What's it like to ride a rocket to Mars?European engineers shake their Mars rover to see that it can survive the violence of a rocket launch.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Road rules for gene transfer are written in DNAA new discovery suggests that bacteria's ability to transfer genes, like those associated with antibiotic resistance, are governed by a previously unknown set of rules that are written in the DNA of the recipient.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Nanoscale 'crack-junctions' can speed up DNA sequencingThe time-consuming, expensive process of sequencing DNA molecules – a technology used to identify, diagnose and possibly find cures for diseases – could become a whole lot faster and cheaper as a result of a new nanofabrication method that takes advantage of nano-sized air-gaps, or nanocracks, in electrically conductive materials.
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The Atlantic

Photos: A Tent City for Detained Children in TexasTwenty miles outside of El Paso, Texas, along the U.S.-Mexico border, sits the Tornillo Port of Entry , a U.S. Customs and Border Protection facility which was selected by the Trump administration to be the first site for temporary housing for the overflow of unaccompanied minors and the children of detained migrant parents, under the new “zero-tolerance” policy. A quickly erected tent city insid
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Nano crystals impact stem cell fate during bone formationScientists from the University of Freiburg and the University of Basel identified a master regulator for bone regeneration. Prasad Shastri, Professor of Biofunctional Macromolecular Chemistry at the Institute for Macromolecular Chemistry and Professor of Cell Signalling Environments in the Cluster of Excellence BIOSS Centre for Biological Signalling Studies at the University of Freiburg led the st
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Futurity.org

BPA seems to alter communication for generationsMouse pups whose grandparents experienced BPA exposure show different vocalization patterns, which can affect the amount of parental care they receive, a new study shows. Past studies showed negative effects on offspring when when BPA-exposed mothers and fathers provide care. Scientists believe the new findings with grandparents could have important relevance to humans. “Rodent pups use vocalizat
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Game-changing finding pushes 3D-printing to the molecular limitNew University of Nottingham research proves that advanced materials containing molecules that switch states in response to environmental stimuli such as light can be fabricated using 3D printing.The study findings have the potential to vastly increase the functional capabilities of 3D-printed devices for industries such as electronics, healthcare and quantum computing.
2h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

D for danger! Speech sounds convey emotionsIndividual speech sounds — phonemes — are statistically associated with negative or positive emotions in several languages, new research published in the journal Cognition by Bocconi Professor Zachary Estes, his Warwick colleague James Adelman and Bocconi student Martina Cossu shows. These associations help us quickly avoid dangers, because the phoneme-emotion associations are strongest at the b
2h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

The first experimental discovery in the world of the propagation of plasma turbulenceThe research group of NIFS together with collaborators in the United States applied the 'heat pulse modulation method' in the magnetic island produced intentionally in the tokamak 'Doublet III-D.' Temperature gradient inherent in the magnetically confined plasma causes turbulence while there is no turbulence in the magnetic island because of the absence of the gradient. That the turbulence propaga
2h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Physicists solve the mystery of vanishing particles in grapheneA team of scientists explained the paradoxical phenomenon of the mutual annihilation of particles and antiparticles in graphene. The theoretical justification for this process was until recently one of the most complex riddles of solid-state physics. This discovery makes the idea of creating graphene lasers relevant.
2h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Mysterious IceCube event may be caused by a tau neutrinoEight years ago, the IceCube detector, a research center located at the South Pole to detect neutrinos emanating from the cosmos, was commissioned. Three years later, it began to register the first momentous results. The detection of high-energy neutrinos by IceCube made viable completely new options for explaining how our universe works.
2h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Moving toward fast internet on the planeStreaming films and music or accessing business data in the cloud when flying to the holiday destination or to business meetings – this is the dream of passengers as well as airlines. So far, however, fast internet on the plane has failed due to the lacking capacity of data connections between the plane and the ground. For the first time, a team of researchers at Karlsruhe Institute of Technology
2h
Ingeniøren

VIDEO: Første tur med elektrisk fly i NorgeNorge går efter el gøre indenrigsflyvning eldreven. Men de fly, der skal tages i brug i 2020’erne, bliver hybrider.
2h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Schools must equip students to navigate alt-right websites that push fake newsMore than 60 percent of America's middle and high school students rely on alt-right internet sites as credible sources for their research papers. The students are using alt-right sites to write papers on topics that range from free speech and the Second Amendment to citizenship, immigration and the Holocaust.
2h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

The public health benefits of adding offshore wind to the gridNew plans to build two commercial offshore wind farms near the Massachusetts and Rhode Island coasts have sparked a lot of discussion about the vast potential of this previously untapped source of electricity.
2h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

How setting a schedule can make you less productiveIt can seem like there's never enough time – not enough for sleep and not enough for play, not enough for cooking and not enough for exercise.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Scientists participate in month-long experiment to study indoor air pollutionScientists can tell us a lot about outdoor air pollution and its effects on human health and the environment, but less is known about the air we breathe in homes, offices and other indoor spaces.
2h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Grown-ups with supportive robotsRobots will be a necessity with the ageing population needing assistance to improve their mobility. On the long road to help seniors maintain their life quality, EU researchers have developed a unique prototype robot.
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Futurity.org

Big data may only offer ‘fuzzy snapshot’ of healthWhen it comes to understanding what makes people tick—and get sick—medical science has long assumed that the bigger the sample of human subjects, the better. New research suggests this big-data approach may be wildly off the mark. That’s largely because emotions, behavior, and physiology vary markedly from one person to the next and one moment to the next. So averaging out data from a large group
2h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Everything big data claims to know about you could be wrongWhen it comes to understanding what makes people tick — and get sick — medical science has long assumed that the bigger the sample of human subjects, the better. But new research led by the University of California, Berkeley, suggests this big-data approach may be wildly off the mark.
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Dagens Medicin

Ny direktør for Børsen Associated MediaDagens Medicin og de øvrige aktiviteter under Børsen Associated Media (BAM) får ny administrerende direktør.
2h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Insights into group living shed light on ageing mechanismsA new study on how Cape ground squirrels live in the wild is revealing the effects of social stress on ageing. The research has potential to help understand ageing mechanisms in humans as well.
2h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Australia must embrace transformation for a sustainable futureLast Friday, the Australian government released its first report on our progress towards meeting the United Nations' Sustainable Development Goals by 2030.
2h
Scientific American Content: Global

How Does the Quantum World Cross Over?The universe according to quantum mechanics is strange and probabilistic, but our everyday reality seems nailed down. New experiments aim to probe where—and why—one realm passes into the… — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
2h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Proposed NSW logging laws value timber over environmental protectionNew South Wales is revamping its logging laws for the first time in two decades, drafting regulations that will govern more than two million hectares of public native forest.
2h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Grindr profile pics are all about the hookupHow do we present ourselves on our dating profiles? When we select our photos, what do our selections say about us? What do they say about the app or service we are using?
2h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Physicists solve the mystery of vanishing particles in grapheneResearchers from the Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology and Tohoku University (Japan) have explained the puzzling phenomenon of particle-antiparticle annihilation in graphene, recognized by specialists as Auger recombination. Although persistently observed in experiments, it was for a long time thought to be prohibited by the fundamental physical laws of energy and momentum conservation. T
2h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

I am not the sum of my personal dataThe Cambridge Analytica scandal scandalises everyone… and at the same time, no one. Similarly, Mark Zuckerberg's solemn yet insolent testimony before the US congress is both reassuring and troubling.
3h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

In Paris, the risk of flooding is never far awayIn 1910, Paris was subject to a historic flood that is still remembered, and it's far from a unique event. In France, the risk of flooding is the number-one natural hazard, affecting one in four people, or 17 million residents. Rising river levels are a natural phenomenon that can lead – depending on their intensity (height, speed), duration and geographical reach – to overflow flooding (where the
3h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

From Cape Town to São Paulo, large cities are facing water shortagesWill South Africa's second largest city dry up on August 19 of this year? By launching an official countdown, Cape Town City Council wished to highlight the impending cuts to domestic water supply for its more than 3.7 million inhabitants.
3h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Image: A dexterous laboratory in spaceHave you ever considered yourself capable of manipulating gravity? When you grip an object, you are doing just that.
3h
Scientific American Content: Global

Barriers between Realities: Irrational Thinking and the Quantum-Classical Divide— Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
3h
Popular Science

How I reconstruct the faces of early human ancestorsScience Sculptor Élisabeth Daynès works in paleo-reconstruction, bringing the faces of long-dead human ancestors back to life. Sculptor Élisabeth Daynès works in paleo-reconstruction, bringing the faces of long-dead human ancestors back to life. A.K.A. Science eye for the Neanderthal guy.
3h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Low vitamin D levels associated with scarring lung diseaseReviewing medical information gathered on more than 6,000 adults over a 10-year period, Johns Hopkins researchers have found that lower than normal blood levels of vitamin D were linked to increased risk of early signs of interstitial lung disease (ILD).
3h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Toothpaste and hand wash are causing antibiotic resistanceA common ingredient in toothpaste and hand wash could be contributing to antibiotic resistance, according to University of Queensland research.A study led by Dr Jianhua Guo from UQ's Advanced Water Management Centre focused on triclosan, a compound used in more than 2000 personal care products.
3h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Methadone and buprenorphine reduce risk of death after opioid overdoseA National Institutes of Health-funded study found that treatment of opioid use disorder with either methadone or buprenorphine following a nonfatal opioid overdose is associated with significant reductions in opioid related mortality. The research, published today in the Annals of Internal Medicine, was co-funded by the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) and the National Center for Advancing
3h
Dagens Medicin

Nedtrapning af biologisk behandling kan gavne både økonomi og patienterMuligheden for at nedtrappe leddegigtpatienter i biologisk behandling bør vinde indpas nationalt, mener formand for tværregionalt forum for ibrugtagning af medicin, Hanne Rolighed Christensen.
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Dagens Medicin

Rigshospitalet har fundet ny direktør til NeurocentretOverlæge Jannick Brennum tiltræder 1. juli som direktør i Neurocentret på Rigshospitalet.
3h
Big Think

Why plant protein is superior to animal proteinChoosing a diet is hard for many people. But it doesn't have to be. Read More
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Futurity.org

Amino acid puts dates on Clovis remains and artifactsBoth the skeletal remains of a young child and the antler and stone artifacts at the Anzick site in Montana—the only known Clovis burial site—date back 12,725 to 12,900 years. The work raises new questions about the early inhabitants of North America. The main focus of the research centered on properly dating the Anzick site, which gets its name from the family who own the land. Construction work
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Science | The Guardian

What is cannabis oil and how does it work?Your questions about the medical use of cannabis oil answered Cannabis oils are extracts from cannabis plants. Unprocessed, they contain the same 100 or so active ingredients as the plants, but the balance of compounds depends on the specific plants the oil comes from. The two main active substances in cannabis plants are cannabidiol, or CBD, and delta-9 tetrahydrocannabinol, or THC. Oil extracte
3h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

'Smart stent' detects narrowing of arteriesUBC researchers have developed a type of 'smart stent' that monitors even subtle changes in the flow of blood through the artery, detecting the narrowing in its earliest stages and making early diagnosis and treatment possible.
3h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Deep-sea marine sponges may hold key to antibiotic drug resistanceFAU's Harbor Branch houses more than 1,000 strains of actinobacteria, one of the most prolific microbial groups for the production of natural products. Derived from sea sponges and other macro-organisms, several strains were identified for their potent antifungal activity, for anti-MRSA activity, and for both antifungal and antibacterial activities. A key finding was the identification of a strain
3h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Bad habits that lead to cancer, chronic disease corrected by simple lifestyle interventionFour of the most common bad habits — too much screen time, too little exercise and high fat and low fruit and vegetable intake — can lead to heart disease and cancer, but a simple intervention using mobile health tools and coaching normalized these behaviors, and improvements were sustained.
3h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Good primary lowers ED use for those with intellectual and developmental disabilitiesOne in three adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD) visit the emergency department annually but effective primary care could reduce these numbers, suggests a new study led by St. Michael's Hospital and the Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences (ICES).
3h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Cells can trap viruses in protein cage to stop their spread, study revealsResearchers at The Francis Crick Institute in London have discovered that cells can trap viruses in a protein cage to stop them from spreading to neighboring cells. The study, which will be published June 19 in the Journal of Cell Biology, reveals that the vaccinia virus can escape this trap by recruiting additional proteins to dismantle the cage and propel the virus out of the cell.
3h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Breast cancer could be prevented by targeting epigenetic proteins, study suggestsResearchers at the Princess Margaret Cancer Centre in Toronto have discovered that epigenetic proteins promote the proliferation of mammary gland stem cells in response to the sex hormone progesterone. The study, which will be published June 19 in the Journal of Cell Biology, suggests that inhibiting these proteins with drugs could prevent the development of breast cancer in women at high risk of
3h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Warnings to texting pedestrians may not eliminate risks, but they can helpImproving pedestrian safety even in the presence of warnings remains a challenge.
3h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Scripps graduate student discovers world's first known manta ray nurseryA graduate student at Scripps Institution of Oceanography at the University of California San Diego and colleagues from NOAA's Office of National Marine Sanctuaries have discovered the world's first known manta ray nursery.
3h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Blue gene regulation helps plants respond properly to lightResearchers at the RIKEN Center for Sustainable Resource Science (CSRS) have discovered a process through which gene expression in plants is regulated by light. Published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences USA, the study found that blue light triggers a shift in which portion of a gene is ultimately expressed.
3h
Ingeniøren

3D-print vil flytte rundt på partikler med lyd og lysForskere fra DTU vil fordele partikler i en væske med vibrationer og lys.
3h
Futurity.org

1 anxiety and depression therapy could be really bad for leftiesA new model of emotion in the brain shows that a current treatment for the most common mental health problems could be ineffective or even detrimental to about 50 percent of the population—left-handers. Since the 1970s, hundreds of studies have suggested that each hemisphere of the brain is home to a specific type of emotion. The neural system for emotions linked to approaching and engaging with
3h
cognitive science

How Does Language Shape the Way We Think? Cognitive Scientist Lera Boroditsky Explainssubmitted by /u/burtzev [link] [comments]
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Latest Headlines | Science News

Madagascar’s predators are probably vulnerable to toxic toadsThe Asian common toad, an invasive species in Madagascar, produces a toxin in its skin that’s probably toxic to most of the island’s predators.
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Dagens Medicin

Professorer modtager stor pris for deres bidrag til lægevidenskabelig forskningProfessor og overlæge Anne Tybjærg-Hansen og professor Kristian Helin modtager i år KFJ-prisen for deres bidrag til forskningen inden for bl.a. hjertekarsygdomme og kræft.
3h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Cells can trap viruses in protein cage to stop their spread, study revealsResearchers at The Francis Crick Institute in London have discovered that cells can trap viruses in a protein cage to stop them from spreading to neighboring cells. The study, which will be published June 19 in the Journal of Cell Biology, reveals that the vaccinia virus can escape this trap by recruiting additional proteins to dismantle the cage and propel the virus out of the cell.
3h
Feed: All Latest

Iran’s Telegram Ban Has Impacted All Corners of the CountryIn Iran, secure messaging app Telegram effectively is the internet. The government has blocked it since April.
3h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Bees love blue fluorescent light, and not just any wavelength will doResearchers have learned that a specific wavelength range of blue fluorescent light set bees abuzz.
3h
Discovery (uploads) on YouTube

Doc and the Street Beast | Street Outlaws: Crash CourseOnce the King, now barely in reach of his old kingdom atop the 405 List thanks to the dirty List Shakeup. Feast your eyes on the chaos that is the Doc and the Street Beast. Full episodes streaming now on DiscoveryGO: https://discovery.com/tv-shows/street-outlaws/ Binge watch all Street Outlaws: Crash Course now! https://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/street-outlaws-crash-course/ Subscribe to Discover
3h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

New testing method suggests baby Anzick-1 was same age as surrounding Clovis artifactsA team of researchers from the University of Oxford, Texas A&M University and Stafford Research LLC has found evidence bolstering the theory that the skeletal remains of an infant unearthed in Montana are those of the only known Clovis burial. In their paper published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the group describes their testing methods and what they found.
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The Scientist RSS

Image of the Day: Multiple ChoicePhotosynthesis can happen in more than one way.
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The Scientist RSS

Pancreatic Cell Size Negatively Relates to Lifespan in MammalsSpecies with larger pancreatic cells tend to have shorter lives, according to a study.
4h
The Atlantic

How Did the GOP Find Itself Separating Families?In March of 2017, then-Homeland Security Secretary John Kelly spoke wit h CNN’s Wolf Blitzer about a possible new initiative separating children from their parents at the border. “I would do almost anything to deter the people from Central America from getting on this very, very dangerous network that brings them up through Mexico to the United States … The vast majority of the young women are se
4h
Popular Science

This giant demon plant gives you burns if you touch it, and it's spreadingHealth The name "giant hogweed" should give you a clue as to how horrible this plant is. This horrifying nightmare of a plant mostly grows in the northeastern part of the U.S., but recently it’s been spreading. News spread this week that the a patch of giant…
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Dana Foundation

Gladwell Podcasts Examine Brain IssuesAs neuroscience enthusiasts already know, there are countless podcasts out there about brain-related topics. To inform my Cerebrum podcasts , I’ve sampled many of them to pick up tips on how to explain research that can often be complex and difficult to understand. One such podcast that does a masterful job of explaining both chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) and false memory is Revisionist
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Scientific American Content: Global

How Identity, Not Issues, Explains the Partisan DivideNew research has disturbing implications — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
4h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

A new way to measure the light-warping properties of hyperbolic metamaterialsManipulating light in a variety of ways—shrinking its wavelength and allowing it to travel freely in one direction while stopping it cold in another—hyperbolic metamaterials have wide application in optical communications and as nanoparticle sensors. But some of the same optical properties that make these metamaterials so appealing make them frustratingly difficult to evaluate.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Tongues give clues to snake sex secretsFor the Spotted Brown Snake (or dugite), size doesn't matter when it comes to sex.
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The Atlantic

Shops Aren’t for Shopping AnymoreIn the year 2000 at Easton Town Center in Columbus, Ohio, Abercrombie and Fitch opened the first location of its new shop, Hollister, and set Midwestern high schoolers like myself California dreaming. Designed with a “Dude” or a “Betty” in mind, Hollister had a West Coast–meets– That ’70s Show vibe. There was a dimly lit “lounge” where you could sink into vintage velvet chairs with funky rope fri
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The Atlantic

What J.D. Salinger Understood About Chance EncountersBy Heart is a series in which authors share and discuss their all-time favorite passages in literature. See entries from Colum McCann, George Saunders, Emma Donoghue, Michael Chabon, and more. doug mclean When I was in high school, I sent J.D. Salinger a letter, enclosing a blue dollar bill from the 1930s I’d gotten back as change from the diner. The additional offering, I hoped, might help me se
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The Atlantic

Letter: Trump’s North Korea Statements Are an ‘Acknowledgement of Reality’Trump Got Nearly Nothing From Kim Jong Un The leaders’ meeting last week may have been the beginning of something big, Uri Friedman argued . But it started off small. I found your article very well written, but I can’t agree with some of the conclusions and the basic premise of the article. You wrote: But Trump then proceeded to, rhetorically at least, make one concession after another to North K
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Feed: All Latest

Analysis: Zillow Shows Rising Seas Threaten Over 300,000 HomesClimate change study predicts ‘staggering impact’ of swelling oceans on coastal communities within next 30 years.
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Feed: All Latest

ShareWaste's Compost-Finding App Makes an Internet Community GrowShareWaste uses digital mapping to connect individuals with leftover food scraps to nearby neighbors who have a composting system.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

On the expansion threshold of a species' rangeWhat stops a species adapting to an ever-wider range of conditions, continuously expanding its geographic range? The biomathematician Jitka Polechová, an Elise Richter Fellow at the University of Vienna, has published a paper in PLoS Biology which explains the formation of species' range margins. The theory shows that just two compound parameters, important for both ecology and evolution of specie
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Scientists demonstrate coherent coupling between a quantum dot and a donor atom in siliconQuantum computers could tackle problems that current supercomputers can't. Quantum computers rely on quantum bits, or "qubits." Current computers perform millions of calculations, one after the other. Qubit coupling allows quantum computers to perform them all at the same time. Qubits could store the data that add up to bank accounts and medical records. In an unusual twist, qubits represent data
4h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

New tech uses isomeric beams to study how and where the galaxy makes one of its most common elementsOur galaxy produces and destroys the element aluminum-26 in the process of making magnesium-26. As it forms, it can be momentarily "stuck" in a mirror-image (isomeric) state. Getting stuck lets other reactions occur that destroy the element. Measuring how much aluminum-26 the galaxy makes is tough because scientists have to know how much is destroyed. For the first time, scientists produced an alu
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

First 3-D analysis of the stone tools of African hunter-gatherersScientists from the CENIEH have published a paper on the use of stones to process baobab by the Hadza people, whose results suggest that the wear identified might be detectable in the archaeological record
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

SmokeBot – a robot serving rescue unitsSmokeBot is a robot developed to assist fire services and rescue units in deployments under critical conditions. It collects data about accident and disasters situations with extremely limited visibility, effectively improving the safety of rescue operations.
4h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Method could help boost large scale production of grapheneThe measure by which any conductor is judged is how easily, and speedily, electrons can move through it. On this point, graphene is one of the most promising materials for a breathtaking array of applications. However, its ultra-high electron mobility is reduced when you synthesize larger sheets of the material. Now this barrier to industrial production of graphene may be broken as a result of new
4h
New Scientist – News

Time to end the cruel ban on using cannabis therapy for epilepsyIll-conceived and outdated drug laws in the UK are denying children with severe epilepsy vital medicinal cannabis treatments. That must change, says David Nutt
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Futurity.org

Sleeve system lets users ‘read’ messages through touchResearchers have created a method for haptic communications that lets users receive messages through the skin on the forearm by learning to interpret signals such as a buzzing sensation. Hong Tan, founder and director of the Haptic Interface Research Laboratory at Purdue University, says that, while the research lends itself to use by hearing-impaired and visually impaired users, the method could
5h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Marine natural parks in Catalonia, affected by climate changePopulations of gorgonian and other benthic organisms in the Natural Park of Cap de Creus and Natural Park in Montgrí experienced a high mortality rate during 2017 due the proliferation of filament algae in the Catalan coast during 2017. This phenomenon could be the result of the high temperatures in spring and summer and the high concentration of nutrients in the environment, according to a report
5h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Accelerated reactions in condensed bio-matter?HITS researcher Dr. Kashif Sadiq explores ribonucleoprotein granules, a condensed form of bio-matter found inside cells. He investigates whether the rate of enzymatic reactions in these membrane-less granules is accelerated. If true, this would lead to new insights in how cells regulate their biochemistry and may shed light on the origins of life on Earth. The project is funded by the Volkswagen S
5h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Tiny jumping roundworm undergoes unusual sexual developmentNematodes may be among the simplest animals, but scientists can't get enough of the microscopic roundworms. They have mapped the entire genome ofC. elegans, the "lab rat" of nematodes, and have characterized nearly every aspect of its biology, with a particular focus on neurons. For years, it was assumed other nematodes' neurons were similar to those ofC. elegans, until researchers at the Universi
5h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Turning around urban declineWe've all seen the photos of Detroit when it was at its lowest point after the 2008 recession: street after street of vacant lots and abandoned homes—a city in visible decline. It might have been the poster child for urban blight, but those problems are more common than one would think in poor neighborhoods in many medium-sized cities around the country.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Water processing—new method eliminates hormonesHormones and other micropollutants adversely affect health when residues enter the body via drinking water. Widely applicable solutions for removal, however, are still lacking. Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) has now developed a method by which hormones are eliminated from wastewater rapidly and with a high energy efficiency. The results are reported in the Journal of Hazardous Materials.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Weighing the planet's biological matterOur planet is teeming with life: Even in the most extreme places, like the scorching deserts and the pitch-black ocean depths, living organisms can be found. But just how much living matter is on this planet? A new study now makes the first global estimates of the total weight, or biomass, of life on Earth. The research is a collaboration between Yinon Bar-On and Ron Milo of the Weizmann Institute
5h
Live Science

Why You Should Eat Popcorn with ChopsticksIt happens fast. You crack open a bottle of your favorite drink and put it to your lips. The delicious flavor is nearly overwhelming. But a minute later, you’re barely noticing the taste as you drink it.
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Live Science

Could Marijuana Use Make Injuries More Painful?Marijuana use may affect how much pain people feel and the dose of painkillers they need following traumatic injury.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Iron-rich minerals on Mars could contain life's fatty acidsA little stream in the south of England could guide the way towards finding evidence for ancient life on Mars, in the form of fatty acids preserved in an iron-rich mineral called goethite.
5h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Exotic invasions can drive native species extinctLatest research from the University of Southampton has revealed the impact of exotic species upon native wildlife, which could potentially lead to native plant species extinctions within their natural habitats.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Using mobile money in Afghanistan, researchers develop product that helps people to saveBillions of people worldwide, particularly those in developing countries, face challenges saving money. They may already hold a device that can assist them in the palms of their hands: their cellphone.
5h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Gender parity in tech transferThe theme of International Women's Day this past March may have been "gender parity," but at the rate things are going, women won't file as many patents as men in a single calendar year until nearly 2100, according to the Institute for Women's Policy Research.
5h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

How to decorate like a VikingGreen is the colour of hope, white symbolises surrender or innocence, and black binds the living to the dead.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

X-ray fluorescence mapping to measure tumour penetration by a novel anticancer agentA new anticancer agent developed by the University of Warwick has been studied using microfocus synchrotron X-ray fluorescence (SXRF) at I18 at Diamond Light Source. As described in the Journal of Inorganic Biochemistry, researchers saw that the drug penetrated ovarian cancer cell spheroids and the distribution of zinc and calcium was perturbed.
5h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Twenty-five per cent of seafood sold in Metro Vancouver is mislabelledA quarter of the seafood tested from Metro Vancouver grocery stores, restaurants and sushi bars is not what you think it is.
5h
Ingeniøren

Microgrids modstår naturkatastrofer langt bedreAmerikanske erfaringer fra de mange orkaner i 2017 viser, at microgrids kan minimere skaderne.
5h
Ingeniøren

Igen igen: Rigsrevisionen kritiserer manglende søkort i GrønlandGeodatastyrelsen vil indføre ét fælles produktionssystem til produktion af søkort, så nye medarbejdere hurtigere opnår ekspertise. For i dag er manglen på kort til fare for mennesker og miljø.
5h
The Atlantic

Religious Leaders Condemn Family Separations—but Not Necessarily TrumpOver the past three weeks, conservative religious leaders have been steadily intensifying their condemnation of President Donald Trump’s “zero-tolerance” policy on the U.S.-Mexico border, including the forced separation of children and parents who illegally migrated to the United States. Groups including the Southern Baptist Convention and the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops released
5h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Love inspires new species nameLove is in the air at The University of Queensland with entomologist Dr Errol Hassan naming a new species of wasp after his wife to celebrate more than 50 years of marriage.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Blue gene regulation helps plants respond properly to lightResearchers at the RIKEN Center for Sustainable Resource Science (CSRS) have discovered a process through which gene expression in plants is regulated by light. Published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences USA, the study found that blue light triggers a shift in which portion of a gene is ultimately expressed.
5h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Best ever at splitting light, new material could improve LEDs, solar cells, optical sensorsPlace a chunk of the clear mineral Iceland spar on top of an image and suddenly you'll see double, thanks to a phenomenon called double refraction—a result of a quality of the crystal material called optical anisotropy. Beyond just a nifty trick, materials with optical anisotropy are vital for a variety of devices such as lasers, liquid-crystal displays, lens filters and microscopes.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Sister species of birds reveal clues to how biodiversity evolvesExtensive new datasets about the world's birds are helping to solve the riddle of how life on Earth diversified.
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Feed: All Latest

How Oprah’s Network Finally Found Its VoiceIn the new golden age of TV, success is all about finding a passionate niche audience. With "Love Is___" and a slate of scripted shows, OWN has cracked that code.
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Feed: All Latest

Space Really Does Need Traffic CopsTrump’s new space directive spreads out the responsibility for Earth’s congested orbital thoroughfares.
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Feed: All Latest

Apple Deals: Sale on Watch, iPad, Mac, and More Happening NowApple Watch, iPad Pro, Macs, Beats, and more are on sale this week!
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Collecting bacterial communities from puddles helps solve ecosystem riddlesResearchers have used puddle ecosystems to start to unravel the roles different bacteria play in complex communities.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Alexa, send up breakfast: Amazon launches Echo for hotelsAlexa has a new job: hotel concierge.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Game-changing finding pushes 3-D printing to the molecular limitNew University of Nottingham research proves that advanced materials containing molecules that switch states in response to environmental stimuli such as light can be fabricated using 3-D printing.
5h
Live Science

Deer Survived for Years After Bone Grew Over This Arrow in Its RibsA hard-core deer not only survived being shot with an arrow; it also grew bone tissue around the bolt in its rib cage.
5h
Live Science

Men's Testes Have a 'Microbiome.' Could It Affect Fertility?Men's testes were once thought to be free of bacteria, but a small new study suggests that microbes may live naturally in this part of the male reproductive system.
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Live Science

Can You Really Get a Vasectomy Reversed?In a dramatic reality TV finale, actor and wrestler John Cena said that he's willing to reverse his vasectomy so he and his girlfriend can have children, but can it be done?
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Scientific American Content: Global

To Prevent Alzheimer's, We Must Study Differences between the SexesThe disease can present, progress, and respond to treatments differently in men and women — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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New on MIT Technology Review

It’s time to rein in the data baronsFacebook, Amazon, and Google will resist attempts to restrain their market power. But for the sake of our collective prosperity and our personal privacy, it’s a fight we can’t afford to lose.
5h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

How dragonfly larvae could inspire more effective artificial heart valvesThe way dragonfly larvae control the water jets they use to move and breathe could have a range of engineering and medical applications, according to new research.
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Feed: All Latest

A Merger That Would Have Made Crypto Investing Easier FailsThe deal would have united a a risk-averse financial trust in Kentucky with a venture-backed startup in Silicon Valley.
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Feed: All Latest

The Man Who Saw the Dangers of Cambridge Analytica Years AgoResearchers at the Psychometrics Centre knew better than most how Facebook data can be manipulated, but investigations and suspensions have halted their work.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Groundbreaking discoveries could create superior alloys with many applicationsMany current and future technologies require alloys that can withstand high temperatures without corroding. Now, researchers at Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden, have hailed a major breakthrough in understanding how alloys behave at high temperatures, pointing the way to significant improvements in many technologies. The results are published in the highly ranked journal Nature Materials.
6h
Scientific American Content: Global

Jaguars Thrive in Lightly Logged ForestsResponsibly harvested areas may serve as habitat corridors for the big cats — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Study of bonobos finds that day care pays off for the babysittersDrawn to a behavior she didn't understand, a UO researcher watching bonobos in a zoo has revealed how young female bonobos prepare for motherhood.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Palm oil: The carbon cost of deforestationA recent study by EPFL and the Swiss Federal Institute for Forest, Snow and Landscape Research (WSL) shows that intensive farming of palm oil has a major impact on the environment. Both short- and long-term solutions exist, however. The article, which was published on June 19 in Nature Communications, analyzed the carbon costs and benefits of converting rainforests into oil palm plantations.
6h
cognitive science

‘Be personal and appreciative’ – research highlights effective responses to online patient feedback. More patients are sharing views on social media and online forums, so how can health and social care organisations offer value in their response?submitted by /u/parrishthethought [link] [comments]
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cognitive science

What Teens Really Say About Sex, Drugs And Sadnesssubmitted by /u/parrishthethought [link] [comments]
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

New blood test reveals susceptibility to costly disease in dairy cowsOregon State University researchers have developed a blood test to identify dairy cows are susceptible to bovine clinical mastitis.
6h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Nano-scale 'vibrational wave' research could transform the field of materials physicsNew UK research studying the vibrational properties of matter, or phonons, at the nanoscale, could bring transformational advances in the design and development of a new generation of advanced materials, such as thermoelectrics, among many others.
6h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

How to track and trace a protein: Nanosensors monitor intracellular deliveriesResearchers at the University of Basel's Biozentrum have developed a method for tracing the movement of proteins within the cell. They tagged proteins with tiny nanosensors, so-called nanobodies, which enable the scientists to live track and trace the proteins' pathway through the cell. The method described in the current issue of PNAS is suitable for a wide range of research purposes.
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Ingeniøren

Big data sender folk med den rigtige elevatorFinske Kone opsamler data om brugen af deres elevatorer på 180.000 elevatorer og rulletrapper. De anvendes til forebyggende vedligehold og ‘trafikstyring’.
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Ingeniøren

Trump taber kampen for kulKul og atomkraft mister terræn i USA’s energiforsyning. I et lækket notat foreslås det, at de amerikanske energiselskaber skal tvinges til at købe el fra kulkraftværker. Også i Europa er kul på vej ud.
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Ingeniøren

Algoritmer erstatter Amazons indkøbereAmazon erstatter i stigende grad mennesker med skræddersyede algoritmer, når de skal bestille varer.
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Ingeniøren

WHO klassificerer afhængighed af computerspil som sygdomVerdenssundhedsorganisationen klassificerer nu afhængighed af computerspil som en rigtig sygdom.
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The Atlantic

From ‘I Alone Can Fix It’ to ‘Change the Laws!’Nearly two years ago, on July 21, 2016, Donald Trump stood at a lectern in Cleveland and made a solemn vow. “Nobody knows the system better than me, which is why I alone can fix it,” he said. To his critics, this line was chilling , even authoritarian, defying the democratic nature of the American system. But to many of Trump’s supporters, it was a heartening moment—a sign that he would not allow
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The Atlantic

Poor Americans Really Are in DespairThe decline in life expectancy and health among less-educated white Americans is often attributed to “deaths of despair”—those from conditions like substance abuse and suicide. (Suicides, the CDC reported last week, are up nearly 30 percent since 1999.) The cause is often attributed to “cumulative distress,” as Princeton’s Anne Case and Angus Deaton have speculated . “The failure of life to turn
6h
Feed: All Latest

Ellen Pao on the Perverse Incentives Helping Incels Thrive at Tech CompaniesIncels are well-represented at tech companies, raising challenging ethical issues for leaders who want to create a safe workspace.
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Feed: All Latest

The Olympic Destroyer Hackers May Have Returned For MoreA recent spate of attacks against biological and chemical threat protection agencies bears the hallmarks of the group hacker group behind Olympic Destroyer.
6h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Hunting molecules to find new planetsIt's impossible to obtain direct images of exoplanets as they are masked by the high luminous intensity of their stars. However, astronomers led by UNIGE propose detecting molecules present in the exoplanet's atmosphere in order to make it visible, provided that these same molecules are absent from its star. The researchers have developed a device that is sensitive to the selected molecules, rende
7h
Dagens Medicin

Aalborg ansætter ny ledende overlæge til Klinisk FarmakologiBirgitte Klindt Poulsen tiltræder 1. september som ledende overlæge i Klinisk Farmakologisk Enhed på Aalborg Universitetshospital.
7h
cognitive science

Researchers develop a faster cheaper better way of synthesizing DNAsubmitted by /u/davyeminy [link] [comments]
7h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Team develops flexible blue vertical micro LEDsA KAIST research team has developed a technology that will advance the commercialization of micro LEDs. Professor Keon Jae Lee from the Department of Materials Science and Engineering and his team have developed a low-cost production technology for thin-film blue flexible vertical micro LEDs (f-VLEDs).
7h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Observation of anisotropic magneto-Peltier effectNIMS and Tohoku University have jointly observed an anisotropic magneto-Peltier effect—a thermoelectric conversion phenomenon in which simple redirection of a charge current in a magnetic material induces heating and cooling. Thermoelectric heating and cooling are conventionally achieved by applying a charge current to a junction between two different electrical conductors. In this study, the rese
7h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Blood signature could improve early TB diagnosisA gene signature in the bloodstream can reveal whether someone is going to develop active tuberculosis (TB) disease months before symptoms begin. This offers the prospect of intervening before individuals pose a risk of transmitting the infection to others.
7h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Palm oil: The carbon cost of deforestationPalm oil has become part of our daily lives, but a recent study by EPFL and the Swiss Federal Institute for Forest, Snow and Landscape Research (WSL) serves as a reminder that intensive farming of this crop has a major impact on the environment. Both short- and long-term solutions exist, however. The article, which was published on June 19 in Nature Communications, analyzed the carbon costs and be
7h
Ingeniøren

I det store jernbane-puslespil er besparelsen på køreledninger blot peanutsSelv om Danmark måske sparer en milliard kroner på at være forsøgsland for ny teknik med længere mellem masterne, så er det småpenge i forhold til de samlede investeringer jernbanen.
7h
New Scientist – News

Football’s a mess: don’t let technology spoil thatThe video-assisted refereeing technology being introduced in this year's World Cup will supposedly cut errors – but that ignores what makes football great
7h
Science : NPR

Beyond Opioids: How A Family Came Together To Stay TogetherInfants do better with their parents, studies find, as long as parents have support to get and stay clean. This program starts during pregnancy, to rally and train a strong family support network. (Image credit: Natalie Piserchio for NPR)
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Science : NPR

As Carbon Dioxide Levels Rise, Major Crops Are Losing NutrientsAs the level of carbon dioxide in the air rises because of climate change, scientists are trying to pin down how plants are impacted. There's evidence that it's changing many important plants we eat. (Image credit: Toshihiro Jasegawa, National Agriculture and Food Research Organization of Japan)
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