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Nyheder2018juni20

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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Swedes have been brewing beer since the Iron Age, new evidence confirmsArchaeologists at Lund University in Sweden have found carbonised germinated grains showing that malt was produced for beer brewing as early as the Iron Age in the Nordic region. The findings made in Uppåkra in southern Sweden indicate a large-scale production of beer, possibly for feasting and trade.
7h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Researchers find last of universe's missing ordinary matterResearchers at the University of Colorado Boulder have helped to find the last reservoir of ordinary matter hiding in the universe.
2h
Big Think

Trump signs executive order ending child separation at U.S. borderIn a stark reversal on immigration policy, President Donald Trump signed an order on Wednesday that ends the controversial practice of separation immigrant children from families at the border. Read More
1h

LATEST

Live Science

A Weird Lump on a Woman's Face Turned Out to Be a Worm Crawling Under Her SkinWhen a woman in Russia noticed a small lump under her left eye, she snapped a selfie. Then, the lump moved.
2min
NYT > Science

Is There a Smarter Path to Artificial Intelligence? Some Experts Hope SoA branch of A.I. called deep learning has transformed computer performance in tasks like vision and speech. But meaning, reasoning and common sense remain elusive.
2min
Live Science

Separated Migrant Children Face Lasting Psychological TraumaHow can the absence of hugs and comforting from their parents affect children?
7min
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Researchers identify method to diagnose cancer in patients with early onset diabetesPatients diagnosed with pancreatic cancer can develop elevated blood sugar levels up to three years before their cancer diagnosis, according to the results of a study by Mayo Clinic researchers published the journal Gastroenterology.
7min
New on MIT Technology Review

The US Federal Trade Commission wants your ideas for how to better police Big Tech[no content]
16min
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

How physics explains the evolution of social organizationA scientist at Duke University says the natural evolution of social organizations into larger and more complex communities that exhibit distinct hierarchies can be predicted from the same law of physics that gives rise to tree branches and river deltas.
17min
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Learning about the Himalayas using Mars technologyThe Himalayan Range includes some of the youngest and most spectacular mountains on Earth, but the rugged landscape that lends it the striking beauty for which it is known can also keep scientists from fully understanding how these mountains formed. "We know more about the rocks on parts of Mars than we do about some of the areas in the Himalaya," said Dr. Alka Tripathy-Lang.
17min
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Better model of water under extreme conditions could aid understanding of Earth's mantleDeep inside the Earth exist pockets of water, but the liquid there isn't like the water on the surface.
17min
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

'Walking molecules" haul away damaged DNA to the cell's emergency roomThe cell has its own paramedic team and emergency room to aid and repair damaged DNA, a new USC Dornsife study reveals.
17min
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

Game-changing finding pushes 3D-printing to the molecular limitNew research proves that advanced materials containing molecules that switch states in response to environmental stimuli such as light can be fabricated using 3D printing. The study findings have the potential to vastly increase the functional capabilities of 3D-printed devices for industries such as electronics, healthcare and quantum computing.
20min
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

Better model of water under extreme conditions could aid understanding of Earth's mantleA team of scientists ran quantum simulations to develop a new model of the behavior of water at extremely high temperatures and pressures. The computational measurements should help scientists understand water's role in the makeup of the mantle and potentially in other planets.
20min
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

Neonics are being ingested by free-ranging animalsUniversity of Guelph researchers found residues of the insecticides in the livers of wild turkeys, providing evidence that this common agrochemical is being ingested by free-ranging animals.
20min
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

Scientists find evidence of 27 new viruses in beesAn international team of researchers has discovered evidence of 27 previously unknown viruses in bees. The finding could help scientists design strategies to prevent the spread of viral pathogens among these important pollinators.
20min
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

The seed that could bring clean water to millionsScientist are refining a process that could soon help provide clean water to many in water-scarce regions. The process uses sand and plant materials readily available in many developing nations.
20min
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

Competition for space: Oncogenic mutant cells vs normal cellsResearchers discovered how oncogenic mutant cells selectively expand into surrounding normal tissues and occupy them based on prediction by computer simulation and experimental verification.
20min
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

Stone tools from ancient mummy reveal how Copper Age mountain people livedStone tools found with a 5,300-year-old frozen mummy from Northern Italy reveal how alpine Copper Age communities lived.
20min
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

Chemical 'caryatids' improve the stability of metal-organic frameworksMetal-organic frameworks (MOFs) are porous materials that can change the way we capture carbon, filter water, and an array of other applications. Chemists have now found the link between mechanical stability and structure, thus overcoming a significant obstacle in optimizing MOFs.
20min
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

Whether wheat weathers heat wavesUnlike humans, crops in a field can't move to air conditioning to endure a heat wave. Scientists in Australia are working to understand how heat waves impact wheat.
20min
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

Around the world, people have surprisingly modest notions of the 'ideal' lifeIt seems reasonable that people would want to maximize various aspects of life if they were given the opportunity to do so, whether it's the pleasure they feel, how intelligent they are, or how much personal freedom they have. In actuality, people around the world seem to aspire for more moderate levels of these and other traits, according a new study.
20min
Feed: All Latest

With IGTV, Instagram Takes Aim at YouTubeThe new app for long-form video will exist within Instagram’s existing app, which now has more than 1 billion monthly active users.
23min
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Neonics are being ingested by free-ranging animals, study findsHealth impacts of neonicotinoids may go well beyond bees, according to a new University of Guelph study.
23min
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Collaboration yields discovery of 12-sided silica cagesWhat do you call a materials science discovery that was given a major boost by a lecture from a Nobel laureate in chemistry, used cryogenic electron microscopy (cryo-EM), and was pushed further along by a doctoral student's thesis on machine learning?
23min
Popular Science

Your risk of cancer likely increases with each additional drink of alcoholHealth Light drinking may prolong your life—but it's more complicated than that. Despite the ubiquity of alcohol consumption, epidemiologists and other health researchers still haven’t figured out how alcohol and overall health mix.
28min
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Learning about the Himalayas using Mars technologyhe Himalayan Range includes some of the youngest and most spectacular mountains on Earth, but the rugged landscape that lends it the striking beauty for which it is known can also keep scientists from fully understanding how these mountains formed. 'We know more about the rocks on parts of Mars than we do about some of the areas in the Himalaya,' said Dr. Alka Tripathy-Lang.
29min
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

New 'e-dermis' brings sense of touch, pain to prosthetic handsEngineers have created an electronic 'skin' in an effort to restore a real sense of touch for amputees using prosthetics.
29min
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

In mice, stem cells seem to work in fighting obesity! What about stem cells in humans?This release aims to summarize the available literature in regard to the effect of Mesenchymal Stem Cells transplantation on obesity and related comorbidities from the animal model. This helpful to justify going forward with clinical trials for stem cell regimens for a possible future application in humans.
29min
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Collaboration yields discovery of 12-sided silica cagesIn a paper published in Nature, a team led by Uli Wiesner, the Spencer T. Olin Professor of Engineering in the Department of Materials Science and Engineering at Cornell University, reports discovery of 10-nanometer, individual, self-assembled dodecahedral structures — 12-sided silica cages that could have applications in mesoscale material assembly, as well as medical diagnosis and therapeutics.
29min
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

The world's tiniest first respondersAmid the rise of CRISPR and genome editing, scientists are still learning more about DNA repair and its significance in aging and diseases such as cancer.
29min
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

How physics explains the evolution of social organizationA scientist at Duke University says the natural evolution of social organizations into larger and more complex communities exhibiting distinct hierarchies can be predicted from the same law of physics that gives rise to tree branches and river deltas — a concept called the constructal law.
29min
Live Science

These Bizarre Sea Monsters Once Ruled the OceanThe Cambrian explosion, when simple life forms rapidly evolved to more complex creatures, produced some beautiful, bizarre, and mysterious animals
36min
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

Gas flow through tiny atonically flat walls: Atomic-scale ping-pongNew experiments have shed more light on the gas flow through tiny, angstrom-sized channels with atomically flat walls.
48min
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

New therapeutic opportunity for the treatment of resistant malignant melanomaResearchers have revealed that malignant melanoma can reprogram their protein synthesis machinery and become addicted to a new family of enzymes that modify transfer RNAs during acquired resistance. The inhibition of these molecules synergies with targeted therapies to produce a strong anti-tumoral effect. These new findings will be key in the development of improved diagnostic tools and melanoma
48min
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

Last of universe's missing ordinary matterResearchers have helped to find the last reservoir of ordinary matter hiding in the universe.
48min
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

Chameleon-inspired nanolaser changes colorsChameleons change color by controlling the spacing among nanocrystals on their skin. The nanolaser changes color similarly — by controlling the spacing among metal nanoparticles.
48min
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Better model of water under extreme conditions could aid understanding of Earth's mantleA team of University of Chicago scientists ran quantum simulations to develop a new model of the behavior of water at extremely high temperatures and pressures. The computational measurements, published June 18 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, should help scientists understand water's role in the makeup of the mantle and potentially in other planets.
50min
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Cell-free DNA profiling informative way to monitor urinary tract infectionsUsing shotgun DNA sequencing, Cornell University researchers have demonstrated a new method for monitoring urinary tract infections (UTIs) that surpasses traditional methods in providing valuable information about the dynamics of the infection as well as the patient's biological response.
50min
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Emergency department patients want to be invited to share in medical decision-makingMost emergency department patients want to be involved in some aspects of medical decision-making, but they need to be invited.
50min
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Medicaid work requirements and health savings accounts may impact people's coverageCurrent experimental approaches in Medicaid programs — including requirements to pay premiums, contribute to health savings accounts, or to work — may lead to unintended consequences for patient coverage and access, such as confusing beneficiaries or dissuading some people from enrolling, according to a new study from Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health.
50min
Inside Science

In Vino Veritas, Sort OfIn Vino Veritas, Sort Of Growing interest in minimally processed wines is shaking up the wine industry. WineGlasses.jpg Image credits: Africa Studio/ Shutterstock Culture Wednesday, June 20, 2018 – 15:45 Joel Shurkin, Contributor (Inside Science) — About 10,000 years ago, a farmer in Asia noticed that some of his grapes had naturally fermented and liquid was forming around them. He took a taste
51min
New Scientist – News

NASA outlines its plans to deal with a large asteroid impactNASA is designing and testing missions to deflect a potential asteroid from hitting Earth, and working with emergency responders to plan for a day when one does
56min
Big Think

Study of 20,000 finds an income advantage for those judged to be very unattractiveA longitudinal study of 20,000 young Americans found a strong correlation between extreme unattractiveness and higher pay. Read More
1h
Live Science

Should the US Have a Military Presence in Space?President Donald Trump's call this week that to create a sixth branch of the U.S. military — which he called the "Space Force" — has reopened a wider debate on the military's role in space.
1h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Neonics are being ingested by free-ranging animals, U of G study findsUniversity of Guelph researchers found residues of the insecticides in the livers of wild turkeys, providing evidence that this common agrochemical is being ingested by free-ranging animals.
1h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

US stepping up Earth's protection from asteroids, cometsThe U.S. government is stepping up efforts to protect the planet from incoming asteroids that could wipe out entire regions or even continents.
1h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Martian dust storm grows global; Curiosity captures photos of thickening hazeA storm of tiny dust particles has engulfed much of Mars over the last two weeks and prompted NASA's Opportunity rover to suspend science operations. But across the planet, NASA's Curiosity rover, which has been studying Martian soil at Gale Crater, is expected to remain largely unaffected by the dust. While Opportunity is powered by sunlight, which is blotted out by dust at its current location,
1h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Scientists find evidence of 27 new viruses in beesAn international team of researchers has discovered evidence of 27 previously unknown viruses in bees. The finding could help scientists design strategies to prevent the spread of viral pathogens among these important pollinators.
1h
Big Think

Where’s your flying car? Here’s your flying car.The GoFly challenge has just announced 10 winning flying-car designs. It’s the first phase of a three-part contest, and they’re very cool. Read More
1h
Feed: All Latest

AMC's Latest Move Proves MoviePass Changed Moviegoing for GoodAMC MoviePass S. A-ListNow that even AMC has gotten in on the subscription game, there's no going back.
1h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

The cells that control the formation of fatA study has revealed a new cell type that resides in the body's fat depots where it can actively suppress fat cell formation. This discovery was made using single-cell transcriptomics and opens entirely new avenues to combat obesity and related diseases such as diabetes.
1h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

T. Rex couldn't stick out its tongueDinosaurs are often depicted as fierce creatures, baring their teeth, with tongues wildly stretching from their mouths like giant, deranged lizards. But new research reveals a major problem with this classic image: Dinosaurs couldn't stick out their tongues like lizards. Instead, their tongues were probably rooted to the bottoms of their mouths in a manner akin to alligators.
1h
Big Think

Waking up early linked to a reduction in depressionEvery month new research is showing how essential sleep is for optimal health. Here are two more. Read More
1h
NYT > Science

Newly Discovered ‘Limb Pit’ Reveals Civil War Surgeons’ Bitter ChoicesTwo skeletons and the remains of 11 amputated limbs are leading to new knowledge of combat injuries and medical practices on long-ago battlefields.
1h
The Atlantic

On the Border With the Photographer John MooreThe Getty Images photographer John Moore has won many photojournalism awards throughout his career, bringing a high level of skill, empathy, professionalism, perseverance, and an amazing eye for beauty and color to all of his work. Moore has spent years working along the U.S.-Mexico border, and regularly travels to Mexico and Central America, covering the many issues that surround the ongoing imm
1h
New Scientist – News

Ötzi the Iceman ran out of rock to make his tools before he diedÖtzi the Iceman, a prehistoric man found mummified in a mountain glacier, was short of crucial supplies in the days and weeks before his violent death
1h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Facebook's Instagram has more than a billion usersInstagram IGTV YouTubeInstagram said Wednesday it now has more than one billion active users, highlighting surging growth at the Facebook-owned social network focused on photo and video sharing.
1h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Why 9 to 5 isn't the only shift that can work for busy familiesFor the millions of Americans who work "nonstandard" shifts—evenings, nights or with rotating days off—the schedule can be especially challenging with children at home.
1h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

The seed that could bring clean water to millionsCarnegie Mellon University's Biomedical Engineering and Chemical Engineering Professors Bob Tilton and Todd Przybycien recently co-authored a paper with Ph.D. students Brittany Nordmark and Toni Bechtel, and alumnus John Riley, further refining a process that could soon help provide clean water to many in water-scarce regions. The process, created by Tilton's former student and co-author Stephanie
2h
Viden

I fremtiden skal du måske smile i dit pasNy forskning viser, at vi har lettere ved at genkende hinanden på billeder, når vi finder det store colgate-smil frem. Det kan hjælpe paskontrollører.
2h
Feed: All Latest

China Won’t Solve the World’s Plastics Problem Any MoreChina stopped taking in most of the world’s recycling. Where does it go now?
2h
BBC News – Science & Environment

The gene-edited pigs immune to lung diseasePigs in Scotland have had their genes altered so they are now immune to a deadly respiratory disease.
2h
Live Science

Ötzi the Iceman Had Just Sharpened His Tools Days Before His MurderDays before his violent murder in the Italian Alps about 5,300 years ago, Ötzi the iceman re-sharpened his tools, likely with his right hand, according to a new analysis of the cut marks on his belongings.
2h
Popular Science

The proposed Space Force isn’t the first time the United States has tried to militarize spaceSpace In 1966, the Air Force sent an uncrewed space station into orbit If President Donald Trump’s Space Force idea actually comes to fruition, it won’t be the first military force aiming for space. Not by a long shot. In fact, the idea of…
2h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Rare in-vivo study shows weak brain nodes have strong influence on memory networkThe majority of existing simulation studies show that the parts of the brain with high connectivity, the so-called 'hubs', are most important when it comes to several different cognitive tasks. But the results of a rare in-vivo study by Gino Del Ferraro of The City College of New York recently published in Nature demonstrates that the nucleus accumbens (NAc) — a part of the brain with weak connec
2h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Why 9 to 5 isn't the only shift that can work for busy familiesA new study from the University of Washington finds that the impacts of parent work schedules on children vary by age and gender, and often reflect which shift a parent works. Rotating shifts — a schedule that varies day by day or week by week — can be most problematic for children.
2h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Chameleon-inspired nanolaser changes colorsChameleons change color by controlling the spacing among nanocrystals on their skin. Northwestern University's nanolaser changes color similarly — by controlling the spacing among metal nanoparticles.
2h
The Atlantic

Trump Says He Will End the Family Separations He ImposedUpdated on June 20 at 4:18 p.m. Seeking to quell one of the most volatile political tempests of his stormy presidency, Donald Trump on Wednesday signed an executive order he said was intended to end the separation of children from parents arrested illegally entering the United States by directing that youths be held with adults. “We’re going to have strong borders but we’re going to keep the fami
2h
NYT > Science

After Volcano Eruption in Guatemala, Re-creating a Truck Covered in AshHow 727 photos taken in 29 minutes became an immersive 3D experience.
2h
Big Think

Study: Ecstasy could be far less dangerous than past research suggestsA new paper suggests past research on MDMA often overestimated the dangers of the drug because the studies examined heavy users, not average ones. Read More
2h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Instagram unveils new video service in challenge to YouTubeInstagram IGTV YouTubeFacebook's Instagram service is loosening its restraints on video in an attempt to lure younger viewers away from YouTube when they're looking for something to watch on their smartphones.
2h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Technology enables soft contact lenses to monitor glucose, medical conditions and deliver medicationsPurdue University researchers have developed soft contact lenses that not only correct vision but also can monitor glucose and medical conditions and be used for ocular pain relief or drug delivery.
2h
Live Science

There's No Way World Cup Soccer Fans Caused an Earthquake in Mexico, Seismic Expert SaysThe soccer earthquake that wasn't.
2h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Researchers find last of universe's missing ordinary matterResearchers at the University of Colorado Boulder have helped to find the last reservoir of ordinary matter hiding in the universe.
2h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Potential to replace race as a risk factor for kidney-transplant failureMarva Moxey-Mims, M.D., FASN, says APOLLO study researchers hope that clarifying the role of the APOL1 gene in kidney-transplant failure could lead to fewer discarded kidneys, which could boost the number of available kidneys for patients awaiting transplants.
2h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

T. Rex couldn't stick out its tongue, new research showsDinosaurs are often depicted as fierce creatures, baring their teeth, with tongues wildly stretching from their mouths like giant, deranged lizards. But new research reveals a major problem with this classic image: Dinosaurs couldn't stick out their tongues like lizards. Instead, their tongues were probably rooted to the bottoms of their mouths in a manner akin to alligators.
2h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

No, asylum seekers are not a 'burden' for European economiesDoes the arrival of asylum seekers lead to a deterioration in the economic performance and public finances of the European countries that host them? The answer is no, according to economists from the CNRS, Clermont-Auvergne and Paris-Nanterre universities, who have estimated a dynamic statistical model based on thirty years of data from fifteen countries in Western Europe. On the contrary, the eco
2h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Established medications combat lung cancer tumor growthTwo research groups have discovered that the growth of an intractable type of lung cancer in mouse models can be restrained with a class of drug known as kinase inhibitors.
2h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Research reveals zero proof probiotics can ease your anxietyA study from the University of Kansas appearing Wednesday in PLOS ONE found evidence that probiotics can reduce anxiety in rodents, but not in humans.
2h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Asylum seekers positively affect host countries' economy, though on slower timescaleAsylum seekers fleeing to Western European countries to escape war-ridden areas positively affect a host countries' economy, according to a new report that analyzes 30 years' worth of economic and migration data.
2h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

The sounds of climate changeIn a new study in Science Advances, researchers describe a way to quickly sift through thousands of hours of field recordings to estimate when songbirds arrive at their Arctic breeding grounds. Their research could be applied to any dataset of animal vocalizations to understand how migratory animals are responding to climate change.
2h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Scientists calculate impact of China's ban on plastic waste importsScientists from the University of Georgia have calculated the potential global impact of China's ban on plastic waste imports and how this policy might affect efforts to reduce the amount of plastic waste entering the world's landfills and natural environment.
2h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Joint venture: Breakthrough treatment for crippling jaw disease created by UCI, othersA first-ever tissue implant to safely treat a common jaw defect, known as temporomandibular joint dysfunction, has been successfully tested by UCI-led researchers in a large animal model, according to new findings.
2h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Study of 800 million tweets finds distinct daily cycles in our thinking patternsOur mode of thinking changes at different times of the day and follows a 24-hour pattern, according to new findings published in PLOS ONE. University of Bristol researchers were able to study our thinking behavior by analyzing seven billion words used in 800 million tweets.
2h
The Atlantic

The UN Human Rights Council Is a Deeply Flawed BodyThe United Nations cares about human rights so much that i t has ten organizations working on human-rights-related issues. One of these is the UN Human Rights Council, the organization from which the U.S. withdrew Tuesday because of, among other things, its “chronic bias against Israel,” to quote Nikki Haley, the U.S. envoy to the UN. Haley has a point. The Council’s rules single out Israel for s
2h
The Atlantic

How to Look Away“These child actors weeping and crying on all the other networks 24/7 right now; do not fall for it, Mr. President.” Ann Coulter, on Sunday, was speaking to that famed audience of one—Donald Trump—in the language whose grammar and idioms both of them understand intuitively: that of the Fox News Channel. But the pundit wasn’t speaking to the world leader so much as she was warning him. And she was
2h
The Atlantic

Why Would You Want a Prosthetic Hand That Feels Pain?At a lab at Johns Hopkins University, researchers are building a prosthetic hand unlike any other: It can sense pain. It’s easy to understand why you might want a prosthesis that can feel the squishiness of a grape or the warmth of another person’s hand. But pain? Well, pain could be useful, too. “If you think about how we humans use pain, it’s to protect our bodies, to prevent damage,” says Luke
2h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Chameleon-inspired nanolaser changes colorsAs a chameleon shifts its color from turquoise to pink to orange to green, nature's design principles are at play. Complex nano-mechanics are quietly and effortlessly working to camouflage the lizard's skin to match its environment.
2h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Boring barnacles prefer the shallow life on coral reefsIf you want to know about the future of coral reefs that harbor marine life and protect coastlines, sometimes that means you have to go there and count barnacles.
2h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Scientists find evidence of 27 new viruses in beesAn international team of researchers has discovered evidence of 27 previously unknown viruses in bees. The finding could help scientists design strategies to prevent the spread of viral pathogens among these important pollinators.
2h
Science | The Guardian

No clear evidence probiotics can help with human anxiety, study findsBut beneficial bacteria do appear to reduce anxiety in rodents with various problems There is no clear sign that taking probiotics can help dampen feelings of anxiety in humans, according to new research, despite evidence that it works for rodents. A wide range of conditions, from obesity to asthma, have been linked to the microbes living in our guts , with a number of studies suggesting a link t
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Science | The Guardian

Tongue-tied: T rex couldn't stick out its tongueResearchers say many dinosaurs’ tongues were anchored to the floors of their mouths and unable to waggle The fearsome creatures of Jurassic World might chase you, kill you and rip you limb from limb, but there is one thing a T rex couldn’t do: stick out its tongue. While Hollywood depictions of dinosaurs often show the creatures open-mouthed with tongues waving, researchers have discovered that m
3h
Live Science

Idaho Was Once Swarming with Ancient Buzz-Saw-Faced Sharkshis bizarre shark was 25 feet long and had teeth that looked like a buzz saw.
3h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Stone tools from ancient mummy reveal how Copper Age mountain people livedStone tools found with a 5,300-year-old frozen mummy from Northern Italy reveal how alpine Copper Age communities lived, according to a study published June 20, 2018 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Ursula Wierer from the Soprintendenza Archeologia, Florence, Italy, and colleagues.
3h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Scientists calculate impact of China's ban on plastic waste importsWhile recycling is often touted as the solution to the large-scale production of plastic waste, upwards of half of the plastic waste intended for recycling is exported from higher income countries to other nations, with China historically taking the largest share.
3h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

The sounds of climate change—Researchers develop an AI to analyze field recordings and estimate songbird arrivalsSpring is coming earlier to parts of the Arctic, and so are some migratory birds. But researchers have yet to get a clear picture of how climate change is transforming tundra life. That's starting to change as automated tools for tracking birds and other animals in remote places come online, giving researchers an earful of clues about how wildlife is adapting to hotter temperatures and more errati
3h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

No, asylum seekers are not a 'burden' for European economies: studyDoes the arrival of asylum seekers lead to a deterioration in the economic performance and public finances of the European countries that host them? The answer is no, according to economists from the CNRS, Clermont-Auvergne University, and Paris-Nanterre University, who have estimated a dynamic statistical model based on 30 years of data from 15 countries in Western Europe. On the contrary, the ec
3h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

T. Rex couldn't stick out its tongue, new research showsDinosaurs are often depicted as fierce creatures, baring their teeth, with tongues wildly stretching from their mouths like giant, deranged lizards. But new research reveals a major problem with this classic image: Dinosaurs couldn't stick out their tongues like lizards. Instead, their tongues were probably rooted to the bottoms of their mouths in a manner akin to alligators.
3h
New on MIT Technology Review

Tesla files a lawsuit against a former employee for allegedly leaking confidential IP[no content]
3h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Tesla sues ex-employee alleging data theft, leaks to mediaA former employee hacked into computers at Tesla's Nevada battery factory, stole confidential information and combined it with falsehoods in leaks to the media, the electric car maker alleged in a federal lawsuit.
3h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Sweden starts construction on fossil fuel-free steel plantSweden has started construction on a factory that will test whether it's feasible to make steel without burning fossil fuels.
3h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

Mega-cruises are becoming copies of the great Las Vegas resortsThe productive improvements and innovations in the shipyards, which have made the mega ships possible, have made the cruise ship operators look for a leisure model that fills the abundant space that these new floating cities offer. In many of these ships, the classic model of luxury has been abandoned to copy, with great precision, the theme parks of the great casino resorts of Las Vegas.
3h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

New screening tool could help diagnose early cognitive decline in dementia from homeAn international team of scientists have developed a new way to screen for age-related cognitive decline at home using a test which asks people to detect sounds and flashes on their laptop or phone.
3h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Fossils show ancient primates had grooming claws as well as nailsHumans and other primates are outliers among mammals for having nails instead of claws. But how, when and why we transitioned from claws to nails has been an evolutionary head-scratcher.
3h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Fossils show ancient primates had grooming claws as well as nailsHumans and other primates are outliers among mammals for having nails instead of claws. But how, when and why we transitioned from claws to nails has been an evolutionary head-scratcher.
3h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Double jeopardy: The high costs of living in Nairobi's slumsTenants in the slums of Nairobi, Kenya, receive drastically inferior household services and pay more rent compared to those in its formal settlements, according to new research from the University at Buffalo School of Management.
3h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Cooler computing through statistical physics?In the space inside a computer chip, where electricity becomes information, there's a scientific frontier. The same frontier can be found inside a cell, where information instead takes the form of chemical concentrations. Recent breakthroughs in the field of nonequilibrium statistical physics have revealed vast areas of research lying hidden within the "thermodynamics of computation." Advances in
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Scientific American Content: Global

Separating Families May Cause Lifelong Health DamageA noted pediatrician and advocate for immigrant children says the effects will last well beyond the separation — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

Encrypted messages in biological processesRNA modifications can encrypt the RNA code and are responsible for a very sophisticated control of RNA function. A research team has shown that modified RNA bases have a great impact on the dynamics of gene expression from DNA to functional RNA. The study yields important new insight into how the basis of RNA modifications can affect the function of mature RNA molecules.
3h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

Dogs understand what's written all over your faceDogs are capable of understanding the emotions behind an expression on a human face. This study is the latest to reveal just how connected dogs are with people. The research also provides evidence that dogs use different parts of their brains to process human emotions.
3h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

Interaction of paired and lined-up electrons can be manipulated in semiconductorsThe way that electrons paired as composite particles or arranged in lines interact with each other within a semiconductor provides new design opportunities for electronics, according to recent findings.
3h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

Key molecule of aging discoveredEvery cell and every organism ages sooner or later. But why is this so? Scientists have now discovered for the first time a protein that represents a central switching point in the aging process. It controls the life span of an individual — from the fly to the human being. This opens up new possibilities for developing therapies against age-related diseases.
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Feed: All Latest

Europe Considers a New Copyright Law. Here's Why That MattersCritics say a proposal in the European Parliament would lead to legal content being blocked, even outside the EU.
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Feed: All Latest

Trump Stokes Outrage in Silicon Valley—But It's SelectiveGovernment contracts have sparked protests among tech employees, but a larger reflection on the role of technology is needed in Silicon Valley.
3h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

New therapeutic opportunity for the treatment of resistant malignant melanomaResearchers have revealed that malignant melanoma can reprogram their protein synthesis machinery and become addicted to a new family of enzymes that modify transfer RNAs during acquired resistance. The inhibition of these molecules synergies with targeted therapies to produce a strong anti-tumoral effect. These new findings will be key in the development of improved diagnostic tools and melanoma
3h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

The cells that control the formation of fatA study led by researchers in Switzerland has revealed a new cell type that resides in the body's fat depots where it can actively suppress fat cell formation. This discovery was made using single-cell transcriptomics and opens entirely new avenues to combat obesity and related diseases such as diabetes.
3h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Gene-edited pigs are resistant to billion dollar virus, study findsScientists at the University of Edinburgh have produced pigs that can resist one of the world's most costly animal diseases, by changing their genetic code. Tests with the virus — called Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome, or PRRS — found the pigs do not become infected at all. The animals show no signs that the change in their DNA has had any other impact on their health or wellbeing
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Compound made inside human body stops viruses from replicatingA team of researchers has identified the mode of action of viperin, a naturally occurring enzyme in humans and other mammals that is known to have antiviral effects on viruses such as West Nile, hepatitis C, rabies, and HIV. This discovery could allow researchers to develop a drug that could act as a broad-spectrum therapy for a range of viruses, including Zika.
3h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Biologists discover how pancreatic tumors lead to weight lossA study from MIT and Dana-Farber Cancer Institute offers insight into the weight loss seen in pancreatic cancer patients, and suggests that weight loss may not necessarily affect patients' survival.
3h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Atomic-scale ping-pongNew experiments by researchers at the National Graphene Institute at the University of Manchester have shed more light on the gas flow through tiny, angstrom-sized channels with atomically flat walls.
3h
Popular Science

The best vacuums for any kind of messGadgets Pet-hair-sucking robots, at your service. Pet-hair-sucking robots, at your service. These vacuums will keep your dwelling's floors dust-mite and crumb-free.
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Science | The Guardian

Scientists genetically engineer pigs immune to costly diseaseGene-editing technology could be propelled into commercial farms within five years Scientists have genetically engineered pigs to be immune to one of the world’s most costly animal diseases, in an advance that could propel gene-editing technology into commercial farms within five years. The trial, led by the University of Edinburgh’s Roslin Institute, showed that the pigs were completely immune t
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Feed: All Latest

You Can Now Live Out 'Westworld' With Your Amazon EchoNope, that's not scary at all.
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BBC News – Science & Environment

Gene-edited farm animals are on their wayScientists create pigs that are immune to one of the world's costliest livestock diseases.
4h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

What a pain: The iPad neck plagues women moreGender and posture — not screen time — are biggest factors behind developing 'iPad neck' and shoulder pain, UNLV study finds.
4h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Double jeopardy: The high costs of living in Nairobi's slumsTenants in the slums of Nairobi, Kenya, receive drastically inferior household services and pay more rent compared to those in its formal settlements, according to new research from the University at Buffalo School of Management.
4h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Cooler computing through statistical physics?Recent breakthroughs in nonequilibrium statistical physics have revealed opportunities to advance the 'thermodynamics of computation,' a field that could have far-reaching consequences for how we understand, and engineer, our computers.
4h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Atomic-scale ping-pongNew experiments by researchers at the National Graphene Institute at the University of Manchester have shed more light on the gas flow through tiny, angstrom-sized channels with atomically flat walls.
4h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

The cells that control the formation of fatFat cells, or adipocytes, are at the center of nutritional and metabolic balance. Adipogenesis—the formation of mature fat cells from their precursor cells—has been linked to obesity and related health problems such as cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes.
4h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Gene-edited pigs are resistant to billion dollar virus, study findsScientists have produced pigs that can resist one of the world's most costly animal diseases, by changing their genetic code.
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Science | The Guardian

High time that we relaxed the rules on cannabis use | LettersMargaret Gibbs calls for more medical testing, while Douglas Moffat wants an odourless weed before legalisation One of the wisdoms of our healthcare system is its evidence-based approach to the use of medicines, which also helps make rational decisions on health economics ( Javid announces review into use of medicinal cannabis , 20 June). However, the evidence we aspire to is high-quality, random
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The Atlantic

How the Carmakers Trumped ThemselvesThese are strange times for America’s car industry. This month, the White House will decide the fate of a set of federal rules called the Corporate Average Fuel Economy standards, or CAFE standards. These laws regulate the miles-per-gallon number of “light-duty vehicles”—that is, sedans, minivans, Ford F-150s, and anything else that’s street-legal and weighs less than 10,000 pounds. The rules wor
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The Atlantic

The Exceptional Cruelty of a No-Hugging PolicyOn Monday, when ProPublica released the now infamous seven-and-a-half minutes of audiotape recorded inside a U.S. Customs and Border Protection facility, in which several wailing kids can be heard crying out for their moms and dads, Darcia Narvaez clicked the link and told herself she’d do her best to listen to the whole thing. Within seconds, however, Narvaez, a professor of psychology at the Un
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New Scientist – News

Eating less red meat protects against endometriosisMinimising red meat consumption seems to protect against endometriosis, according to a study of more than 80,000 women who were followed for two decades
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

Using bloodstains at crime scenes to determine age of a suspect or victimFrom the spatter analysis made famous in the TV show Dexter to the frequent DNA profiling of CSI and the real cases covered in the FBI Files, blood tests are ubiquitous in forensic science. Now, researchers report that a new blood test, which could be performed at a crime scene, could help determine the age of a suspect or victim within just an hour.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

Electron sandwich doubles thermoelectric performanceResearchers more than doubled the ability of a material to convert heat into electricity, which could help reduce the amount of wasted heat, and thus wasted fossil fuel, in daily activities and industries.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

'Green'-feed: Industrial microbes could feed cattle, pigs, chickenToday, producing feed for pigs, cattle and chicken causes immense impacts for the climate and the environment. In the future, animal feed production is likely to be shifted from croplands to large-scale industrial facilities as it could bring both financial and environmental benefits. Replacing 2 percent feed with protein-rich microbes could decrease agricultural greenhouse gas emissions, global c
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

FTC puts data, privacy under spotlight with new hearingsThe Federal Trade Commission says it plans to hold hearings about technology, competition and privacy of a kind it hasn't held in more than 20 years.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Possible link found between diabetes and common white pigmentIn a pilot study by a team of researchers at The University of Texas at Austin, crystalline particles of titanium dioxide — the most common white pigment in everyday products ranging from paint to candies — were found in pancreas specimens with Type 2 diabetes, suggesting that exposure to the white pigment is associated with the disease.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Daily cannabis use is on the rise in American adultsCannabis use may be decreasing among teens, but a new study showed that American adults have increasingly used cannabis daily since 2007. The study found that nondaily cannabis use decreased among those aged 12 to 25 and 35 to 49 before 2007, and increased among all adults after 2007, particularly among adults 26 to 34.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Putting the brakes on metastatic cancerA groundbreaking discovery by University of Alberta researchers has identified previously-unknown therapeutic targets that could be key to preventing the spread of cancer. In a study published in Nature Communications, the team found that by inhibiting several newly identified gene targets they could block more than 99.5 per cent of cancer metastasis in living cells.
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The Atlantic

Republicans Are Lost on Family SeparationIn a press conference on Wednesday, the morning after President Donald Trump addressed House Republicans on immigration, Speaker Paul Ryan offered little clarity on the lower chamber’s path forward on family separations at the border. Members are scheduled to vote on two pieces of immigration reform on Thursday, a development sparked in large part by moderate Republicans frustrated by their leade
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Earth's intact forests vanishing at accelerating pace: scientists (Update)Earth's intact forests shrank by an area larger than Austria every year from 2014 to 2016 at a 20 percent faster rate than during the previous decade, scientists said Wednesday as the UN unveiled an initiative to harness the "untapped potential" of the land sector to fight climate change.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Deutsche Bank fined $205 mn in US for forex manipulationUS officials fined embattled German banking giant Deutsche Bank $205 million in a settlement to resolve foreign exchange market manipulation violations, New York's top banking regulator announced Wednesday.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

Birds have time-honored traditions, tooBy faithfully copying the most popular songs, swamp sparrows create time-honored song traditions that can be just as long-lasting as human traditions, finds a new study. The results show that creating traditions that pass the test of time doesn't necessarily require exceptional smarts.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

Parent-child therapy helps young children with depressionNew research demonstrates that an interactive therapy involving parents and their depressed preschoolers can reduce rates of depression and lower the severity of children's symptoms.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

A dual-therapy approach to boost motor recovery after a strokeScientists have shown that combining a brain-computer interface (BCI) with functional electrical stimulation (FES) can help stroke victims recover greater use of their paralyzed arm — even years after the stroke.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

Surgery in spaceWith renewed public interest in manned space exploration comes the potential need to diagnose and treat medical issues encountered by future space travelers.
4h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Researchers say short-term management responses to climate change-mediated disasters can be maladaptive in the long-termAs hurricane season commences on the East Coast and the West Coast heads into fire season, there's no time like the present to consider the short- and long-term effects of responses to disasters being shaped by the climate of a warming Earth. Are we doing enough to ensure our future well-being in the face of climate change, or are we too distracted by intense but relatively infrequent disasters su
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

New theory deepens understanding of Turing patterns in biologyA team of researchers have expanded Alan Turing's seminal theory on how patterns are created in biological systems. This work may answer whether nature's patterns are governed by Turing's mathematical model and could have applications in tissue engineering.
4h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Heated dilemmasShort-term management responses to climate change-mediated disasters can be maladaptive in the long-term.
4h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Workplace health clinics can lower health care spendingThe largest study about the benefits of workplace health clinics finds that such an effort can substantially lower worker health care spending. Studying clinics opened in a large urban school district to serve teachers and their families, researchers found that workers who used the health clinics cut health care costs by about 15 percent and were significantly less likely to be admitted to the hos
4h
Futurity.org

Colorful images reveal how crop genes result in traitsResearchers have devised a new way to automatically and efficiently gather data about a plant’s phenotype: the physical traits that emerge from its genetic code. Each rendering and its associated data come courtesy of LiDAR, a technology that fires pulsed laser light at a surface and measures the time it takes for those pulses to reflect back—the greater the delay, the greater the distance. By sc
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Scientific American Content: Global

Adapting to Climate Change Will Take More than Just Sea Walls and LeveesOur government’s unconscionable policies are a scary precedent — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

New tissue-imaging technology could enable real-time diagnostics, map cancer progressionA new microscope system can image living tissue in real time and in molecular detail, without any chemicals or dyes, report researchers at the University of Illinois.
4h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Archimedes' screw inspires researchers to devise a novel particle-trapping laser beamAn active field of research, laser optical trapping works to control the movement and position of particles of different sizes and shapes. The ability to move small particles in a precise and controlled manner is important to both basic and applied science. For example, the ability to control the movement of single atoms can be used to realize quantum computing, and the research also contributes t
5h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Robot bloodhound tracks odors on the groundBloodhounds are famous for their ability to track scents over great distances. Now researchers have developed a modern-day bloodhound—a robot that can rapidly detect odors from sources on the ground, such as footprints. The robot, reported in ACS Sensors, could even read a message written on the ground using odors as a barcode.
5h
Feed: All Latest

Moonlit Photographs of Detroit's ResilienceThese mom-and-pop stores have persisted even as the Motor City has declined.
5h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Scientists unravel DNA code behind rare neurologic diseaseScientists conducting one of the largest full DNA analyses of a rare disease have identified a gene mutation associated with a perplexing brain condition that blinds and paralyzes patients.
5h
Scientific American Content: Global

Facebook Redirects Users Searching for Opioids to Federal Crisis Help LineTech giants are grappling with questions about illicit sales on their platforms — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
5h
The Atlantic

Trumpism, RealizedAt least 2,000 children have now been forcibly separated from their parents by the United States government. Their stories are wrenching. Antar Davidson , a former youth-care worker at an Arizona shelter, described to the Los Angeles Times children “huddled together, tears streaming down their faces,” because they believed that their parents were dead. Natalia Cornelio, an attorney with the Texas
5h
Ingeniøren

Region Hovedstaden får hård kritik for Sundhedsplatformen af StatsrevisorerneIfølge Statsrevisorerne, har 'forberedelse af ibrugtagningen af Sundhedsplatformen på Herlev og Gentofte Hospital været uprofessionel og kritisabel.'
5h
Quanta Magazine

Theory Suggests That All Genes Affect Every Complex TraitThe question most of genetics tries to answer is how genes connect to the traits we see. One person has red hair, another blonde hair; one dies at age 30 of Huntington’s disease, another lives to celebrate a 102nd birthday. Knowing what in the vast expanse of the genetic code is behind traits can fuel better treatments and information about future risks and illuminate how biology and evolution wo
5h
Live Science

The 10 Weirdest Medical Cases in the Animal KingdomA deer with two heads found near the Mississippi River and a mountain lion with teeth and hair growing from its forehead are just two such oddball cases in the animal kingdom.
5h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Modern laser science brightened by 2,300-year-old technologyScientists at Tel Aviv University have harnessed a 2,300-year-old water displacement technology to develop a novel laser beam that traps and moves particles in specific directions. It is a significant contribution to the future of both basic and applied science.
5h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Fetal T cells are first responders to infection in adultsCornell University researchers have discovered there is a division of labor among immune cells that fight invading pathogens in the body.
5h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

New study sheds light on the growing phenomenon of radicalized European youthsA study published in European Psychiatry reports on factors underlying the current rise in radical conversions among European youth. Compared to previous groups such as Al-Qaïda, ETA, or Hamas, today's radical groups are smaller, less hierarchical, and are mainly composed of young, homegrown individuals. This review delves into the profiles of today's European adolescents and young adults who have
5h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Life-saving stroke educational program goes globalIn an effort to improve stroke recognition and reduce life-threatening pre-hospital delays worldwide, researchers at Penn Medicine created a universal stroke awareness program, Stroke 112.
5h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Robot bloodhound tracks odors on the groundBloodhounds are famous for their ability to track scents over great distances. Now researchers have developed a modern-day bloodhound — a robot that can rapidly detect odors from sources on the ground, such as footprints. The robot, reported in ACS Sensors, could even read a message written on the ground using odors as a barcode.
5h
The Atlantic

The Clinical Case for Keeping Families TogetherIn April, the Trump administration announced that anyone caught crossing into the United States illegally at the southwestern border would be referred for criminal prosecution. When adults are detained, their children are separated from them and sent into government custody or foster care. Since then, over 2,000 children have been separated from their parents in this way. What happens to the chil
5h
The Atlantic

The Brazilian Spring That Never ArrivedWhen Brazilians of all stripes took to the streets five years ago, the whole country seemed united in its demand for more from their government. Instead, they wound up with much less. On June 13, 2013, the Movimento Passe Livre (MPL), a radical group demanding free public transportation, brought several thousand people into the streets of São Paulo to protest a 20-centavo increase in the bus fare
5h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

Beluga whales have sensitive hearing, little age-related lossScientists published the first hearing tests on a wild population of healthy marine mammals. The tests on beluga whales in Bristol Bay, Alaska, revealed that the whales have sensitive hearing abilities and the number of animals that experienced extensive hearing losses was far less than what scientists had anticipated.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

Atrial fibrillation: Weight loss reverses heart condition in obesity sufferersAustralian research shows for the first time that obese people who are suffering from atrial fibrillation can reduce or reverse the effects of the condition by losing weight.
5h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

Evaluation method for the impact of wind power fluctuation on power system qualityAbrupt changes of wind power generation output are a source of severe damage to power systems. Researchers have developed a stochastic modeling method that enables to evaluate the impact of such phenomena.
5h
Ingeniøren

Tidligere astronaut: »Trumps idé om Space Force er dum«Tidligere astronaut Mark Kelly mener, at Trumps idé om at oprette en militær rumenhed er direkte dum, da området allerede er dækket af flyvevåbnet.
5h
Popular Science

The weirdest things we learned this week: biblical rhabdo, corpse adventures, and socks from the world’s loneliest islandScience Our editors scrounged up some truly bizarre facts. What’s the weirdest thing you learned this week? Well, whatever it is, we promise you’ll have an even weirder answer if you listen to PopSci’s newest podcast.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Key molecule of aging discoveredEvery cell and every organism ages sooner or later. But why is this so? Scientists at the German Cancer Research Center in Heidelberg have now discovered for the first time a protein that represents a central switching point in the aging process. It controls the life span of an individual — from the fly to the human being. This opens up new possibilities for developing therapies against age-relat
5h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Interaction of paired and lined-up electrons can be manipulated in semiconductorsThe way that electrons paired as composite particles or arranged in lines interact with each other within a semiconductor provides new design opportunities for electronics, according to recent findings in Nature Communications.
5h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

New tissue-imaging technology could enable real-time diagnostics, map cancer progressionA new microscope system can image living tissue in real time and in molecular detail, without any chemicals or dyes, report researchers at the University of Illinois. It enables researchers to study concurrent processes within cells and tissue, and could give cancer researchers a new tool for tracking tumor progression and physicians new technology for tissue pathology and diagnostics.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Simple sugar delays neurodegeneration caused by enzyme deficiencyThe sugar trehalose increases cellular waste disposal and improves the neurological symptoms in a mouse model of mucopolysaccharidoses IIIB .
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

News from Molecular & Cellular ProteomicsIn recent articles, scientists optimize experimental design for understanding potential chemotherapeutic agents, delve into crop responses to salt-water stress, and present a better way to ensure consistency in long-term proteomics studies.
5h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Study explores satisfaction, quality of life after breast reconstructionIn a new study, researchers from Brigham and Women's Hospital evaluated patient-reported satisfaction and well-being outcomes prior to, and two years after their initial surgery for more than 2,000 women across the United States. Researchers found that patients who underwent autologous reconstruction had greater satisfaction with their breasts, as well as a greater psychosocial and sexual well-bei
5h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Opioid overdose survivors face continued health challenges, higher death rateSurvivors of opioid overdose are at great risk of dying in the year after overdose, but the deaths are not always caused by drug use, a new study reveals. In addition to succumbing to drug use, survivors were much more likely to die from respiratory diseases, viral hepatitis, and suicide.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Patient outcomes, complication rates of postmastectomy breast reconstructionTwo studies, a commentary and podcast focus on patient outcomes after breast reconstruction surgery following mastectomy. One studied compared satisfaction and quality of life between patients who had breast reconstruction using implants or their own tissue, and a second study compared two-year complication rates across common breast reconstruction techniques.
5h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Causes of subsequent death for patients after nonfatal opioid overdoseAdults who survive an opioid overdose are at high risk of dying during the year after the incident of substance use-associated diseases, suicide and other medical conditions.
5h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Powerful new approach helps understand molecular alterations in neurological diseaseScientists have developed a high-throughput, multi-pronged approach that integrates laboratory experiments, data from published literature and network analysis of large datasets to identify genes that drive disease.
5h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Computational method puts finer point on multispecies genomic comparisonsA new computational tool will potentially help geneticists to better understand what makes a human a human, or how to differentiate species in general, by providing more detailed comparative information about genome function.
5h
Scientific American Content: Global

Electric Car Advocates Want to Expand Access to Low-Income CommunitiesThose most impacted by air pollution should be able to more easily use cleaner vehicles, environmentalists argue — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
5h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Fixing a massive NYC plumbing leak, 55 stories undergroundNew York City is in the midst of a plumbing repair job of monumental proportions.
5h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

PayPal move blocks sales of school shooting video gameThe developer of a school shooting video game condemned by parents of slain children has lost the ability to sell the game online after being dumped by PayPal.
5h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

Encrypted messages in biological processesRNA modifications can encrypt the RNA code and are responsible for a very sophisticated control of RNA function. A new study shows that modified RNA bases have a great impact on the dynamics of gene expression from DNA to functional RNA.
5h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

Is it their own fault?! How people judge the exclusion of othersThe way people view the social exclusion of others varies — depending on how much they think the excluded person is to blame. However, this is heavily influenced by how similar the group members are to each other, researchers report.
5h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

Having a meal activates the functioning of human brown fatThe importance of the human brown adipose tissue (BAT) has become clearer during the past ten years. Using positron emission tomography, PET, it was shown that adult humans have functional BAT. Coldness is an effective activator of the BAT metabolic function but, in rodents, eating has the same effect. Now, researchers have shown that having a meal increases oxygen consumption in human BAT as much
5h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

Lonely and prolonged struggle for people with severe obesityThe majority of people with severe obesity have a lonely and prolonged struggle with their weight. In one study spanning more than 10 years, 83 percent report that they constantly strive to lose weight or prevent weight gain.
5h
New Scientist – News

Children seized at US border will face lasting health effectsThe psychological and physical effects of serious trauma are likely to impact the children being separated from their families at the US border for years
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

TravelLab: In a forest on the trail of synchronous fireflies (Update)Picture a moonless June evening, shortly after midnight, deep in a northwestern Pennsylvania forest. Wild sounds echo gently. Stars glow far above through the canopy of trees. Otherwise it is dark—so very dark.
5h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Disney ups its bid for Fox to counter ComcastDisney 21st Century FoxDisney sweetened its bid for key assets of 21st Century Fox Wednesday, raising its offer to $71.3 billion in cash and stock to counter a rival bid from Comcast.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Crumple up this keyboard and stick it in your pocketBendable portable keyboards for use with computers and other electronic devices are already on the market, but they have limited flexibility, and they're fairly sizable when rolled up for transport. Now researchers have crafted an inexpensive keyboard that is so tough, flexible and thin that it can be crumpled up and tucked in a pocket without damaging it. The study appears in the journal ACS Appl
5h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Teaching robots to sort out their issuesRobots can help do a lot of things—assemble cars, search for explosives, cook a meal or aid in surgery. But one thing they can't do is tell you how they're doing—yet.
5h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Dogs understand what's written all over your faceDogs are capable of understanding the emotions behind an expression on a human face. For example, if a dog turns its head to the left, it could be picking up that someone is angry, fearful or happy. If there is a look of surprise on a person's face, dogs tend to turn their head to the right. The heart rates of dogs also go up when they see someone who is having a bad day, say Marcello Siniscalchi,
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Dagens Medicin

Statsrevisorer: Ibrugtagning af Sundhedsplatformen var »uprofessionel«Beretning fra Rigsrevisionen kritiserer, at Sundhedsplatformen blev taget i brug på Herlev, selvom systemet var ufærdigt og ikke tilstrækkeligt gennemtestet.
6h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Planned movements and spontaneous reactions are processed differently in the brainScientists from the German Primate Center – Leibniz Institute for Primate Research (DPZ) have been able to show in their recently published study of two rhesus monkeys that planned and spontaneous gripping movements have the same brain activity during the movement but that the preceded brain activity differs.
6h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

University of Michigan researchers use gene silencing to alleviate common ataxiaIn what researchers are calling a game changer for future ataxia treatments, a new study showed the ability to turn down the disease progression of the most common dominantly inherited ataxia, Spinocerebellar ataxia type 3 (SCA3), also known as Machado-Joseph disease. A single gene mutation causes this neurodegenerative disease, making it an ideal target for researchers.
6h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Crumple up this keyboard and stick it in your pocketBendable portable keyboards for use with computers and other electronic devices are already on the market, but they have limited flexibility, and they're fairly sizable when rolled up for transport. Now researchers have crafted an inexpensive keyboard that is so tough, flexible and thin that it can be crumpled up and tucked in a pocket without damaging it. The study appears in the journal ACS Appl
6h
TED Talks Daily (SD video)

How we can bring mental health support to refugees | Essam DaodThe global refugee crisis is a mental health catastrophe, leaving millions in need of psychological support to overcome the traumas of dislocation and conflict. To undo the damage, child psychiatrist and TED Fellow Essam Daod has been working in camps, rescue boats and the shorelines of Greece and the Mediterranean Sea to help refugees (a quarter of which are children) reframe their experiences th
6h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Computational method puts finer point on multispecies genomic comparisonsA new computational tool will potentially help geneticists to better understand what makes a human a human, or how to differentiate species in general, by providing more detailed comparative information about genome function.
6h
Ingeniøren

Energiprofessor: Storskala geotermi giver kun mening, hvis det kan udnytte billig vindstrømBrian Vad Mathiesen fra Aalborg Universitet kalder det virkelig positivt, at store spillere som A. P Møller går ind i geotermisk varme, men advarer mod at man skaber et konstant elforbrug
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

A case of 'kiss and tell': Chromosomal kissing gets less elusiveHow are chromosomes arranged in the cell nucleus? Is it possible that they communicate with one another by "touching" each other? To answer this question and to shed more light on the fundamental properties of the communication between different chromosomes, Philipp Maass from Friedrich Luft's lab at the Max Delbrück Center for Molecular Medicine in the Helmholtz Association (MDC) and Experimental
6h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

New screening tool could help diagnose early cognitive decline in dementia from homeAn international team of scientists have developed a new way to screen for age-related cognitive decline at home using a test which asks people to detect sounds and flashes on their laptop or phone.
6h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Towards personalised medicine: One type of data is not enoughTo understand the biology of diseased organs researchers can use different types of molecular data.One of the biggest computational challenges at the moment is integrating these multiple data types.A new computational method jointly analyses different types of molecular data and disentangles the sources of disease variability to guide personalised treatment.
6h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

A case of 'kiss and tell': Chromosomal kissing gets less elusiveChromosomes occupy different territories in the nucleus; their arrangement and communication with each other is still poorly understood. Scientists from Berlin and Jena published in EMBO Journal findings about structural chromosomal aberrations which have an effect on genome organization (chromosomal kissing) and disease progression.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Finnish scientists analyzed the proteome of T helper 17 cellsT helper 17 (Th17) cells belong to a group of T cells with essential functions in autoimmune diseases and inflammation. Regulatory T cells (iTregs) are T cells with a suppressive function to maintain self-tolerance and prevent autoimmune responses. Researchers from Turku Centre for Biotechnology and Aalto University together utilised the advanced technology called label-free quantitative proteomic
6h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Quantum step forward in protecting communications from hackersResearchers at the University of York have shown that a new quantum-based procedure for distributing secure information along communication lines could be successful in preventing serious security breaches.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

People who feel threatened by vegetarianism more likely to care less about animalsNew research suggests that if people perceive the rise of vegetarianism as a threat to their way of life they are more likely to care less for some animals.
6h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Dogs understand what's written all over your faceDogs are capable of understanding the emotions behind an expression on a human face. The study in Springer's journal Learning & Behavior is the latest to reveal just how connected dogs are with people. The research also provides evidence that dogs use different parts of their brains to process human emotions.
6h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Mega-cruises are becoming copies of the great Las Vegas resortsThe productive improvements and innovations in the shipyards, which have made the mega ships possible, have made the cruise ship operators look for a leisure model that fills the abundant space that these new floating cities offer. In many of these ships, the classic model of luxury has been abandoned to copy, with great precision, the theme parks of the great casino resorts of Las Vegas.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

Strange sponge-like fossil creature from half a billion years agoA discovery of a new species of sponge-like fossil from the Cambrian Period sheds light on early animal evolution.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Augmented reality helps build aircraft tanksWalking through an unfamiliar city, getting directions or simulations of buildings that no longer exist – augmented reality is where virtual content and the real world come together. Scientists at Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) are developing an assistance system based on this technology which supports engineers in building and maintaining aircraft tanks. The system is currently being tes
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

South Asian monsoon efficiently purifies the air of pollutants, but also distributes them across the globeThe same phenomenon recurs every year. During the dry season, in winter, burning fossil fuels and biomass in South Asia creates a huge pollution haze: the Atmospheric Brown Cloud. How and why it disappears as soon as the rainy season starts in spring has now been clarified by an international team of scientists led by the Max Planck Institute for Chemistry. The result is that thunderstorm updrafts
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

On the path to an artificial cellIt is hoped that cells created in a test tube can answer some of the major questions in biology. What is the minimum that a cell needs in order to live? And how did life on Earth begin? Researchers from the Max Planck Institute for Dynamics of Complex Technical Systems in Magdeburg and the Paul Pascal Research Center at the CNRS and University of Bordeaux are now presenting the forerunners of an a
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Quantum step forward in protecting communications from hackersResearchers at the University of York have shown that a new quantum-based procedure for distributing secure information along communication lines could be successful in preventing serious security breaches.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

In praise of the midges pestering footballers in the World CupEngland's opening match in World Cup 2018 was a dramatic clash between Gareth Southgate's Young Lions and several million gnats, not to mention Tunisia's wrestling footballers. England pulled a win out of the bag at the last minute – but only after a gruelling fight with some determined insects. Those plucky gnats also had to fight off the insecticide treatments of nearby swamps and insect repelle
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Thousands of Swedes are inserting microchips into themselves – here's whyThousands of people in Sweden have inserted microchips, which can function as contactless credit cards, key cards and even rail cards, into their bodies. Once the chip is underneath your skin, there is no longer any need to worry about misplacing a card or carrying a heavy wallet. But for many people, the idea of carrying a microchip in their body feels more dystopian than practical.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

Do bats adapt to gates at abandoned mines?Abandoned mines can serve as roost sites for bats, but because the mines pose serious risks to humans, officials often install gates at their entrances.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

Can evolution explain why the young are often more susceptible than adults to infection?In many species, including humans, the young are often more susceptible to infection than adults, even after accounting for prior exposure to infection. New research suggests that many species may have evolved to prioritize growth over immunity while maturing.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

Climate change to overtake land use as major threat to global biodiversityClimate change will have a rapidly increasing effect on the structure of global ecological communities over the next few decades, with amphibians and reptiles being significantly more affected than birds and mammals, a new report finds.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

Chip upgrade helps bee-size drones navigateThe same researchers, who last year designed a tiny computer chip tailored to help honeybee-sized drones navigate, have now shrunk their chip design even further, in both size and power consumption.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

Living the high life: How altitude influences bone growthA study of modern Himalayan populations shows that living at high altitude affects the length of lower arm bones, a possible indicator of differential growth of certain limb segments under high altitude stress.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Why homosexual behaviour in insects may be a case of mistaken identitySex is costly for insects. It uses up resources such as water, energy and time. Some species, like bush crickets, can ejaculate as much as a quarter of their body weight. In others, like one species of fruit fly, their sperm is actually longer than their body.
6h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Dry landscapes can increase disease transmissionIn water-limited landscapes sick animals can have increased contact with healthy individuals, which can facilitate disease transmission. Scientists from the German Leibniz Institute for Zoo and Wildlife Research (Leibniz-IZW) present these findings in the British Ecological Society journal Functional Ecology.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

China and the US are racing to develop AI weaponsWhen Google's AlphaGo defeated the Chinese grandmaster at a game of Go in 2017, China was confronted with its own "Sputnik moment": a prompt to up its game on the development of artifical intelligence (AI). Sure enough, Beijing is pursuing launch a national-level AI innovation agenda for "civil-military fusion". It's part of China's ambitious quest to become a "science and technology superpower" –
6h
Ingeniøren

Miljøstyrelsen flår legetøj af hylderne: 100 pct. af de testede er ulovligeTo forskellige test-scenarier med legetøjsproduktet squishies har vist, at legetøjet indeholder stoffer, der kan være både skadelige for leveren, irritere øjnene og genere lungerne hos børn.
6h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Protected bike lanes reduce stress, travel time for riders: studyEdmonton's contentious 7.8-kilometre stretch of protected bike lanes and shared-use paths that were built last summer have led to a sixfold increase in the number of stress-free connections made in the city, according to student-led research from the University of Alberta.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

People feeling threatened by vegetarianism care less about animalsNew research suggests that if people perceive the rise of vegetarianism as a threat to their way of life they are more likely to care less for some animals.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Hearing tests on wild whalesScientists published the first hearing tests on a wild population of healthy marine mammals. The tests on beluga whales in Bristol Bay, AK, revealed that the whales have sensitive hearing abilities and the number of animals that experienced extensive hearing losses was far less than what scientists had anticipated.
6h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Researchers develop a better method to compare gene expression in single cellsEfforts to capitalize on next-generation sequencing to compare gene expression in individual cells for clues about cancer's origins, progression or relapse just got a boost. St. Jude Children's Research Hospital researchers have developed an algorithm that provides a more accurate and sensitive method of identifying differences in gene expression in individual cells.
6h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

New tool using Facebook data shows worldwide gender gapAn international group of researchers, involving scientists from Universidad Carlos III de Madrid (UC3M) and the Complexity Science Hub Vienna, developed a tool to track and analyze gender inequality through Facebook usage data. Their results, published in an article in the latest issue of Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS), show that gender inequality online is related to gend
6h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Quantum non-locality in ultra-cold atomic gasesNon-locality, Einstein's 'spooky action at a distance', has already been observed between quantum objects separated by more than one kilometer. This achievement is not a surprise — recent years have seen a major advancement in the quest for non-local systems. In their "Physical Review Letters" publication, researchers from the Faculty of Physics, University of Warsaw present a novel and versati
6h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Coconut oil prolongs life in peroxisomal disorders'Lorenzo's Oil' was to help a seriously ill boy suffering from a peroxisomal disorder (adrenoleukodystrophy/ALD). The true story was turned into a film which made the rare disease well known. Scientists from the University of Bonn, the German Center for Neurodegenerative Diseases and the German Cancer Research Center investigated such peroxisomal diseases on fruit flies. They were able to prove th
6h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

A lightweight carbon nanofiber-based collectorLithium metal is considered to be the most promising anode material for the next-generation rechargeable batteries. However, the growth of lithium dendrite and the resulted poor cyclic stability and safety issues greatly hinder the practical application. This work shows a lightweight three-dimensional carbon nanofiber framework with high nitrogen-doping level as current collector, which effectivel
6h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Dry landscapes can increase disease transmissionIn water-limited landscapes sick animals can have increased contact with healthy individuals, which can facilitate disease transmission. Scientists from the German Leibniz Institute for Zoo and Wildlife Research (Leibniz-IZW) present these findings in the British Ecological Society journal Functional Ecology.
6h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Forgetting may help improve memory and learningForgetting names, skills or information learned in class is often thought of as purely negative. However unintuitive it may seem, research suggests that forgetting plays a positive role in learning: It can actually increase long-term retention, information retrieval and performance. The findings will be presented today at the American Physiological Society's (APS's) Institute on Teaching and Learn
6h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Hearing tests on wild whalesScientists published the first hearing tests on a wild population of healthy marine mammals. The tests on beluga whales in Bristol Bay, AK, revealed that the whales have sensitive hearing abilities and the number of animals that experienced extensive hearing losses was far less than what scientists had anticipated.
6h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

New theory deepens understanding of Turing patterns in biologyA team of researchers at EMBL have expanded Alan Turing's seminal theory on how patterns are created in biological systems. This work, which was partly done at the Centre for Genomic Regulation (CRG), may answer whether nature's patterns are governed by Turing's mathematical model and could have applications in tissue engineering. Their results have been published on June 20 in Physical Review X.
6h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Focusing on next 10 years could lead to better use of recommendations for cancer screeningIn a recent study, asking participants to decide on a screening schedule for the next 10 years, instead of just making a single decision for an upcoming appointment, nearly doubled the number of participants who followed evidence-based recommendations for cervical cancer screening.
6h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Competition for space: Oncogenic mutant cells vs normal cellsOsaka University-led researchers discovered how oncogenic mutant cells selectively expand into surrounding normal tissues and occupy them based on prediction by computer simulation and experimental verification.
6h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Miniaturized infrared cameras take colored photos of the eyeResearchers at the Nara Institute of Science and Technology (NAIST), in partnership with scientists at the University of Tokyo, report a new miniaturized camera module that can be used to diagnose the eye. The module uses three wavelengths of near infrared light to give a clear image of the fundus that matches the performance of cameras in the clinic, but is small enough to mount on top a smartpho
6h
The Atlantic

What Incredibles 2 Says About Hero WorshipThis article contains major spoilers for the plot of Incredibles 2. “Politicians don’t understand people who do good things. That makes them nervous,” Rick Dicker, the rheumy-eyed secret agent assigned to the world of superheroes, tells the Parr family as they go into hiding at the start of Incredibles 2 . Delivered with a melancholy shrug, it’s an unusually charged line for a children’s film, an
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The Atlantic

Enforce the Border—HumanelyFrom Laura Bush to Rosalyn Carter, from elected representatives to past high government officials, outrage is the mood of the moment, perhaps more than at any time since the immediate aftermath of the 2016 election. The Trump administration’s border policies and his dehumanizing rhetoric about immigrants, whether illegal or not, have triggered this incandescent reaction. Concentration-camp compar
6h
The Atlantic

Brexit Could Cripple Britain’s PortsI arrive in Dover, England, on a Thursday evening in late spring, a few hours before sundown. On my left as I emerge from the railway station is a pale cliff face with a castle on top. I go right up Folkestone Road, passing a flurry of guesthouses and allotments. It is golden hour and, apart from some furious seagulls, peaceful and quiet. You wouldn’t know it from where I’m standing, but Dover is
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

What will freight and supply chains look like 20 years from now? Experts ponder the scenariosThe Australian government is developing a national freight and supply chain strategy. As part of that effort, we created a set of scenarios describing what Australia's future might look like 20 years from now. In evaluations by a large number of experts of all the future drivers of change we identified, two emerged as the most powerful and uncertain: widespread use of automation, and increased pre
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

Swedes have been brewing beer since the Iron Age, new evidence confirmsArchaeologists have found carbonized germinated grains showing that malt was produced for beer brewing as early as the Iron Age in the Nordic region. The findings made in Uppåkra in southern Sweden indicate a large-scale production of beer, possibly for feasting and trade.
6h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

Controlling robots with brainwaves and hand gesturesSystem enables people to correct robot mistakes on multi-choice problems.
6h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Novel genetic method improves efficiency of enzymeResearchers at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and the University of Georgia developed a new genetic engineering technique to dramatically improve an enzyme's ability to break down biomass.
7h
Popular Science

A smartphone camera is the most boring device for documenting your lifeTechnology These three cameras are interesting alternatives to the ubiquitous smartphone shooters. A stand-alone camera—from any generation—can capture distinctive memories worth keeping. These three cameras are interesting alternatives to the ubiquitous smartphone…
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Latest Headlines | Science News

How to help your toddler be helpful (with caveats)Even very young toddlers like to help, a social skill that’s linked to later success in school and life.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Scientists create new building material out of fungus, rice and glassWould you live in a house made of fungus? It's not just a rhetorical question: fungi are the key to a new low-carbon, fire-resistant and termite-deterring building material.
7h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

New theory deepens understanding of Turing patterns in biologyA team of researchers at EMBL have expanded Alan Turing's seminal theory on how patterns are created in biological systems. This work, which was partly done at the Centre for Genomic Regulation (CRG), may answer whether nature's patterns are governed by Turing's mathematical model and could have applications in tissue engineering. Their results have been published on 20 June in Physical Review X.
7h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Researchers find important new piece in the Huntington's disease puzzleIn a new study, researchers from the University of Copenhagen have discovered a hitherto unknown error in the transport of glutamine between astrocytes and neurons in the brain of mice with Huntington's disease. At the same time, it is a relevant area on which to focus the effort of developing a future treatment for the disease, the researchers believe.
7h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Self-care and social ties can help men recover from the suicide of a loved oneNew UBC research suggests that male values like self-care and protecting family and friends can help men deal with the emotional trauma of losing a friend or family member to suicide.
7h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Brainhealth: Financial decision-making capacity need not decline in healthy advanced agingNew research from The Center for BrainHealth® at The University of Texas at Dallas shows that advancing age alone is not the defining factor in impaired financial decision-making.
7h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

New beacons light up the interiorLMU's Ralf Jungmann develops modes of microscopy that can resolve cellular structures with dimensions on the order of nanometers. He has now succeeded in imaging actin networks in cells in greater detail than before.
7h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Stereo vision using computing architecture inspired by the brainThe Brain-Inspired Computing group at IBM Research-Almaden will be presenting at the 2018 IEEE Conference on Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition (CVPR 2018) our most recent paper titled "A Low Power, High Throughput, Fully Event-Based Stereo System." The paper describes an end-to-end stereo vision system that uses exclusively spiking neural network computation and can run on neuromorphic hardw
7h
Futurity.org

Kids know what you get depends on what you giveChildren as young as 5 have a nuanced understanding of fairness, according to a new study. The research shows they incorporate market concerns—the idea that what you get is in line with what you give or offer—into their decision making and increasingly do so as they get older. Some people think children are innately selfish—they want to get goodies for themselves. Other people think children are
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

How to print a building—the science behind 3-D printing in constructionIt's often claimed that 3-D printing – known in the trade as "additive manufacturing" – will change the way we live. Most recently, a team from Eindhoven University of Technology announced plans to build the "world's first" habitable 3-D printed houses. But it's one thing to build small, prototype homes in a park – it's quite another to successfully use additive manufacturing for large scale proje
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Study confirms beetles exploit warm winters to expand rangeA new study by Los Alamos National Laboratory scientists and colleagues confirms that increasing minimum winter temperatures allow beetles to expand their range but reveals that overcrowding can put the brakes on population growth.
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Live Science

Mystery 'Dogman' Beast Shot in Montana Was Just a Gray Wolf, DNA ShowsWhen the beast was found, its features led to some pretty wild speculation about whether it was a dire wolf, a dog-wolf hybrid or perhaps a dog-human hybrid (seriously, people?).
7h
Big Think

Billion-dollar acquisitions: Where tech giants buy some of their best ideasThe top 10 tech companies spend big bucks acquiring innovative startups and their brilliant technologies. Read More
7h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

The deformation and mechanics of one-atom thin layer materialsHigh strength and ultra-low bending rigidity brings in uniqueness of graphene in contrast to other carbon allotropes. The out-of-plane deformation is of soft nature, which gives rise to rich morphology and is crucial for morphology control. Constructing the structure – mechanical property relationship of graphene is of compelling need for the reliability and durability of graphene-based applicatio
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Lonely and prolonged struggle for people with severe obesityThe majority of people with severe obesity have a lonely and prolonged struggle with their weight. In one study spanning more than 10 years, 83 percent report that they constantly strive to lose weight or prevent weight gain.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Reading risk behavior in the brainAnxious people take fewer risks — in itself this is not a surprising observation. However, a team of psychologists from the University of Jena, together with partners from Würzburg (Gerrmany) and Victoria (Canada) have succeeded in making this decision process visible in the brain, allowing them to predict the behaviour of individuals. To this end, they conducted an experiment to measure the risk
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Encrypted messages in biological processesRNA modifications can encrypt the RNA code and are responsible for a very sophisticated control of RNA function. A Danish-German research team has shown that modified RNA bases have a great impact on the dynamics of gene expression from DNA to functional RNA. The study yields important new insight into how the basis of RNA modifications can affect the function of mature RNA molecules.
7h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Weight loss reverses heart condition in obesity sufferersAustralian research shows for the first time that obese people who are suffering from atrial fibrillation can reduce or reverse the effects of the condition by losing weight.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Review of the synthetic techniques and applications of QDs/GR compositesRecent research published in a paper in NANO by a group of researchers from Yunnan University investigates the recent research progress on QDs/GR composites with focus on their industrial preparation and commercial applications. The selection of the appropriate synthetic method is highly dependent on the applying requirements of QDs/GR composites.
7h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Study confirms beetles exploit warm winters to expand rangeA new study by Los Alamos National Laboratory scientists and colleagues confirms that increasing minimum winter temperatures allow beetles to expand their range but reveals that overcrowding can put the brakes on population growth.
7h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Lyme disease cases among children are on the rise in western PennsylvaniaDoctors found that cases of Lyme disease in children have increased exponentially in western Pennsylvania.
7h
Scientific American Content: Global

Dogs Have a Lot More Neurons Than CatsDogs beat their domesticated rivals, cats, in a new attempt to measure cognitive power — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

A possible explanation for varying measurements of Venus's rotation rateA trio of researchers with the University of California and Sorbonne Universités has found a possible explanation for why Venus probes have found different day lengths for the planet. In their paper published in the journal Nature Geoscience, T. Navarro, G. Schubert and S. Lebonnois describe a theory they have developed based on observational data.
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Dagens Medicin

Region Hovedstaden skal spare 198 mio. kr. i 2019Region Hovedstadens hospitaler, Akutberedskabet og Region Hovedstadens Apotek skal finde besparelser for 198 mio. kr. i 2019. Psykiatriområdet undgår sparekniven.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Misinformation and biases infect social media, both intentionally and accidentallySocial media are among the primary sources of news in the U.S. and across the world. Yet users are exposed to content of questionable accuracy, including conspiracy theories, clickbait, hyperpartisan content, pseudo science and even fabricated "fake news" reports.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

EU tells Luxembourg to recover 120 mn euros from French energy giantThe EU on Wednesday ruled that Luxembourg had given illegal tax breaks to energy giant Engie and ordered it to recover 120 million euros from the company, whose biggest shareholder is the French state.
7h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Report provides 24-hour view of cyberattacks in Florida, USThe Internet of things (IoT) – smartphones, vehicles, smart buildings, home appliances and other devices that use electronics, software and sensors—have transformed the way people around the world live and work. But not without risks. Data breaches and cyberattacks affect millions of businesses and households each year, hindering the integrity of critical systems, leaking private information and p
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Braiding may be key to using time crystals in quantum computingOver the past few years, physicists have predicted that a new form of matter called time crystals may have potential applications in quantum computing. Now in a new study, physicists Raditya Weda Bomantara and Jiangbin Gong at the National University of Singapore have taken some of the first steps toward showing exactly how that might be done. They theoretically demonstrate that, by braiding two d
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Viden

Skjult kamera gør nye smartphones til én stor skærmFlere kinesiske smartphone-producenter fremviser telefonener som nærmest rammeløse. Kameraet skyder frem fra skjul når det skal i brug.
7h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Having a meal activates the functioning of human brown fatThe importance of the human brown adipose tissue (BAT) has become clearer during the past ten years. Using positron emission tomography, PET, it was shown that adult humans have functional BAT. Coldness is an effective activator of the BAT metabolic function but, in rodents, eating has the same effect. Now, the researchers at Turku PET Centre in Finland have proven that having a meal increases oxy
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Is it their own fault?! How people judge the exclusion of othersThe way people view the social exclusion of others varies — depending on how much they think the excluded person is to blame. However, this is heavily influenced by how similar the group members are to each other, as a research team from the University of Basel writes in the Journal of Personality and Social Psychology.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Evaluation method for the impact of wind power fluctuation on power system qualityAbrupt changes of wind power generation output are a source of severe damage to power systems. Researchers at Kyoto University developed a stochastic modeling method that enables to evaluate the impact of such phenomena. The feature of the method lies in its significant computational effectiveness in comparison to standard Monte Carlo simulation, and its applicability to analysis and synthesis of
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

When you're a sitting duck, you learn to adaptWhen sitting on a nest to incubate eggs, a bird is physically stuck and most vulnerable to attacks of any kind, so coping without stress and other significant costs is important. For common loons, black flies are a common blood-feeding pest and can cause nest abandonment and decreased fledging rates. A new study from The Auk: Ornithological Advances presents some of the best data to date supportin
7h
New Scientist – News

Cocaine in the water makes eels hyperactive and damages musclesThere are low levels of cocaine and other drugs in many rivers, and lab studies suggest that European eels are suffering muscle damage as a result
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Dagens Medicin

Ny forskningschef ansat på Nordsjællands HospitalOverlæge Thea Kølsen Fischer bliver fra 1. september ny forskningschef på Nordsjællands Hospital. Hun kommer fra en stilling som forskningsleder på Statens Serum Institut.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

EU copyright law passes key hurdleEU Copyright InternetA highly disputed European copyright law that could force online platforms such as Google and Facebook to pay for links to news content passed a key hurdle in the European Parliament on Wednesday.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Hyundai Motor, Audi join hands for fuel cell technologyHyundai Motor Group said Wednesday it signed an agreement with Audi AG to jointly develop electronics vehicles powered by fuel cell.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Electric promise: Volvo Cars opens first US factoryVolvo Cars, the first major automaker to abandon cars powered solely by internal combustion engines, is officially opening its first plant in the United States.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Using bloodstains at crime scenes to determine age of a suspect or victimFrom the spatter analysis made famous in the TV show Dexter to the frequent DNA profiling of CSI and the real cases covered in the FBI Files, blood tests are ubiquitous in forensic science. Now, researchers report in ACS Central Science that a new blood test, which could be performed at a crime scene, could help determine the age of a suspect or victim within just an hour.
8h
Feed: All Latest

Sennheiser CX Sport Review: Can’t Shake ’EmSenny’s latest buds lack bass but stay put during the most strenuous workouts.
8h
Big Think

More women in government leads to less corruption, new research showsA new study of 155 regions found that the more women are represented in local and national governments, the less corruption there is. Read More
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The Scientist RSS

Image of the Day: Snacking on SnailsFive newly identified species of snakes suck the mollusks right out of their shells.
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The Atlantic

Tucker Carlson Is Hurting America AgainLast week, Fox News Channel’s Tucker Carlson, or else the eponymous populist demagogue that he plays on TV, declared on Tucker Carlson Tonight, “ If you’re looking to understand what’s actually happening in this country, always assume the opposite of whatever they’re telling you on the big news stations.” He has previously hosted TV shows on CNN, MSNBC, and PBS. While not uncharacteristic of the
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

When you're a sitting duck, you learn to adaptWhen sitting on a nest to incubate eggs, a bird is physically stuck and most vulnerable to attacks of any kind, so coping without stress and other significant costs is important. For Common Loons, black flies are a common blood-feeding pest and can cause nest abandonment and decreased fledging rates. This has impacts on not only individual pair success, but on population dynamics as well. A new st
8h
Discovery (uploads) on YouTube

Monza | Street Outlaws: Crash CourseThe 405 List wouldn't be the same without the silent street killer, Monza and his Sinister Split Bumper. See how he's grown to be one of the OKC's most consistent competitors. Full episodes streaming now on DiscoveryGO: https://discovery.com/tv-shows/street-outlaws/ Binge watch all Street Outlaws: Crash Course now! https://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/street-outlaws-crash-course/ Subscribe to Disco
8h
Ingeniøren

Dansk algoritme skal forhindre madspild til havsAalborg Universitet og en sønderjysk elektronikvirksomhed har udviklet et varslingssystem, som kan forudsige nedbrud på køle­containere til havs. Bag de smarte algoritmer ligger mange timers tungt manuelt arbejde.
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Dagens Medicin

Nordsjællands Hospital får ny klinisk professor i obstetrik og gynækologi
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

As future batteries, hybrid supercapacitors are super-chargedA newly discovered supercapacitor has the highest energy density of any comparable system as demonstrated by a team of Molecular Foundry users and staff. These ultracapacitors can be charged and discharged repeatedly. The team's new design approach also makes them very stable.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Could aliens harness stars to keep ahead of expanding universe?Dan Hooper, a senior scientist with Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory has written a paper outlining a way future aliens could keep their civilizations alive in spite of the isolation due to an expanding universe. In his paper uploaded to the arXiv preprint server, he suggests they might consider collecting and storing stars.
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Scientific American Content: Global

Why We Procrastinate and 5 Ways to StopWe all procrastinate, even at times we know better — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Ingeniøren

Kronik: Elbiler er vejen til 2030-klimamål[no content]
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Ingeniøren

Facebook-dom rammer danske medier – de må nu vente på IT-gigantenForeningen Danske Medier er uenig i EU-dom, der blandt giver dens medlemmer medansvar for Facebook's dataindsamling, når medierne prøver at nå læsere med såkaldte 'fansider' på den sociale platform.
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Popular Science

Everything you think you know about bald eagles is wrongAnimals They’re whiney moochers, for starters. Bald eagles look awesome. Heck, all eagles look awesome. It’s why they’re a good national symbol—they seem so fearsome and regal. But despite their image being…
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

New research shows why nutrition should be back on the table for surgical patientsImplementing a nutrition care program for malnourished surgical patients showed a nearly 50 percent reduction in readmission rates, according to new data from Advocate Health Care and Abbott. New guidelines call for hospital reform on improving nutrition before and after surgery for better patient outcomes.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Chemical 'caryatids' improve the stability of metal-organic frameworksMetal-organic frameworks (MOFs) are porous materials that can change the way we capture carbon, filter water, and an array of other applications. EPFL chemists have now found the link between mechanical stability and structure, thus overcoming a significant obstacle in optimizing MOFs.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Spacefood for cowsToday, producing feed for pigs, cattle and chicken causes immense impacts for the climate and the environment.In the future, animal feed production is likely to be shifted from croplands to large-scale industrial facilities as it could bring both financial and environmental benefits.Replacing 2 percent feed with protein-rich microbes could decrease agricultural greenhouse gas emissions, global cro
8h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Microbial proteins could supplement animal feed, reduce land use and pollutionAs the world's population swells, humans will have to figure out how to keep feeding livestock without using even larger tracts of land to grow food for them or causing more harm to the environment. Scientists report in a study appearing in Environmental Science & Technology that the key could be bacteria that can efficiently produce large amounts of microbial proteins. These proteins could replac
8h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Using bloodstains at crime scenes to determine age of a suspect or victimFrom the spatter analysis made famous in the TV show Dexter to the frequent DNA profiling of CSI and the real cases covered in the FBI Files, blood tests are ubiquitous in forensic science. Now, researchers report in ACS Central Science that a new blood test, which could be performed at a crime scene, could help determine the age of a suspect or victim within just an hour.
8h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Evaluation method for the impact of wind power fluctuation on power system qualityAbrupt changes of wind power generation output are a source of severe damage to power systems. Researchers at Kyoto University developed a stochastic modeling method that enables to evaluate the impact of such phenomena. The feature of the method lies in its significant computational effectiveness in comparison to standard Monte Carlo simulation, and its applicability to analysis and synthesis of
8h
The Atlantic

Gilead in AmericaThis article contains spoilers through the 10th episode of Season 2 of The Handmaid’s Tale. The aura of timeliness that hovers around The Handmaid’s Tale has, for the last two seasons, charged Hulu’s television adaptation of the novel. Margaret Atwood’s 1985 work of speculative fiction imagines a repressive theocratic regime staging a coup in America and forcing fertile women into sexual and repr
8h
The Atlantic

Trump’s Insidious Reason for Leaving the UN Human Rights CouncilWhen the Trump administration commits to a decision, it goes full throttle—and often with little regard for the consequences. One such decision was announced Tuesday evening: The United States is withdrawing its membership from the UN Human Rights Council, which it joined in 2008, two years after its creation. The stated reasons for withdrawal ranged from what the Trump administration regards as
8h
The Atlantic

Dear Therapist: I'm Turning 50 and Panicking About My AppearanceEditor’s Note: Every Wednesday, Lori Gottlieb answers questions from readers about their problems, big and small. Have a question? Email her at dear.therapist@theatlantic.com . Dear Therapist, I’ll be turning 50 later this year and I’m having a very difficult time with my current stage in the aging process. I’m not so much worried about the number itself but about the changes in my body and espec
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The Atlantic

What Petty Nextdoor Posts Reveal About AmericaJosh Cochran Here are some of the things I heard about in my neighborhood over the past year: A thunderstorm downed a tree, blocking a central road; a shadowy agent called “the night clipper” arose, surreptitiously cutting overhanging bushes while unsuspecting property owners slept; several dogs and cats were lost, found, or “on the loose,” whatever that means for a cat; a federal-grand-jury-summ
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BBC News – Science & Environment

Astronauts eject UK-led space junk demo missionThe RemoveDebris satellite will trial technologies for snaring broken hardware drifting in orbit.
8h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Self-heating drinks cans set for a relaunch—here's how they workA US technology firm is hoping to make a very old idea finally work by launching self-heating drinks cans. HeatGenie recently received US$6m to bring their can design to market in 2018, more than 15 years after Nestle abandoned a similar idea. Yet the principles behind the technology go back much further to 1897, when Russian engineer Yevgeny Fedorov invented the first self-heating can. So how do
8h
Futurity.org

Cheating on your diet? A blood test can tellAnalyzing metabolites in a blood sample can reveal if you’re following your prescribed diet or cheating, researchers report. Clinical trials are often plagued by participants’ poor adherence to assigned diets, which can make it difficult to detect the diets’ true effectiveness. The new approach, described in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition , could provide an objective and relatively ea
9h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Competition for space—oncogenic mutant cells vs normal cellsCells in multicellular tissues adhere to each other. Epithelial tissues on the surface layer of the intestines and skin pack cells into a hexagonal (honeycomb) pattern, with cells adhering tightly to the six cells adjacent to them (Fig. 1). The whole tissue can be represented as a network, and body function is maintained by keeping this basic adhesion network intact.
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Futurity.org

Political leanings shape city water laws as much as climateA city’s water ordinances can be as much related to whether it leans left or right politically as they are to whether the climate is wet or dry, according to a new report. Researchers found Los Angeles ranks No. 1 for number and strength of policies, followed by six other left-leaning California cities along with Austin, Texas. “We had expected that water conservation would be a more neutral issu
9h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

New AI method increases the power of artificial neural networksAn international team of scientists from Eindhoven University of Technology, University of Texas at Austin, and University of Derby, has developed a revolutionary method that quadratically accelerates artificial intelligence (AI) training algorithms. This gives full AI capability to inexpensive computers, and would make it possible in one to two years for supercomputers to utilize Artificial Neura
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Turbulence isn't just a science problemMost of us have an understanding of what atmospheric turbulence is – nauseating plane movement is hard to forget.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Industrial microbes could feed cattle, pigs and chicken with less damage to the environmentToday's agricultural feed cultivation for cattle, pigs and chicken comes with tremendous impacts for the environment and climate, including deforestation, greenhouse gas emissions, biodiversity loss and nitrogen pollution. Cultivating feed in industrial facilities instead of on croplands might help to alleviate the critical implications in the agricultural food supply chain. Protein-rich microbes,
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Chemical 'caryatids' improve the stability of metal-organic frameworksMetal-organic frameworks (MOFs) are materials with nano-sized pores in their crystal structures. These pores allow MOFs to capture molecules so efficiently that they are now prime candidates in applications like carbon capture and water filtering.
9h
Ingeniøren

El-scootere med bytte-batteri myldrer fremOvergangen fra små larmende to- og firetaktere til lydløse elektriske scootere er godt i gang. Nu får den første taiwanesiske model med udskiftelige batterier konkurrence fra en af verdens scootergiganter.
9h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Within 10 years, a high-luminosity LHC at CERNA new site opened on Friday, June 15, 2018, at the LHC, the Large Hadron Collider. Begun in 2011, this project aims to commission a high-luminosity LHC (HL-LHC) by 2026 that will increase the number of proton-proton collisions and gather more data. France is contributing substantially to this project (to the tune of 180 million euros, including salaries). Teams at CNRS and CEA are participating in
9h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Not always bad—MXenes' spontaneous oxidation harnessed to create 2-D nanocompositesResearchers at Missouri S&T have discovered a new way to harness the potential of a type of spontaneously oxidized MXene thin films, to create nanocomposites that could sense both light and the environment. Previously, such spontaneous oxidation was considered detrimental because it degrades the MXene structure. The research is published in the June 2018 issue of ACS Nano, one of Google Scholar's
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Smashing avocado disease threatsResearchers are working with the Australian avocado industry to safeguard one of the nation's favourite fruits from the threat of existing and emerging disease.
9h
Futurity.org

Aging out of WIC leaves some kids hungryNo safety net exists for children who age out of the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants and Children (WIC) before they become eligible to attend kindergarten, a new study shows. Not only does the coverage gap affect overall food insecurity, but it also reduces reading scores at kindergarten entry, a time when children are often placed on learning trajectories, says Irma Art
9h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

How wildfires contaminate drinking water sourcesWildfires can contaminate nearby streams and watersheds through mobilization of sediments, nutrients and dissolved organic matter, straining the capabilities of downstream municipal treatment facilities, a new report co-authored by CU Boulder researchers shows.
9h
The Atlantic

The Immigrants Fueling the Gig EconomyEditor’s Note: This article is the third in a series about how the gig economy is shaping the future of labor and what that means for workers. Sakhr Sharafadin was making $8 an hour in the kitchen at a Little Caesars, during his senior year of high school, when friends started telling him about their work as Uber drivers and food deliverers for an app called Caviar. Though he’d been promoted to n
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Dagens Medicin

Styrelsen for Patientsikkerhed rækker hånden ud til praktiserende lægerEn debat på Folkemødet lørdag tog en uventet drejning, da Styrelsen for Patientsikkerhed opfordrede PLO til at komme med et udspil til, hvilke punkter patientsikkerheden i almen praksis skal måles på fremadrettet. Parterne vil nu sætte sig sammen og drøfte sagen nærmere.
9h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

New NASA mission to detect plant water use from spaceDoctors learn a lot about their patients' health by taking their temperature. An elevated temperature, or fever, can be a sign of illness. The same goes for plants, but their temperatures on a global scale are harder to measure than the temperatures of individual people.
9h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Charting a path to better cell models of the intestineFor many years, drug development has relied on simplified and scalable cell culture models to find and test new drugs for a wide variety of diseases. However, cells grown in a dish are often a feint representation of healthy and diseased cell types in vivo. This limitation has serious consequences: Many potential medicines that originally appear promising in cell cultures often fail to work when t
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Helping visually impaired children to 'feel' the universeA University of Portsmouth project is helping blind and visually impaired children to 'feel' the universe.
9h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Friends in high places can lead to questionable spendingHaving friends in high places such as the U.S. Congress can lead to reckless behavior at the local government level, according to a new study.
9h
New Scientist – News

The Milky Way has devoured 15 other galaxies since it formedOur galaxy formed fast, and with an appetite. It’s devoured 15 other galaxies, including a big one nicknamed Kraken that we didn’t know existed until now
9h
New Scientist – News

Robo bomb squads compete to gather evidence after a drone attackObstacle courses, simulated chemical spills, and IEDs are just some of the challenges bomb squads tackle with ground robots and drones at the Robot Rodeo competition
9h
Science-Based Medicine

Is Gaming Addiction a Thing?The WHO has added gaming disorder as an official ICD diagnosis, and the APA is considering adding gaming disorder to the DSM. What is gaming disorder and how should it be diagnosed?
9h
The Atlantic

Parasites Can Mind-Control Animals Without Infecting ThemA tapeworm is essentially a very long, parasitic towel with a grappling hook for a head. It attaches itself to the internal organs of its host with its fiendish head spines, and it absorbs nutrients through its tagliatelle-shaped body. Once fastened, it does very little. It has no mouth or gut, no circulatory or respiratory systems. Its sparse nerves culminate in a cluster that could barely be ca
9h
The Atlantic

Exit InterviewFor years, Edith Gondwe, a lawyer and human-resources manager, clocked in 12 to 14 hours a day at top-tier law firms. She shattered records recruiting talent and developing firm leadership—but she also had to terminate countless employees. “I understood that these people had invested so much of themselves into their careers,” Gondwe told me, and that losing those careers “felt like a failure.” Ev
9h
The Atlantic

The Subtle and Not-So-Subtle Force of AgeismEditor’s Note: This article is part of Exit Interview , a series of conversations about leaving one’s career. In 2014, Gordon Rothman, a multimedia producer who worked in TV news, lost his job at CBS in a mass layoff. He didn’t sit idle. Rothman had already been volunteering for Gatewave, a radio reading service for the blind, and became the nonprofit’s executive director. He saved the group from
9h
The Atlantic

When a Job Is Just Too MuchEditor’s Note: This article is part of Exit Interview , a series of conversations about leaving one’s career. James T. Green landed the job of his dreams fresh out of the University of St. Francis in Joliet, Illinois. At just 23 years old, he had a senior graphic-design position in advertising at a major media organization. But after landing in the hospital, not once but twice, he worried that st
9h
The Atlantic

When Changing Your Career Means Changing Your IdentityEditor’s Note: This article is part of Exit Interview , a series of conversations about leaving one’s career. In 1966, Nancy Bancroft changed not just her career, but her name. After joining a convent, “I went from Nancy to Sister Dorothy, which was my mother’s name. Dorothy means ‘gift of God.’” While there, she wanted to continue to pursue a meaningful career, but was also curious about what it
9h
The Atlantic

The Never-Ending Struggle to Sustain a Small BusinessEditor’s Note: This article is part of Exit Interview , a series of conversations about leaving one’s career. Like many theater rats, the actress Delissa Reynolds had juggled auditions with an on-and-off office job, “daylighting” as a temp at Citibank. She had some success as an actor, even landing two roles on Law and Order . But by 2002, Reynolds faced a reckoning in a field notoriously challen
9h
The Atlantic

The ‘Disenfranchised Grief’ of Losing Your JobEditor’s Note: This article is part of Exit Interview , a series of conversations about leaving one’s career. It’s comforting to know people like Meg Spinella, a hospice chaplain, exist. Spinella radiates empathy, even as she jokingly describes herself as “more of a ‘shit happens’” than “an ‘everything happens for a reason’ person.” It certainly felt more like the former when, in 2007, budget cut
9h
Feed: All Latest

Autonomous Vehicles Might Drive Cities to Financial RuinAmerican cities rely on car-related fees to fund public transit. But driverless cars might not need to park or fill up on gas—causing the system to collapse.
10h
Feed: All Latest

Why Lyft Is Trying to Become the Next Subscription BusinessAfter months of testing its fledgling membership program, Lyft is betting that the model that built loyal followings for Netflix and Spotify can also work for transit
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Latest Headlines | Science News

Each year painted lady butterflies cross the Sahara — and then go back againPainted ladies migrate the farthest of any butterfly.
10h
New on MIT Technology Review

Basic income could work—if you do it Canada-styleA Canadian province is giving people a basic income, no strings attached—revealing both the appeal and the limitations of the idea.
10h
Live Science

SpongeBob NoPants? Bizarre 'Nude' Sea Creature May Be a Sponge Relative After AllA "nude" sponge-like animal that lived 500,000 years ago is offering compelling new clues about early animal evolution.
10h
Live Science

Photos: Ancient Shrimp-Like Critter Was Tiny But FierceAbout 508 million years ago, a fierce water beastie with paddles and a shrimp-like tail sped through the water, hunting for prey.
10h
Live Science

First Known Nursery for Baby Manta Rays Discovered Off the Texas CoastThe little rays use the shallow reefs as hiding spots to avoid big sharks in the area.
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Live Science

Ancient, Mustached Sea Creature Used Spiny Limbs to Disembody PreyIt took more than 100 years, but researchers have finally come up with a scientific description for a weird, thumb-size sea creature with large eyes, a "mustache" and fringed paddles for zipping through the ocean during the Cambrian period.
10h
Scientific American Content: Global

Colorectal Cancer Is on the Rise in Young AdultsThey're reluctant to have invasive colonoscopies, but a simple blood test could improve compliance — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
10h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Electron sandwich doubles thermoelectric performanceResearchers more than doubled the ability of a material to convert heat into electricity, which could help reduce the amount of wasted heat, and thus wasted fossil fuel, in daily activities and industries.
10h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Fossil fish with platypus-like snout shows that coral reefs have long been evolution hotspotsCoral reefs are well known today for their incredibly diverse and abundant marine life, including fish species ranging from delicate butterflyfish to huge humphead wrasse and ornate lionfish.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Image: Dark and stormy JupiterThis image captures the intensity of the jets and vortices in Jupiter's North North Temperate Belt.
10h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Sentinel-3 flies tandemThe key to monitoring Earth's changing environment and to guaranteeing a consistent stream of satellite data to improve our daily lives is to take the same measurements over the course of decades. But how do you know that measurements from successive satellites, even though identical in build, are like for like?
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Big Data exploration in the era of GaiaTwo astronomers from the University of Groningen (The Netherlands) have developed a software library that can effortlessly generate visualisations based on hundreds of millions of data points. Maarten Breddels and Jovan Veljanoski initially developed their software to handle the enormous quantity of data from the Gaia mission. However, the software can also show patterns in other large data files.
10h
Scientific American Content: Global

Babysitting Mammals Keep It in the FamilyBlood relations may be the key factor for mole rats, meerkats and others. But how do humans fit in? — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
10h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

New tool using Facebook data shows worldwide gender gapAn international group of researchers, involving scientists from the Complexity Science Hub Vienna & Medical University of Vienna and Universidad Carlos III de Madrid, developed a tool to track and analyse gender inequality through Facebook usage data. Their results, published in the latest issue of Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS), show that gender inequality online is relat
10h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Detecting the fingerprints of harmful molecules noninvasively via black siliconScientists of the Far Eastern Federal University (FEFU) in cooperation with colleagues from the Russian Academy of Sciences (RAS), Australian and Lithuanian Universities have improved the technique of ultrasensitive nonperturbing spectroscopic identification of molecular fingerprints.
10h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Creating a new composite fuel for next-generation fast reactorsJoint research efforts of a team of scientists at Lobachevsky University of Nizhny Novgorod (UNN) comprising chemists, physicists and engineers are currently focused on solving the problems of handling plutonium and minor actinides (MA) accumulated over many years. To this end, they are studying composite ceramics-ceramics (Cer-Cer) and ceramics-metal (CerMet) materials on the basis of mineral-lik
10h
Dagens Medicin

Moderne sololæge: Regeringen glemmer osI 2030 skal ni ud af ti praktiserende læger sidde i en flermandspraksis, lyder et af udviklingsmålene i regeringens udspil for fremtidens almen praksis. Det får sololæge Jette Willendrup til at føle sig overset og misforstået. »Udfordringen består i at forbedre rammerne, ikke ændre måden vi driver praksis på‚« siger hun.
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Dagens Medicin

Nyborg og Svendborg får bedre lægedækningRegion Syddanmark sælger to ekstra ydernumre i Nyborg og Svendborg. Rettidig omhu, siger udvalgsformand.
10h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

An unlikely marriage among oxidesThe term alloy usually refers to a mixture of several metals. However, other materials can also be alloyed. In the semiconductor industry, for instance, oxide and nitride alloys have long been used successfully to tune the material's functional properties. Usually, these changes occur gradually and the properties of the base materials are still easy to recognize.
10h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Light pollution a reason for insect declineClimate change, pesticides and land use changes alone cannot fully explain the decline in insect populations in Germany. Scientists from the Leibniz-Institute of Freshwater Ecology and Inland Fisheries (IGB) have now discovered that regions that have experienced a sharp decline in flying insects also have high levels of light pollution. Many studies have suggested that artificial light at night ha
10h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Responses of the tropical atmospheric circulation to climate changeThe tropical circulation change under global warming has been a growing subject of research in recent decades. It has a close relationship with the tropical precipitation change, and the uncertainty in making projections is one of the difficulties in climate science.
10h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

The first experimental proof of the propagation of plasma turbulenceIn seeking to achieve fusion energy, research on magnetic field confinement of high-temperature plasma is being conducted around the world. In a high-temperature plasma, there is a temperature gradient. When the temperature gradient becomes steep, turbulence is generated. Because the high-temperature regions and the low temperature areas are mixed due to the turbulence, the core temperature cannot
10h
Ingeniøren

Lange vindmøllevinger skal bygges i kompositmaterialerTendensen mod stadigt længere vinger får DTU og vingeproducenten LM Wind Power til at arbejde tæt sammen om nye kompositmaterialer, der er lettere, stivere og bedre kan modstå revner.
10h
Ingeniøren

Yousee: It-fejl sendte tusinder af hemmelige numre til åben nummeroplysningDirektør for bredbånd og tv i YouSee, Jacob Mortensen, oplyser, at datalækket er anmeldt til Erhvervsstyrelsen.
10h
Ingeniøren

Efter Fukushima: Radioaktive mikropartikler findes 40 km vækEn ny målemetode viser, at radioaktive, cæsiumholdige mikropartikler i stort antal findes i jorden op til 40 km fra atomkraftværkerne. Det overrasker forskerne.
10h
New Scientist – News

The New York bird with a song that may be a thousand years oldA walk in the Hudson Valley 1000 years ago may have sounded similar to today. A simulation shows the songs passed down by swamp sparrows can last a millennium
10h
Dagens Medicin

Kommune afviser penge til nyt sundhedscenterVordingborg Kommune har takket nej til sundhedsministeriets penge til et nye læge- og sundhedshus. »Vi har ingen mulighed for at finde over fem millioner kroner fra egen kasse til projektet,« siger sundhedsformand.
11h
Dagens Medicin

Ny formand for reumatologer indleder forsøg med cannabisOliver Hendricks er ny formand for Reumatologisk Selskab. Han går fra august i gang med et større forsøg med medicinsk cannabis.
11h
Ingeniøren

Malerier forsimpler lynets forgreningerPå malerier ser man ikke lyn med flere end 11 forgreninger, i den virkelige verden kan lyn have mere end 50 forgreninger. Digitale fotos har været med til at mindske fejlene.
11h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

A dual-therapy approach to boost motor recovery after a strokeEPFL scientists have shown that combining a brain-computer interface (BCI) with functional electrical stimulation (FES) can help stroke victims recover greater use of their paralyzed arm — even years after the stroke.
11h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Birds have time-honored traditions, tooBy faithfully copying the most popular songs, swamp sparrows create time-honored song traditions that can be just as long-lasting as human traditions, finds a new study. The results show that creating traditions that pass the test of time doesn't necessarily require exceptional smarts.
11h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

American swamp sparrows have sung the same songs for more than 1,000 yearsAmerican swamp sparrows may have sung the same songs for more than 1,000 years and passed them on through generations by learning, according to researchers at Queen Mary University of London, Imperial College London and Duke University.
11h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Electron sandwich doubles thermoelectric performanceResearchers more than doubled the ability of a material to convert heat into electricity, which could help reduce the amount of wasted heat, and thus wasted fossil fuel, in daily activities and industries.
11h
New Scientist – News

Stealth sheets can make you appear invisible to infrared camerasA cloaking material renders objects almost completely invisible in infrared light and could have military applications
11h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Birds have time-honored traditions, tooWhat makes human cultural traditions unique? One common answer is that we are better copycats than other species, which allows us to pass our habits and ways of life down through the generations without losing or forgetting them.
12h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Giant operation against wildlife crime in 93 countriesInternational police agency Interpol says a giant operation against illegal trade in wildlife and timber has resulted in millions of dollars' worth of seizures and the identification of 1,400 suspects across the world.
12h
Science : NPR

The Science Behind The World Cup BallFor every World Cup, there's a custom official ball. But how does the Telstar 18 actually stack up? To find out, scientists stuck it in a wind tunnel with a bunch of sensors. (Image credit: Mladen Antonov/AFP/Getty Images)
12h
Viden

Dexter, Broen og CSI tager fejl: Sådan opklares et mord i virkelighedenBlodstænk, blåt lys der afslører usynlige blodpletter og lynhurtige DNA-maskiner. Politiets metoder på tv er ikke helt så fancy i virkeligheden.
12h
Ingeniøren

Landmændenes maskiner får fælles sprogGlobale konkurrenter arbejder sammen om software til fejlfri udveksling af data mellem ­landbrugsmaskiner. Aarhusianske Agrointelli og Aarhus Universitet er med i projektet.
12h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

European firms say China business 'more difficult'European companies complain they still face a tough business climate in China despite Beijing's pledges of openness, with about half saying it has become tougher in the past year, according to a survey released Wednesday.
12h
New Scientist – News

Black men are left out of cancer trials because of their biologyProstate cancer is more common in African Americans, but they are less likely to be included in drug trials. Unintended biological biases are partly to blame
12h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Hackers steal $30m from top Seoul bitcoin exchangeHackers stole more than $30 million worth of cryptocurrencies from South Korea's top bitcoin exchange, sending the unit's price falling around the world on Wednesday.
12h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Honolulu mayor vetoes bill to limit Uber, Lyft 'surge' faresHonolulu's mayor has vetoed a bill aimed at setting limits for what ride-hailing services such as Uber and Lyft can charge during peak demand.
13h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Indian government grounds Air India sale plans: reportsIndia has shelved its plans to sell debt-stricken national carrier Air India after failing to attract any bidders, a senior official has told local media.
13h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Pilot whale meat poses health hazard, Faroese warnedThe Faroe Islands' ritual pilot whale hunt is not only highly controversial, eating the whale meat also poses a health hazard, public health authorities in Denmark's autonomous North Atlantic territory warn, advising against eating it.
13h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Noble Group shares soar after deal with key investorNoble Group shares surged more than 50 percent Wednesday after the embattled commodities trader sealed a deal with a major investor, paving the way for a debt restructuring.
13h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

General Electric dropped from Dow Jones stock indexSlumping US industrial giant General Electric will be booted from the prestigious Dow Jones stock index next week, S&P Dow Jones Indices announced Tuesday.
13h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Australia telecom giant Telstra to axe 8,000 jobsAustralia's dominant telecommunications company Telstra Wednesday announced plans to axe 8,000 jobs—a quarter of its workforce—as part of a drastic new strategy to cope with an increasingly competitive industry.
13h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Oil in the Faroe Islands: mirage or miracle ?After fuelling hopes of independence from Denmark at the turn of the millennium, the Faroe Islands' dreams of an oil bonanza have turned out to be more of a mirage than a miracle.
13h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Multiracial congregations have nearly doubled in the United StatesThe percentage of multiracial congregations in the United States has nearly doubled, with about one in five American congregants attending a place of worship that is racially mixed, according to a Baylor University study.
13h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Flexible content delivery, student-faculty interaction frees time without hurting gradesMedical students face an intense schedule and workload and often struggle to juggle their priorities. Similarly, medical school faculty must find time in their busy schedules to prepare lectures and for face-to-face interaction with their students. In an effort to optimize student and faculty time and increase engagement between them, researchers from Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center "
13h
Science | The Guardian

No, these pterosaurs were not Jurassic puffins | Elsa PanciroliNew research into pterosaur diets is overturning assumptions based on qualitative assertions made decades ago What did it eat ? This is one of the first questions the general public – and especially kids – ask about extinct animals. It may surprise you to know that palaeontologists sometimes struggle to work out the answer. They may look at living relatives for clues, but for long-gone animals wi
13h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Survey: Companies in China feel pressure to give up techOne in five foreign companies in China feels compelled to hand over technology for market access, a business group said Wednesday, highlighting a key irritant in an escalating U.S.-Chinese trade dispute.
13h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Does good attendance equal good grades?Studies of classroom attendance patterns in undergraduate students have shown that attendance and performance go hand in hand—attending class is the key to reaping the rewards of academic achievement. However, many of these studies were completed before the advent of the internet and the explosion of online learning. Researchers will discuss the changing nature of medical student engagement in the
13h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Political leaning influences city water policies as strongly as climateUrban water conservation policies are reflecting the nation's political polarization, with a new report demonstrating that a city's water ordinances can be as much related to whether it leans left or right as to whether the climate is wet or dry.
13h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Machine learning may be a game-changer for climate predictionA major challenge in current climate prediction models is how to accurately represent clouds and their atmospheric heating and moistening. This challenge is behind the wide spread in climate prediction. Yet accurate predictions of global warming in response to increased greenhouse gas concentrations are essential for policy-makers (e.g. the Paris climate agreement).
13h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Whether wheat weathers heat wavesA heat wave sweeps through a city and people swelter, running indoors to find air conditioning. But crops out in a field aren't so lucky. For them, there is no escape.
13h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Innovative autonomous system for identifying schools of fishEU Europe CopyrightThe University of Haifa (Israel) and two teams from the IMDEA Networks Institute have developed an innovative autonomous system, SYMBIOSIS, to monitor real-time schools of fish. This system, which combines optical and acoustic technologies, will be environmentally friendly and will provide reliable information about the condition of marine fish stocks, something that at the moment is practically i
14h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Banking by smart speaker arrives, but security issues existHey Alexa, what's my bank account balance?
14h
Ingeniøren

Yousee smider 10.000 hemmelige numre og adresser ud i offentlig søgemaskineDet er endnu uvist, hvordan selskabets digitale flyttemænd lykkedes med at flytte de mange danskeres hemmelige informationer i søgemaskinen 118.dk.
14h
Science | The Guardian

Pill-testing success in ACT proves it should go national, organisers sayTrial at music festival found many of those tested didn’t know what drug they were taking • Sign up to receive the top stories in Australia every day at noon The pill-testing trial at a music festival in the Australian Capital Territory was an “overwhelming success” and the federal government should help roll out a scheme nationwide, the organisers have said. In a report on the trial at the Groov
15h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Intervention shows promise for treating depression in preschool-aged childrenChildren as young as 3-years-old can be diagnosed with clinical depression. Although young children are sometimes prescribed antidepressants, a psychotherapeutic intervention is needed. Researchers adapted Parent-Child Interaction Therapy (PCIT), (a validated treatment for disruptive behavioral disorders in children), by adding new emotional development content. PCIT-ED treatment resulted in signi
15h
Science | The Guardian

Don’t deny my daughter the cannabis that could save her | Memuna FornaLike Billy Caldwell’s mother, I want to try anything that might help stop my child’s seizures. At the moment, I can’t Billy Caldwell is a 12-year-old boy with severe epilepsy. Last week, British airport officials confiscated the cannabis oil his mother was using to treat his condition, because the tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) it contains is illegal in the UK. He ended up in hospital after his seizu
16h
Viden

Peter giver de døde en stemme: Hans opdagelser fælder Danmarks mordereKom med indenfor på retsmedicinsk institut og se, hvordan det er at arbejde på en af Danmarks blodigste arbejdspladser.
16h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

Political leaning influences city water policies as strongly as climateResearchers examined city water policies over the course of four years to create a database of water conservation policies. They also developed an associated index of the number of different categories of policies each city adopted and gathered data on the climate, water sources, population, economy and political leanings of each city and its surrounding metropolitan statistical area — as reflect
16h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

When muscles weaken with ageAge-related changes in the peripheral nerves can drastically reduce the quality of life. Scientists have now identified what triggers such changes.
16h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Multiracial congregations have nearly doubled in the United StatesThe percentage of multiracial congregations in the United States has nearly doubled, with about one in five American congregants attending a place of worship that is racially mixed, according to a Baylor University study.
16h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Whether wheat weathers heat wavesUnlike humans, crops in a field can't move to air conditioning to endure a heat wave. Scientists in Australia are working to understand how heat waves impact wheat.
16h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Around the world, people have surprisingly modest notions of the 'ideal' lifeIt seems reasonable that people would want to maximize various aspects of life if they were given the opportunity to do so, whether it's the pleasure they feel, how intelligent they are, or how much personal freedom they have. In actuality, people around the world seem to aspire for more moderate levels of these and other traits, according to findings published in Psychological Science , a journal
16h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Innovative autonomous system for identifying schools of fishThe University of Haifa (Israel) and two teams from the IMDEA Networks Institute have developed an innovative autonomous system, SYMBIOSIS, to monitor real-time schools of fish. This system, which combines optical and acoustic technologies, will be environmentally friendly and will provide reliable information about the condition of marine fish stocks, something that at the moment is practically i
16h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Do bats adapt to gates at abandoned mines?Abandoned mines can serve as roost sites for bats, but because the mines pose serious risks to humans, officials often install gates at their entrances.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Why isn't anyone talking about vaginal dryness (or doing anything about it)?It's a common problem that only gets worse during the menopause transition; yet, no one wants to talk about it, and even fewer women are doing anything to correct it. A new study identifies those factors that contribute to the taboo problem of vaginal dryness. Study results are published online today in Menopause, the journal of The North American Menopause Society (NAMS).
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Annual southeast Asia haze linked to increased respiratory problemsFor more than a decade, Southeast Asia has faced annual haze due to a combination of human activity, natural fires, and climatic factors.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Do circulating bone turnover markers indicate hip fracture risk?The evidence that circulating levels of markers of bone turnover correlate with hip fracture risk among postmenopausal women is limited.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Substance in hair may be a marker for alcohol consumptionA new Drug Testing & Analysis study reveals that measuring levels of ethyl sulfate (EtS), a metabolite of ethanol, in the hair can be used to assess alcohol consumption.
16h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Guidelines address self-management of hospitalized diabetes patientsIt is important that patients with diabetes be involved in decisions concerning the management of their condition while they are hospitalized.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Surgery in spaceWith renewed public interest in manned space exploration comes the potential need to diagnose and treat medical issues encountered by future space travelers.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Controlling robots with brainwaves and hand gesturesSystem enables people to correct robot mistakes on multi-choice problems.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Parent-child therapy helps young children with depressionNew research from Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis demonstrates that an interactive therapy involving parents and their depressed preschoolers can reduce rates of depression and lower the severity of children's symptoms.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Should pharmacists be allowed to write prescriptions?Prescribing of medications has traditionally been restricted to physicians, but there is growing support to allow pharmacists to do so as well.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

The role of vitamin D in a healthy pregnancyFor a pregnancy to proceed to term, early modulation of the immunologic response is required to induce tolerance to the fetus.
16h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Can older adults safely donate kidneys?With increasing organ demand, living kidney donation from older donors has become more common.
16h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Non-dairy drinks can be dangerous for infantsA brief report published in Acta Paediatrica points to the dangers of replacing breast milk or infant formula with a non-dairy drink before one year of age.
16h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Alcohol and marijuana use may increase risk of condomless sex in young adultsYoung persons who use alcohol and/or marijuana experience heightened likelihood of condomless sex, according to a new study published in The American Journal on Addictions.
16h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

Flexible content delivery, student-faculty interaction frees time without hurting gradesMedical students face an intense workload and often struggle to juggle priorities. Similarly, medical school faculty must find time in their schedules to prepare lectures and for face-to-face interaction with students. To optimize student and faculty time and increase engagement between them, researchers 'flipped' their content delivery strategy upside down.
17h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

Long-term estrogen therapy changes microbial activity in the gutLong-term therapy with estrogen and bazedoxifene alters the microbial composition and activity in the gut, affecting how estrogen is metabolized, a new study in mice found.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

Absence epilepsy: When the brain is like 'an orchestra without a conductor'New contributions to the field of epilepsy have opened a window into the cellular events that occur in the brain during absence seizures.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

Religious involvement deters recreational and medical marijuana use, researchers findResearchers have found that individuals who regularly attend church and report that religion is very important in their daily decision making are less likely to use marijuana recreationally and medically.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

Floppy eyelids may be sign of sleep apneaA new study is providing further evidence that floppy eyelids may be a sign of sleep apnea. The study found that 53 percent of sleep apnea patients had upper eyelids that were lax and rubbery.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

Blue gene regulation helps plants respond properly to lightResearchers have discovered a process through which gene expression in plants is regulated by light. The study found that blue light triggers a shift in which portion of a gene is ultimately expressed.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

Age limit for federal food assistance program impacts reading scores, learningNearly 1 million children face food insecurity simply because they were born late in the year. No safety net coverage exists for these children when they age out of the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants and Children (WIC) and they are not yet eligible to attend kindergarten. A researcher has found that not only does the coverage gap impact overall food insecurity, it reduce
17h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

Site of the next major earthquake on the San Andreas Fault?Many researchers hypothesize that the southern tip of the 1300-km-long San Andreas fault zone (SAFZ) could be the nucleation site of the next major earthquake on the fault, yet geoscientists cannot evaluate this hazard until the location and geometry of the fault zone is documented.
17h
Science : NPR

Civil War Battlefield 'Limb Pit' Reveals Work Of Combat SurgeonsScientists have been analyzing bones first uncovered by a utility crew digging at the Manassas National Battlefield Park in Virginia. The remains provide insights into surgery during the Civil War. (Image credit: Meredith Rizzo/NPR)
17h
Latest Headlines | Science News

With this new system, robots can ‘read’ your mindGiving robots instructions via brain waves and hand gestures could help the machines operate more safely and efficiently.
17h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Do bats adapt to gates at abandoned mines?Abandoned mines can serve as roost sites for bats, but because the mines pose serious risks to humans, officials often install gates at their entrances. With more than 80,000 abandoned mines in the southwestern United States, these subterranean habitats are important to bat survival as human disturbances from recreation and other activities at natural caves are affecting their use by bats.
17h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

Say cheese! Why a toothy smile makes it easier for you to be identifiedA fulsome smile in a photo makes it easier for people to identify the individual, say researchers.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

Exercise makes the blood of obese people healthierExercise can reduce inflammation in obese people by changing the characteristics of their blood, according to new research.
17h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

The answer to triple-negative breast cancer?Researchers have developed a computer program which has revealed a previously unknown combination of drugs that may be the answer to Triple Negative Breast Cancer (TNBC), using genetic and treatment data from TNBC cells grown in labs and from hundreds of patients world-wide. Importantly researchers can tell, by inputting patients' genomic and proteomic information into their computer model, who ma
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

Binge drinking during youth may impact future offspringA rat model found preconception binge drinking may have negative consequences on future offspring's growth, social interactions and pubertal development, according to a new study.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

Risks of cancer and mortality by average lifetime alcohol intakeThe risk of mortality, and of developing a number of cancers, is lowest in light drinkers consuming an average of less than one drink per day across their lifetime, and the risk of some cancers increases with each additional drink per week, according to a new study.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

RFK's assassination: A medical analysis of his injuries and neurosurgical careAlthough much has been written about Robert F. Kennedy's assassination, to date there has been no detailed medical discussion of Kennedy's injuries and treatment. A new article addresses this subject.
17h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

Twenty-five per cent of seafood sold in Metro Vancouver is mislabelledA new study used DNA barcoding to determine that 70 of 281 seafood samples collected in Metro Vancouver between September 2017 and February 2018 were mislabelled.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

When photons spice up the energy levels of quantum particlesFor the first time, a team of mathematical physicists, call upon supersymmetry to explain the behavior of particles that have received a photon and are subjected to particular potential energies known as shape-invariant potentials.
17h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

Future ultrahigh density data storageThe development of high-density data storage devices requires the highest possible density of elements in an array made up of individual nanomagnets. The closer they are together, the greater the magnetic interactions between them.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

Rush hour metro crowd governed by people's eagerness to go homeEver feared rush hours in a metro station? Engineering researchers have developed a new model to study the movement of crowds exiting a metro station. In a recent study, they have for the first time employed models typically used to observe the interactions of gas molecules to assess the consequences of interactions between pedestrians in a crowd.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

Approach can help English learners improve at math word problemsEducation professors have shown that a comprehension-based strategy can help English learners improve their math word-problem solving abilities. The approach boosts reading comprehension and problem solving as well.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

Success of blood test for autism affirmedOne year after researchers published their work on a physiological test for autism, a follow-up study confirms its exceptional success in assessing whether a child is on the autism spectrum.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

Bad habits that lead to cancer, chronic disease corrected by simple lifestyle interventionFour of the most common bad habits — too much screen time, too little exercise and high fat and low fruit and vegetable intake — can lead to heart disease and cancer, but a simple intervention using mobile health tools and coaching normalized these behaviors, and improvements were sustained.
18h
Scientific American Content: Global

Fat-Carb Combo Is A Potent One-Two PunchFoods high in both carbs and fats tickle the brain’s reward circuits more so than snacks that showcase just one or the other. Karen Hopkin reports. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
19h
The Scientist RSS

Novel Method Could Accelerate DNA SynthesisThe new technique uses an enzyme found in vertebrate immune systems to attach nucleotides to a growing strand.
19h
The Scientist RSS

New Database Expands Number of Estimated Human Protein-Coding GenesSome scientists are not yet convinced that the list is accurate.
19h
The Scientist RSS

Deadly Wasting Syndrome Genetically Altered Sea Stars: StudyThe surviving animals may have evolved genes that provided an advantage in fighting the disease.
19h
The Atlantic

The National Outrage Over Immigration Is Beginning to Get to TrumpPresident Donald Trump on Tuesday evening addressed House Republican lawmakers on immigration, only to leave the conference with members grappling with the same issues as before. For House GOP leadership, it was nothing short of a victory. Speaker Paul Ryan had invited Trump to meet with the conference in the hopes the president would rally skeptics behind the leadership’s so-called “compromise”
19h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Exercise makes the blood of obese people healthierExercise can reduce inflammation in obese people by changing the characteristics of their blood, according to new research published in The Journal of Physiology.
19h
Science : NPR

Nursery For Giant Manta Rays Discovered In Gulf Of MexicoSightings of baby mantas are rare, but the Flower Garden Banks Marine Sanctuary appears to be a safe playground for newborns to adolescents. (Image credit: G.P. Schmahl/FGBNMS)
20h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

How vaping helps even hardened smokers quitVaping helps people stop smoking — even when they don't want to, according to new research from the University of East Anglia.A study published today shows that smokers who switch to vaping may be better able to stay smoke-free in the long term.And that even people who didn't want to stop smoking, have eventually quit because they found vaping more enjoyable.
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Feed: All Latest

Why Ford Is Buying Detroit’s Derelict Central DepotIt’s a savvy PR move, but it also sends a big message. The carmaker wants to show it can compete with Uber and Waymo and all the Silicon Valley tech giants.
21h
Futurity.org

Just 4 drinks can change sleep geneA single episode of binge drinking can affect the gene that regulates sleep, leading to sleep disruption, a new study with mice shows. The findings may shed light on how sleep problems can contribute to alcoholism in humans. One in six adults in the United States binge drinks at least four times a month, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. “Sleep is a serious problem for
21h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Can evolution explain why the young are often more susceptible than adults to infection?In many species, including humans, the young are often more susceptible to infection than adults, even after accounting for prior exposure to infection. From an evolutionary perspective this may seem puzzling, as dying young or becoming infertile due to infection means organisms will be unable to reproduce. However, new research from the University of Bath suggests that many species may have evolv
21h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Climate change to overtake land use as major threat to global biodiversityClimate change will have a rapidly increasing effect on the structure of global ecological communities over the next few decades, with amphibians and reptiles being significantly more affected than birds and mammals, a new report by UCL finds.
21h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Strange 'nude' fossil creature from half a billion years agoA discovery of a new species of sponge-like fossil from the Cambrian Period sheds light on early animal evolution.
21h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Living the high life: How altitude influences bone growthStudy of modern Himalayan populations shows that living at high altitude affects the length of lower arm bones, a possible indicator of differential growth of certain limb segments under high altitude stress.
21h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Say cheese! Why a toothy smile makes it easier for you to be identifiedA fulsome smile in a photo makes it easier for people to identify the individual, say researchers at the University of York.
21h
BBC News – Science & Environment

Wolves in France: Farmers fear attacksOne mayor says children under 10 years old should not walk alone, in case of an attack.
22h
NYT > Science

New Group, With Conservative Credentials, Plans Push for a Carbon TaxA new lobbying group is hoping to build support for a “climate dividend” plan. Its members include Trent Lott, Janet L. Yellen and Ben S. Bernanke.
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Futurity.org

Watch: Robotics offer clues to fixing gait after strokeA major issue in rehabilitation robotics is that devices such as exoskeletons and treadmills correct patients’ movements only while they are using the device. Ongoing research aims to change that. Gelsy Torres-Oviedo, director of the Sensorimotor Learning Lab at the University of Pittsburgh, leads a research team that uses rehabilitation robotics and motion capture cameras to study “locomotor lea
22h
Futurity.org

Why adult bodies still rely on fetal T cellsFetal immune cells are present in adults and have specialized roles during infections, according to new research. “…we might be able to predict how individuals will respond to infection based on how many fetal cells are present in the adult pool…” In fact, the first immune cells made in early life are fast-acting first responders to microbes in adulthood. These immune cells—called CD8+ T cells—co
22h
Futurity.org

iPad overlay makes reading easier for blind usersResearchers have developed an e-reader that enables people with visual impairments to read the same text sighted readers do. The system, called STAAR (Situated Touch Audio Annotator And Reader) allows the user to scan the text with their fingers to hear the words, control the pace of their reading, bookmark a page, and highlight important information. An embossed plastic overlay sits on top of an
22h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Strange 'nude' fossil creature from half a billion years agoScientists have discovered the fossil of an unusual large-bodied 'nude' sea-creature from half a billion years ago.
22h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Climate change to overtake land use as major threat to global biodiversityClimate change will have a rapidly increasing effect on the structure of global ecological communities over the next few decades, with amphibians and reptiles being significantly more affected than birds and mammals, a new report by UCL finds.
22h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Can evolution explain why the young are often more susceptible than adults to infection?In many species, including humans, the young are often more susceptible to infection than adults, even after accounting for prior exposure to infection. From an evolutionary perspective this may seem puzzling, as dying young or becoming infertile due to infection means organisms will be unable to reproduce. However, new research from the University of Bath suggests that many species may have evolv
22h
Futurity.org

How calling video game addiction a disorder will help addictsThe World Health Organization’s classification of video game addiction as a mental health disorder is a significant step toward getting people the help they need, argues Douglas Gentile, professor of psychology at Iowa State University and an expert on video games and addiction. In a 2011 study published in Pediatrics , Gentile and his colleagues found gaming addiction is comorbid with other ment
22h
Futurity.org

Machine makes squishy 3D stuff from graphene foamScientists have developed a simple way to produce conductive, three-dimensional objects from graphene foam. The squishy solids look and feel something like a child’s toy but offer new possibilities for energy storage and flexible electronic sensor applications, according to James Tour, a chemist at Rice University, whose lab developed the method. The technique, detailed in Advanced Materials , is
22h
Futurity.org

Genetic ‘control system’ beefs up crop defensesResearchers have developed a genetic control system that would enable plants to strengthen their defense response against deadly pathogens. When pathogens attack crop plants, they obtain energy and nutrients from the plant but also target the plant’s immune response, weakening defense, and making the plants more vulnerable. “Minimizing crop waste is obviously an essential part of creating a more
22h
New on MIT Technology Review

Verizon, AT&T, Sprint, and T-Mobile will stop selling your location information to data brokers[no content]
22h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

Lion conservation research can be bolstered by input from a wide-range of professionalsTo tackle the sharp decline in lion numbers, conservation research should consider wild prey, livestock and the environment, not just human-lion interaction, a new review suggests.
22h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

Tax havens and limited regulation increase risk for shareholders, study showsSome large, publicly held companies are incorporated in tax haven countries, ostensibly to increase value for shareholders. But new research finds that many such companies — particularly those headquartered in countries with limited shareholder protections — are more likely to engage in practices that benefit executives at the cost of their shareholders.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

Are you sticking to your diet? Scientists may be able to tell from a blood sampleAn analysis of small molecules called 'metabolites' in a blood sample may be used to determine whether a person is following a prescribed diet, scientists show in a new study.
22h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

Climate action can limit Asia's growing water shortagesEven 'modest' action to limit climate change could help prevent the most extreme water-shortage scenarios facing Asia by the year 2050, according to a new study.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

Deep Brain Stimulation showing promise for patients with mild Alzheimer's disease over 65An age group analysis of data from the ADvance trial has shown that participants over the age of 65 continue to derive the most benefit from Deep Brain Stimulation of the fornix (DBS-f), as observed in the data from the phase 2 findings (12 – 24 months) of the Phase II trial.
22h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

Drones could be used to detect dangerous 'butterfly' landmines in post-conflict regionsDrones could be used to detect dangerous "butterfly" landmines in remote regions of post-conflict countries.
22h
Live Science

There Are More 'Pet' Tigers Than There Are in the Wild. How Did That Happen?How did we get into this situation?
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

Museum collection reveals distribution of Carolina parakeet 100 years after its extinctionWhile 2018 marks the centenary of the death of the last captive Carolina parakeet — North America's only native parrot, a team of researchers have shed new light on the previously known geographical range of the species.
22h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

Diabetes may be an early manifestation of pancreatic cancerA new study indicates that recent-onset type 2 diabetes may be early expression of pancreatic cancer. Diabetes was associated with a more than twofold higher risk of pancreatic cancer in African-Americans and Latinos, but recent-onset diabetes was associated with a 2.3-fold greater increase in risk of pancreatic cancer than long-standing diabetes.
22h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

Sodium- and potassium-based batteries hold promise for cheap energy storageResearchers have found new evidence suggesting that batteries based on sodium and potassium hold promise as a potential alternative to lithium-based batteries.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

Blood signature could improve early TB diagnosisA gene signature in the bloodstream can reveal whether someone is going to develop active tuberculosis (TB) disease months before symptoms begin. This offers the prospect of intervening before individuals pose a risk of transmitting the infection to others.
22h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

Diagnostics of genetic cardiac diseases using stem cell-derived cardiomyocytesA new study demonstrates that with the use of artificial intelligence and machine learning, it is possible not only to accurately sort sick cardiac cell cultures from healthy ones, but also to differentiate between genetic cardiac diseases.
22h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

World's first intra-operative MRI-guided robot for bilateral stereotactic neurosurgeryScientists have recently designed the first neurosurgical robotic system capable of performing bilateral stereotactic neurosurgery inside a magnetic resonance imaging ('MRI') scanner.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

Hypnosis may help reduce fear of cancer treatment in childrenHypnosis could help to reduce the fear of medical procedures in children and young people with cancer.
22h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

Cell type and environment influence protein turnover in the brainScientists have revealed that protein molecules in the brain are broken down and replaced at different rates, depending on where in the brain they are.
22h
The Atlantic

The Atlantic Daily: Mark the FragilityWhat We’re Following On the Border: The Trump administration’s “zero-tolerance” policy for illegal immigration is straining federal courts. Russell Berman reports from a mass criminal hearing in McAllen, Texas, where lawyers say that “adults who cross the border with children now seem to be priorities for prosecution.” See photos of a tent city where detained parents’ children are being held. Oth
22h
iBiology (uploads) on YouTube

John Schiller (NCI at NIH) 2: Why Do HPV Virus-Like Particle Vaccines Work So Well?John Schiller provides an overview of HPV virus and infection, compares the three FDA approved vaccines against HPV, and explains the endpoints used in the clinical trials to prove vaccine efficacy. https://www.ibiology.org/human-disease/hpv Talk Overview: Human Papillomavirus (HPV) causes 5% of all cancers worldwide, and the first vaccine against HPV was approved in 2006. In this seminar, Dr. Jo
22h
iBiology (uploads) on YouTube

John Schiller (NCI at NIH) 1: Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Vaccines to Prevent CancerJohn Schiller provides an overview of HPV virus and infection, compares the three FDA approved vaccines against HPV, and explains the endpoints used in the clinical trials to prove vaccine efficacy. https://www.ibiology.org/human-disease/hpv Talk Overview: Human Papillomavirus (HPV) causes 5% of all cancers worldwide, and the first vaccine against HPV was approved in 2006. In this seminar, Dr. Jo
22h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Walking is more efficient than thought for threatened polar bearsPolar bears are under increasing risk and one of the threats was thought to be an inefficient walking style, which could drive them to starvation as they are forced to walk further to find food as the summer sea ice retreats. However, new measurements of the metabolic rates of captive polar and grizzly bears suggests that their walking style is as efficient as that of other large mammals.
22h
Popular Science

Facebook is working on AI tools to fix photos ruined by blinkingTechnology It could open closed eyes with surprising accuracy. Facebook's AI tools can help open closed eyes and do a lot more down the road.
23h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

Machine learning may be a game-changer for climate predictionNew research demonstrates that machine-learning techniques can be used to accurately represent clouds and their atmospheric heating and moistening, and better represent clouds in coarse resolution climate models, with the potential to narrow the range of climate prediction. This could be a major advance in accurate predictions of global warming in response to increased greenhouse gas concentration
23h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

Does good attendance equal good grades?Studies of classroom attendance patterns in undergraduate students have shown that attendance and performance go hand in hand — attending class is the key to reaping the rewards of academic achievement. However, many of these studies were completed before the explosion of online learning.
23h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

Parents' explanations of peer interactions affect how children interpret peers' behaviorNew research shows that parents can help their children perceive less hostility in their social world by framing social situations in a positive way, and thus, reduce their likelihood of behaving aggressively.
23h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

Children's immune system could hold the key to preventing sepsisScientists have identified the key response that children use to control infections.
23h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

Combining different malaria vaccines could reduce cases by 91 percentUsing two experimental anti-malarial vaccines, which work in different ways, can greatly reduce the number of malaria infections in animal studies.
23h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

Palm oil: The carbon cost of deforestationPalm oil has become part of our daily lives, but a recent study serves as a reminder that intensive farming of this crop has a major impact on the environment. Both short- and long-term solutions exist, however. The article analyzed the carbon costs and benefits of converting rainforests into oil palm plantations.
23h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

Low vitamin D levels associated with scarring lung diseaseReviewing medical information gathered on more than 6,000 adults over a 10-year period, researchers have found that lower than normal blood levels of vitamin D were linked to increased risk of early signs of interstitial lung disease (ILD).
23h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

Methadone and buprenorphine reduce risk of death after opioid overdose, study suggestsA new study found that treatment of opioid use disorder with either methadone or buprenorphine following a nonfatal opioid overdose is associated with significant reductions in opioid related mortality.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

Gene mutations linked to pancreatic cancerSix genes contain mutations that may be passed down in families, substantially increasing a person's risk for pancreatic cancer. However, because researchers found these genetic mutations in patients with no family history of pancreatic cancer, they are recommending genetic testing for all pancreatic cancer patients as the new standard of care.
23h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

'Smart stent' detects narrowing of arteriesResearchers have developed a type of 'smart stent' that monitors even subtle changes in the flow of blood through the artery, detecting the narrowing in its earliest stages and making early diagnosis and treatment possible.
23h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

Why older people respond poorly to cancer treatmentResearchers may have found a group of immune cells that increase in number with age but are too worn out to fight diseases. The accumulation of dysfunctional virtual memory T cells, in addition to the loss of true naïve T cells, may explain why older people have reduced immune responses to cancer and vaccines, why cancer immunotherapy is less successful in the elderly, and may help to tailor cance
23h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Walking is more efficient than thought for threatened polar bearsA polar bear plunges into the icy Arctic waters in search of firmer ice; its world, which was once a sea of white, is melting beneath its paws. 'Research has documented declines in polar bear populations in some regions of the Arctic', says Anthony Pagano from the US Geological Survey, explaining that the bears now have to roam further on the receding ice to locate the seals upon which they dine.
23h
BBC News – Science & Environment

Mountain lion kittens found living in US caveMeet the new residents of a cave in California.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

How a single binge drinking episode affects gene that regulates sleepNew findings explain how a single episode of binge drinking can affect the gene that regulates sleep, leading to sleep disruption in mice. The finding may shed light on how sleep problems can contribute to alcoholism in humans.
23h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

Liberals do drink more lattes, but maybe not for the reasons you thinkDo liberals really drink more lattes? According to a new study, liberals in America are indeed more likely than conservatives to drink lattes. The researchers believe this is because liberals are more open to globalization and products associated with other countries.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

An unlikely marriage among oxidesSebastian Siol is looking for new materials with unusual properties that were so far not accessible in experiments. To do this, he connects partners who don't really fit together: One partner forces the other into a state that would not be possible without the unlikely pairing. Siol also makes sure that the crystal bonds last in everyday life. Only then are they interesting for industrial applicat
23h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

Insight into infant handling by young bonobosDrawn to a behavior she didn't understand, a researcher watching bonobos in a zoo has revealed how young female bonobos prepare for motherhood.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Chip upgrade helps miniature drones navigateResearchers at MIT, who last year designed a tiny computer chip tailored to help honeybee-sized drones navigate, have now shrunk their chip design even further, in both size and power consumption.
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cognitive science

Tackling bullying could help reduce depression in autistic teenssubmitted by /u/davyeminy [link] [comments]
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

Could this material enable autonomous vehicles to come to market sooner?A new material might show promise for such infrared detection applications as autonomous vehicles, emergency services and even manufacturing.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

Keyhole may trump robotic surgery for mitral valve repairKeyhole surgery for heart valve repair may trump robotic surgery, because it is associated with lower rates of subsequent heart flutter and blood transfusions, and a shorter hospital stay, reveals research looking at the pros and cons of different surgical approaches.
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The Atlantic

The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: Hagin Out-Written by Elaine Godfrey ( @elainejgodfrey ) Today in 5 Lines President Trump again defended his administration’s “zero tolerance” policy ahead of a meeting with Republicans on Capitol Hill Tuesday evening to discuss immigration. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell told reporters that his Republican colleagues support legislation to end the practice of separating families at the border, addi
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Floppy eyelids may be sign of sleep apnea, Loyola study findsA Loyola Medicine study is providing further evidence that floppy eyelids may be a sign of sleep apnea. The study, published in the journal The Ocular Surface, found that 53 percent of sleep apnea patients had upper eyelids that were lax and rubbery.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Machine learning may be a game-changer for climate predictionNew research from Columbia Engineering Professor Pierre Gentine demonstrates that machine-learning techniques can be used to accurately represent clouds and their atmospheric heating and moistening, and better represent clouds in coarse resolution climate models, with the potential to narrow the range of climate prediction. This could be a major advance in accurate predictions of global warming in
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Long-term estrogen therapy changes microbial activity in the gut, study findsLong-term therapy with estrogen and bazedoxifene alters the microbial composition and activity in the gut, affecting how estrogen is metabolized, a new study in mice found.The research team was led by University of Illinois food science and human nutrition professor Zeynep Madak-Erdogan.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

FSU researchers find religious involvement deters recreational and medical marijuana useFSU Associate Professor Amy Burdette and her team found that individuals who regularly attend church and report that religion is very important in their daily decision making are less likely to use marijuana recreationally and medically. The study was recently published in the Journal of Drug Issues.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Political leaning influences city water policies as strongly as climateResearchers examined city water policies over the course of four years to create a database of water conservation policies. They also developed an associated index of the number of different categories of policies each city adopted and gathered data on the climate, water sources, population, economy and political leanings of each city and its surrounding metropolitan statistical area — as reflect
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Flexible content delivery, student-faculty interaction frees time without hurting gradesMedical students face an intense workload and often struggle to juggle priorities. Similarly, medical school faculty must find time in their schedules to prepare lectures and for face-to-face interaction with students. To optimize student and faculty time and increase engagement between them, researchers from Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center 'flipped' their content delivery strategy up
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Does good attendance equal good grades?Studies of classroom attendance patterns in undergraduate students have shown that attendance and performance go hand in hand–attending class is the key to reaping the rewards of academic achievement. However, many of these studies were completed before the explosion of online learning. Researchers will discuss the changing nature of medical student engagement in the physical classroom and effect
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Feed: All Latest

WHO Calls Gaming Disorder an Illness. Experts Say Not So FastSome mental health experts have reservations about the change in the WHO’s International Classification of Diseases.
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Feed: All Latest

Why Are the Velociraptors in 'Jurassic World' So Big?In reality, they were about the size of a large turkey. On the big screen? Not so much.
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The Atlantic

All Cats Go to HeavenCats are like potato chips , reads a sign in Bruce and Terry Jenkins’s home. You can’t just have one! In fact, the Jenkinses have 30. They have devoted their retirement to caring for this plethora of elderly cats, transforming their home over the years into a makeshift feline senior center. “It’s kind of a big family,” says Terry Jenkins in Jonathan Napolitano’s short documentary, Cats Cradle . “
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

Good relationships with siblings may buffer the effects of family conflictA new longitudinal study finds that having a good relationship with a sibling may help buffer the distress of ongoing hostility between parents.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

Ground-breaking discoveries could create superior alloys with many applicationsMany current and future technologies require alloys that can withstand high temperatures without corroding. Now, researchers have hailed a major breakthrough in understanding how alloys behave at high temperatures, pointing the way to significant improvements in many technologies.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

Deep-sea marine sponges may hold key to antibiotic drug resistanceFAU's Harbor Branch houses more than 1,000 strains of actinobacteria, one of the most prolific microbial groups for the production of natural products. Derived from sea sponges and other macro-organisms, several strains were identified for their potent antifungal activity, for anti-MRSA activity, and for both antifungal and antibacterial activities. A key finding was the identification of a strain
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

Beware of getting a tattoo if your immune system isn't up to scratch, doctors warnGetting a tattoo may have some unexpected complications if your immune system isn't up to scratch, warn doctors in a new article.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

Marriage may protect against heart disease/stroke and associated risk of deathMarriage may protect against the development of heart disease/stroke as well as influencing who is more likely to die of it, suggests a new analysis.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Absence epilepsy — When the brain is like 'an orchestra without a conductor'New contributions to the field of epilepsy have opened a window into the cellular events that occur in the brain during absence seizures.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

FSU study finds religious involvement does little to prevent opioid abuseIn a new study published in the Journal for the Scientific Study of Religion, a team of researchers led by FSU Associate Professor Amy Burdette examined the correlation — or lack thereof — between drug use and church attendance for women who are mothers.
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Millions of Google, Roku, and Sonos Devices Are Vulnerable to a Web AttackUsing a technique called DNS rebinding, one amateur hacker found vulnerabilities in devices from Google, Roku, Sonos, and more.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Facebook to offer interactive game shows on video platformFacebook said Tuesday it is offering a series of new formats for its online video platform including interactive game shows, quizzes and polls.
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The Atlantic

How Will XXXTentacion Be Remembered?Nearly six months before his death, the embattled 20-year-old rapper XXXTentacion shared an urgent manifesto via Instagram Live. Eerily prescient, his words belied a sense of macabre resignation. “If I’m gonna die or ever be a sacrifice, I wanna make sure that my life made at least 5 million kids happy or they found some sort of answers or resolve in my life,” said the rapper, born Jahseh Onfroy.
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New on MIT Technology Review

The US Supreme Court is taking a hard look at Apple’s app store monopoly[no content]
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Science | The Guardian

The surge in hay fever is rooted in our modern lifestylesObsessive hygiene, antibiotics and car exhausts are blamed for hay fever now affecting 20% of Britain’s population This has been the worst month for hay fever for 12 years. Grasses had perfect growing conditions over late April and in May with warm sunshine and showers. That was followed in June by hot dry conditions when the grass flowers matured and shed clouds of pollen on light breezes and up
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Age limit for federal food assistance program impacts reading scores, learningNearly 1 million children face food insecurity simply because they were born late in the year. No safety net coverage exists for these children when they age out of the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants and Children (WIC) and they are not yet eligible to attend kindergarten. Irma Arteaga, assistant professor in the Truman School of Public Affairs at the University of Missou
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Popular streaming playlists can boost a song's revenue by up to $163kArtists lucky enough to find their song on 'Today's Top Hits', a Spotify playlist with over 20 million followers, could see a boost in popularity worth between $116k and $163k in additional streaming revenue.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Site of the next major earthquake on the San Andreas Fault?Many researchers hypothesize that the southern tip of the 1300-km-long San Andreas fault zone (SAFZ) could be the nucleation site of the next major earthquake on the fault, yet geoscientists cannot evaluate this hazard until the location and geometry of the fault zone is documented.
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Ingeniøren

A.P. Møller vil bore efter grøn fjernvarmeSelskabet ser stort potentiale i geotermi og vil tilbyde kommuner med egnet undergrund geotermisk varme til en fast lav pris, der kan konkurrere med prisen på varme fra afgiftsfri biomasse.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Popular streaming playlists can boost a song's revenue by up to $163kArtists lucky enough to find their song on Spotify's most popular playlists could see could see considerable increases in streams and revenue.
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Big Think

Fundraiser to reunite families separated at U.S. border raises $5.4 million in four daysThe fundraiser started on Saturday morning with a goal of $1,500, but at one point on Monday the campaign was earning $4,000 every minute. Read More
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Feed: All Latest

Beyoncé and Jay-Z's 'Everything Is Love' Marks a New Step in the Album's EvolutionThe format is constantly changing in the era of streaming.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Site of the next major earthquake on the San Andreas Fault?Many researchers hypothesize that the southern tip of the 1300-km-long San Andreas fault zone (SAFZ) could be the nucleation site of the next major earthquake on the fault, yet geoscientists cannot evaluate this hazard until the location and geometry of the fault zone is documented.
1d
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Age limit for federal food assistance program impacts reading scores, learningNearly 1 million children face food insecurity simply because they were born late in the year. No safety net coverage exists for these children when they age out of the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants and Children (WIC) and they are not yet eligible to attend kindergarten. Irma Arteaga, assistant professor in the Truman School of Public Affairs at the University of Missou
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The Atlantic

Elon Musk’s Long Obsession With SabotageIn October 2008, the news outlet Valleywag published a letter from an employee at Tesla. The company, just five years old then, had called employees into a meeting and revealed some troubling news, the writer said. Tesla had only $9 million in the bank. Meanwhile, the letter writer claimed, the company had taken more than 1,200 preorders for its electric cars—thousands of dollars in deposits—but
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Reply to Vickers: Pharmacogenetics and progression to neovascular age-related macular degeneration—Evidence supporting practice change [Biological Sciences]Vickers (1) offers little substantive criticism, but we address three items he mentions: (i) our choice of clinical endpoint, (ii) the potential for multiple-testing false positives, and (iii) the need for additional study. An important distinction of our study (2) is the use of neovascular AMD (nvAMD) as the endpoint….
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Morality traits still dominate in forming impressions of others [Social Sciences]Melnikoff and Bailey (M a…
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Reply to Landy et al.: Terms and conditions may apply [Social Sciences]Landy, Piazza, and Goodwin (LP&G) have codeveloped a seminal and indispensable new model of person perception (1, 2). While endorsing LP&G’s model, we recently challenged one of its auxiliary hypotheses: the morality dominance hypothesis (MDH) (3). LP&G critiqued our studies, arguing that they merely qualify the MDH (4). We concur…
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Pharmacogenomics of antioxidant supplementation to prevent age-related macular degeneration [Biological Sciences]Casual readers of Vavvas et al.’s recent paper in PNAS (1) on the pharmacogenomics of age-related macular degeneration (AMD) may get the impression that the authors have made an important incremental advance based on a logical series of studies, each of which has been moving the science in the same…
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Water agglomerates on Fe3O4(001) [Chemistry]Determining the structure of water adsorbed on solid surfaces is a notoriously difficult task and pushes the limits of experimental and theoretical techniques. Here, we follow the evolution of water agglomerates on Fe3O4(001); a complex mineral surface relevant in both modern technology and the natural environment. Strong OH–H2O bonds drive…
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Simultaneous cancer and tumor microenvironment subtyping using confocal infrared microscopy for all-digital molecular histopathology [Chemistry]Histopathology based on spatial patterns of epithelial cells is the gold standard for clinical diagnoses and research in carcinomas; although known to be important, the tissue microenvironment is not readily used due to complex and subjective interpretation with existing tools. Here, we demonstrate accurate subtyping from molecular properties of epithelial…
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Exceptionally high levels of lead pollution in the Balkans from the Early Bronze Age to the Industrial Revolution [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]The Balkans are considered the birthplace of mineral resource exploitation and metalworking in Europe. However, since knowledge of the timing and extent of metallurgy in southeastern Europe is largely constrained by discontinuous archaeological findings, the long-term environmental impact of past mineral resource exploitation is not fully understood. Here, we present…
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Targeting the potent Beclin 1-UVRAG coiled-coil interaction with designed peptides enhances autophagy and endolysosomal trafficking [Biochemistry]The Beclin 1–Vps34 complex, known as “mammalian class III PI3K,” plays essential roles in membrane-mediated transport processes including autophagy and endosomal trafficking. Beclin 1 acts as a scaffolding molecule for the complex and readily transits from its metastable homodimeric state to interact with key modulators such as Atg14L or UVRAG…
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Individuality and slow dynamics in bacterial growth homeostasis [Biophysics and Computational Biology]Microbial growth and division are fundamental processes relevant to many areas of life science. Of particular interest are homeostasis mechanisms, which buffer growth and division from accumulating fluctuations over multiple cycles. These mechanisms operate within single cells, possibly extending over several division cycles. However, all experimental studies to date have…
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

In vitro biomimetic engineering of a human hematopoietic niche with functional properties [Cell Biology]In adults, human hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) reside in the bone marrow (BM) microenvironment. Our understanding of human hematopoiesis and the associated niche biology remains limited, due to human material accessibility and limits of existing in vitro culture models. The establishment of an in vitro BM system would…
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Spatially modulated ephrinA1:EphA2 signaling increases local contractility and global focal adhesion dynamics to promote cell motility [Cell Biology]Recent studies have revealed pronounced effects of the spatial distribution of EphA2 receptors on cellular response to receptor activation. However, little is known about molecular mechanisms underlying this spatial sensitivity, in part due to lack of experimental systems. Here, we introduce a hybrid live-cell patterned supported lipid bilayer experimental platform…
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Minimizing ATP depletion by oxygen scavengers for single-molecule fluorescence imaging in live cells [Cell Biology]The stability of organic dyes against photobleaching is critical in single-molecule tracking and localization microscopy. Since oxygen accelerates photobleaching of most organic dyes, glucose oxidase is commonly used to slow dye photobleaching by depleting oxygen. As demonstrated here, pyranose-2-oxidase slows bleaching of Alexa647 dye by ∼20-fold. However, oxygen deprivation may…
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Automatically identifying, counting, and describing wild animals in camera-trap images with deep learning [Ecology]Having accurate, detailed, and up-to-date information about the location and behavior of animals in the wild would improve our ability to study and conserve ecosystems. We investigate the ability to automatically, accurately, and inexpensively collect such data, which could help catalyze the transformation of many fields of ecology, wildlife biology,…
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Directed evolution of multiple genomic loci allows the prediction of antibiotic resistance [Evolution]Antibiotic development is frequently plagued by the rapid emergence of drug resistance. However, assessing the risk of resistance development in the preclinical stage is difficult. Standard laboratory evolution approaches explore only a small fraction of the sequence space and fail to identify exceedingly rare resistance mutations and combinations thereof. Therefore,…
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Cell-intrinsic regulation of murine epidermal Langerhans cells by protein S [Immunology and Inflammation]AXL, a member of the TYRO3, AXL, and MERTK (TAM) receptor tyrosine kinase family, has been shown to play a role in the differentiation and activation of epidermal Langerhans cells (LCs). Here, we demonstrate that growth arrest-specific 6 (GAS6) protein, the predominant ligand of AXL, has no impact on LC…
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Gastrointestinal stromal tumor enhancers support a transcription factor network predictive of clinical outcome [Medical Sciences]Activating mutations in the KIT or PDGFRA receptor tyrosine kinases are hallmarks of gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST). The biological underpinnings of recurrence following resection or disease progression beyond kinase mutation are poorly understood. Utilizing chromatin immunoprecipitation with sequencing of tumor samples and cell lines, we describe the enhancer landscape of…
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

A stress-induced response complex (SIRC) shuttles miRNAs, siRNAs, and oligonucleotides to the nucleus [Medical Sciences]Although some information is available for specific subsets of miRNAs and several factors have been shown to bind oligonucleotides (ONs), no general transport mechanism for these molecules has been identified to date. In this work, we demonstrate that the nuclear transport of ONs, siRNAs, and miRNAs responds to cellular stress….
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

PHIP as a therapeutic target for driver-negative subtypes of melanoma, breast, and lung cancer [Medical Sciences]The identification and targeting of key molecular drivers of melanoma and breast and lung cancer have substantially improved their therapy. However, subtypes of each of these three common, lethal solid tumors lack identified molecular drivers, and are thus not amenable to targeted therapies. Here we show that pleckstrin homology domain-interacting…
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

ABC transporter content diversity in Streptococcus pneumoniae impacts competence regulation and bacteriocin production [Microbiology]The opportunistic pathogen Streptococcus pneumoniae (pneumococcus) uses natural genetic competence to increase its adaptability through horizontal gene transfer. One method of acquiring DNA is through predation of neighboring strains with antimicrobial peptides called “bacteriocins.” Competence and production of the major family of pneumococcal bacteriocins, pneumocins, are regulated by the quorum
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Comprehensive skin microbiome analysis reveals the uniqueness of human skin and evidence for phylosymbiosis within the class Mammalia [Microbiology]Skin is the largest organ of the body and represents the primary physical barrier between mammals and their external environment, yet the factors that govern skin microbial community composition among mammals are poorly understood. The objective of this research was to generate a skin microbiota baseline for members of the…
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Stimulation-induced increases in cerebral blood flow and local capillary vasoconstriction depend on conducted vascular responses [Neuroscience]Functional neuroimaging, such as fMRI, is based on coupling neuronal activity and accompanying changes in cerebral blood flow (CBF) and metabolism. However, the relationship between CBF and events at the level of the penetrating arterioles and capillaries is not well established. Recent findings suggest an active role of capillaries in…
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Rapid, experience-dependent translation of neurogranin enables memory encoding [Neuroscience]Experience induces de novo protein synthesis in the brain and protein synthesis is required for long-term memory. It is important to define the critical temporal window of protein synthesis and identify newly synthesized proteins required for memory formation. Using a behavioral paradigm that temporally separates the contextual exposure from the…
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Soluble epoxide hydrolase plays a key role in the pathogenesis of Parkinson’s disease [Neuroscience]Parkinson’s disease (PD) is characterized as a chronic and progressive neurodegenerative disorder, and the deposition of specific protein aggregates of α-synuclein, termed Lewy bodies, is evident in multiple brain regions of PD patients. Although there are several available medications to treat PD symptoms, these medications do not prevent the progression…
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

A shared cis-regulatory module activates transcription in the suspensor of plant embryos [Plant Biology]The mechanisms controlling the transcription of gene sets in specific regions of a plant embryo shortly after fertilization remain unknown. Previously, we showed that G564 mRNA, encoding a protein of unknown function, accumulates to high levels in the giant suspensor of both Scarlet Runner Bean (SRB) and Common Bean embryos,…
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Evolutionary convergence in lignin-degrading enzymes [Evolution]The resurrection of ancestral enzymes of now-extinct organisms (paleogenetics) is a developing field that allows the study of evolutionary hypotheses otherwise impossible to be tested. In the present study, we target fungal peroxidases that play a key role in lignin degradation, an essential process in the carbon cycle and often…
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

BP180 dysfunction triggers spontaneous skin inflammation in mice [Immunology and Inflammation]BP180, also known as collagen XVII, is a hemidesmosomal component and plays a key role in maintaining skin dermal/epidermal adhesion. Dysfunction of BP180, either through genetic mutations in junctional epidermolysis bullosa (JEB) or autoantibody insult in bullous pemphigoid (BP), leads to subepidermal blistering accompanied by skin inflammation. However, whether BP180…
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Regulation of stringent factor by branched-chain amino acids [Microbiology]When faced with amino acid starvation, prokaryotic cells induce a stringent response that modulates their physiology. The stringent response is manifested by production of signaling molecules guanosine 5′-diphosphate,3′-diphosphate (ppGpp) and guanosine 5′-triphosphate,3′-diphosphate (pppGpp) that are also called alarmones. In many species, alarmone levels are regulated by a multidomain bifunction
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Synthetic bottom-up approach reveals the complex interplay of Shigella effectors in regulation of epithelial cell death [Microbiology]Over the course of an infection, many Gram-negative bacterial pathogens use complex nanomachines to directly inject tens to hundreds of proteins (effectors) into the cytosol of infected host cells. These effectors rewire processes to promote bacterial replication and spread. The roles of effectors in pathogenesis have traditionally been investigated by…
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Gut microbiota regulates maturation of the adult enteric nervous system via enteric serotonin networks [Microbiology]The enteric nervous system (ENS) is crucial for essential gastrointestinal physiologic functions such as motility, fluid secretion, and blood flow. The gut is colonized by trillions of bacteria that regulate host production of several signaling molecules including serotonin (5-HT) and other hormones and neurotransmitters. Approximately 90% of 5-HT originates from…
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Small RNA profiling in Mycobacterium tuberculosis identifies MrsI as necessary for an anticipatory iron sparing response [Microbiology]One key to the success of Mycobacterium tuberculosis as a pathogen is its ability to reside in the hostile environment of the human macrophage. Bacteria adapt to stress through a variety of mechanisms, including the use of small regulatory RNAs (sRNAs), which posttranscriptionally regulate bacterial gene expression. However, very little…
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Transdifferentiation of human adult peripheral blood T cells into neurons [Neuroscience]Human cell models for disease based on induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells have proven to be powerful new assets for investigating disease mechanisms. New insights have been obtained studying single mutations using isogenic controls generated by gene targeting. Modeling complex, multigenetic traits using patient-derived iPS cells is much more challenging…
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

TMS-induced neuronal plasticity enables targeted remodeling of visual cortical maps [Neuroscience]Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) has become a popular clinical method to modify cortical processing. The events underlying TMS-induced functional changes remain, however, largely unknown because current noninvasive recording methods lack spatiotemporal resolution or are incompatible with the strong TMS-associated electrical field. In particular, an answer to the question of how…
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Genome-wide regulation of light-controlled seedling morphogenesis by three families of transcription factors [Plant Biology]Three families of transcription factors have been reported to play key roles in light control of Arabidopsis seedling morphogenesis. Among them, bHLH protein PIFs and plant-specific protein EIN3/EIN3-LIKE 1 (EIN3/EIL1) accumulate in the dark to maintain skotomorphogenesis. On the other hand, HY5 and HY5 HOMOLOG (HYH), two related bZIP proteins,…
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Uncovering pH at both sides of the root plasma membrane interface using noninvasive imaging [Plant Biology]Building a proton gradient across a biological membrane and between different tissues is a matter of great importance for plant development and nutrition. To gain a better understanding of proton distribution in the plant root apoplast as well as across the plasma membrane, we generated Arabidopsis plants expressing stable membrane-anchored…
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Temporal transcriptional logic of dynamic regulatory networks underlying nitrogen signaling and use in plants [Plant Biology]This study exploits time, the relatively unexplored fourth dimension of gene regulatory networks (GRNs), to learn the temporal transcriptional logic underlying dynamic nitrogen (N) signaling in plants. Our “just-in-time” analysis of time-series transcriptome data uncovered a temporal cascade of cis elements underlying dynamic N signaling. To infer transcription factor (TF)-target…
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Memory-related hippocampal activation in the sleeping toddler [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]Nonhuman research has implicated developmental processes within the hippocampus in the emergence and early development of episodic memory, but methodological challenges have hindered assessments of this possibility in humans. Here, we delivered a previously learned song and a novel song to 2-year-old toddlers during natural nocturnal sleep and, using functional…
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Trends in health inequalities in 27 European countries [Social Sciences]Unfavorable health trends among the lowly educated have recently been reported from the United States. We analyzed health trends by education in European countries, paying particular attention to the possibility of recent trend interruptions, including interruptions related to the impact of the 2008 financial crisis. We collected and harmonized data…
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

The biomass distribution on Earth [Systems Biology]A census of the biomass on Earth is key for understanding the structure and dynamics of the biosphere. However, a global, quantitative view of how the biomass of different taxa compare with one another is still lacking. Here, we assemble the overall biomass composition of the biosphere, establishing a census…
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Correction for Zahran et al., Assessment of the Legionnaires’ disease outbreak in Flint, Michigan [Correction]ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES Correction for “Assessment of the Legionnaires’ disease outbreak in Flint, Michigan,” by Sammy Zahran, Shawn P. McElmurry, Paul E. Kilgore, David Mushinski, Jack Press, Nancy G. Love, Richard C. Sadler, and Michele S. Swanson, which was first published February 5, 2018; 10.1073/pnas.1718679115 (Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 115:E1730–E1739)….
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Correction for Adam et al., Evolutionary history of carbon monoxide dehydrogenase/acetyl-CoA synthase, one of the oldest enzymatic complexes [Correction]EVOLUTION Correction for “Evolutionary history of carbon monoxide dehydrogenase/acetyl-CoA synthase, one of the oldest enzymatic complexes,” by Panagiotis S. Adam, Guillaume Borrel, and Simonetta Gribaldo, which was first published January 22, 2018; 10.1073/pnas.1716667115 (Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 115:E1166–E1173). The authors wish to note the following: “We would like to…
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Correction for Oyen et al., Structural basis for antibody recognition of the NANP repeats in Plasmodium falciparum circumsporozoite protein [Correction]MICROBIOLOGY, BIOPHYSICS AND COMPUTATIONAL BIOLOGY Correction for “Structural basis for antibody recognition of the NANP repeats in Plasmodium falciparum circumsporozoite protein,” by David Oyen, Jonathan L. Torres, Ulrike Wille-Reece, Christian F. Ockenhouse, Daniel Emerling, Jacob Glanville, Wayne Volkmuth, Yevel Flores-Garcia, Fidel Zavala, Andrew B. Ward, C. Richter King, and Ian…
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

In This Issue [This Week in PNAS]Commensal rats record shifts in Polynesian resources View of Tikopia Island with its crater lake from the peak of Mt Reani. Although little direct archaeological evidence exists to quantify the impacts of human colonization on local ecosystems, commensal animals, which accompany human habitation but are not domesticated, can preserve a…
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Fatty acid chemical mediator provides insights into the pathology and treatment of Parkinson’s disease [Neuroscience]Parkinson’s disease (PD) ranks as the second-most prevalent neurodegenerative disorder that afflicts the aging population (1). Hallmark neuropathological features of PD consist of dopaminergic cell loss in the substantia nigra, striatal dopamine deficiency, and formation of intracellular inclusions, called Lewy bodies, marked by α-synuclein aggregates (2). Although the primary brain…
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Time to build on good design: Resolving the temporal dynamics of gene regulatory networks [Plant Biology]The increasing availability of -omics data is driving the development of computational methods for integrating these datasets to connect the underlying molecular mechanisms to phenotypes. Building gene regulatory networks (GRNs) from transcriptomic studies often results in a static view of gene expression, which can make it difficult to disentangle pathway…
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

The scale of life and its lessons for humanity [Systems Biology]The scale of life on Earth is shaped by a confluence of biophysical, evolutionary, ecological, and, recently, human forces. Measuring the scale of life offers insights about these forces and raises many more questions. In PNAS, Bar-On et al. (1) offer the most comprehensive quantification to date of the biomass…
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Restructuring of nutrient flows in island ecosystems following human colonization evidenced by isotopic analysis of commensal rats [Anthropology]The role of humans in shaping local ecosystems is an increasing focus of archaeological research, yet researchers often lack an appropriate means of measuring past anthropogenic effects on local food webs and nutrient cycling. Stable isotope analysis of commensal animals provides an effective proxy for local human environments because these…
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Modulating cell state to enhance suspension expansion of human pluripotent stem cells [Applied Biological Sciences]The development of cell-based therapies to replace missing or damaged tissues within the body or generate cells with a unique biological activity requires a reliable and accessible source of cells. Human pluripotent stem cells (hPSC) have emerged as a strong candidate cell source capable of extended propagation in vitro and…
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

High-resolution {mu}CT of a mouse embryo using a compact laser-driven X-ray betatron source [Applied Physical Sciences]In the field of X-ray microcomputed tomography (μCT) there is a growing need to reduce acquisition times at high spatial resolution (approximate micrometers) to facilitate in vivo and high-throughput operations. The state of the art represented by synchrotron light sources is not practical for certain applications, and therefore the development…
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

A folded viral noncoding RNA blocks host cell exoribonucleases through a conformationally dynamic RNA structure [Biochemistry]Folded RNA elements that block processive 5′ → 3′ cellular exoribonucleases (xrRNAs) to produce biologically active viral noncoding RNAs have been discovered in flaviviruses, potentially revealing a new mode of RNA maturation. However, whether this RNA structure-dependent mechanism exists elsewhere and, if so, whether a singular RNA fold is required,…
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Robust nonequilibrium pathways to microcompartment assembly [Biophysics and Computational Biology]Cyanobacteria sequester photosynthetic enzymes into microcompartments which facilitate the conversion of carbon dioxide into sugars. Geometric similarities between these structures and self-assembling viral capsids have inspired models that posit microcompartments as stable equilibrium arrangements of the constituent proteins. Here we describe a different mechanism for microcompartment assembly, o
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Altered p53 functionality in cancer-associated fibroblasts contributes to their cancer-supporting features [Cell Biology]Within the tumor microenvironment, cancer cells coexist with noncancerous adjacent cells that constitute the tumor microenvironment and impact tumor growth through diverse mechanisms. In particular, cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) promote tumor progression in multiple ways. Earlier studies have revealed that in normal fibroblasts (NFs), p53 plays a cell nonautonomous tumor-suppressive role…
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Distinguishing malignant from benign microscopic skin lesions using desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry imaging [Chemistry]Detection of microscopic skin lesions presents a considerable challenge in diagnosing early-stage malignancies as well as in residual tumor interrogation after surgical intervention. In this study, we established the capability of desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry imaging (DESI-MSI) to distinguish between micrometer-sized tumor aggregates of basal cell carcinoma (BCC), a…
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Opinion: Medical misinformation in the era of Google: Computational approaches to a pervasive problem [Computer Sciences]On December 28, 1917, a fascinating article appeared in the pages of the New York Evening Mail. The article, titled “A Neglected History,” written by H.L. Mencken, laments the fact that the 75th anniversary of the introduction of the bathtub to the United States had passed without the slightest public…
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Potassic, high-silica Hadean crust [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]Understanding Hadean (>4 Ga) Earth requires knowledge of its crust. The composition of the crust and volatiles migrating through it directly influence the makeup of the atmosphere, the composition of seawater, and nutrient availability. Despite its importance, there is little known and less agreed upon regarding the nature of the…
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Pronounced summer warming in northwest Greenland during the Holocene and Last Interglacial [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]Projections of future rates of mass loss from the Greenland Ice Sheet are highly uncertain because its sensitivity to warming is unclear. Geologic reconstructions of Quaternary interglacials can illustrate how the ice sheet responded during past warm periods, providing insights into ice sheet behavior and important tests for data-model comparisons….
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Proterozoic Milankovitch cycles and the history of the solar system [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]The geologic record of Milankovitch climate cycles provides a rich conceptual and temporal framework for evaluating Earth system evolution, bestowing a sharp lens through which to view our planet’s history. However, the utility of these cycles for constraining the early Earth system is hindered by seemingly insurmountable uncertainties in our…
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Distance-dependent defensive coloration in the poison frog Dendrobates tinctorius, Dendrobatidae [Ecology]Poison dart frogs provide classic examples of warning signals: potent toxins signaled by distinctive, conspicuous coloration. We show that, counterintuitively, the bright yellow and blue-black color of Dendrobates tinctorius (Dendrobatidae) also provides camouflage. Through computational modeling of predator vision, and a screen-based detection experiment presenting frogs at different spatial reso
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Exploitation drives an ontogenetic-like deepening in marine fish [Ecology]Virtually all studies reporting deepening with increasing size or age by fishes involve commercially harvested species. Studies of North Sea plaice in the early 1900s first documented this phenomenon (named Heincke’s law); it occurred at a time of intensive harvesting and rapid technological changes in fishing methods. The possibility that…
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Human midcingulate cortex encodes distributed representations of task progress [Neuroscience]The function of midcingulate cortex (MCC) remains elusive despite decades of investigation and debate. Complicating matters, individual MCC neurons respond to highly diverse task-related events, and MCC activation is reported in most human neuroimaging studies employing a wide variety of task manipulations. Here we investigate this issue by applying a…
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Configuration correlation governs slow dynamics of supercooled metallic liquids [Physics]The origin of dramatic slowing down of dynamics in metallic glass-forming liquids toward their glass transition temperatures is a fundamental but unresolved issue. Through extensive molecular dynamics simulations, here we show that, contrary to the previous beliefs, it is not local geometrical orderings extracted from instantaneous configurations but the intrinsic…
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Beating the classical precision limit with spin-1 Dicke states of more than 10,000 atoms [Physics]Interferometry is a paradigm for most precision measurements. Using N uncorrelated particles, the achievable precision for a two-mode (two-path) interferometer is bounded by the standard quantum limit (SQL), 1/N, due to the discrete (quanta) nature of individual measurements. Despite being a challenging benchmark, the two-mode SQL has been approached in…
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Reciprocal space tomography of 3D skyrmion lattice order in a chiral magnet [Physics]It is commonly assumed that surfaces modify the properties of stable materials within the top few atomic layers of a bulk specimen only. Exploiting the polarization dependence of resonant elastic X-ray scattering to go beyond conventional diffraction and imaging techniques, we have determined the depth dependence of the full 3D…
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Popular Science

Carbon dioxide injections might seem better than liposuction—but there's a catchHealth The results don't last. A group of plastic surgeons set out to see if injecting carbon dioxide into your skin, a cosmetic treatment known as carboxytherapy, actually works.
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Live Science

Donald Trump Wants a 'Space Force,' But America Already Has OneTrump's proposed Space Force would basically be doing things the Air Force already does.
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The Atlantic

Harvard's Impossible Personality TestEvery year, Harvard’s admissions officers are charged with whittling a batch of 40,000 applicants down to a bare-bones selection to fill the institution’s roughly 1,600 freshman seats. Those officers can’t just set a high bar for test scores and GPAs to arrive at that selection; far too many candidates boast those qualifications . Plus, even if that arithmetic were possible, Harvard prides itself
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Feed: All Latest

Google Podcasts Hands On: It's About TimeAfter years of mostly ignoring the podcast world, Google now makes a dedicated Android app for listening. And it's pretty good!
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The Atlantic

Celebrating Juneteenth in a Moment of PerilAcross most of the reaches of the United States, the originally Texan holiday of Juneteenth is ascending in importance as a national commemoration of the emancipation of American slaves . The practices are fittingly patchwork. There are parades, symbolic baptisms, cookouts, family reunions, spades games, durag festivals , and nighttime vigils at churches. Different communities’ celebrations of em
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The Atlantic

Here’s What Trump Actually Achieved With North KoreaDonald Trump didn’t get much in the way of North Korean denuclearization in Singapore. And that’s not necessarily a bad thing. In the days since the summit with Kim Jong Un, critics— including me —have pointed out how little the U.S. president got from North Korea’s leader during their much-hyped meeting. And it’s true that Trump fell far short in that meeting of his stated goal to fully dismantl
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

Genes associated with infantile forms of schizophrenia identifiedScientists have identified novel genes associated with a specific form of schizophrenia.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

Breast cancer could be prevented by targeting epigenetic proteins, study suggestsResearchers have discovered that epigenetic proteins promote the proliferation of mammary gland stem cells in response to the sex hormone progesterone. The study suggests that inhibiting these proteins with drugs could prevent the development of breast cancer in women at high risk of the disease.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

Human immune response in the fruit flyResearchers have seen how both humans and fruit flies deploy a protein that a plays a critical role in their immune responses to invading bacteria. The discovery gives scientists evolutionary insight and a model organism with which to explore ways to boost the human immune system and create infection-fighting medicines.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

Cells can trap viruses in protein cage to stop their spread, study revealsResearchers have discovered that cells can trap viruses in a protein cage to stop them from spreading to neighboring cells. The study reveals that the vaccinia virus can escape this trap by recruiting additional proteins to dismantle the cage and propel the virus out of the cell.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

Mysterious event may be caused by a tau neutrinoTheoretical physicists calculate the origin of a high-energy particle track captured by the IceCube Neutrino Observatory.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Can psychological stress cause vision loss?Persistent psychological stress, which is widely recognized as a consequence of vision loss, is also a major contributor to its development and progression, according to a study now published in the EPMA Journal, the official journal of the European Association for Predictive, Preventive, and Personalized Medicine. Clinical practice implications of this finding include a recommendation to improve
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Latest Headlines | Science News

To combat an expanding universe, aliens could hoard starsAn advanced alien civilization might combat the impact of dark energy by harvesting stars.
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Big Think

19 dog gestures and what they mean, according to scienceA new study analyzes dog-owner videos and discovers the meanings behind 19 things a dog does. Read More
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Big Think

People with a keener sense of smell find sex more pleasant and, if they are female, have more orgasms during sexIn a new study, people with a keener sense of smell reported finding their sexual activities more “pleasant”, and women with a greater sensitivity to odours had more orgasms during sex. Read More
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Big Think

Trump orders creation of new military branch: ‘Space Force’President Donald Trump wants to create Space Force, a sixth branch of the military that would likely boost U.S. military capabilities and weaponry in space—if congress approves it. Read More
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Big Think

Scientists create an avocado that lasts 4 times longerTired of your avocados going bad? This company has developed a way to keep them fresh for four times longer. Read More
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

Warnings to texting pedestrians may not eliminate risks, but they can helpHuman factors researchers have been looking at ways to harness technology to prevent fatalities among pedestrians who are struck by vehicles while texting. In their latest study, researchers simulated a busy roadway to determine whether sending loud warning sounds to cell phones when texting pedestrians attempted to cross an unsafe gap would result in safer crossing behavior.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

Toothpaste and hand wash are causing antibiotic resistanceA common ingredient in toothpaste and hand wash could be contributing to antibiotic resistance, according to new research. The study focused on triclosan, a compound used in more than 2000 personal care products.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

D for danger! Speech sounds convey emotionsIndividual speech sounds — phonemes — are statistically associated with negative or positive emotions in several languages, new research shows. These associations help us quickly avoid dangers, because the phoneme-emotion associations are strongest at the beginning of the word and the phonemes that are spoken fastest tend to have a negative association
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

The first experimental discovery of the propagation of plasma turbulenceScientists applied the 'heat pulse modulation method' in the magnetic island produced intentionally in the tokamak 'Doublet III-D.' Temperature gradient inherent in the magnetically confined plasma causes turbulence while there is no turbulence in the magnetic island because of the absence of the gradient. That the turbulence propagates has now been demonstrated for the first time by investigating
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

Good primary care lowers emergency department use for those with intellectual and developmental disabilitiesOne in three adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities visit the emergency department annually but effective primary care could reduce these numbers, suggests a new study.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

Mechanism controlling multiple sclerosis risk identifiedWhile the DNA sequence remains the same throughout a person's life, the expression of the encoded genes may change with time and contribute to disease development in genetically predisposed individuals. Researchers have now discovered a new mechanism of a major risk gene for multiple sclerosis (MS) that triggers disease through epigenetic regulation. They also found a protective genetic variant th
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

Is the sky the limit? On the expansion threshold of a species' rangeWhat stops a species adapting to an ever-wider range of conditions, continuously expanding its geographic range? A biomathematician now explains the formation of species' range margins. The theory shows that just two compound parameters, important for both ecology and evolution of species, are fundamental to the stability of their range: the environmental heterogeneity and the size of the local po
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

Scientists reveal how gut microbes 'recover' after antibiotic treatmentNew insight on how antibiotics affect the gut microbiome — the community of microbes that live inside us — has been published.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

Kids grasp that you get what you pay forFrom a young age, children have a nuanced understanding of fairness.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

Light pollution a reason for insect declineClimate change, pesticides and land use changes alone cannot fully explain the decline in insect populations in Germany. Scientists have now discovered that regions that have experienced a sharp decline in flying insects also have high levels of light pollution. Many studies already suggest that artificial light at night has negative impacts on insects, and scientists should pay greater attention
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

Clovis site: Montana burial site answers questions about early humansScientists have shown that at the Anzick site in Montana – the only known Clovis burial site – the skeletal remains of a young child and the antler and stone artifacts found there were buried at the same time, raising new questions about the early inhabitants of North America.
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Popular Science

If you're scared of artificial intelligence, you should know it's already everywhereTechnology From sandwich pics to real estate. You're using AI even when you don't know it.
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New on MIT Technology Review

Five ways you can already become a cyborg, one body part at a timeWant to use your hand to prove your identity? Become a better skier without any work? Try this.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

Ocean's heat cycle shows that atmospheric carbon may be headed elsewhereA new study examined the global carbon cycle and suggests that scientists may have misgauged how carbon is distributed around the world, particularly between the northern and southern hemispheres. The results could change projections of how, when and where the currently massive levels of atmospheric carbon will result in environmental changes such as ocean acidification.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

New material for splitting waterSolar energy is clean and abundant, but when the sun isn't shining, you must store the energy in batteries or through a process called photocatalysis. In photocatalytic water splitting, sunlight separates water into hydrogen and oxygen, which can then be recombined in a fuel cell to release energy. Now, a new class of materials — halide double perovskites — may have just the right properties to
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

World's first known manta ray nurseryLocated in the Gulf of Mexico off the coast of Texas at NOAA's Flower Garden Banks National Marine Sanctuary, the juvenile manta ray habitat is the first of its kind to be described in a scientific study.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

Everything big data claims to know about you could be wrongWhen it comes to understanding what makes people tick — and get sick — medical science has long assumed that the bigger the sample of human subjects, the better. But new research suggests this big-data approach may be wildly off the mark.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

Bees love blue fluorescent light, and not just any wavelength will doResearchers have learned that a specific wavelength range of blue fluorescent light set bees abuzz.
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Live Science

Here's the Latest Study on the Links Between Alcohol and CancerHow much alcohol is linked to a lower risk of cancer?
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New on MIT Technology Review

School lockdowns are so prevalent that companies are making apps to help teachers manage them[no content]
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

'Kiss of death' cancerMonash researchers have developed a computer program which has revealed a previously unknown combination of drugs that may be the answer to Triple Negative Breast Cancer (TNBC), using genetic and treatment data from TNBC cells grown in labs and from hundreds of patients world-wide. Importantly researchers can tell, by inputting patients' genomic and proteomic information into their computer model,
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Binge drinking during youth may impact future offspringA rat model found preconception binge drinking may have negative consequences on future offspring's growth, social interactions and pubertal development, according to a new study published in the Endocrine Society's Journal of the Endocrine Society.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Risks of cancer and mortality by average lifetime alcohol intakeThe risk of mortality, and of developing a number of cancers, is lowest in light drinkers consuming an average of less than one drink per day across their lifetime, and the risk of some cancers increases with each additional drink per week, according to a new study, published this week in PLOS Medicine by Andrew Kunzmann of Queen's University Belfast, and colleagues.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Researchers map cardiovascular disease risk across IndiaThe average 10-year risk of developing cardiovascular disease varies widely among India's states, ranging from 13.2 percent to 19.5 percent, with substantial variation across socio-demographic groups according to a study published this week in PLOS Medicine by Pascal Geldsetzer and Rifat Atun of Harvard University, and colleagues.
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cognitive science

A new paper in Psychological Science explores how mere group membership affects kids' self-control in the marshmallow task.submitted by /u/markmana [link] [comments]
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Allergies, glaciers, and pikas: climate change in actionYou don't just feel the heat of global warming, you can see it in action all around.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

New model for gauging ice sheet movement may improve sea-level-rise predictionsResearchers discovered friction — or 'basal drag' — between ice sheets and the hard bed underneath has no influence on how fast glaciers flow.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

Mild problem-solving task improves brain function after a concussion, new study suggestsA mild problem-solving task improves brain functioning after a concussion, according to a new study. Currently there are many questions about rehabilitation and treatment options, with absolute rest often the go-to treatment. But the new study suggests that a simple cognitive task as early as four days after a brain injury activates the region that improves memory function, and may guard against d
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

Tackling bullying could help reduce depression in autistic teensTeenagers with difficulties in social communication, including autism, have higher rates of depressive symptoms, especially if they are being bullied.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

Nuclear power shutdowns won't spike power pricesDespite economic woes that could shutter two of Pennsylvania's nuclear power plants — which generate 6 percent of the state's power — power prices will remain steady due to low natural gas prices, according to an associate professor of energy policy and economics.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

Spintronics: Controlling magnetic spin with electric fieldsPhysicists have found a way to reverse electron spins using electric fields for the first time, paving the way for programmable spintronics technologies.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Interaction of paired and lined-up electrons can be manipulated in semiconductorsThe way that electrons paired as composite particles or arranged in lines interact with each other within a semiconductor provides new design opportunities for electronics, according to recent findings in Nature Communications.
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Big Think

Listen: Stephen Hawking's final message to humankindThis piece of music was beamed into back hole 1A 0620-00, about 3,457 light years away. You can listen to the six-minute song, with spoken word by Stephen Hawking, right here. Read More
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Ford celebrates purchase of iconic Detroit train stationFord Motor Co. is celebrating its purchase of Detroit's long vacant train depot that the company plans to redevelop for research and development of self-driving vehicles.
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Big Think

Artificial intelligence wins a debate against a human—twicePlease tell me that Internet trolls didn't just get a huge leg up. Read More
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The Atlantic

85 Immigrants Sentenced Together Before One JudgeMCALLEN, Tex.—There wasn’t a single empty seat among the six rows of wooden pews in Magistrate Judge J. Scott Hacker’s courtroom on Monday afternoon. The gallery was packed, its visitors jammed shoulder to shoulder, as if the public had crowded in to witness a momentous ruling or, perhaps, a celebrity trial. But the people who occupied these seats in the back of the courtroom were no mere observe
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Popular Science

Meet the yogis who hang out in cadaver labsScience You can hone your corpse pose by hanging out with actual corpses. In the basement of a funeral home in Colorado, yogis—and acupuncturists, massage therapists, and anyone else looking for a better understanding of human flesh—can sign…
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Four new mountain lions kittens found in California mountainsFour new mountain lion kittens have been found by researchers studying the wild cats living in Southern California's Santa Monica Mountains, wildlife officials announced in video posts Tuesday showing the blue-eyed babies meowing and one feisty one hissing and even taking a swipe at the person filming her.
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cognitive science

Thinking like a Physicist to Solve Neuroscience Problemssubmitted by /u/NaiveSkeptic [link] [comments]
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Scientific American Content: Global

7 Questions to Watch in the Theranos SagaSince criminal charges were filed, these may be the most pressing issues — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Audi names interim CEO after boss arrested in diesel probeGerman carmaker Audi said Tuesday it had named a new interim chief, a day after prosecutors arrested boss Rupert Stadler in connection with parent company Volkswagen's "dieselgate" scandal.
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Quanta Magazine

Her Key to Modeling Brains: Ignore the Right DetailsIn May 2013, the mathematician Carina Curto attended a workshop in Arlington, Virginia, on “ Physical and Mathematical Principles of Brain Structure and Function ” — a brainstorming session about the brain, essentially. The month before, President Obama had issued one of his “Grand Challenges” to the scientific community in announcing the BRAIN Initiative (Brain Research through Advancing Innovat
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New Scientist – News

A huge number of mystery microbes are living on your skinWe thought we knew about most of the species in our bodies’ microbiomes, but a study has revealed a large number of previously-unidentified organisms
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Visa says over 5 million payments affected by June outagePayment systems giant Visa said Tuesday that a massive technical glitch earlier this month had affected 5.2 million card transactions, almost half of which were in Britain.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Foxconn investing in $30 million water recycling systemFoxconn Technology Group plans to invest in a $30 million recycling system that will significantly reduce the amount of water it has to draw from Lake Michigan for its proposed manufacturing complex in southeast Wisconsin, the company said Tuesday.
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cognitive science

Out of their minds: wild ideas at the ‘Coachella of consciousness’submitted by /u/The_Ebb_and_Flow [link] [comments]
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Ocean's heat cycle shows that atmospheric carbon may be headed elsewhereAs humans continue to pump the atmosphere with carbon, it's crucial for scientists to understand how and where the planet absorbs and naturally emits carbon.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Liberals do drink more lattes, but maybe not for the reasons you thinkThe term "latte liberal" has been a popular way to disparage American progressives as uppity and out of touch, but does a person's coffee preference really say something about his or her political ideology?
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

NASA examined Tropical Cyclone Bud's rains in the US southwestBeneficial rainfall from hurricane Bud's remnants has spread into the U.S. Desert Southwest after making landfall in western Mexico and moving north. NASA added up the rainfall using satellite data to provide a full picture of the rainfall.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Nuclear power shutdowns won't spike power pricesDespite economic woes that could shutter two of Pennsylvania's nuclear power plants—which generate 6 percent of the state's power—power prices will remain steady due to low natural gas prices, according to Seth Blumsack, associate professor of energy policy and economics, Penn State.
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NYT > Science

Dr. Adel Mahmoud, Who Was Credited With HPV and Rotavirus Vaccines, Dies at 76As president of Merck Vaccines, Dr. Mahmoud overcame doubts in developing vaccines against two threats to women and babies: HPV and rotavirus.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

New model for gauging ice sheet movement may improve sea-level-rise predictionsA just-published paper in Science changes the formula scientists should use when estimating the speed of huge ice sheets in Greenland and Antarctica that flow into the ocean and drive mounting sea levels around the globe.
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Scientific American Content: Global

New Human Gene Tally Reignites DebateThe controversy over how many genes are contained in the human genome continues to simmer — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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BBC News – Science & Environment

Hot airAs demand for air conditioning goes through the roof, what are the implications for our planet?
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Study shows approach can help English learners improve at math word problemsEnglish learners are the fastest-growing minority in U.S. schools. While they face many of the same challenges as their peers, when it comes to mathematics, they are not only learning to work with numbers but doing so through the dynamic of a second language that presents new difficulties, especially with word problems. University of Kansas researchers have published a study that shows how an evid
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The Atlantic

Purgatory at the BorderMATAMOROS, Mexico—When drug traffickers shot Wayner Berduo seven times last year, they didn’t stop there. The men nearly beat him to death with their pistol grips, police reports say. One bullet pierced Berduo’s eye socket, so after the attack, surgeons removed his left eye and stitched back together his face and his right arm, which now hangs limply by his side. For days, Berduo has waited hours
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