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Nyheder2018juni21

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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

BCG vaccine leads to long-term blood sugar improvement in type 1 diabetes patientsLong-term follow-up of participants in Massachusetts General Hospital clinical trials of a generic vaccine to reverse advanced type 1 diabetes finds significant clinical benefits, including restoration of near-normal blood sugar levels.
13h
Science : NPR

Koko The Gorilla Dies; Redrew The Lines Of Animal-Human CommunicationKoko fascinated and elated millions of people with her facility for language and her ability to interact with humans. She also gave people a glimpse of her emotions. (Image credit: Bettmann Archive)
11h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Laser bursts generate electricity faster than any other methodTake a glass thread a thousand times thinner than a human hair. Use it as a wire between two metals. Hit it with a laser pulse that lasts a millionth of a billionth of a second.
11h

LATEST

Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

Chemists teach an enzyme a new trick, with potential for building new moleculesChemists have found a way to make a naturally occurring enzyme take on a new, artificial role, which has significant implications for modern chemistry, including pharmaceutical production.
now
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

Writing away the body image bluesBody dissatisfaction among women is widespread and can lead to a number of worrisome outcomes, including eating disorders, depression and anxiety. While researchers know a lot about what makes women's body image worse, they are still short on empirically supported interventions for improving women's body image. A psychology professor tested the effect of three specific writing exercises on college
now
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Why the Supreme Court Sales Tax Ruling May Benefit AmazonSupreme Court OnlineStates can now require all online retailers to collect sales tax, even if the company does not have a physical presence in the state.
19min
Popular Science

Koko, the beloved gorilla who communicated through sign-language, dies at age 46Animals Remembering, as Koko once put it, a 'fine-gorilla-person.' One of the world's most beloved primates Koko, the gorilla famous for her ability to communicate using sign language, died in her sleep Tuesday morning at age 46.
20min
The Atlantic

The Atlantic Daily: Between ParentsWhat We’re Following Border Politics: President Donald Trump’s executive order from Wednesday has—at least on paper—reversed his administration’s policy of separating families who enter the country illegally. Yet its political impact is still unfolding, and the public outrage over the policy may not bode well for Trump or the Republican Party. Democrats, for their part, could look to French Presi
21min
New Scientist – News

Mystery gibbon found buried in tomb of ancient Chinese royaltyThe skeleton of an entirely new – but now extinct – species of gibbon was found in the tomb of Lady Xia, grandmother of China’s first emperor, and was probably her pet
22min
New Scientist – News

Many psychiatric conditions have the same genes in commonSeveral conditions including anxiety, depression and anorexia all share a common set of genes, which could lead to better diagnoses
22min
New Scientist – News

We’ve just seen a huge space explosion and don’t know what it isThere’s an enormous, fast-moving explosion in space unlike anything we’ve seen before, and astronomers around the world are scrambling to figure out what it is
22min
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

Antarctic ice sheet is melting, but rising bedrock below could slow it downAn international team of researchers has found that the bedrock below the remote West Antarctic Ice Sheet is rising much more rapidly than previously thought, in response to ongoing ice melt.
23min
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

Psychiatric disorders share an underlying genetic basisResearchers explored the genetic connections between brain disorders at a scale far eclipsing previous work on the subject. The team determined that psychiatric disorders share many genetic variants, while neurological disorders (such as Parkinson's or Alzheimer's) appear more distinct. The results indicate that psychiatric disorders likely have important similarities at a molecular level, which c
23min
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

California Aedes mosquitoes capable of spreading ZikaOver the last five years, Zika virus has emerged as a significant global human health threat following outbreaks in South and Central America. Now, researchers have shown that invasive mosquitoes in California — where cases of Zika in travelers have been a regular occurrence in recent years — are capable of transmitting Zika.
23min
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

Caffeine from four cups of coffee protects the heart with the help of mitochondriaA new study shows that a caffeine concentration equivalent to four cups of coffee promotes the movement of a regulatory protein into mitochondria, enhancing their function and protecting cardiovascular cells from damage.
23min
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

The psychobiology of online gamingWhen researchers looked at expression of a particular gene complex that is activated by chronic stress, they found differences depending on whether someone was positively engaging in video games or were problematic gamers.
23min
New on MIT Technology Review

Here’s how the proposed reorganization of the federal government could impact science and tech[no content]
24min
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

What's that extra in my online cart? Soon, maybe a sales taxAttention shoppers: You may soon be paying more taxes on what you put in your online cart.
37min
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

'Exam Roulette' could quell essay-induced anxietyFor many students, essay tests are a source of dread and anxiety. But for professors, these tests provide an excellent way to assess a student's depth of knowledge and critical-thinking skills. At the American Physiological Society's (APS's) Institute on Teaching and Learning in Madison, Wis., Andrew Petzold, Ph.D., of the University of Minnesota Rochester Center for Learning Innovation, will disc
37min
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Online professional development boosts teachers' confidence, knowledgeMultiple factors go into making an effective professional development (PD) program for K-12 teachers. Focusing on content, active learning, collaboration and coaching support and using models of effective teaching can broaden the knowledge of science teachers. However, many teachers are short on the resources needed to attend one-time short-term PD programs. Additionally, there is little data on t
37min
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Prop. 47 lessened racial disparities in drug arrestsIn 2014, California voters approved Proposition 47, which reclassified drug possession offenses from felonies or "wobblers"—which prosecutors can charge as either felonies or misdemeanors—to misdemeanors, and in the process reduced the state's prison and jail populations. Now, a study out of UC San Francisco has quantified the effects of the ballot measure, which was at the leading edge of a natio
37min
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Study abroad for commuters: a case study at the University of New Hampshire at ManchesterStudying abroad can impart a number of valuable, lifelong skills in students, including improved foreign language skills, appreciation for other cultures and, importantly, access to unique learning opportunities only available in certain countries and settings. However, less than 10 percent of U.S. college students participate in study abroad experiences. The cost of these experiences remains a ma
37min
Popular Science

This new system could help air taxis and drone deliveries avoid crashingTechnology The program is focused on a 35-mile route in Ohio. A drone management network project underway in Ohio will help keeps all those aerial vehicles from colliding.
49min
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Template to create superatoms could make for better batteriesVirginia Commonwealth University researchers have discovered a novel strategy for creating superatoms—combinations of atoms that can mimic the properties of more than one group of elements of the periodic table. These superatoms could be used to create new materials, including more efficient batteries and better semiconductors; a core component of microchips, transistors and most computerized devi
49min
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Chemists teach an enzyme a new trick, with potential for building new moleculesPrinceton chemists have found a way to make a naturally occurring enzyme take on a new, artificial role, which has significant implications for modern chemistry, including pharmaceutical production. Their work appears in the journal Nature Chemistry.
49min
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

Scientists discover how brain signals travel to drive language performanceUsing transcranial magnetic stimulation and network control theory, researchers have taken a novel approach to understanding how signals travel across the brain's highways and how stimulation can lead to better cognitive function.
51min
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

'Antifreeze' molecules may stop and reverse damage from brain injuriesThe key to better treatments for brain injuries and disease may lie in the molecules charged with preventing the clumping of specific proteins associated with cognitive decline and other neurological problems, researchers report.
51min
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

A mechanism behind choosing alcohol over healthy rewards is foundChanges in a brain signalling system contribute to the development of alcohol addiction-like behaviors in rats, according to a new study. The findings indicate a similar mechanism in humans.
51min
The Atlantic

The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: Do U Care?-Written by Lena Felton ( @lenakfelton ) and Elaine Godfrey ( @elainejgodfrey ) Today in 5 Lines First lady Melania Trump made an unexpected visit to McAllen, Texas, to “see what’s real” on the U.S.-Mexico border, according to her spokeswoman. But it wasn’t just her surprise travel plans that generated buzz—photographers also captured her boarding the plane wearing a jacket that read, in white le
57min
Latest Headlines | Science News

Koko the gorilla is gone, but she left a legacyAn ape that touched millions imparted some hard lessons about primate research.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Princeton chemists teach an enzyme a new trick, with potential for building new moleculesPrinceton chemists led by Prof. Todd Hyster have found a way to make a naturally occurring enzyme take on a new, artificial role, which has significant implications for modern chemistry, including pharmaceutical production.
1h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Online professional development boosts teachers' confidence, knowledgeMultiple factors make an effective professional development (PD) program for K-12 teachers. Focusing on content, active learning, collaboration and coaching support and using effective teaching models can broaden the knowledge of science teachers. However, many teachers are short on the resources needed to attend one-time short-term PD programs. The results of one online PD program for teachers wi
1h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

'Exam Roulette' could quell essay-induced anxietyFor many students, essay tests are a source of dread and anxiety. But for professors, these tests provide an excellent way to assess a student's depth of knowledge and critical-thinking skills. At the American Physiological Society's (APS's) Institute on Teaching and Learning in Madison, Wis., Andrew Petzold, PhD, of the University of Minnesota Rochester Center for Learning Innovation, will discus
1h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Study abroad for commuters: a case study at the University of New Hampshire at ManchesterStudying abroad can impart valuable, lifelong skills, including foreign language skills, appreciation for other cultures and access to unique learning opportunities. However, the cost remains a major impediment to many students. A course at University of New Hampshire at Manchester offered a study abroad trip during spring break. The cost, a course fee, was potentially covered under financial aid
1h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Medicaid Expansion increased low-income patient access to kidney transplantsStates that fully implemented Medicaid expansion under the Affordable Care Act saw significant increases for preemptive kidney transplant listings among black and Hispanic patients.
1h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Reduction in protein in the urine is a treatment goal in children with kidney diseaseThe blood pressure-lowering medication ramipril reduced protein excretion — or proteinuria — in children with chronic kidney disease. Greater reductions in proteinuria during the first months of treatment were linked with a lower risk of kidney disease progression.
1h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Medicaid expansion helps low-income patients get on transplant waitlist before dialysisIn states that expanded Medicaid under the Affordable Care Act to cover more low-income individuals, there was an increase in the number of Medicaid beneficiaries who were preemptively waitlisted to receive a kidney transplant. Medicaid expansion was associated with greater gains racial and ethnic minorities in being listed pre-emptively on the transplant waitlist compared with whites.
1h
The Atlantic

How Some Immigrant Families Are Avoiding SeparationMCALLEN, Tex.—Angel Bonilla spent eight days in an immigrant-detention facility with his five-month-old daughter, Selene Alanis, after trekking for nearly a month through Mexico from his home in Honduras. Like so many others, he was caught by the Border Patrol crossing the Rio Grande in a raft. Right now, they’re in McAllen. Soon, they’ll be on their way to Dallas, where Bonilla will stay with fr
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Our intestinal microbiome influences metabolism — through the immune systemThe innate immune system, our first line of defense against bacterial infection, has a side job that's equally important: fine-tuning our metabolism.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Anxious individuals are less risky, moderated by higher control when making decisionsNew research shows that highly anxious individuals exert more cognitive control when they make a risky decision compared with less anxious individuals. This in turn leads to less risky decisions.
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cognitive science

Koko The Gorilla Dies; Redrew The Lines Of Animal-Human Communicationsubmitted by /u/burtzev [link] [comments]
1h
Live Science

Physicists Just Found the Last Missing Protons and Neutrons In the Universehe universe's missing baryons have been found, and they're floating between the stars in the form of superhot oxygen.
1h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Ketamine acts fast to treat depression and its effects last — but how?Researchers led by Mark Rasenick in the University of Illinois at Chicago College of Medicine, describe the molecular mechanisms behind ketamine's ability to squash depression and keep it at bay. They report their findings in the journal Molecular Psychiatry.
1h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Deep data dive helps predict cerebral palsyA pioneering technique developed to analyze genetic activity of Antarctic worms is helping to predict cerebral palsy. The technique uses next-generation genetic sequencing data to measure how cells control the way genes are turned on or off, and can also be used in other human health care research.
1h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Scientists solve the case of the missing subplate, with wide implications for brain scienceA new study shows that a group of neurons, previously thought to die in the course of development, in fact become incorporated into the brain's cortex. This research has implications for understanding — and possibly treating –several brain disorders.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

New cellular pathway helps explain how inflammation leads to artery diseaseInvestigators have identified a new cellular pathway that may help explain how arterial inflammation develops into atherosclerosis — deposits of cholesterol, fats and other substances that create plaque, clog arteries and promote heart attacks and stroke. The findings could lead to improved therapies for atherosclerosis, a leading cause of death worldwide.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Template to create superatoms, created by VCU researchers, could make for better batteriesVirginia Commonwealth University researchers have discovered a novel strategy for creating superatoms — combinations of atoms that can mimic the properties of more than one group of elements of the periodic table. These superatoms could be used to create new materials, including more efficient batteries and better semiconductors; a core component of microchips, transistors and most computerized d
1h
The Scientist RSS

US Scientists Letter Calls for Transparency in Animal ResearchNearly 600 signatories, including four Nobel Prize winners, urge openness about animal experiments.
1h
The Scientist RSS

Bones in Ancient Tomb Are of Newly Discovered Ape GenusThe now-extinct gibbon was buried with the grandmother of China's first emperor and her many pets.
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BBC News – Science & Environment

Mystery extinct ape found in ancient Chinese tombThe discovery of a prehistoric pet gibbon suggests humans pushed apes to extinction far back in history.
2h
Big Think

NASA unveils 3 ways it will defend Earth from catastrophic asteroidsThe chances of an asteroid large enough to be a threat to areas where human beings are concentrated are small. Still, it's what's known as a "high impact" result. Read More
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Prop. 47 lessened racial disparities in drug arrestsIn 2014, California voters approved Proposition 47, which reclassified drug possession offenses from felonies to misdemeanors, and in the process reduced the state's prison and jail populations. Now, a study out of UC San Francisco has quantified the effects of the ballot measure, which was at the leading edge of a national movement to reduce incarceration rates and change the criminal justice app
2h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

Fundamental rule of brain plasticityA series of complex experiments in the visual cortex of mice has yielded a simple rule about plasticity: When a synapse strengthens, others immediately nearby weaken.
2h
Big Think

The Dutch are closing even more prisons as crime continues to dropThe Netherlands is set to close four more prisons following some of the lowest crime rates the country's seen in decades—but do those statistics reflect the reality of Dutch crime? Read More
2h
New on MIT Technology Review

Alphabet is in talks to spin out its molten-salt storage playBill Gates’s Breakthrough Energy Ventures is involved in the deal.
2h
Popular Science

Massive atmospheric wave on Venus could explain the planet's weird rotationSpace More than a light Venusian breeze. Venus’ rotation has always been weird. Estimates of it have changed over time, much to the puzzlement of scientists.
2h
The Atlantic

The Outrage Cycle, Italian StylePARIS—What does Matteo Salvini, Italy’s new right-wing, hard-liner interior minister want? He’s called for a census of Roma who don’t have Italian citizenship then slightly backtracked because, well, it would likely be challenged in court, but anyway then he’s said he wants to turn “words into actions” and expel some of them because “unfortunately we have to keep the Italian Roma”—the ones that h
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

'Antifreeze' molecules may stop and reverse damage from brain injuriesThe key to better treatments for brain injuries and disease may lie in the molecules charged with preventing the clumping of specific proteins associated with cognitive decline and other neurological problems, researchers from Penn report in a new study published in Neurobiology of Disease.
2h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Scientists discover how brain signals travel to drive language performanceUsing transcranial magnetic stimulation and network control theory, researchers have taken a novel approach to understanding how signals travel across the brain's highways and how stimulation can lead to better cognitive function.
2h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

VLT makes most precise test of Einstein's general relativity outside Milky WayAstronomers using the ESO Very Large Telescope, and the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, have made the most precise test yet of Einstein's general theory of relativity outside the Milky Way. The galaxy ESO 325-G004 distorts light from a galaxy behind it and creates an Einstein ring around its centre. By comparing the mass of ESO 325-G004 with the curvature of space around it, astronomers found tha
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Live Science

Why Archaeologists Were Surprised to Find This Gibbon in a Royal Chinese TombAbout 2,300 years ago, the grandmother of China's first emperor received an elaborate burial outfitted with a macabre menagerie of buried animals — notably, the remains of an ancient, extinct gibbon that was previously unknown to science.
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Feed: All Latest

Batman Is Only Kinda Good at Crime Scene InvestigationBruce Wayne’s gumshoe techniques are alright, but how does he stack up against 'True Detective'?
2h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Deutsche Telekom says will slash 10,000 jobs at subsidiaryDeutsche Telekom said Thursday it would slash 10,000 jobs worldwide at its loss-making IT services subsidiary in the next three years as it seeks 600 million euros ($696 million) in savings.
2h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Escaped lion shot dead at Belgium zoo, sparking criticismBelgian police have been criticised for shooting dead a young lioness at a zoo on Thursday after it escaped from its enclosure.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

Zebrafish's near 360 degree UV-vision knocks stripes off Google Street ViewA zebrafish view of the world has been forensically analyzed by researchers to reveal that how they see their surroundings changes hugely depending on what direction they are looking.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

Majority of US adults prescribed epinephrine report not using it in an emergencyA new study shows in an emergency, 52 percent of adults with potentially life-threatening allergies didn't use the epinephrine auto-injectors (EAI) they were prescribed.
2h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

Waking up is hard to do: Prefrontal cortex implicated in consciousnessResearchers discover that stimulating the prefrontal cortex can induce wake-like behavior in anesthetized rats.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

Graphene assembled film shows higher thermal conductivity than graphite filmResearchers have developed a graphene assembled film that has over 60 percent higher thermal conductivity than graphite film — despite the fact that graphite simply consists of many layers of graphene. The graphene film shows great potential as a novel heat spreading material for form-factor driven electronics and other high power-driven systems.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

Brain tingles: First study of its kind reveals physiological benefits of ASMRAutonomous Sensory Meridian Response (ASMR) – the relaxing 'brain tingles' experienced by some people in response to specific triggers, such as whispering, tapping and slow hand movements — may have benefits for both mental and physical health, according to new research.
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TED Talks Daily (SD video)

Why you should love gross science | Anna RothschildWhat can we learn from the slimy, smelly side of life? In this playful talk, science journalist Anna Rothschild shows us the hidden wisdom of "gross stuff" and explains why avoiding the creepy underbelly of nature, medicine and technology closes us off to important sources of knowledge about our health and the world. "When we explore the gross side of life, we find insights that we never would hav
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The Atlantic

Hats of the Royal AscotThe Royal Ascot is an annual five-day horse-race meeting held on a course outside of London, England, with racehorses competing for nearly $18 million in prizes. It is a major event for both racing and fashion fans, and is regularly attended by Queen Elizabeth II and other royalty. Parts of the racecourse maintain a “top hats and tails” rule for men, while many women dress in eye-catching outfits
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Antidiabetic action of natural fatty acid derivatives not confirmedA team of researchers at Sanofi and Mainz University finds no positive action of isomers of the fatty acid derivatives 5- and 9-PAHSA in diabetes models.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Coining less expensive currency: bringing down the cost of making nickelsCashing in on materials science, NIST makes a new nickel for use in the U.S. Mint. The work might be useful for building durable high-tech devices like smartphones, too.
2h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

New clues to improving chemotherapiesThe work has important implications for understanding how human cancer cells develop resistance to natural product-based chemotherapies.
3h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

Researchers create matchmaking service, for peptides and antibioticsResearchers have matched small proteins, called peptides, with antibiotics so they can work together to combat hard-to-treat infections that don't respond well to drugs on their own.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

Fish's use of electricity might shed light on human illnessesAfrican weakly electric fish, commonly called baby whales, use incredibly brief electrical pulses to sense the world around them and communicate with other members of their species. Part of that electrical mechanism exists in humans — and by studying these fish, scientists may unlock clues about conditions like epilepsy.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

First ancient syphilis genomes decodedAn international research team has recovered the first historic genomes from the bacterium Treponema pallidum, which causes syphilis. It was previously not thought possible to recover DNA of this bacterium from ancient samples. In the study, the researchers were able to distinguish genetically between the subspecies of the disease that cause syphilis and that cause yaws, which are not readily dist
3h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

Garden seed diet for threatened turtle doves has negative impactNew research into Britain's fastest declining bird species has found that young turtle doves raised on a diet of seeds foraged from non-cultivated arable plants rather than food provided in people's gardens are more likely to survive after fledging. Ecologists investigated the dietary habits of European turtle doves using DNA analysis of faecal samples and found significant associations between th
3h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

Probiotics can protect the skeletons of older womenResearchers have demonstrated that probiotics, dietary supplements with health-promoting bacteria, can be used to affect the human skeleton. Among older women who received probiotics, bone loss was halved compared to women who received only a placebo. The research opens the door to a new way to prevent fractures among the elderly.
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New on MIT Technology Review

Over one-third of industrial robots purchased last year were installed in China[no content]
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Live Science

Antarctica Is Getting Taller, and Here’s WhyThe ground under Antarctica's ice is on the move, rising more rapidly than ever recorded.
3h
Popular Science

Instagram TV is pulling us ever closer to a future full of tall videosInstagram IGTV YouTubeTechnology Moving images have historically been wide, but smartphones are changing that. Instagram TV is bringing long-form content to vertical video.
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Inside Science

BRIEF: EPA May Have Underestimated Methane Leaks From Oil and GasBRIEF: EPA May Have Underestimated Methane Leaks From Oil and Gas Escaped methane likely warms the climate as much as all natural gas burned in the U.S. alvarez1HR_cropped.jpg Image credits: Environmental Defense Fund Earth Thursday, June 21, 2018 – 15:00 Nala Rogers, Staff Writer (Inside Science) — Methane emissions from U.S. oil and gas operations are 63 percent higher than government estimate
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Writing away the body image bluesBody dissatisfaction among women is widespread and can lead to a number of worrisome outcomes, including eating disorders, depression and anxiety. While researchers know a lot about what makes women's body image worse, they are still short on empirically supported interventions for improving women's body image. Northwestern psychology professor Renee Engeln tested the effect of three specific writ
3h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Crisis can force re-evaluation and derail efforts to reach goalsSetbacks are to be expected when pursuing a goal, whether you are trying to lose weight or save money. The challenge is getting back on track and not giving up after a difficulty or crisis, says an Iowa State marketing professor working on practical ways to help people stick to health-related goals.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

Water can be very dead, electrically speakingWater is one of the most fascinating substances on Earth and at the heart of its many unusual properties is high polarizability, a strong response to an applied electric field. Now researchers have found that on a microscopic scale water behaves very differently and its thin layers lose any polarizability, becoming electrically dead.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

Einstein proved right in another galaxyAstronomers have made the most precise test of gravity outside our own solar system. By combining data taken with NASA's Hubble Space Telescope and the European Southern Observatory's Very Large Telescope, the researchers show that gravity in this galaxy behaves as predicted by Albert Einstein's general theory of relativity, confirming the theory's validity on galactic scales.
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Scientific American Content: Global

Scientists Pinpoint Brain Region That May Be Center of Alcohol AddictionResearchers map out a cellular mechanism that offers a biological explanation for alcoholism, and could lead to treatments — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Viden

Selvskade: Hjernen føler lykke, når du skærer i dig selvAt skade sig selv kan være lige så vanedannende som at være på stoffer, siger ekspert.
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Live Science

Don't Stare into a Laser Pointer Beam. You Could Burn a Hole in Your EyeA boy in Greece burned a hole in his retina after repeatedly staring into a laser-pointer beam, according to a new report.
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cognitive science

Alexa Skill illustrates cognitive magic tricksubmitted by /u/brianfit [link] [comments]
3h
The Atlantic

Trump’s Katrina MomentSome years ago, I met via fellowship a group of journalists from countries where the fates of citizens hinge on choices out of Washington: Iraq, Iran, Afghanistan. The idea was to get to know one another and our worlds, and so one afternoon we heard from an expert on federalism. “Americans,” he told us, looking mostly at the foreigners, “don’t care about foreign policy. They care about domestic p
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Science : NPR

Long-Extinct Gibbon Found Inside Tomb Of Chinese Emperor's GrandmotherA Chinese tomb has turned up evidence of a new species of long-extinct ape. The gibbon, called Junzi imperialis, lived and died alongside its imperial human caretaker. (Image credit: Joachim S. Müller/Flickr)
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Inside Science

Shooing Birds Away With SoundShooing Birds Away With Sound A humane way to keep birds from gathering where they’re not wanted. Shooing Birds Away With Sound Video of Shooing Birds Away With Sound Creature Thursday, June 21, 2018 – 14:15 Nala Rogers, Staff Writer (Inside Science) — Humans and birds don't always get along. We clash over resources like food and shelter, and sometimes we clash literally — when birds collide wi
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

How snowshoe hares evolved to stay seasonally camouflagedMany animals have evolved fur or feather colors to blend in with the environment and hide from predators. But how do animals stay camouflaged when their environment changes with each new season? For snowshoe hares, hybridization plays an important role in their ability to match their environment, new research shows.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

Unprecedented control of polymer grids achievedThe first examples of covalent organic frameworks (COFs) were discovered in 2005, but quality has been poor and preparation methods uncontrolled. Now researchers have produced high-quality versions of these materials, demonstrate their superior properties and control their growth. The team's two-step process produces organic polymers with crystalline, two-dimensional structures. The precision of t
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

Brain's response to opioids: New research provides expanded insightsOpioids are powerful painkillers that act on the brain, but they have a range of harmful side effects including addiction. Researchers have developed a tool that gives deeper insights into the brain's response to opioids.
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Live Science

Could Herpes Viruses Play a Role in Alzheimer's? New Study Backs TheoryAlzheimer's brains had up to twice as much of two common strains of herpes viruses than non-Alzheimer's brains.
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Popular Science

Why our brains see the world as ‘us’ versus ‘them’—and what to do about itScience Our brains are wired to build walls, but we do our best work when we knock them down. Even within species, is there something in our neural circuits that leads us to find comfort in those like us and unease with those who may differ?
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Scientific American Content: Global

The Healthy Addiction? Coffee Study Finds More Health BenefitsNew research in mice details the mechanism of how caffeine seems to help the heart — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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The Scientist RSS

Koko the Signing Gorilla Dies at 46The primate was famous for her ability to communicate with humans.
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The Scientist RSS

Common Gene Variants Found Among Psychiatric DisordersIn the largest-ever study of its kind, researchers combined genomic data from nearly 900,000 patients and healthy individuals to identify commonalities among 10 mental illnesses.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

Mice not only experience regret, but also learn to avoid it in the futureNew research has discovered that mice are capable of learning to plan ahead in order to avoid regret down the road even if there is no additional gain in rewards.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

Old star clusters could have been the birthplace of supermassive starsAstrophysicists may have found a solution to a problem that has perplexed scientists for more than 50 years: why are the stars in globular clusters made of material different to other stars found in the Milky Way?
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Blog » Languages » English

Eyewire Cup TriviaBefore the Cup begins, get in the competitive spirit with a friendly round of trivia! We’ll have some World Cup themed trivia along with your regular dose of science trivia. We’ll kick things off at 11:00 AM ET on 6/22 and continue until 11:00 AM ET on 6/24 , at which point things will finish with a power hour till noon. Submit your answers by typing them into the chat box. You may submit answers
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

New study finds US oil & gas methane emissions 60 percent higher than estimatedThe US oil and gas industry emits 13 million metric tons of the potent greenhouse gas methane from its operations each year, 60 percent more than estimated by the US Environmental Protection Agency, according to a new study published today in the journal Science.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Hundreds of thousands of genomes shed light on psychiatric disordersA massive undertaking by the Brainstorm Consortium to analyze the genomes of nearly 900,000 people has revealed important insights into the genetic overlap among some psychiatric diseases, as well as among personality traits.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

A quick rebound of Antarctic crust promotes ice-sheet stabilityThe unexpectedly rapid rebound of the Amundsen Sea Embayment (ASE) may help stabilize the West Antarctic Ice Sheet against catastrophic collapse, says a new study offering a rare silver-lining in glacier research.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

The lady's ape: Extinct gibbon discovered in royal ancient Chinese tombA new genus and species of gibbon has been identified in the most unexpected of places — interred in the tomb of an ancient Chinese noble-woman.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

US methane emissions greater than thought, in recent years?Methane leakage from the US oil and natural gas supply chain is greater than previously estimated, researchers report. US oil and natural gas production has been growing steadily in the last decade.
4h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Northwestern researchers achieve unprecedented control of polymer gridsThe first examples of covalent organic frameworks (COFs) were discovered in 2005, but quality has been poor and preparation methods uncontrolled. Now a Northwestern University research team is the first to produce high-quality versions of these materials, demonstrate their superior properties and control their growth. The team's two-step process produces organic polymers with crystalline, two-dime
4h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

New research provides expanded insights into the brain's response to opioidsOpioids are powerful painkillers that act on the brain, but they have a range of harmful side effects including addiction. Researchers from the Max Planck Institute of Biochemistry in collaboration with researchers from the Medical University of Innsbruck, Austria, University of Innsbruck, and the Lewis Katz School of Medicine at Temple University, have developed a tool that gives deeper insights
4h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Antarctic ice sheet is melting, but rising bedrock below could slow it downAn international team of researchers has found that the bedrock below the remote West Antarctic Ice Sheet is rising much more rapidly than previously thought, in response to ongoing ice melt.
4h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

UM research identifies how snowshoe hares evolved to stay seasonally camouflagedResearchers at the University of Montana recently discovered that hybridization played an important role in snowshoe hares' ability to match their environment.
4h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

UBC researchers create matchmaking serviceUBC researchers have matched small proteins, called peptides, with antibiotics so they can work together to combat hard-to-treat infections that don't respond well to drugs on their own.
4h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Common psychiatric disorders share an overlapping genetic riskInvestigators found that many common psychiatric disorders are deeply connected on a genetic level, sharing specific genetic risk factors, underscoring the need to recognize shared dimensions of brain dysfunction, and develop new treatment strategies. Results of this investigation have been published in the June 22, 2018 issue of the journal, Science.
4h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Mice not only experience regret, but also learn to avoid it in the futureNew research from the University of Minnesota publishing 21 June in the open access journal PLOS Biology from authors Brian M. Sweis, Mark J. Thomas, and A. David Redish has discovered that mice are capable of learning to plan ahead in order to avoid regret down the road even if there is no additional gain in rewards.
4h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Water can be very dead, electrically speakingWater is one of the most fascinating substances on Earth and at the heart of its many unusual properties is high polarizability, a strong response to an applied electric field. Now researchers at the University of Manchester have found that on a microscopic scale water behaves very differently and its thin layers lose any polarizability, becoming electrically dead.
4h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Psychiatric disorders share an underlying genetic basisIn a new international collaboration, researchers explored the genetic connections between brain disorders at a scale far eclipsing previous work on the subject. The team determined that psychiatric disorders share many genetic variants, while neurological disorders (such as Parkinson's or Alzheimer's) appear more distinct. The results indicate that psychiatric disorders likely have important simi
4h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

First ancient syphilis genomes decodedAn international research team has recovered the first historic genomes from the bacterium Treponema pallidum, which causes syphilis. It was previously not thought possible to recover DNA of this bacterium from ancient samples. In the study, published in PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases, the researchers were able to distinguish genetically between the subspecies of the disease that cause syphilis
4h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Einstein proved right in another galaxyAn international team of astronomers have made the most precise test of gravity outside our own solar system.
4h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

A mechanism behind choosing alcohol over healthy rewards is foundChanges in a brain signalling system contribute to the development of alcohol addiction-like behaviours in rats, according to a new study led by researchers at Linköping University, Sweden. The findings, to be published in Science, indicate a similar mechanism in humans.
4h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Fast rising bedrock below West Antarctica reveals an extremely fluid Earth mantleAn international team of researchers, with a new study published in Science with DTU Space as lead author, finds that the bedrock below the West Antarctic Ice Sheet is rising much more rapidly than expected, revealing a very different Earth structure than previously believed. This discovery has important implications in understanding the present and future climate changes in Antarctica.
4h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

MIT scientists discover fundamental rule of brain plasticityA series of complex experiments in the visual cortex of mice has yielded a simple rule about plasticity: When a synapse strengthens, others immediately nearby weaken.
4h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Bedrock in West Antarctica rising at surprisingly rapid rateThe earth is rising in one part of Antarctica at one of the fastest rates ever recorded, as ice rapidly disappears and weight is lifted off the bedrock, a new international study has found. The findings have surprising and positive implications for the survival of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet (WAIS), which scientists had previously thought could be doomed because of the effects of climate change.
4h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Caffeine from four cups of coffee protects the heart with the help of mitochondriaA new study shows that a caffeine concentration equivalent to four cups of coffee promotes the movement of a regulatory protein into mitochondria, enhancing their function and protecting cardiovascular cells from damage. The work, by Judith Haendeler and Joachim Altschmied of the Medical Faculty, Heinrich-Heine-University and the IUF-Leibniz Research Institute for Environmental Medicine in Duessel
4h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

How competition and cooperation between bacteria shape antibiotic resistanceNew computational simulations suggest that the effects of antibiotics on a bacterial community depend on whether neighboring species have competitive or cooperative relationships, as well as their spatial arrangement. Sylvie Estrela of Yale University and Sam Brown of the Georgia Institute of Technology present these findings in PLOS Computational Biology.
4h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Cross-species prion adaptation depends on prion replication environmentA hamster prion that replicated under conditions of low RNA levels in mouse brain material resulted in altered disease features when readapted and transmitted back to hamsters, according to new research presented in PLOS Pathogens by Elizaveta Katorcha of the University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, and colleagues.
4h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Synthetic peptides enhance antibiotic attack of skin infections in miceShort, synthetic peptides that disrupt bacteria's response to antibiotics boost antibiotic activity against high-density skin infections in mice, according to new research presented by Daniel Pletzer and colleagues at the University of British Columbia in Vancouver, Canada.
4h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

California Aedes mosquitoes capable of spreading ZikaOver the last five years, Zika virus has emerged as a significant global human health threat following outbreaks in South and Central America. Now, researchers reporting in PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases have shown that invasive mosquitoes in California — where cases of Zika in travelers have been a regular occurrence in recent years — are capable of transmitting Zika.
4h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Ancient Treponema pallidum from human remains sheds light on its evolutionary historyThe evolutionary history and origin of syphilis, and other treponemal diseases, is a hotly debated topic by scholars. Scholars who theorize syphilis originated in the 'New World' and preceded the 15th century have been in fierce debate with scholars who theorize a multiregional origin followed by the 15th century pandemic spread. Both sides are supported by organic evidence found in contemporary g
4h
The Atlantic

The Power of Mo Salah’s Goal-Scoring RitualEgypt suffered a disappointing loss to Uruguay during its first World Cup match last week, and this week proved no better. In their second-match loss to Russia on Tuesday, the Pharaohs effectively bid farewell to any hopes of advancing to the tournament’s final knockout stage. But they didn’t leave the field completely empty-handed: Their beloved star player Mohamed “Mo” Salah had returned from a
4h
The Atlantic

Radio Atlantic: The View from the BorderSocial media is awash with images of undocumented migrants held in cages, sounds of children crying for their parents, and viral videos of a callous administration response. On Wednesday, President Trump caved to immense political pressure and signed an executive order meant to end family separation at the border. But what effect will it actually have? Video producer Jeremy Raff has been in McAll
4h
The Atlantic

A Landmark Study on the Origins of AlcoholismFor Markus Heilig, the years of dead ends were starting to grate. A seasoned psychiatrist, Heilig joined the National Institutes of Health in 2004 with grand ambitions of finding new ways to treat addiction and alcoholism. “It was the age of the neuroscience revolution, and all this new tech gave us many ways of manipulating animal brains,” he recalls. By studying addictive behavior in laboratory
4h
The Atlantic

New Gibbon Species Discovered in a 2,200-Year-Old Royal Chinese TombWhen Samuel Turvey found a drawer labelled “gibbon,” he knew he had hit the jackpot. But what he found inside was better than he could have hoped for. Yes, it was a gibbon, or rather the remains of one—parts of its face, jaw, and arm. These fragments were enough for Turvey to show that the animal belonged to a new species of gibbon , distinct from the 20 that live today, and all the ones that we
4h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

Enhanced detection of nuclear events, thanks to deep learningA deep neural network running on an ordinary desktop computer is interpreting highly technical data related to national security as well as — and sometimes better than — today's best automated methods or even human experts. The research probes incredibly complex data sets filled with events called radioactive decays.
4h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

Buildings as power stations work: They generate more energy than they consume, data showsThe UK's first energy-positive classroom generated more than one and a half times the energy it consumed, according to data from its first year of operation, the team has revealed. The findings were announced as the researchers launched the next phase of their research, gathering data and evidence on an office building, constructed using similar methods.
4h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

Powerful new approach helps understand molecular alterations in neurological diseaseScientists have developed a high-throughput, multi-pronged approach that integrates laboratory experiments, data from published literature and network analysis of large datasets to identify genes that drive disease.
4h
NYT > Science

Trilobites: Extinct Gibbon Found in Tomb of Ancient Chinese Emperor’s GrandmotherThe remains appear to be a new species of gibbon, and it was perhaps a pet.
4h
NYT > Science

The Natural Gas Industry Has a Leak ProblemEmissions of methane, a powerful greenhouse gas, are 60 percent higher than government estimates. That’s bad news for climate change.
4h
Science current issue

Emerging stem cell ethics[no content]
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Science current issue

News at a glance[no content]
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Science current issue

U.S. center will fight infections with viruses[no content]
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Science current issue

Reports of inner-ear damage deepen diplomat controversy[no content]
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Science current issue

Rising bedrock may delay ice sheet collapse[no content]
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Science current issue

Neanderthal brain organoids come to life[no content]
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Science current issue

Radio arrays take shape in the global south[no content]
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Science current issue

NIH kills alcohol trial, starts hunt for other suspect studies[no content]
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Science current issue

Chinese grave reveals vanished gibbon genus[no content]
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Science current issue

Feeding the gods[no content]
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Science current issue

Mechanisms behind the monarch's decline[no content]
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Science current issue

How did Homo sapiens evolve?[no content]
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Science current issue

Aberrant choice behavior in alcoholism[no content]
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Science current issue

Receptor networks underpin plant immunity[no content]
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Science current issue

Feel the dielectric force[no content]
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Science current issue

Combating deforestation: From satellite to intervention[no content]
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Science current issue

Hard feelings[no content]
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Science current issue

The Victorian dynamo[no content]
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Science current issue

Evaluating human trials: FDA's role[no content]
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Science current issue

Response–Evaluating human trials: FDA's role[no content]
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Science current issue

Casualties of human-wildlife conflict[no content]
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Science current issue

Hybrid camouflage variation[no content]
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Science current issue

China's plastic waste import ban[no content]
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Science current issue

The noblewoman's ape[no content]
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Science current issue

Dialing down the opioids[no content]
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Science current issue

Fingers on the trigger[no content]
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Science current issue

A nanostructure quantum simulator[no content]
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Science current issue

A quick rebound for Antarctic crust[no content]
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Science current issue

Testing General Relativity on galaxy scales[no content]
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Science current issue

Rebalancing strength between synapses[no content]
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Science current issue

Where have all the monarchs gone?[no content]
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Science current issue

Out of Africa, with a difference[no content]
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Science current issue

Networks in plant immunity[no content]
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Science current issue

Brainstorming diseases[no content]
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Science current issue

Mechanisms of drug action[no content]
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Science current issue

Finding the vulnerable minority[no content]
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Science current issue

Time and place of electron exit[no content]
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Science current issue

Taking enantiomers for a spin[no content]
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Science current issue

Water's surface dielectric[no content]
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Science current issue

Disjointed no more[no content]
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Science current issue

Surface antibody maturation[no content]
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Science current issue

Benzene ice clouds in Titan's atmosphere[no content]
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Science current issue

Making a triple negative[no content]
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Science current issue

Paired photoreceptors function as an oceanic depth gauge[no content]
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Science current issue

A ray of hope for advanced breast cancer[no content]
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Science current issue

A good excuse to sleep in[no content]
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Science current issue

Warming in Greenland's past[no content]
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Science current issue

The human prefrontal cortex is special[no content]
4h
Science current issue

Tunable quantum criticality and super-ballistic transport in a "charge" Kondo circuitQuantum phase transitions (QPTs) are ubiquitous in strongly correlated materials. However, the microscopic complexity of these systems impedes the quantitative understanding of QPTs. We observed and thoroughly analyzed the rich strongly correlated physics in two profoundly dissimilar regimes of quantum criticality. With a circuit implementing a quantum simulator for the three-channel Kondo model,
4h
Science current issue

A molecular mechanism for choosing alcohol over an alternative rewardAlcohol addiction leads to increased choice of alcohol over healthy rewards. We established an exclusive choice procedure in which ~15% of outbred rats chose alcohol over a high-value reward. These animals displayed addiction-like traits, including high motivation to obtain alcohol and pursuit of this drug despite adverse consequences. Expression of the -aminobutyric acid (GABA) transporter GAT-3
4h
Science current issue

Orientation-dependent stereo Wigner time delay and electron localization in a small moleculeAttosecond metrology of atoms has accessed the time scale of the most fundamental processes in quantum mechanics. Transferring the time-resolved photoelectric effect from atoms to molecules considerably increases experimental and theoretical challenges. Here we show that orientation- and energy-resolved measurements characterize the molecular stereo Wigner time delay. This observable provides dir
4h
Science current issue

Separation of enantiomers by their enantiospecific interaction with achiral magnetic substratesIt is commonly assumed that recognition and discrimination of chirality, both in nature and in artificial systems, depend solely on spatial effects. However, recent studies have suggested that charge redistribution in chiral molecules manifests an enantiospecific preference in electron spin orientation. We therefore reasoned that the induced spin polarization may affect enantiorecognition through
4h
Science current issue

Observed rapid bedrock uplift in Amundsen Sea Embayment promotes ice-sheet stabilityThe marine portion of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet (WAIS) in the Amundsen Sea Embayment (ASE) accounts for one-fourth of the cryospheric contribution to global sea-level rise and is vulnerable to catastrophic collapse. The bedrock response to ice mass loss, glacial isostatic adjustment (GIA), was thought to occur on a time scale of 10,000 years. We used new GPS measurements, which show a rapid (4
4h
Science current issue

Anomalously low dielectric constant of confined waterThe dielectric constant of interfacial water has been predicted to be smaller than that of bulk water ( 80) because the rotational freedom of water dipoles is expected to decrease near surfaces, yet experimental evidence is lacking. We report local capacitance measurements for water confined between two atomically flat walls separated by various distances down to 1 nanometer. Our experiments reve
4h
Science current issue

A precise extragalactic test of General RelativityEinstein’s theory of gravity, General Relativity, has been precisely tested on Solar System scales, but the long-range nature of gravity is still poorly constrained. The nearby strong gravitational lens ESO 325-G004 provides a laboratory to probe the weak-field regime of gravity and measure the spatial curvature generated per unit mass, . By reconstructing the observed light profile of the lensed
4h
Science current issue

New genus of extinct Holocene gibbon associated with humans in Imperial ChinaAlthough all extant apes are threatened with extinction, there is no evidence for human-caused extinctions of apes or other primates in postglacial continental ecosystems, despite intensive anthropogenic pressures associated with biodiversity loss for millennia in many regions. Here, we report a new, globally extinct genus and species of gibbon, Junzi imperialis , described from a partial cranium
4h
Science current issue

Locally coordinated synaptic plasticity of visual cortex neurons in vivoPlasticity of cortical responses in vivo involves activity-dependent changes at synapses, but the manner in which different forms of synaptic plasticity act together to create functional changes in neurons remains unknown. We found that spike timing–induced receptive field plasticity of visual cortex neurons in mice is anchored by increases in the synaptic strength of identified spines. This is a
4h
Science current issue

Adaptive introgression underlies polymorphic seasonal camouflage in snowshoe haresSnowshoe hares ( Lepus americanus ) maintain seasonal camouflage by molting to a white winter coat, but some hares remain brown during the winter in regions with low snow cover. We show that cis-regulatory variation controlling seasonal expression of the Agouti gene underlies this adaptive winter camouflage polymorphism. Genetic variation at Agouti clustered by winter coat color across multiple h
4h
Science current issue

Antihomotypic affinity maturation improves human B cell responses against a repetitive epitopeAffinity maturation selects B cells expressing somatically mutated antibody variants with improved antigen-binding properties to protect from invading pathogens. We determined the molecular mechanism underlying the clonal selection and affinity maturation of human B cells expressing protective antibodies against the circumsporozoite protein of the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum (PfCSP). W
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Science current issue

New Products[no content]
4h
Science current issue

Dinner without reservations[no content]
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Science current issue

In vivo brain GPCR signaling elucidated by phosphoproteomicsA systems view of G protein–coupled receptor (GPCR) signaling in its native environment is central to the development of GPCR therapeutics with fewer side effects. Using the kappa opioid receptor (KOR) as a model, we employed high-throughput phosphoproteomics to investigate signaling induced by structurally diverse agonists in five mouse brain regions. Quantification of 50,000 different phosphosi
4h
Science current issue

Comment on "Sterilizing immunity in the lung relies on targeting fungal apoptosis-like programmed cell death"Shlezinger et al . (Reports, 8 September 2017, p. 1037) report that the common fungus Aspergillus fumigatus , a cause of aspergillosis, undergoes caspase-dependent apoptosis-like cell death triggered by lung neutrophils. However, the technologies they used do not provide reliable evidence that fungal cells die via a protease signaling cascade thwarted by a fungal caspase inhibitor homologous to h
4h
Science current issue

Analysis of shared heritability in common disorders of the brainDisorders of the brain can exhibit considerable epidemiological comorbidity and often share symptoms, provoking debate about their etiologic overlap. We quantified the genetic sharing of 25 brain disorders from genome-wide association studies of 265,218 patients and 784,643 control participants and assessed their relationship to 17 phenotypes from 1,191,588 individuals. Psychiatric disorders shar
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Science current issue

Response to Comment on "Sterilizing immunity in the lung relies on targeting fungal apoptosis-like programmed cell death"Aouacheria et al . question the interpretation of contemporary assays to monitor programmed cell death with apoptosis-like features (A-PCD) in Aspergillus fumigatus . Although our study focuses on fungal A-PCD for host immune surveillance and infectious outcomes, the experimental approach incorporates multiple independent A-PCD markers and genetic manipulations based on fungal rather than mammali
4h
Viden

Kritikere: Nyt EU-forslag vil smadre internettetNye internetregler får en hård medfart af kritikere – og lovgiverne bør lytte til kritikken, siger en ekspert.
4h
Latest Headlines | Science News

Here’s how drinking coffee could protect your heartCoffee’s heart-healthy effects rely on boosting cells’ energy production, a study in mice suggests.
4h
Latest Headlines | Science News

Einstein’s general relativity reigns supreme, even on a galactic scaleScientists have made the most precise test of Einstein’s theory of gravity at great distances.
4h
Latest Headlines | Science News

It may take a village (of proteins) to turn on genesClusters of proteins transiently work together to turn on genes, new microscopy studies of live cells suggest.
4h
Latest Headlines | Science News

A 2,200-year-old Chinese tomb held a new gibbon species, now extinctResearchers have discovered a new gibbon species in an ancient royal Chinese tomb. It's already extinct.
4h
Ingeniøren

DTU-forskere gør chokopdagelse: Landhævning kan stabilisere iskappen på VestantarktisJordens kappe under et område ud for Vestantarktis er så flydende og elastisk, at området hæver sig med rekordfart. Det kan muligvis stabilisere hele iskappen på Vestantarktis.
4h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Bedrock in West Antarctica rising at surprisingly rapid rateThe earth is rising in one part of Antarctica at one of the fastest rates ever recorded, as ice rapidly disappears and weight is lifted off the bedrock, a new international study has found.
4h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Research identifies how snowshoe hares evolved to stay seasonally camouflagedMany animals have evolved fur or feather colors to blend in with the environment and hide from predators. But how do animals stay camouflaged when their environment changes with each new season? Researchers at the University of Montana recently discovered that hybridization played an important role in snowshoe hares' ability to match their environment.
4h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Researchers create matchmaking service for peptides and antibioticsUBC researchers have matched small proteins, called peptides, with antibiotics so they can work together to combat hard-to-treat infections that don't respond well to drugs on their own.
4h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Mice not only experience regret, but also learn to avoid it in the futureExperiencing regret can leave a "bad taste" in one's mouth and drive an individual to compensate for one's losses. This immediate post-regret phenomenon was once thought to be unique to humans, but it has been recently demonstrated in other species. However, it was previously unknown if other species are capable of learning from these mistakes over time. New research from the University of Minneso
4h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Water can be very dead, electrically speakingIn a study published in Science this week, the researchers describe the dielectric properties of water that is only a few molecules thick. Such water was previously predicted to exhibit a reduced electric response but it remained unknown by how much. The new study shows that atomically thin layers of water near solid surfaces do not respond to an electric field, a finding that has very important i
4h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

New study finds US oil and gas methane emissions 60 percent higher than estimatedThe U.S. oil and gas industry emits 13 million metric tons of the potent greenhouse gas methane from its operations each year, 60 percent more than estimated by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, according to a new study published today in the journal Science.
4h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Einstein proved right in another galaxyAn international team of astronomers have made the most precise test of gravity outside our own solar system.
4h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

New research provides expanded insights into the brain's response to opioidsOpioids are powerful painkillers that act on the brain, but they have a range of harmful side effects including addiction. Researchers from the Max Planck Institute of Biochemistry (MPIB) in collaboration with researchers from the Medical University of Innsbruck, Austria, University of Innsbruck, and the Lewis Katz School of Medicine at Temple University (LKSOM), have developed a tool that gives d
4h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Researchers achieve unprecedented control of polymer gridsSynthetic polymers are ubiquitous—nylon, polyester, Teflon and epoxy, to name just a few—and these polymers are all long, linear structures that tangle into imprecise structures. Chemists have long dreamed of making polymers with two-dimensional, grid-like structures, but this goal has proven challenging.
4h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

How competition and cooperation between bacteria shape antibiotic resistanceNew computational simulations suggest that the effects of antibiotics on a bacterial community depend on whether neighboring species have competitive or cooperative relationships, as well as their spatial arrangement. Sylvie Estrela of Yale University and Sam Brown of the Georgia Institute of Technology present these findings in PLOS Computational Biology.
4h
New Scientist – News

More penalty shoot-outs needed to make future World Cups fairerBad news for England: only extra penalty shoot-outs plus a new points system will discourage collusion in future football World Cups, says Ignacio Palacios-Huerta
4h
Big Think

Firefox's new privacy feature stops Facebook seeing what else you do onlineAfter more than a decade since launching its first Firefox browser, Mozilla has been steadily earning web browser converts with its newest browser Firefox Quantum. Read More
4h
Scientific American Content: Global

Massive Dust Storm Engulfs MarsThe sunlight-sapping global storm has taken NASA’s Opportunity rover offline, perhaps forever — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
4h
NYT > Science

Koko the Gorilla, Who Used Sign Language and Befriended Mr. Rogers, Dies at 46Koko Gorilla Sign LanguageKoko became an instant celebrity in her youth and charmed entertainers like Fred Rogers and Robin Williams, as well as their audiences.
4h
The Scientist RSS

Herpes Viruses Implicated in Alzheimers DiseaseA new study shows that the brains of Alzheimer's disease patients have a greater viral load, while another study in mice finds infection leads to amyloid-β build up.
5h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

First music festival turns to blockchainA music festival will for the first time run on blockchain, tapping the fast-growing technology as an innovative way to address longstanding issues such as ticket scalping and fan engagement.
5h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Electric scooters launch in Paris, to spread in EuropeThe boulevards of Paris, already bustling with a dizzying range of transport devices, are set to feature a new shared electric scooter system that has swept the US and is now heading for Europe.
5h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

Using fragment-based approaches to discover new antibioticsA new review article summarizes new methods of fragment-based lead discovery (FBLD) to identify new compounds as potential antibiotics. It explains how FBLD works and illustrates its advantages over conventional high-throughput screening.
5h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

New target to stop cancer growth uncoveredResearchers have discovered that a protein called Munc13-4 helps cancer cells secrete large numbers of exosomes — tiny, membrane-bound packages containing proteins and RNAs that stimulate tumor progression. The study could lead to new therapies that stop tumor growth and metastasis by halting exosome production.
5h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

Exposure to fracking chemicals and wastewater spurs fat cell developmentExposure to fracking chemicals and wastewater promotes fat cell development, or adipogenesis, in laboratory cell models, a new study finds. Researchers observed increases in the size and number of fat cells after exposing the models to a mixture of 23 common fracking chemicals or to wastewater or surface-water samples containing them, even at diluted concentrations. Adipogenesis occurred through P
5h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

Human immune 'trigger' map paves way for better treatmentsA discovery about how human cells are 'triggered' to undergo an inflammatory type of cell death could have implications for treating cancer, stroke and tissue injury, and immune disorders. A research team has identified the molecular trigger in human cells that drives necroptosis, and implicated defects in this molecular trigger as potentially playing a role in cancer development.
5h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

Ratchet up the pressure: Molecular machine exploits motion in a single directionA research team developed a 'ratchet-like molecular machine,' which promotes uni-directional molecular motion during reactions. Inspired by dumbbell-shaped rotaxanes, their molecular machine contains two rings (stations) connected by spacers.
5h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Dead plankton, stunned fish: the harms of man-made ocean noiseHuman-caused ocean noise and its dangers to marine life are the focus of meetings at the United Nations this week, a victory for advocacy groups that have long warned of this problem.
5h
New on MIT Technology Review

Behind the MIT Technology Review redesignPentagram’s Michael Bierut leads this 119-year-old magazine back to the future
5h
The Atlantic

Will a New Supreme Court Decision Change Online Shopping?As consumers shop more and more online, they’ve often stumbled across a delightful fact: Many online purchases are tax-free. This can mean consumers save a few dollars on small purchases, and even more money on big-ticket items, making it even more difficult for physical stores to lure in buyers. It’s a boon for shoppers in the states that don’t collect sales tax for online purchases, but has sev
5h
Scientific American Content: Global

NASA Offers New Plan to Detect and Destroy Dangerous AsteroidsThe federal government's five-point strategy is a roadmap for dealing with threatening near-Earth objects — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
5h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

DNA enzyme shuffles cell membranes a thousand times faster than its natural counterpartA new synthetic enzyme, crafted from DNA rather than protein, flips lipid molecules within the cell membrane, triggering a signal pathway that could be harnessed to induce cell death in cancer cells. This is the first such synthetic enzyme to outperform its natural counterpart — and it does so by three orders of magnitude.
5h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

Changes in stress after meditationor a thousand years, people have reported feeling better by meditating but there are few systematic studies that quantified stress and how much stress changes as a direct result of meditation, until now.
5h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

Cells stop dividing when this gene kicks into high gearScientists seeking to unlock secrets of cellular aging have identified a gene that triggers senescence, a phenomenon in which cells stop dividing. The gene, called CD36, is unusually active in older, senescent cells. Heightening CD36 activity also caused young, healthy cells to stop dividing, with the effect also spreading to nearby cells in the same petri dish.
5h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

Marine reserves are vital — but under pressureA massive study of nearly 1800 tropical coral reefs around the world has found that marine reserves near heavily populated areas struggle to do their job — but are a vast improvement over having no protection at all.
5h
Live Science

Scientists Piped Music Into Women's Wombs to See If Fetuses Like Freddie MercuryMusic is the perfect mental stimulation for babies… even before they're born.
5h
Ingeniøren

Har Nasa ikke styr på sine beregninger af asteroidestørrelser?Udover mystik om asteroidestørrelser bragte ugen godt nyt fra verdens største laser, og en vigtig intergalaktisk opdagelse fik et regnestykke til at gå op.
5h
The Atlantic

The Mysterious ‘Jumping Gene’ That Appears 500,000 Times in Human DNAFor years, Miguel Ramalho-Santos tried to convince researchers in his lab to study a segment of DNA he personally thought was quite extraordinary: LINE1. It’s repeated half a million times in the human genome, making up nearly a fifth of the DNA in every cell. But nobody in his lab wanted to study it. “It was sort of a running joke in the lab,” says Ramalho-Santos, a developmental biologist at th
5h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

Reversing way potassium channels work from bacteria to humanResearch develops a better understanding of and exerts an unparalleled control of protein molecules.
5h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

Higher body fat linked to lower breast cancer risk in younger womenAn analysis has linked higher body mass index, or BMI, to lower breast cancer risk for younger women, even for women within a normal weight range.
5h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

Nearly 80 exoplanet candidates identified in record timeScientists have analyzed data from K2, the follow-up mission to NASA's Kepler Space Telescope, and have discovered a trove of possible exoplanets amid some 50,000 stars. The scientists report the discovery of nearly 80 new planetary candidates, including a particular standout: a likely planet that orbits the star HD 73344, which would be the brightest planet host ever discovered by the K2 mission.
5h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

Engineering bacteria to exhibit stochastic Turing patternsA new study has brought science one step closer to a molecular-level understanding of how patterns form in living tissue. The researchers engineered bacteria that, when incubated and grown, exhibited stochastic Turing patterns: a 'lawn' of synthesized bacteria in a petri dish fluoresced an irregular pattern of red polka dots on a field of green.
5h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

Major challenge in mass production of low-cost solar cells solvedA team has solved a major fabrication challenge for perovskite cells — the intriguing potential challengers to silicon-based solar cells. The team reveals a new scalable means of applying the compound PCBM, a critical component, to perovskite cells.
5h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

'Flamingo:' High-powered microscopy coming to a scientist near youScientists have developed a portable, shareable light sheet microscope. The project can be mailed to a lab anywhere in the world, configured remotely by engineers, and run one to three months of experiments.
5h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

Mindful movement may help lower stress, anxietyTaking a walk may be a good opportunity to mentally review your to-do list, but using the time to instead be more mindful of your breathing and surroundings may help boost your wellbeing, according to researchers who found that while students reported being less stressed while they were on their feet and moving, they received an even greater benefit when they reported also being more mindful.
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Scientific American Content: Global

What's in the House Bills to Address the Opioid Crisis–and What's NotLawmakers are considering 57 separate pieces of legislation — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
5h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Koko the gorilla, who learned sign language, dies at 46Koko Gorilla Sign LanguageKoko the gorilla, whose remarkable sign-language ability and motherly attachment to pet cats helped change the world's views about the intelligence of animals and their capacity for empathy, has died at 46.
5h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

High Court: Online shoppers can be forced to pay sales taxSupreme Court OnlineStates will be able to force more people to pay sales tax when they make online purchases under a Supreme Court decision Thursday that will leave shoppers with lighter wallets but is a big financial win for states.
5h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Scripps Research study provides new clues to improving chemotherapiesThe work has important implications for understanding how human cancer cells develop resistance to natural product-based chemotherapies.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Study provides new clues to improving chemotherapiesAbout half of all drugs, ranging from morphine to penicillin, come from compounds that are from—or have been derived from—nature. This includes many cancer drugs, which are toxic enough to kill cancer cells.
6h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

'Red nuggets' are galactic gold for astronomersAbout a decade ago, astronomers discovered a population of small, but massive galaxies called "red nuggets." A new study using NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory indicates that black holes have squelched star formation in these galaxies and may have used some of the untapped stellar fuel to grow to unusually massive proportions.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Thousands celebrate summer solstice at StonehengeThousands watched the sun glint over the horizon at Stonehenge on Thursday, celebrating the summer solstice at the Neolithic stone circle.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

More evidence for controversial theory that herpesviruses play role in Alzheimer's diseaseIn a large-scale analysis, researchers use data from three different brain banks to suggest that human herpesviruses are more abundant in the brains of Alzheimer's patients and may play a role in regulatory genetic networks that are believed to lead to the disease. This work lends support to the controversial hypothesis that viruses are involved in Alzheimer's disease and offers potential new path
6h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Research team reverse way potassium channels work from bacteria to humanFor the first time ever, researchers at the Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center (TTUHSC) have identified a specific amino acid residue that is responsible for inverting the communication between the opening of the activation gate and the inactivation of a potassium channel's selectivity filter. The study was published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS) April iss
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Blog » Languages » English

Update to Eyewire Cup Qualifiers ScoringDuring the Eyewire Cup Qualifiers you will be able to switch countries by adjusting the flag in your profile. Points earned will stay with the team you were on when you earned them. Make sure to check your flag in Eyewire. You can change teams during the Qualifiers but not during the Quarterfinals, Semifinals, or Finals.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Researchers engineer bacteria to exhibit stochastic Turing patternsHow did the zebra get its stripes, or the leopard its spots? Mankind has been trying to answer such questions since our earliest recorded days, and they resonate throughout the extant mythologies and folklores of an earlier world. In modern times, we've looked to mathematical models and most recently to genomic science to uncover the explanation of how patterns form in living tissues, but a full a
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

'Flamingo:' High-powered microscopy coming to a scientist near youModern microscopy has given scientists a front-row seat to living, breathing biology in all its technicolor glory. But access to the best technologies can be spotty.
6h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

'Flamingo:' High-powered microscopy coming to a scientist near youThe Morgridge Institute for Research has developed a portable, shareable light sheet microscope. The project can be mailed to a lab anywhere in the world, configured remotely by Morgridge engineers, and run one to three months of experiments.
6h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Higher body fat linked to lower breast cancer risk in younger womenAn analysis co-led led by a UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center researcher linked higher body mass index, or BMI, to lower breast cancer risk for younger women, even for women within a normal weight range.
6h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Researchers solve major challenge in mass production of low-cost solar cellsA team led by led by André D. Taylor of NYU Tandon School of Engineering and Yifan Zheng of Peking University solved a major fabrication challenge for perovskite cells — the intriguing potential challengers to silicon-based solar cells. In a cover article in the June 28, 2018 issue of Nanoscale, a publication of the Royal Society of Chemistry, the team reveals a new scalable means of applying the
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Three new species and important taxonomic insights featured in PhytoKeys issue 100Eight years, more than 500 articles and no less than 13 000 pages since its launch, Pensoft's flagship botanical title Phytokeys, celebrates its 100th issue. In its anniversary issue the journal features two new species and taxonomic revisions on families Brassicaceae, Zamiaceae and Menispermaceae.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Facebook expands fact-check effort to photos, videosFacebook said Thursday it would launch fact-checking of photos and videos as it expands the effort to curb misinformation to more countries.
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Big Think

When – and why – did people first start using money?Cash currency goes back a long time – 40,000 years. Read More
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New Scientist – News

Moths fly 1000 kilometres with Earth’s magnetic field as a guideBogong moths are the first insects found to use Earth’s magnetic field to navigate long distances, during their epic migrations across Australia
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New Scientist – News

World’s first sanctuary for beluga whales to open in IcelandConservation charity Sea Life Trust has spent six years developing a plan to bring the 12 year-old belugas, nicknamed “Little White” and “Little Grey”, from captivity in China to an open water refuge
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New Scientist – News

Herpes viruses in the brain linked to Alzheimer’s diseaseA detailed molecular analysis of hundreds of post-mortem brains supports the controversial theory that viruses contribute to Alzheimer’s disease
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Scientific American Content: Global

CO2 Can Directly Impact Extreme Weather, Research SuggestsSome experts are calling for a cap on CO2 emissions in addition to warming limits — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Live Science

Photos: Great White Shark Mysteriously Washes Up on a California BeachCalifornia's Department of Fish and Wildlife has opened up a law-enforcement investigation after this dead great white shark washed up on a Santa Cruz beach.
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Live Science

A Dead Great White Shark on Santa Cruz Beach Leads to a Criminal InvestigationA dead great white shark is now the subject of a criminal investigation in California.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

New World Atlas of Desertification shows unprecedented pressure on planet's resourcesOn 21 June 2018, the Joint Research Centre of the European Commission published a new edition of the World Atlas of Desertification, offering a tool for decision makers to improve local responses to soil loss and land degradation.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Zebrafish's near 360 degree UV-vision knocks stripes off Google Street ViewTiny freshwater fish have a view of the world that blows Google Street View out of the water—using different parts of their eyes to deliver optimum uses of colour, black-and-white and ultraviolet.
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NYT > Science

A Common Virus May Play Role in Alzheimer’s Disease, Study FindsThe research did not find that viruses cause Alzheimer’s. But it showed that two types of herpes interact with Alzheimer’s-related genes and might drive the disease process
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NYT > Science

Trilobites: Magnetic Sense Helps Billions of Moths on an Australian MigrationResearchers say this is the first reliable evidence that insects can use Earth’s magnetic field for navigation.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Cells stop dividing when this gene kicks into high gear, study findsScientists seeking to unlock the secrets of cellular aging have identified a gene that triggers senescence, a phenomenon in which cells stop dividing.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Repellent research: Navy developing ship coatings to reduce fuel, energy costsIt can repel water, oil, alcohol and even peanut butter. And it might save the U.S. Navy millions of dollars in ship fuel costs, reduce the amount of energy that vessels consume and improve operational efficiency.
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Quanta Magazine

Finally, a Problem That Only Quantum Computers Will Ever Be Able to SolveEarly on in the study of quantum computers, computer scientists posed a question whose answer, they knew, would reveal something deep about the power of these futuristic machines. Twenty-five years later, it’s been all but solved. In a paper posted online at the end of May , computer scientists Ran Raz and Avishay Tal provide strong evidence that quantum computers possess a computing capacity bey
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Science | The Guardian

Screen time harm to children is unproven, say expertsResearchers say World Health Organisation’s warnings over ‘gaming disorder’ are premature and say other factors affect child wellbeing There is no strong evidence to support fears that screen time is inherently bad for children, experts have warned, adding that the recognition of so-called gaming disorder by the World Health Organisation is premature. Time spent using devices ranging from compute
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Science | The Guardian

Cocaine in rivers harming endangered eels, study findsTests show drug causes eels to become hyperactive and damages their muscles, possibly hindering their ability to migrate Tiny amounts of cocaine flushed into rivers cause eels to become not only hyperactive but to suffer from muscle wastage, impaired gills and hormonal changes, a study has found. The impact of traces of cocaine on the physiology of European eels could be hindering their epic migr
6h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Researchers engineer bacteria to exhibit stochastic Turing patternsA new study by researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and the Applied Physics Laboratory, Johns Hopkins University has brought science one step closer to a molecular-level understanding of how patterns form in living tissue. The researchers engineered bacteria that, when incubated and grown, exhibited stochastic Turing patterns: a
6h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Nearly 80 exoplanet candidates identified in record timeScientists at MIT and elsewhere have analyzed data from K2, the follow-up mission to NASA's Kepler Space Telescope, and have discovered a trove of possible exoplanets amid some 50,000 stars. In a paper that appears online today in The Astronomical Journal, the scientists report the discovery of nearly 80 new planetary candidates, including a particular standout: a likely planet that orbits the sta
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Research team reverse way potassium channels work from bacteria to humanResearch develops a better understanding of and exerts an unparalleled control of protein molecules.
6h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

One year of school comes with an IQ bump, meta-analysis showsA year of schooling leaves students with new knowledge, and it also equates with a small but noticeable increase to students' IQ, according to a systematic meta-analysis.
6h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

New World Atlas of Desertification shows unprecedented pressure on planet's resourcesThe World Desertification Atlas by the European Commission's Joint Research Centre provides the first comprehensive, evidence-based assessment of land degradation at a global level and highlights the urgency to adopt corrective measures.
6h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

Alzheimer's breakthrough: Brain metals that may drive disease progression revealedAlzheimer's disease could be better treated, thanks to a breakthrough discovery of the properties of the metals in the brain involved in the progression of the neurodegenerative condition.
6h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

Scientists print sensors on gummi candyMicroelectrodes can be used for direct measurement of electrical signals in the brain or heart. These applications require soft materials, however. With existing methods, attaching electrodes to such materials poses significant challenges. A team has now succeeded in printing electrodes directly onto several soft substrates.
6h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

How do horses read human emotional cues?Scientists demonstrated for the first time that horses integrate human facial expressions and voice tones to perceive human emotion, regardless of whether the person is familiar or not.
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Popular Science

Meet the menagerie of parasites that can live in human eyesAnimals Some are accidental guests. For others, our peepers are prime real estate. Some gnarly eye parasites are accidental guests in the human body. For others, our peepers are prime real estate.
7h
Science : NPR

Researchers Find Herpes Viruses In Brains Marked By Alzheimer's DiseaseTwo herpes viruses that cause skin rashes in toddlers may accelerate Alzheimer's disease when they infect brain cells. The finding suggests antiviral drugs might help protect the brain. (Image credit: NCI/Science Source)
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The Economist: The world this week

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The Economist: The world this week

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The Economist: The world this week

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7h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Army study quantifies changes in stress after meditationor a thousand years, people have reported feeling better by meditating but there has never been a systematic study that quantified stress and how much stress changes as a direct result of meditation until now.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Cells stop dividing when this gene kicks into high gear, study findsScientists seeking to unlock secrets of cellular aging have identified a gene that triggers senescence, a phenomenon in which cells stop dividing. The gene, called CD36, is unusually active in older, senescent cells. Heightening CD36 activity also caused young, healthy cells to stop dividing, with the effect also spreading to nearby cells in the same petri dish.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

New guide for using mechanical stimulation to improve tissue-engineered cartilageTissue-engineered articular cartilage (AC) for repairing cartilage damaged by trauma or disease can be made to more closely mimic natural AC if mechanical stimulation of particular magnitude and duration is applied during the development process.
7h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Not junk: 'Jumping gene' is critical for early embryoA so-called 'jumping gene' that researchers long considered either genetic junk or a pernicious parasite is actually a critical regulator of the first stages of embryonic development, according to a new study in mice led by UC San Francisco scientists and published June 21, 2018 in Cell.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Watch: Insects also migrate using the Earth's magnetic fieldA major international study led by researchers from Lund University in Sweden has proven for the first time that certain nocturnally migrating insects can explore and navigate using the Earth's magnetic field. Until now, the ability to steer flight using an internal magnetic compass was only known in nocturnally migrating birds.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Zebrafish's near 360 degree UV-vision knocks stripes off Google Street ViewA zebrafish view of the world has been forensically analysed by researchers at the University of Sussex to reveal that how they see their surroundings changes hugely depending on what direction they are looking.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Scientists discover new gene expression mechanism with possible role in human diseaseWhen cells grow and divide to ensure a biological function, DNA must be unwound from its typical tightly packed form and copied into RNA to create proteins. When this process goes awry, the result could be diseases such as cancers. University of North Carolina School of Medicine researchers have discovered that a protein called Spt6 facilitates RNA degradation so that cells have just the right amo
7h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

NIH-funded study finds new evidence that viruses may play a role in Alzheimer’s diseaseAnalysis of large data sets from post-mortem brain samples of people with and without Alzheimer's disease has revealed new evidence linking viruses to Alzheimer's clinical traits and genetic factors. Researchers funded by the National Institute on Aging (NIA), part of the National Institutes of Health, made the discovery by harnessing data from brain banks and cohort studies participating in the A
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Dying cancer cells make remaining glioblastoma cells more aggressive and therapy-resistantA surprising form of cell-to-cell communication in glioblastoma promotes global changes in recipient cells, including aggressiveness, motility, and resistance to radiation or chemotherapy. Paradoxically, the sending cells in this signaling are glioblastoma cells undergoing programmed cell death. The apoptotic cancer cells release extracellular vesicles. These vesicle, or exosomes, carry components
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Crowding inside cells may influence many functions and major diseasesA new study finds that mTORC1 controls how 'crowded' human cells become as a person ages.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Is increased BMI associated with reduced risk of premenopausal breast cancer?Higher body mass index (BMI), especially in early adulthood, may be associated with reduced risk for premenopausal breast cancer.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Fish's use of electricity might shed light on human illnessesAfrican weakly electric fish, commonly called baby whales, use incredibly brief electrical pulses to sense the world around them and communicate with other members of their species. Part of that electrical mechanism exists in humans — and by studying these fish, scientists may unlock clues about conditions like epilepsy.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Waking up is hard to do: Prefrontal cortex implicated in consciousnessMichigan Medicine researchers discover that stimulating the prefrontal cortex can induce wake-like behavior in anesthetized rats.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

New study suggests viral connection to Alzheimer's diseaseA first-of-its kind study, next generation sequencing is brought to bear to investigate a culprit in the path to Alzheimer's disease: the presence of viruses in the brain.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

More evidence for controversial theory that herpesviruses play role in Alzheimer's diseaseIn a large-scale analysis published in the journal Neuron, researchers use data from three different brain banks to suggest that human herpesviruses are more abundant in the brains of Alzheimer's patients and may play a role in regulatory genetic networks that are believed to lead to the disease. This work lends support to the controversial hypothesis that viruses are involved in Alzheimer's disea
7h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Genetic variation in progesterone receptor tied to prematurity risk, study findsHumans have unexpectedly high genetic variation in the receptor for a key pregnancy-maintaining hormone, according to research led by scientists at the Stanford University School of Medicine. The finding may help explain why some populations of pregnant women have an elevated risk of premature birth.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Bogong moths first insect known to use magnetic sense in long-distance nocturnal migrationResearchers reporting in Current Biology on June 21 have found that nocturnal Bogong moths, like migratory birds, depend on the Earth's magnetic field to guide them on their way. The discovery offers the first reliable evidence that nocturnal insects can use the Earth's magnetic field to steer flight during migration, the researchers say.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Unusually high levels of herpesviruses found in the Alzheimer's disease brainTwo strains of human herpesvirus — human herpesvirus 6A (HHV-6A) and human herpesvirus 7 (HHV-7) — are found in the brains of people with Alzheimer's disease at levels up to twice as high as in those without Alzheimer's, researchers from the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai report.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Six new species of goblin spiders named after famous goblins and browniesA remarkably high diversity of goblin spiders is reported from the Sri Lankan forests by two researchers from the National Institute of Fundamental Studies, Kandy, Sri Lanka. Nine new species are described in a recent paper in the open-access journal Evolutionary Systematics, where six are named after goblins and brownies from Enid Blyton's children's books. There are now 45 goblin spider species
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The Atlantic

Melania Trump Plays the Role of Medieval QueenOn June 17, First Lady Melania Trump issued a rare statement on current policy through her spokesperson. That statement lamented the separation of refugee children from their parents by the Department of Homeland Security and declared that America should be “a country that governs with heart.” And when, on Wednesday, her husband reversed his policy, White House aides rushed to credit her interven
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Dagens Medicin

Velkendt gigtmiddel reducerer hjerte-kar-dødeligheden blandt leddegigtpatienterDet velafprøvede og billige gigtmiddel hydroxyklorokin giver en signifikant reduktion af hjertekardødeligheden blandt leddegigtpatienter, viser resultaterne af et dansk forskningsprojekt
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Science | The Guardian

Alzheimer's link to herpes virus in brain, say scientistsResearch reveals strains of virus more abundant in brains with early stage of disease, though uncertainly whether virus is a trigger or a symptom The presence of viruses in the brain has been linked to Alzheimer’s disease in research that challenges conventional theories about the onset of dementia. The results, based on tests of brain tissue from nearly 1,000 people, found that two strains of he
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Science : NPR

Some DNA Dismissed As 'Junk' Is Crucial To Embryo DevelopmentFormerly considered useless, or maybe a parasite, the stretch of DNA known as LINE-1 actually plays "a key role" in creating an embryo and embryonic stem cells, research shows. (Image credit: Ramalho-Santos lab/UCSF)
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Futurity.org

Endometriosis isn’t just a ‘thin women’s disease’New research debunks the myth that endometriosis is a ‘skinny woman’s disease.’ Painful, stressful, and all-too-common, endometriosis—abnormal tissue growth affecting a woman’s reproductive and pelvic organs—can be devastating, in some cases leaving women infertile and vulnerable to complications elsewhere in the body. Despite affecting one in 10 women of reproductive age, the condition is relati
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

New World Atlas of Desertification shows unprecedented pressure on planet's resourcesThe World Desertification Atlas by the European Commission's Joint Research Centre provides the first comprehensive, evidence-based assessment of land degradation at a global level and highlights the urgency to adopt corrective measures.
7h
Scientific American Content: Global

Harder Evidence Builds That Viruses Play a Role in Alzheimer'sA study seeking new drug targets for the disease unexpectedly implicates two types of herpes — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Crowding inside cells may influence many functions and major diseasesAmong the most studied protein machines in history, mTORC1 has long been known to sense whether a cell has enough energy to build the proteins it needs to multiply as part of growth. Because faulty versions of mTORC1 contribute to the abnormal growth seen in cancer, drugs targeting the complex have been the subject of 1,300 clinical trials since 1970.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Scientists discover new gene expression mechanism with possible role in human diseaseWhen cells grow and divide to ensure a biological function—such as a properly working organ—DNA must be unwound from its typical tightly packed form and copied into RNA to create proteins. When this process goes awry—if too little or too much RNA is produced—then the result could be diseases such as cancers. UNC School of Medicine researchers have discovered that a protein called Spt6, previously
7h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Bogong moths first insect known to use magnetic sense in long-distance nocturnal migrationEach spring, millions of nocturnal Bogong moths hatch across breeding grounds throughout southeastern Australia before flying over 1,000 kilometers through the dark night to reach a limited number of high alpine caves in the Australian Alps. After a few months of summer dormancy in those cool mountain caves, the moths fly right back to the breeding grounds where they were born. Now, researchers re
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Six new species of goblin spiders named after famous goblins and browniesFictional characters originally 'described' by famous English children's writer Enid Blyton have given their names to six new species of minute goblin spiders discovered in the diminishing forests of Sri Lanka.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Not junk: 'Jumping gene' is critical for early embryoA so-called "jumping gene" that researchers long considered either genetic junk or a pernicious parasite is actually a critical regulator of the first stages of embryonic development, according to a new study in mice led by UC San Francisco scientists and published June 21, 2018 in Cell.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Fish's use of electricity might shed light on human illnessesDeep in the night in muddy African rivers, a fish uses electrical charges to sense the world around it and communicate with other members of its species. Signaling in electrical spurts that last only a few tenths of a thousandth of a second allows the fish to navigate without letting predators know it is there. Now scientists have found that the evolutionary trick these fish use to make such brief
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The Atlantic

How Will Detained Children Find Their Parents?More than 2,000 children have been separated from their families at the U.S.-Mexico border in the five weeks since the Trump administration announced it was implementing a “zero tolerance” immigration policy—and it’s still not clear how, or when, those children might be reunited with their parents. On Wednesday, amid mounting pressure to end the policy, President Donald Trump signed an executive
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TED Talks Daily (SD video)

How Netflix changed entertainment — and where it's headed | Reed HastingsNetflix changed the world of entertainment — first with DVD-by-mail, then with streaming media and then again with sensational original shows like "Orange Is the New Black" and "Stranger Things" — but not without taking its fair share of risks. In conversation with TED curator Chris Anderson, Netflix co-founder and CEO Reed Hastings discusses the company's bold internal culture, the powerful alg
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New Scientist – News

Colonists could use genetically modified bacteria to settle MarsMars colonists could build their habitats and clothes from “living” self-healing materials and make them air-tight with rubber grown by E. coli
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New Scientist – News

Why the moral panic over Fortnite is nothing to worry aboutFrom Fortnite to gaming addiction, anything to do with children and the digital world seems to provoke unnecessary scare stories
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Futurity.org

Fracking exposure leads to more fat cellsExposure to fracking chemicals and wastewater promotes fat cell development, or adipogenesis, in living cells in a laboratory, according to a new study. Researchers observed increases in both the size and number of fat cells after exposing living mouse cells in a dish to a mixture of 23 commonly used fracking chemicals. They also observed these effects after exposing the cells to samples of waste
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Ingeniøren

Toprådgiver siger god for at bruge bidræber-pesticid trods forbudMiljøbevægelsen er i chok og frygter, at EU-forbud bliver gennemhullet som en si, efter at EU's rådgivende ekspertorgan Efsa har sagt god for at tillade neonikotinoider på markerne i en række lande, fordi der ikke er andre måder at bekæmpe skadedyr på.
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Ingeniøren

Ny phishing-kampagne går benhårdt efter fodboldfansPas på med, hvilke programmer du henter i din jagt på det seneste fodbold-nyt. Fodboldfans er sikkerhedsmæssige hotspots disse VM-dage, lyder det fra sikkerhedsfirma.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

The Rosetta stone of active galactic nuclei decipheredA galaxy with at least one active supermassive black hole – named OJ 287 – has caused many irritations and questions in the past. The emitted radiation of this object spans a wide range – from the radio up to the highest energies in the TeV regime. The potential periodicity in the variable optical emission made this galaxy a candidate for hosting a supermassive binary black hole in its centre. The
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

End of driving ban to boost Saudi women's economic roleThe end of a decades-old female driving ban is expected to bring an economic windfall for millions of Saudi women, making it easier for them to work and do business.
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The Atlantic

The Lesson Democrats Have Yet to Learn on ImmigrationAs news cycle after news cycle fills with stories about children ripped away from their parents’ embrace at the U.S. border, you could forgive many Democrats for thinking that the best way for them to beat President Trump on immigration is to just say, “We’re not that guy.” For example, Kamala Harris, the U.S. senator from California and a rumored presidential aspirant, has drawn attention to the
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The Atlantic

Mike Shinoda Asks Not to Be Defined by LossThe rule of threes feels a distant memory, doesn’t it? The past few years’ steady procession of famous people killed by illness (David Bowie and the slew of Baby Boomer icons to fall), suicide ( too many examples this spring alone), or shocking calamity (the 20-year-old rapper XXXTentacion was shot dead Monday) has rendered popular culture an endless overlapping of public grief. This has many ter
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

DNA enzyme shuffles cell membranes a thousand times faster than its natural counterpartA new synthetic enzyme, crafted from DNA rather than protein, flips lipid molecules within the cell membrane, triggering a signal pathway that could be harnessed to induce cell death in cancer cells. This is the first such synthetic enzyme to outperform its natural counterpart — and it does so by three orders of magnitude.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Mindful movement may help lower stress, anxietyTaking a walk may be a good opportunity to mentally review your to-do list, but using the time to instead be more mindful of your breathing and surroundings may help boost your wellbeing, according to researchers who found that while students reported being less stressed while they were on their feet and moving, they received an even greater benefit when they reported also being more mindful.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

One year of school comes with an IQ bump, meta-analysis showsA year of schooling leaves students with new knowledge, and it also equates with a small but noticeable increase to students' IQ, according to a systematic meta-analysis published in Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science.
8h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Brain tingles: First study of its kind reveals physiological benefits of ASMRAutonomous Sensory Meridian Response (ASMR) – the relaxing 'brain tingles' experienced by some people in response to specific triggers, such as whispering, tapping and slow hand movements — may have benefits for both mental and physical health, according to new research.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Hitchhiking to killHow can elimination of therapeutics from the bloodstream or their early enzymatic degradation be avoided in systemic delivery? Chinese scientists have new developed a method to bind an established cancer therapeutic, floxuridine, with natural serum albumin for its transport and delivery to target cancer cells. In the journal Angewandte Chemie, the authors demonstrate the automated synthesis of a c
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Scientists print sensors on gummi candyMicroelectrodes can be used for direct measurement of electrical signals in the brain or heart. These applications require soft materials, however. With existing methods, attaching electrodes to such materials poses significant challenges. A team at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) has now succeeded in printing electrodes directly onto several soft substrates.
8h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Improved CPR training could save more lives, research findsThis Scientific Statement addresses gaps in resuscitation training that lead to flat survival rates for cardiac arrest victims. Standardized online and in-person courses are falling short and not always implemented to optimize retention and mastery. The statement examines best practices in education and applies the learning in new resuscitation science, offering suggestions for improvement in trai
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Intel CEO out after consensual relationship with employeeBrian Krzanich IntelIntel CEO Brian Krzanich resigned after the company learned of what it called his consensual relationship with an employee.
8h
Dagens Medicin

Nyt fælles stamkort skal give bedre patientoverblik for kommunerneSundhedsdatastyrelsen er på vej med nye digitale services heriblandt et stamkort med kontaktoplysninger, der skal give et bedre patientoverblik for blandt andet kommunerne.
8h
Dagens Medicin

Ny forskning skal kaste lys over om GLP-1 kan reducere alkoholtrangEt klinisk studie under ledelse af professor Anders Fink-Jensen fra Region Hovedstadens Psykiatri skal undersøge, om diabetesmidlet exenatid, baseret på GLP1, kan fjerne trangen til alkohol hos alkoholikere – akkurat som han tidligere har fundet hos mus og aber.
8h
Live Science

This Is NASA's New Plan to Detect and Destroy Asteroids Before They Hit EarthNASA has updated its plans to deflect potentially hazardous Earth-bound asteroids — and none of them involve Bruce Willis.
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Viden

VAR-behar? Sådan fungerer FIFA’s nye videoovervågning til VMFor første gang er den nye videoteknologi VAR med til VM i fodbold. Den skal nedsætte antallet af dommerfejl.
8h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Scientists, students to make first live, interactive broadcasts from Arctic Ocean's Northwest PassageThe Arctic Ocean, with its vast icy islands and peninsulas, was once known as terra incognita—the unknown land—the planet's last great un-navigated maritime frontier.
8h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Alzheimer's breakthrough: Brain metals that may drive disease progression revealedAlzheimer's disease could be better treated, thanks to a breakthrough discovery of the properties of the metals in the brain involved in the progression of the neurodegenerative condition, by an international research collaboration including the University of Warwick.
8h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Garden seed diet for threatened turtle doves has negative impactNew research into Britain's fastest declining bird species has found that young turtle doves raised on a diet of seeds foraged from non-cultivated arable plants rather than food provided in people's gardens are more likely to survive after fledging. Ecologists at the University of Lincoln, UK, investigated the dietary habits of European turtle doves using DNA analysis of faecal samples and found s
8h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Bisexual men have higher risk for heart diseaseBisexual men have a higher risk for heart disease compared with heterosexual men across several modifiable risk factors, finds a new study published online in the journal LGBT Health.
8h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Probiotics can protect the skeletons of older womenFor the first time in the world, researchers at the University of Gothenburg, Sweden, have demonstrated that probiotics, dietary supplements with health-promoting bacteria, can be used to affect the human skeleton. Among older women who received probiotics, bone loss was halved compared to women who received only a placebo. The research opens the door to a new way to prevent fractures among the el
8h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

When fluid flows almost as fast as light — with quantum rotationQuark-gluon plasma is formed as a result of high energy collisions of heavy ions. After a collision, for a dozen or so yoctoseconds this most perfect of all known fluids undergoes rapid hydrodynamic expansion with velocities close to the velocity of light. Scientists, associated with the IFJ PAN and the GSI, has presented a new model describing these extreme flows. For the first time effects resul
8h
The Atlantic

The Overlooked Children Working America’s Tobacco FieldsKINSTON, North Carolina —They would wake up at five or six in the morning. They didn’t know where they were going, but they knew how far it was, what time the day had to start. Yesenia Cuello’s mother would fix breakfast, or if the girls were up early they would do it themselves to help her out. Then the preparations for the day would start. Burritos, in the microwave, wrapped in napkins, wrapped
8h
Popular Science

Why you should get a burner phone number, even if you aren't a spyDIY Apps make it easy to create a second number. Why would you need a burner phone number? This measure can protect your privacy, help you set up a side business, and more. Here's how to set one up.
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Science | The Guardian

What does running do to your brain?Neuroscientists have studied treadmill runners, ultramarathon athletes – and a number of lab animals – to investigate the effects of running on grey matter It may seem obvious – as you push on through a long run, veering wildly between sensations of agony and elation – that running can have a huge effect on your state of mind. It is an intuitive idea that a growing number of neuroscientists have
8h
Live Science

Koko, the Gorilla Who Used Sign Language, Is Dead at 46Koko, the western lowland gorilla who signed her way into people's hearts, died in her sleep.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Graphene assembled film shows higher thermal conductivity than graphite filmResearchers at Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden, have developed a graphene assembled film that has over 60 percent higher thermal conductivity than graphite film — despite the fact that graphite simply consists of many layers of graphene. The graphene film shows great potential as a novel heat spreading material for form-factor driven electronics and other high power-driven systems.
8h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Fat cells control fat cell growthResearchers from ETH Zurich and EPFL have discovered a new type of fat cell that suppresses the growth of new fat cells. This opens up new avenues for preventing obesity-related diseases.
8h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

The psychobiology of online gamingWhen researchers looked at expression of a particular gene complex that is activated by chronic stress, they found differences depending on whether someone was positively engaging in video games or were problematic gamers.
8h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Your brain anatomy may play a role in determining your food choicesOur ability to exercise self-control is linked to our neurobiology.
8h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Fright and flight: Deciding when to escapeHow does your brain decide what to do in a threatening situation? A new paper published in Nature describes a mechanism by which the brain classifies the level of a threat and decides when to escape.
8h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Ratchet up the pressure: Molecular machine exploits motion in a single directionA Japanese research team led by Osaka University developed a 'ratchet-like molecular machine,' which promotes uni-directional molecular motion during reactions. Inspired by dumbbell-shaped rotaxanes, their molecular machine contains two rings (stations) connected by spacers. One station has a single methyl attachment, while the other has two, like hooks. Macrocyclic α-cyclodextrin passes from the
8h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Beyond conventional solution-process for 2-D heterostructureChinese researchers demonstrated a facile wet-chemical method to directly grow organic-inorganic hybrid perovskite (MAPbBr3, MA = CH3NH3+) NCs on surfaces of dispersible MoS2 nanosheets.
8h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Opening up a drug delivery route — Discovery of a new vehicle peptideThe bottleneck of cationic antimicrobial peptides as anticancer therapeutics is their limited ability to penetrate cell membranes. Tokyo Medical and Dental University (TMDU) researchers discovered a cyclic decapeptide (termed peptide 1) that serves as a promising lead compound as a new intracellular delivery vehicle for therapeutically effective peptides. When conjugated with another membrane impe
8h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Sticklebacks infected with parasites influence behavior of healthy fishCertain types of tapeworm make sticklebacks behave carelessly and thus become easier prey for birds. A team of biologists have now demonstrated for the first time that the tapeworm not only influences the behavior of the infected fish — indirectly, it can also induce risky behaviour in other fish in the group.
8h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Scientists, students to make first live, interactive broadcasts from Arctic Ocean's Northwest PassageA team of scientists and students, conducting research aboard the R/V Akademik Ioffe, will offer select museums, as well as classrooms and citizen scientists worldwide, an opportunity to explore with them in real time a dramatically changing Arctic Ocean, and to discuss their research in the first-ever live, interactive broadcasts from the fabled Northwest Passage.
8h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Super-resolution imaging reveals mechanism of GLUT1 clusteringProf. WANG Hongda of the Changchun Institute of Applied Chemistry and Prof. XIONG Wenyong from the Kunming Institute of Botany, together with their team members, first investigated the distribution and assembly of GLUT1 at a nanometer resolution by direct stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy.
8h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Tumor suppressor protein plays key role in suppressing infectionsResearchers have found that a previously uncharacterized tumor-suppressor protein plays an important role in the functioning of the immune system. The study, which will be published in the June 22 issue of the Journal of Biological Chemistry, unites studies of immunology and cancer biology.
8h
Futurity.org

‘E-skin’ lets prosthetic hands sense touch and painA new electronic “skin” may restore a sense of touch for amputees who use prosthetic hands. The skin’s inventors say that when the “e-dermis” is layered on top of a prosthetic, it brings back feeling through the fingertips. “After many years, I felt my hand, as if a hollow shell got filled with life again,” says the anonymous amputee who served as the team’s principal volunteer tester. Made of fa
9h
New on MIT Technology Review

Basic income could work—if you do it Canada-styleA Canadian province is giving people money with no strings attached—revealing both the appeal and the limitations of the idea.
9h
Ingeniøren

Vestas flytter fokus fra vindkraft til hybridværkerVerdens største vindmølleproducent vil nu også være nummer et på hybrid-kraftværker i erkendelse af, at energiverdenen ændrer sig med ekspresfart.
9h
Ingeniøren

Kronik: Det skal kunne betale sig at energirenovere[no content]
9h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Physicists show that it is impossible to mask quantum information in correlationsInformation is typically stored in physical systems, such as memory devices. But in a new study, physicists have investigated an alternative way to store and hide information, which is by storing it only in the quantum correlations among two or more systems, rather than in the systems themselves. This idea, which is called "masking," is a way of making the information inaccessible to everyone, wit
9h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

How do horses read human emotional cues?Scientists demonstrated for the first time that horses integrate human facial expressions and voice tones to perceive human emotion, regardless of whether the person is familiar or not.
9h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Researchers uncover new target to stop cancer growthResearchers at the University of Wisconsin-Madison have discovered that a protein called Munc13-4 helps cancer cells secrete large numbers of exosomes — tiny, membrane-bound packages containing proteins and RNAs that stimulate tumor progression. The study, which will be published June 21 in the Journal of Cell Biology, could lead to new therapies that stop tumor growth and metastasis by halting e
9h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

HESS J1943+213 is an extreme blazar, study findsAn international group of astronomers have carried out multi-wavelength observations of HESS J1943+213 and found evidence supporting the hypothesis that this gamma-ray source is an extreme blazar. The finding is reported in a paper published June 11 on the arXiv pre-print repository.
9h
Dagens Medicin

IT-professor: »Rigsrevisionens beretning er hårrejsende læsning«Rigsrevisionens afdækker så mange fejltrin i implementeringen af Sundhedsplatformen, at det giver minister og regionsråd grund til at seriøst at overveje, om systemet skal skrottes. Det vurderer It-professor Jørgen P. Bansler fra Københavns Universitet.
9h
Big Think

What does Gulliver's Travels have to do with how we write our dates and addresses?Are you a 'Big-Endian' or a 'Little-Endian'? Swift's satirical take on religious wars gave us the jargon to describe our different date and address formats. Read More
9h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Marine reserves are vital — but under pressureA massive study of nearly 1800 tropical coral reefs around the world has found that marine reserves near heavily populated areas struggle to do their job — but are a vast improvement over having no protection at all.
9h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

IASLC issues statement paper on liquid biopsy for lung cancerThe lungs can be a difficult organ to biopsy with a needle, so identifying lung cancer through a blood-based biopsy has lung cancer experts and patients optimistic. Knowing how and when to use a liquid biopsy is critically important and led global experts at the International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer (IASLC) to issue 'The IASLC Statement Paper: Liquid Biopsy for Advanced Non-Small
9h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Tumor suppressor protein plays key role in suppressing infectionsResearchers have found that a previously uncharacterized tumor-suppressor protein plays an important role in the functioning of the immune system. The study, which will be published in the June 22 issue of the Journal of Biological Chemistry, unites studies of immunology and cancer biology.
9h
Ingeniøren

Tysk politi: Anholdt ville producere biologisk våben af bønnerEn mand af tunesisk afstamning er blevet anholdt af tysk politi, som fandt den farlige gift ricin i mandens lejlighed. Angiveligt fulgte den anholdte en ISIS-opskrift på biologiske våben.
9h
Feed: All Latest

NASA’s New Plan: Do More Science With Small SatellitesA new NASA program aims to turn the gaze of small, traditionally Earth-monitoring satellites outward toward the cosmos.
9h
Feed: All Latest

The Problem With the ‘Rainbow-Washing’ of LGBTQ+ PrideCorporations might genuinely support the LGBTQ+ community with Pride-related promotions, but is there a line between allyship and marketing that shouldn’t be crossed?
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Amazon Fire TV Cube Review: Don’t Trade the Remote for Alexa Just YetAmazon’s promise for the future of TV doesn't quite come through in the Cube.
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Feed: All Latest

#ChurchToo and Mike Pence’s Crisis of FaithThe vice president has been Trump's ambassador to the Christian right, but scandals within the church and a growing resistance to the administration's policies could change all that.
9h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

How do horses read human emotional cues?Scientists have demonstrated for the first time that horses integrate human facial expressions and voice tones to perceive human emotion, regardless of whether the person is familiar or not.
9h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

DNA enzyme shuffles cell membranes a thousand times faster than its natural counterpartA new synthetic enzyme, crafted from DNA rather than protein, flips lipid molecules within the cell membrane, triggering a signal pathway that could be harnessed to induce cell death in cancer cells.
9h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Research shows beachgoers negatively impacted by offshore oil platformsEvery year, visitors flock to Delaware's beaches for an opportunity to relax, soak up the sun and take a dip in the ocean.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Image: Through the heat barrierESA's next CubeSat mission seen enduring the scorching heat of simulated atmospheric reentry inside the world's largest plasma wind tunnel.
9h
Scientific American Content: Global

Introducing the National Science Policy NetworkA new wave of scientists and engineers are recognizing the importance of their seat at the policy table — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
9h
BBC News – Science & Environment

Koko: Gorilla who mastered sign language dies in CaliforniaKoko Gorilla Sign LanguageKoko is said to have been able to communicate thoughts and feelings using more than 1,000 hand signs.
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Discovery (uploads) on YouTube

Daddy Dave | Street Outlaws: Crash CourseHe's been to the top in a Sonoma, a Corvette, and a Nova. No matter the car, Daddy Dave is always a threat when the light turns on. Let 'er rip and learn why Daddy Dave is one of the 405's fiercest drivers. Full episodes streaming now on DiscoveryGO: https://discovery.com/tv-shows/street-outlaws/ Binge watch all Street Outlaws: Crash Course now! https://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/street-outlaws-c
9h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Garden seed influences young turtle doves' survival chancesYoung turtle doves raised on a diet of seeds from non-cultivated arable plants are more likely to survive after fledging than those relying on food provided in people's gardens, new research into Britain's fastest declining bird species has shown.
9h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

The taste for turtle and the disappearing delicacyIt was the 1850s and people were hungry. They were moving by the thousands to northern California to strike it rich during the Gold Rush, but their appetite wasn't just for precious metal, it was for basic food—there wasn't enough of it to satiate bellies in the booming cities and towns.
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Futurity.org

People in Nairobi’s slums face ‘double jeopardy’Tenants in the slums of Nairobi, Kenya, receive drastically inferior household services and pay more rent compared to those in its formal settlements, a new study shows. “Around a billion people worldwide currently reside in urban slums under deplorable conditions.” The study found that households in Nairobi’s slum areas face significant gaps in public services. For example, in the case of water,
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Futurity.org

Ancient primates had extra claws just for groomingFossil evidence shows that ancient primates—including one of the oldest known, Teilhardina brandti —had specialized grooming claws as well as nails, according to a new study. Humans and other primates are outliers among mammals for having nails instead of claws. But how, when, and why we transitioned from claws to nails has been an evolutionary head-scratcher. The findings overturn the prevailing
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Here are three ways that cities can adapt to changing climatesCape Town's "Day Zero" experience – the prospect of dam levels dropping dangerously low, taps running dry and water rations being distributed from public collection points – speaks powerfully to the urgency and complexity of climate change adaptation.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Solar tower exposes materials to intense heat to test thermal responseSandia National Laboratories is using its solar tower to help assess the impact of extreme temperature changes on materials.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

What drugs are students taking and why are they taking them?For many students, the move away to university is the first time living away from home. And with all the freedoms independent living entails, it's maybe not surprising then that drug use tends to be much higher among students than the general population.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

How refugee children make American education strongerIn recent years, there has been a great deal of public angst about refugee resettlement in the U.S. and Europe. Americans are deeply divided on the issue. For instance, a Pew Research Center study published in May of this year found that only a quarter of Republicans and right-leaning independents say the U.S. "has a responsibility to accept more refugees," compared with almost three-quarters of D
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Driving down freight emissionsResearchers, working with leading supermarket chain Waitrose have developed a more aerodynamic trailer design for articulated vehicles – cutting fuel consumption and pollution by around 7 percent.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Graphene assembled film shows higher thermal conductivity than graphite filmResearchers at Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden, have developed a graphene assembled film that has over 60 percent higher thermal conductivity than graphite film – despite the fact that graphite simply consists of many layers of graphene. The graphene film shows great potential as a novel heat spreading material for form-factor driven electronics and other high power-driven systems.
10h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

'Stealth sheet' hides hot objects from prying infrared eyesInfrared cameras are the heat-sensing eyes that help drones find their targets, even in the dead of night or through heavy fog.
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Dana Foundation

Summer 2018 Brainy Reading ListSummer is finally here! In celebration, we’ve put together a list of seven brainy books, authored by members of the Dana Alliance for Brain Initiatives (DABI) or prominent neuroscientists, for you to grab on your way to enjoy the warm weather and sunshine: The Consciousness Instinct: Unraveling the Mystery of How the Brain Makes the Mind by DABI member Michael S. Gazzaniga, Ph.D., Farrar, Straus
10h
Ingeniøren

Journalister bag signal-sagen: »En vred minister var drivkraft«Overstregede dokumenter, stumme embedsmænd og en vred, vred minister hører med til historien om det skandaleramte signalprogram.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Genetics research verifies purity of the Mexican wolfIn October 2015, two small minnows in the Lower Colorado River Basin—the headwater chub and the roundtail chub—were proposed for listing as threatened species under the Endangered Species Act of 1973. In April 2017, that proposal was withdrawn after new science identified the two small fish as members of the same species.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

How fledglings and their parents negotiate the best time for young birds to leave the nestA team of researchers at the University of Montana has found that fledglings and their parents must negotiate to find the right time for the young birds to leave their nest. In their paper published on the open access site Science Advances, the group describes their study of many types of birds and how they figured out when fledglings should leave the nest.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Climate change may soon hit billions of people—many cities already taking actionBillions of people in thousands of cities around the world will soon be at risk from climate-related heat waves, droughts, flooding, food shortages and energy blackouts by mid-century, but many cities are already taking action to blunt such effects, says a new report from a consortium of international organizations.
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The Scientist RSS

Image of the Day: Performance AnxietyIn the presence of competition, archerfish become more hesitant but accurate shooters.
10h
Popular Science

What is 'trancing' and why does it make my dog act so weird around plants?Animals Some dogs are secret ghost-walkers. This slow-motion slink is known as “trancing”—sometimes called ghost-walking—and is most common in bull terriers and greyhounds.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Forecast predicts below-average hurricane activityHurricane season didn't officially start until June 1, but Subtropical Storm Alberto made an appearance early, causing more than $50 million in damage as it made its way inland and up the coast in late May. Twelve people—seven in Cuba and five in the U.S.—died as Alberto's fallout included flooding, landslides, tornados and mudslides.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Scientists discover new species of ancient marine lizardUniversity of Alberta paleontologists discovered a new species of marine lizard that lived 70 to 75 million years ago, with its muscle and skin remarkably well preserved.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

India's colonial legacy almost caused Bangalore to run out of waterOn hot summer days in Bangalore, India, it is common to see public water taps on roadsides hissing and spurting as water struggles to come out. People crowd around the tap with pots of brightly coloured plastic, burnished brass or steel, waiting for their turn. Many of these people have come from homes without such luxuries as indoor plumbing and will return carrying enough water to last several d
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Realistic avatars for the virtual zooFilmmakers and developers of computer games will have a new way of animating animals in the future. A team led by researchers at the Max Planck Institute for Intelligent Systems in Tübingen, Germany, has developed a technique that uses photographs alone to create lifelike 3-D models of almost all quadrupeds. Animations of these avatars can realistically imitate the movements of animals. But the si
10h
The Atlantic

Disposable AmericaA straw is a simple thing. It’s a tube, a conveyance mechanism for liquid. The defining characteristic of the straw is the emptiness inside it. This is the stuff of tragedy, and America. Over the last several months, plastic straws have come under fire from environmental activists who rightly point out that disposable plastics have created a swirling, centuries-long ecological disaster that is br
10h
The Atlantic

An Extraordinarily Expensive Way to Fight ISISI. Target The B-2 stealth bomber is the world’s most exotic strategic aircraft, a subsonic flying wing meant to be difficult for air defenses to detect—whether by radar or other means—yet capable of carrying nearly the same payload as the massive B-52. It came into service in the late 1990s primarily for use in a potential nuclear war with the Soviet Union, and clearly as a first-strike weapon ra
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

New NIST research could bring down the cost of making nickelsNickels are ubiquitous in American life, tumbling around in pockets, rolling under car seats, and emerging from the back of dryers to be used over and over for countless purchases. But these resilient and somewhat humble-looking coins are also becoming costly to produce. Nickel, the coin's own namesake, has become a prized ingredient in many modern products, pushing the market value so much that s
10h
Feed: All Latest

The Mission to Build the Ultimate Burger BotAlex Vardakostas has been on a decade-long quest to build a robot that can prepare the perfect cheeseburger. It could also put his family out of work.
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Inside the Science of Apeel, the Clever Coating That Saves Your AvocadosA coating doubles the ripeness window of avocados. How? By supercharging the defenses that evolution crafted on its own.
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18 Best Nintendo Switch Accessories (2018): Controllers, Cases, Screen Protectors, BatteryHave a Nintendo Switch? You really should get some of these accoutrements.
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Scientific American Content: Global

Biases Make People Vulnerable to Misinformation Spread by Social MediaResearchers have developed tools to study the cognitive, societal and algorithmic biases that help fake news spread — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Molecular machine exploits motion in a single directionLife is driven by molecular machines. Found in every cell, these tiny motors convert chemical energy into work to keep the body moving. The invention of synthetic molecular machines, which perform similar jobs to power miniaturized technologies, is a hot topic in nanoscience.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

New laser technology shows success in particle acceleratorsLasers—used in medicine, manufacturing and made wildly popular by science fiction—are finding a new use in particle physics.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Next-generation heat pump offers more affordable heating and coolingA novel geothermal heat pump makes cost-effective, energy-efficient heating and cooling of buildings a reality. How? By harnessing heat sources from the air or ground.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

How scientists discovered a new way to produce actinium-225, a rare medical radioisotopeInside a narrow glass tube sits a substance that can harm or cure, depending on how you use it. It gives off a faint blue glow, a sign of its radioactivity. While the energy and subatomic particles it emits can damage human cells, they can also kill some of our most stubborn cancers. This substance is actinium-225.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Proteins with different evolutionary histories now do the same jobMitochondria are essential organelles of cells with a nucleus – known as eukaryotic cells. These are the cells which make up fungi, plants, and animals including humans. Mitochondria work like tiny power plants, processing the energy produced by the digestion of nutrients into a form the cell can use. Yet they have a number of other functions – which are the focus of research by the working group
10h
New Scientist – News

Just four tweets can reveal the identity of an anonymous trollRemaining anonymous online is an increasingly difficult task. Just four geotagged posts is enough to identify trolls from a phone company’s database
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

We don't own data like we own a car – which is why we find data harder to protectIt's known as the "privacy paradox": people say they want to protect their data privacy online, but often do little to keep it safe.
10h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Modelling volcanoes that 'collapse without warning'A new joint research project from Massey University, University of Canterbury and GNS Science is looking to forecast, for the first time, the hazards associated with collapsing volcanoes, that could save infrastructure and lives.
10h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Teaching a machine to spot a crystalProtein crystals don't usually display the glitz and glam of gemstones. But no matter their looks, each and every one is precious to scientists.
10h
The Atlantic

Can Netflix’s Set It Up Help Revive the Romantic Comedy?At the start of 2018, Netflix’s original-film department seemed to swerve in terms of tone. No longer was the company focusing on the sorts of award-friendly prestige projects that had defined its entrance into the market (titles like Beasts of No Nation, First They Killed My Father, and Mudbound ). Instead , it started buying the rights to mid-budget sci-fi and horror movies like The Cloverfield
11h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Majority of US adults prescribed epinephrine report not using it in an emergencyA new study shows in an emergency, 52 percent of adults with potentially life-threatening allergies didn't use the epinephrine auto-injectors (EAI) they were prescribed.
11h
The Atlantic

The GOP’s ‘Utterly Dysfunctional’ Strategy of Babying Its BaseWith his policy of systematically separating children from their parents at the U.S.-Mexico border, Donald Trump finally extended his racially infused economic nationalism to a point that a critical mass of elected Republicans could not follow. But the fact that many Republicans drew the line only at a policy that experts have likened to child abuse is a powerful measure of how far Trump has alre
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New Scientist – News

Team moon vs team Mars: the battle over the future of NASADecades of infighting and political interference have got NASA no closer to landing astronauts on the moon or Mars. Can its new leader spark a relaunch?
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Colorado Joins California in the Fight for Cleaner CarsWhile the EPA moves to roll back vehicle emissions standards, Colorado's using a legal loophole to follow California's much stricter rules.
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Big Tech Isn’t the Problem With Homelessness. It’s All of UsAmid all the digital wealth, the big cities of the West are racked with the destitute. We know how to solve this problem, so what’s stopping us?
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Feed: All Latest

How ‘Self-Limiting’ Mosquitos Can Help Eradicate MalariaWith help from the Gates Foundation, Oxitec aims to release genetically engineered mosquitoes in the Western Hemisphere by 2020.
11h
New on MIT Technology Review

Why robots helped Donald Trump winToledo has more robots per worker than any other US city. They’re producing a healthy economy—and lots of anxiety.
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Scientific American Content: Global

How Facebook Programmed Our RelativesA simple experiment reveals how social media has come to encode a range of social behaviors — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Live Science

Breads Made of Powdered Crickets May Be Loaded with Bacterial SporesThat's a setback for what is otherwise a highly nutritious bread.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Study promotes benefits of 'tickling' ratsParents often use tickling as a playful way to lighten a child's mood. In Brianna Gaskill's Purdue University lab, scientists do the same thing, only with rats.
11h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Bear necessities: cooler home for S. Korea's last polar bearThe last polar bear kept in South Korea will be sent to Britain to escape the country's stifling, humid summers and live out his days in more appropriate surroundings, zookeepers said Thursday.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Supermarkets must help end 'brutal conditions' for farmers: OxfamSupermarkets in the West are using their purchasing power to force suppliers to cut their prices, contributing to exploitation and even forced labour of millions of farmers worldwide, a global charity said Thursday.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Norway fines its main telecoms firm for blocking competitionThe Norwegian Competition Authorities has fined Norway's largest telecoms provider Telenor 788 million kroner ($96 million) for abusing its dominant position on the country's mobile market.
11h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Days after buying Time Warner, AT&T launches new TV serviceAT&T WatchTV Time WarnerAT&T is launching a new streaming service incorporating television networks from the Time Warner company it just bought.
11h
Live Science

Vitamin D May Not Protect Against These Dangerous Pregnancy ComplicationsProper nutrition during pregnancy is important for mother and baby, but there's been a debate about exactly how much vitamin D pregnant women need.
11h
Live Science

Obama's Ears Inspired the Name of this 550-Million-Year-Old CritterThe ears of former U.S. President Barack Obama are so distinct, they inspired the scientific name of a newly identified 550-million-year-old critter: Obamus coronatus.
11h
Live Science

How Does the Summer Solstice Affect Animals?Even if humans have trouble telling time in the "land of the midnight sun," many animals can adjust their schedules to the summer solstice.
11h
Scientific American Content: Global

Here's Why Expanding Protected Areas Isn't Saving NatureA new study proposes tools to gauge when an ecosystem is “intact”—and what might happen if that changes — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
11h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Floating islands project expands on water quality research to study pollinator plantsIslands have returned to Lake LaVerne.
11h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Biases may stoke victim blaming, or reduce it, no matter what the crimeGeneral biases may be at work when people blame or criticize victims of crimes, including rape and robbery victims, according to criminologists. These biases may lead them to criticize, or avoid the criticism of victims of rape and other crimes, they added.
11h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

What makes volcanoes dangerous?Fountains of lava, whiffs of toxic gases, acidic plumes of vaporized seawater and blankets of ash: those are just a few of the dangers that volcanoes have delivered in recent weeks, with Guatemala's Fuego Volcano and Hawaii's Kilauea Volcano each producing its most powerful eruption in decades.
11h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Nearly 80 exoplanet candidates identified in record timeScientists at MIT and elsewhere have analyzed data from K2, the follow-up mission to NASA's Kepler Space Telescope, and have discovered a trove of possible exoplanets amid some 50,000 stars.
11h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

MIT researchers release evaluation of low-cost cooling devices in MaliAcross the Sahel, a semiarid region of western and north-central Africa extending from Senegal to Sudan, many small-scale farmers, market vendors, and families lack an affordable and effective solution for storing and preserving vegetables. As a result, harvested vegetables are at risk of spoiling before they can be sold or eaten.
11h
NYT > Science

Climate Change Brought a Lobster Boom. Now It Could Cause a Bust.Warming waters in the Gulf of Maine have benefited lobsters and the lobstermen who trap them. But as temperatures rise further, will the industry reach a tipping point?
11h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Image: Fireball moon VenusSometimes, nature is the best art director!
12h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Transport of lipid-conjugated floxuridine by natural serum albumin for delivery to cancer cellsHow can elimination of therapeutics from the bloodstream or their early enzymatic degradation be avoided in systemic delivery? Chinese scientists have new developed a method to bind an established cancer therapeutic, floxuridine, with natural serum albumin for its transport and delivery to target cancer cells. In the journal Angewandte Chemie, the authors demonstrate the automated synthesis of a c
12h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Space objects will still be hard to protect despite new policyA new space traffic management policy signed by President Donald Trump could help prevent thousands of space objects from colliding, but sufficient technical solutions are lacking, says Carolin Frueh, Purdue assistant professor of aeronautics and astronautics.
12h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Envisioning a future where all the trees in Europe disappearVegetation plays an important role in shaping local climate—just think of the cool shade provided by a forest or the grinding heat of the open desert.
12h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Two plant cell 'hotspots' tell the cell where to import its resourcesScientists in the Brandizzi lab are increasing our understanding of expand iconendocytosis, how plant cells import molecules from their surroundings.
12h
The Atlantic

How America Treats Its Own ChildrenHow could the United States do this? How could it separate 2,000 children from their parents, perhaps never to be reunited? How could it lose track of thousands more? How could it keep children in cages, in tents, in camps? This is a country that has assimilated wave after wave of immigrants and refugees, so that children might have a better life than their parents. This is the wealthiest civiliz
12h
Ingeniøren

Forskere 3D-printer vindmøllevinge med cellulose fra svampeCellulose kan erstatte plast i 3D-print, mener et forskerhold. De har udviklet et cellulosebaseret materiale, der ikke kræver forurenende kemikalier i produktionen.
12h
Ingeniøren

Dine data bliver dine – men vil du sælge dem?Vi har fået vores data-frihed tilbage, og det åbner op for et væld af nye muligheder som ikke mindst kan fravriste de gamle tech-giganter en del af kagen, er privcy-forkæmpere og datamæglere enige om.
12h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Quantum non-locality in ultra-cold atomic gasesNon-locality, Einstein's "spooky action at a distance," has been observed between quantum objects separated by more than one kilometer. Recent years have seen a major advancement in the quest for non-local systems. Researchers from the Faculty of Physics, University of Warsaw, present a novel and versatile method for creating and detecting such correlations in a many-body system of ultra-cold ato
12h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Mega-cruises are becoming copies of the great Las Vegas resortsBarcelona has become the most important port in the world for cruise holiday tourism, apart from its original market, the Caribbean. This year, it has served as the base for some of the most modern mega-ships, like Royal Caribbean's Symphony of the Sea, or the new flagship of the world's premier cruise ship operator, the Carnival Horizon. In this context, two studies by the Applied Economics & Man
12h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

A lightweight carbon nanofiber-based collectorQuan-Hong Yang from Tianjin University and Wei Lv from Graduate School at Shenzhen, Tsinghua University with their co-workers reported a lightweight, high-level nitrogen-doping carbon nanofiber framework as the current collector for lithium metal anodes, which could restrain the dendrite growth and achieve the uniform lithium deposition. This work was recently published in Science China Materials.
13h
Science | The Guardian

Tourism preventing Kenya's cheetahs from raising young, study findsResearch in Maasai Mara linked areas with high density of vehicles to lower numbers of cubs raised to independence High levels of tourism can lead to a dramatic reduction in the number of cheetahs able to raise their young to independence, new research has found. A study in Kenya’s Maasai Mara savannah found that in areas with a high density of tourist vehicles, the average number of cubs a mothe
13h
Ingeniøren

EU-Parlamentets Retsudvalg vedtager linkbeskatning og censuralgoritmerEU’s Retsudvalg har i dag vedtaget både artikel 11, linkbeskatning, og artikel 13 om indholdsfiltre af EU’s kommende reform af ophavsretslovgivningen. Frygteligt skuffende, men kampen er ikke ovre, lyder det fra Folkebevægelsen mod EU.
13h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Swedes have been brewing beer since the Iron Age, new evidence confirmsArchaeologists at Lund University in Sweden have found carbonised germinated grains showing that malt was produced for beer brewing as early as the Iron Age in the Nordic region. The findings made in Uppåkra in southern Sweden indicate a large-scale production of beer, possibly for feasting and trade.
13h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

The deformation and mechanics of one-atom thin layer materialsIn terms of the attention that graphene has been received in the past decade, no single material is comparable. As the interest and enthusiasm in graphene research continue, it calls for critical examination on the reliability and durability of graphene-enabled applications; the mechanics of graphene hence becomes essential to address related issues.
13h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Miniaturized infrared cameras take colored photos of the eyeLook into one's eye and you might be able to see their soul—or at least you can see signs of a stroke or diabetes. By looking at the blood vessels in the eyes, doctors can tell a lot about a person's health. This can be done using fundus photography, which has been around for almost two centuries and is the standard imaging tool used by ophthalmologists. However, for many, especially the poor, tra
13h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Encrypted messages in biological processesRNA modifications can encrypt the RNA code and are responsible for a very sophisticated control of RNA function. A Danish-German research team has shown that modified RNA bases have a great impact on the dynamics of gene expression from DNA to functional RNA. The study yields important new insight into how the basis of RNA modifications can affect the function of mature RNA molecules.The genetic m
13h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Human immune 'trigger' map paves way for better treatmentsA discovery about how human cells are 'triggered' to undergo an inflammatory type of cell death could have implications for treating cancer, stroke and tissue injury, and immune disorders.A research team from the Walter and Eliza Hall Institute in Melbourne identified the molecular trigger in human cells that drives necroptosis, and implicated defects in this molecular trigger as potentially playi
13h
Ingeniøren

Nyt center for metalprint skal få SMV’erne til at sænke paraderneDanske virksomheder er ifølge Teknologisk Institut mellem tre og fem år efter de udenlandske konkurrenter, når det gælder 3D-print. Det skal TI’s nye center for 3D-print i metal i Aarhus rette op på.
13h
Ingeniøren

Svært at få ledelsen om bord i dataprojekter? Du er ikke aleneDrop teknik-snakken og vis, hvad der kan hentes. Sådan lyder rådene til medarbejdere, der savner ledelsens opbakning til bedre brug af data.
13h
The Atlantic

How Nietzsche Explains TurkeyIn 1989, a small Islamist party called Refah, or “Welfare,” holds a conference titled “National Consciousness.” In the crowd are mustached men with lean faces; many of them are old, wearing skullcaps Muslims use during prayer. Soon, a tall, thin young man dressed in a well-tailored suit rises to speak. “May the peace of God be upon all believers,” he says. His polite bearing, however, belies his
13h
Ingeniøren

Usikkert om DTU får udbetalt 80 millioner til veterinærbyggeriFor et år siden droppede DTU et staldbyggeri i Lyngby. Det kan betyde, at universitetet mister penge fra ’laboratoriepuljen’, viser en beretning fra Statsrevisorerne. DTU mener dog at have fulgt kutymen for universitetsbyggeri.
14h
Dagens Medicin

Misbrug øger risiko for skizofreni hos patienter med skizotypiNyt studie viser, at patienter med skizotypi har en markant højere risiko for at udvikle skizofreni, hvis de samtidig har et misbrug. Det kræver større fokus på at udvikle andre behandlingsformer, mener seniorforsker bag studiet.
14h
Dagens Medicin

NOAK-middel reducerer hjerte­komplikationer og død blandt nyopereredeInternationalt studie med dansk deltagelse viser, at dabigatran reducerer risikoen for hjertekarkomplikationer og død markant blandt nyopererede patienter med tegn på blodprop i hjertet.
14h
Dagens Medicin

Ny vejledning anbefaler forebyggende behandling til diabetespatienterPraktiserende læger får opdateret vejledning i behandling af type 2 diabetes, der anbefaler forebyggende behandling af hjerte-kar-sygdomme for at reducere risikoen for blodpropper, slagtilfælde og død.
14h
cognitive science

Could Multiple Personality Disorder Explain Life, the Universe and Everything?submitted by /u/parrishthethought [link] [comments]
14h
Science | The Guardian

Listen and weep: 'Audiobooks outdo films in emotional engagement'UCL study backed by Audible finds unconscious responses to the same book scenes, witnessed in adaptations across different media, are strongest in the auditory format As Arya Stark watches from the crowd, tears streaming, King Joffrey toys with her father Ned Stark before executing him in front of a baying crowd. This scene from Game of Thrones is harrowing in any medium – but a new University Co
15h
BBC News – Science & Environment

The 'Baby' that ushered in modern computer ageScientists are celebrating the birth 70 years ago of a machine that kick-started the modern computer age.
15h
Viden

Skudt, kvalt eller stukket: Sådan redder lægerne dit livFor 15 år siden gik lægerne i gang med den helt store operation, når de fik traumepatienter ind. I dag stabiliserer de først med et kort indgreb og fuldfører operationen senere.
15h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Monsanto faces first US trial over Roundup cancer linkIn the first trial of its kind, a Californian dying of cancer is suing US agrochemical giant Monsanto, claiming its popular herbicide Roundup caused his disease—a case that could have sweeping ramifications.
15h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Antarctic researchers mark winter solstice with icy plungeScientists based in Antarctica welcomed the winter solstice by plunging into icy waters Thursday as part of a "mad tradition" heralding the return of brighter days after weeks of darkness.
15h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Device may detect heart dysfunction in childhood cancer survivors treated with chemoA wireless device designed for detection of heart dysfunction in childhood cancer survivors treated with anthracycline chemotherapy was accurate and displayed a low false-negative rate as compared to cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) imaging.
15h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Xiaomi: A Chinese startup out to challenge Google, AmazonXiaomi, a Chinese startup that helped pioneer the trend toward ultra-low-priced smartphones, is preparing for what would be the biggest initial public offering since e-commerce giant Alibaba's in 2014.
15h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Daimler cuts profit forecast, blaming US-China tariffsGerman luxury carmaker Daimler on Wednesday cut its profit forecast for 2018, blaming new tariffs on cars exported from the United States to China, amid lingering fears of a trade war between the world's biggest economies.
15h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Dig it: Archaeologists scour Woodstock '69 concert fieldArchaeologists scouring the grassy hillside famously trampled during the 1969 Woodstock music festival carefully sifted through the dirt from a time of peace, love, protest and good vibes.
15h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

GPM satellite probes soaking storms in Southern Texas and the GulfSouthern Texas and the western Gulf of Mexico is getting a soaking because of a low pressure system. The Global Precipitation Measurement mission or GPM core satellite passed over the western Gulf of Mexico and measured the rainfall from the system.
15h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Using fragment-based approaches to discover new antibioticsIn the July 2018 issue of SLAS Discovery, a review article summarizes new methods of fragment-based lead discovery (FBLD) to identify new compounds as potential antibiotics.
15h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Democracy in decline for one-third of the world2.6 billion people—a third of the world's population—live in countries where democracy is in retreat, according to a new study based on the largest dataset on democracy, published today in Democratization. The research also found that only 15 per cent of people globally live in places where women and lower income groups have at least somewhat equal access to power.
15h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

When cozying up with would-be predators, cleaner shrimp follow a dependable scriptIt's a mystery how cleaner shrimp partner with would-be fish predators—sometimes even climbing in their mouths—without getting eaten. A new study reveals how the shrimp convinces fish not to eat them, and the fish conveys that it's a friend and not a foe.
15h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Many wildlife-vehicle collisions preventableA new study from the University of Waterloo has found that Ontario could save millions by implementing simple measures to help prevent vehicle accidents involving wildlife.
15h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Enhanced detection of nuclear events, thanks to deep learningA deep neural network running on an ordinary desktop computer is interpreting highly technical data related to national security as well as—and sometimes better than—today's best automated methods or even human experts.
15h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

DNA barcodes that reliably work: A game-changer for biomedical researchIn the same way that barcodes on your groceries help stores know what's in your cart, DNA barcodes help biologists attach genetic labels to biological molecules to do their own tracking during research, including of how a cancerous tumor evolves, how organs develop or which drug candidates actually work. Unfortunately with current methods, many DNA barcodes have a reliability problem much worse th
15h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Buildings as power stations—they generate more energy than they consumeThe UK's first energy-positive classroom, designed with research expertise from Swansea University, generated more than one and a half times the energy it consumed, according to data from its first year of operation, the team has revealed.
15h
cognitive science

Do dolphins feel grief?submitted by /u/burtzev [link] [comments]
16h
Ingeniøren

Forsvindende lidt mikroplast i norsk drikkevandMens Danmark er på vej med sin undersøgelse af plast i drikkevandet, er Norge færdig med sin. Og den beroliger DTU-professor.
17h
Ingeniøren

Mens Region H overvejer it-outsourcing: Drama i Norge om alvorligt persondatalækSygehusregion i Norge annullerer it-outsourcingkontrakt på fem milliarder norske kroner med DXC efter afsløring af alvorlige persondatalæk til it-ansatte i Fjernøsten.
17h
Ingeniøren

Afgående Region H-direktør: Vi undervurderede SundhedsplatformenVi har indført en ny patientjournal på alle vores hospitaler til tiden og til prisen – vi har fået et stabilt og sammenhængende it-system, anfører regionsrådsformanden fra Region H som svar på skarp kritik fra Statsrevisorerne.
17h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Using fragment-based approaches to discover new antibioticsA new SLAS Discovery review article summarizes new methods of fragment-based lead discovery (FBLD) to identify new compounds as potential antibiotics. It explains how FBLD works and illustrates its advantages over conventional high-throughput screening.
17h
Science | The Guardian

Existing treatment could be used for 'untreatable' form of lung cancerFindings raise hopes many patients could benefit in the near future, given it is already approved for other cancers An existing cancer treatment could be used for a common form of lung cancer for which there is currently no specific treatment available, new research suggests. Scientists found the treatment blocked cell growth in a subtype of lung cancer. The new findings, led by the University of
17h
Science-Based Medicine

Prevagen goes P-hackingCan post-hoc data-dredging produce competent and reliable scientific evidence for Prevagen's claims of memory improvement? The FTC and consumer groups say "no."
17h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

Novel therapy makes oxidative stress deadly to cancerOxidative stress can help tumors thrive, but one way novel cancer treatments work is by pushing levels to the point where it instead helps them die, scientists report.
17h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

New study debunks Dale Carnegie advice to 'put yourself in their shoes'The researchers debunk the theories canonized in Dale Carnegie's How to Win Friends and Influence People that assuming you understand someone else's thoughts, feelings, attitude, or mental state is a correct approach to interpersonal insight.
17h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

Many wildlife-vehicle collisions preventableA new study has found that Ontario could save millions by implementing simple measures to help prevent vehicle accidents involving wildlife.
17h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Enhanced detection of nuclear events, thanks to deep learningA deep neural network running on an ordinary desktop computer is interpreting highly technical data related to national security as well as — and sometimes better than — today's best automated methods or even human experts. The research probes incredibly complex data sets filled with events called radioactive decays.
18h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Many wildlife-vehicle collisions preventableA new study from the University of Waterloo has found that Ontario could save millions by implementing simple measures to help prevent vehicle accidents involving wildlife.
18h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

New study debunks Dale Carnegie advice to 'put yourself in their shoes'The researchers debunk the theories canonized in Dale Carnegie's How to Win Friends and Influence People that assuming you understand someone else's thoughts, feelings, attitude, or mental state is a correct approach to interpersonal insight.
18h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Novel therapy makes oxidative stress deadly to cancerOxidative stress can help tumors thrive, but one way novel cancer treatments work is by pushing levels to the point where it instead helps them die, scientists report.
18h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Envisioning a future where all the trees in Europe disappearGlobal climate change is already affecting the planet, as demonstrated by the shrinking polar ice cap, melting glaciers and cities in the grips of longer, more intense heat waves. Now a team of researchers has conducted a radical thought experiment on how extreme land use changes could influence future climate.
18h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Old star clusters could have been the birthplace of supermassive starsA team of international astrophysicists may have found a solution to a problem that has perplexed scientists for more than 50 years: why are the stars in globular clusters made of material different to other stars found in the Milky Way?
18h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Exposure to fracking chemicals and wastewater spurs fat cell developmentExposure to fracking chemicals and wastewater promotes fat cell development, or adipogenesis, in laboratory cell models, a Duke-led study finds. Researchers observed increases in the size and number of fat cells after exposing the models to a mixture of 23 common fracking chemicals or to wastewater or surface-water samples containing them, even at diluted concentrations. Adipogenesis occurred thro
18h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

No evidence that vitamin D protects against high blood pressure in pregnancyThere is no strong evidence that vitamin D protects against pregnancy-induced high blood pressure (hypertension) or pre-eclampsia, conclude researchers today.
18h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

New medicare model produces expert nurses to address shortage of primary careResearchers call for modernizing the way Medicare pays for training nurses, and highlight a successful new model of cost-effectively training more advanced practice nurses to practice community-based primary care.
18h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

Rewiring plant defense genes to reduce crop wastePlants could be genetically rewired to better resist disease, helping safeguard crop yields worldwide according to new research. Defensive feedback control system developed enables plants to strengthen their defenses to withstand attack by re-wiring existing gene connections. The system uses same approach as aircraft autopilots use to counteract turbulence.
18h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

Half of those on Parkinson's drugs may develop impulse control problemsOver time, half of the people taking certain drugs for Parkinson's disease may develop impulse control disorders such as compulsive gambling, shopping or eating, according to a new study.
18h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

Fossils show ancient primates had grooming claws as well as nailsHumans and other primates are outliers among mammals for having nails instead of claws. But how, when and why we transitioned from claws to nails has been an evolutionary head-scratcher.
18h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

A case of 'kiss and tell': Chromosomal kissing gets less elusiveChromosomes occupy different territories in the nucleus; their arrangement and communication with each other is still poorly understood. Scientists publish findings about structural chromosomal aberrations which have an effect on genome organization (chromosomal kissing) and disease progression.
18h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

Crumple up this keyboard and stick it in your pocketBendable portable keyboards for use with computers and other electronic devices are already on the market, but they have limited flexibility, and they're fairly sizable when rolled up for transport. Now researchers have crafted an inexpensive keyboard that is so tough, flexible and thin that it can be crumpled up and tucked in a pocket without damaging it.
18h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

Robot bloodhound tracks odors on the groundBloodhounds are famous for their ability to track scents over great distances. Now researchers have developed a modern-day bloodhound — a robot that can rapidly detect odors from sources on the ground, such as footprints. The robot could even read a message written on the ground using odors as a barcode.
18h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Old star clusters could have been the birthplace of supermassive starsA team of international astrophysicists may have found a solution to a problem that has perplexed scientists for more than 50 years: why are the stars in globular clusters made of material different to other stars found in the Milky Way?
18h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Exposure to fracking chemicals and wastewater spurs fat cell developmentExposure to fracking chemicals and wastewater promotes fat cell development, or adipogenesis, in living cells in a laboratory, according to a new Duke University-led study.
18h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

Modern laser science brightened by 2,300-year-old technologyScientists have harnessed a 2,300-year-old water displacement technology to develop a novel laser beam that traps and moves particles in specific directions. It is a significant contribution to the future of both basic and applied science.
18h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

Scientists unravel DNA code behind rare neurologic diseaseScientists conducting one of the largest full DNA analyses of a rare disease have identified a gene mutation associated with a perplexing brain condition that blinds and paralyzes patients.
18h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

Short-term responses to climate change-mediated disasters can be maladaptive in long-termShort-term management responses to climate change-mediated disasters can be maladaptive in the long-term.
18h
Feed: All Latest

California Net Neutrality Bill Was 'Hijacked,' Lawmaker SaysBackers of a bill that would have created the nation's strongest net neutrality protections criticize changes to the proposal.
21h
Feed: All Latest

How a Child Moves Through a Broken Immigration SystemTrump's new executive order ends family separation, but detainee advocates say there is no clear process for reuniting those who have already been torn apart.
22h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

Learning about the Himalayas using Mars technologyhe Himalayan Range includes some of the youngest and most spectacular mountains on Earth, but the rugged landscape that lends it the striking beauty for which it is known can also keep scientists from fully understanding how these mountains formed.
22h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

Scientists calculate impact of China's ban on plastic waste importsScientists have calculated the potential global impact of China's ban on plastic waste imports and how this policy might affect efforts to reduce the amount of plastic waste entering the world's landfills and natural environment.
22h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

New drug halves hearing loss in children following cancer treatmentGiving the drug sodium thiosulphate after chemotherapy reduces hearing loss in children treated for liver cancer, according to new findings.
23h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

How physics explains the evolution of social organizationA scientist says the natural evolution of social organizations into larger and more complex communities exhibiting distinct hierarchies can be predicted from the same law of physics that gives rise to tree branches and river deltas — a concept called the constructal law.
23h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

DNA barcodes that reliably work: A game-changer for biomedical researchResearchers have developed a new method for correcting the errors that creep into DNA barcodes — labels used in a wide range of biological experiments — yielding far more accurate results and paving the way for more ambitious medical research in the future.
23h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

Planned movements and spontaneous reactions are processed differently in the brainScientists have been able to show in their recently published study of two rhesus monkeys that planned and spontaneous gripping movements have the same brain activity during the movement but that the preceded brain activity differs.
23h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

Fetal T cells are first responders to infection in adultsResearchers have discovered there is a division of labor among immune cells that fight invading pathogens in the body.
23h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

Cooler computing through statistical physics?Recent breakthroughs in nonequilibrium statistical physics have revealed opportunities to advance the 'thermodynamics of computation,' a field that could have far-reaching consequences for how we understand, and engineer, our computers.
23h
Futurity.org

Enzyme from our bodies could spawn Zika drugNew research suggests future antiviral drugs could take advantage of viperin, a naturally occurring enzyme in humans and other mammals that has antiviral effects on a wide variety of viruses, including West Nile, hepatitis C, rabies, and HIV. The enzyme facilitates a reaction that produces the molecule ddhCTP, which prevents viruses from copying their genetic material and thus from multiplying. T
23h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

Putting the brakes on metastatic cancerA groundbreaking discovery has identified previously unknown therapeutic targets that could be key to preventing the spread of cancer. Researchers found that by inhibiting several newly identified gene targets they could block more than 99.5 per cent of cancer metastasis in living cells.
23h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

Possible link found between diabetes and common white pigmentIn a pilot study, crystalline particles of titanium dioxide — the most common white pigment in everyday products ranging from paint to candies — were found in pancreas specimens with Type 2 diabetes, suggesting that exposure to the white pigment is associated with the disease.
23h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Buildings as power stations — data shows they work: They generate more energy than they consumeThe UK's first energy-positive classroom, designed with research expertise from Swansea University, generated more than one and a half times the energy it consumed, according to data from its first year of operation, the team has revealed.The findings were announced as the researchers launched the next phase of their research, gathering data and evidence on an office building, constructed using si
23h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

No evidence that vitamin D protects against high blood pressure in pregnancyThere is no strong evidence that vitamin D protects against pregnancy-induced high blood pressure (hypertension) or pre-eclampsia, conclude researchers in The BMJ today.
23h
Futurity.org

Just 1 missing atom may lead to colon cancerThe development of an aggressive, early-onset form of colon cancer may come down to a single missing iron atom in a key DNA repair protein, according to new research. The findings, which will appear in Nature Chemistry , reveal how a mutation in the MUTYH protein prevents it from doing its job repairing damaged DNA. The study also shows for the first time in humans that our DNA can function like
23h
Futurity.org

Warming oceans may spark international ‘fish wars’Climate change is forcing fish species to shift their habitats faster than the world’s system for allocating fish stocks, a situation that could exacerbate international fishing conflicts, researchers say. The study shows for the first time that new fisheries are likely to appear in more than 70 countries all over the world. Past studies show that newly shared fisheries often spark conflict among
23h
Futurity.org

3D printing makes flexible bone graftsResearchers have created a new way to make flexible bone grafts using 3D-printed materials. The transplantation of bone tissue, known as bone grafting, typically involves allograft, which is bone from a deceased donor, or autograft, which comes from the patient’s own body. Ramille Shah, a materials scientist from Northwestern University, along with materials engineer Adam Jakus, validated the com
23h
New on MIT Technology Review

A freshly funded battery startup aims to ease the cobalt crunch[no content]
23h
Futurity.org

How underground groups use psychedelic drugs for healingFor a new study, researchers interviewed 15 individuals who have facilitated plant medicine ceremonies for thousands of people. In guided sessions or ceremonies, facilitators administer drugs like ayahuasca or psilocybin to people looking to alter their consciousness and improve their mental health. Little research exists on how people in this underground world are using hallucinogens—which pique
23h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

Martian dust storm grows global: Curiosity captures photos of thickening hazeA storm of tiny dust particles has engulfed much of Mars over the last two weeks and prompted NASA's Opportunity rover to suspend science operations. But across the planet, NASA's Curiosity rover, which has been studying Martian soil at Gale Crater, is expected to remain largely unaffected by the dust. The Martian dust storm has grown in size and is now officially a 'planet-encircling' (or 'global
23h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

The world's tiniest first respondersAmid the rise of CRISPR and genome editing, scientists are still learning more about DNA repair and its significance in aging and diseases such as cancer.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

Simple sugar delays neurodegeneration caused by enzyme deficiencyThe sugar trehalose increases cellular waste disposal and improves the neurological symptoms in a mouse model of mucopolysaccharidoses IIIB.
23h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

New tissue-imaging technology could enable real-time diagnostics, map cancer progressionA new microscope system can image living tissue in real time and in molecular detail, without any chemicals or dyes. It enables researchers to study concurrent processes within cells and tissue, and could give cancer researchers a new tool for tracking tumor progression and physicians new technology for tissue pathology and diagnostics.
23h
Popular Science

Your efforts to save water are actually making a differenceEnvironment Finally, a bit of good news. A new study from the United States Geological Survey shows water use across the country dropped between 2010 and 2015.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

A mix of in-person and online learning may boost student performance, reduce anxietyBefore online learning existed, the traditional lecture was the only option for college courses. Students who skipped class risked missing valuable information. Researchers found that online content accompanied by weekly class meetings — a 'blended' course format — may improve performance in students at risk for failing. In addition, fewer students withdrew from the blended format class.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

Rhesus macaque model offers route to study Zika brain pathologyRhesus macaque monkeys infected in utero with Zika virus develop similar brain pathology to human infants. The findings may open up new ways to study the infection in an animal model.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

Boring barnacles prefer the shallow life on coral reefsScientists have quantified how barnacles infest stony coral over a variety of conditions and reduce calcium carbonate on reefs. Coral reefs harbor diverse marine life and help prevent coastal erosion.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

When cozying up with would-be predators, cleaner shrimp follow a dependable scriptIt's a mystery how cleaner shrimp partner with would-be fish predators — sometimes even climbing in their mouths — without getting eaten. A new study reveals how the shrimp convinces fish not to eat them, and the fish conveys that it's a friend and not a foe.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

Discovery of 12-sided silica cagesScientists report the discovery of 10-nanometer, individual, self-assembled dodecahedral structures — 12-sided silica cages that could have applications in mesoscale material assembly, as well as medical diagnosis and therapeutics.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

New 'e-dermis' brings sense of touch, pain to prosthetic handsEngineers have created an electronic 'skin' in an effort to restore a real sense of touch for amputees using prosthetics.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

Cell-free DNA profiling informative way to monitor urinary tract infectionsUsing shotgun DNA sequencing, researchers have demonstrated a new method for monitoring urinary tract infections (UTIs) that surpasses traditional methods in providing valuable information about the dynamics of the infection as well as the patient's biological response.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

Quantum step forward in protecting communications from hackersResearchers have shown that a new quantum-based procedure for distributing secure information along communication lines could be successful in preventing serious security breaches.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

Using gene silencing to alleviate common ataxiaIn what researchers are calling a game changer for future ataxia treatments, a new study showed the ability to turn down the disease progression of the most common dominantly inherited ataxia, Spinocerebellar ataxia type 3 (SCA3), also known as Machado-Joseph disease.
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The Atlantic

The Atlantic Daily: The Dedication of the LivingWhat We’re Following Policy Shift: President Trump signed a new executive order on immigration that, while preserving the “zero tolerance” policy that has resulted in the separation of hundreds of families who entered the United States illegally, calls for parents to be detained together with their children. What exactly the order will change is not yet clear. It may violate an existing agreement
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NYT > Science

Summer Solstice 2018: The Search for Life in the GalaxyAs you mark the longest day of the year, consider the debate among astronomers over whether Earth’s tilt toward the sun helps make life on our world and others possible.
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Live Science

T. Rex Couldn't Stick Out Its TongueT. rex would have been terrible at licking stamps, lollipops or popsicles.
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Popular Science

Our brains can't quit our gadgets—that didn't happen by accidentTechnology These are some of the design tricks that keep us hooked. Your obsession with your smartphone isn’t an accident. The devices—and apps inside them—are entrancing by design, earning them comparisons to gambling, sugar, and…
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Latest Headlines | Science News

Splitting families may end, but migrant kids’ trauma needs to be studiedThe long-term effects of separating children from their parents at the U.S. border need to be studied, scientists say.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

When cozying up with would-be predators, cleaner shrimp follow a dependable scriptIt's a mystery how cleaner shrimp partner with would-be fish predators — sometimes even climbing in their mouths — without getting eaten. A new study reveals how the shrimp convinces fish not to eat them, and the fish conveys that it's a friend and not a foe.
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The Atlantic

The Meaninglessness of the Stock Market Index in a Digital WorldGeneral Electric, which has been a component of the Dow Jones Industrial Average since Teddy Roosevelt was president in 1907, will be pulled out of the basket of 30 stocks next week . It’ll be replaced by … Walgreens . Why’d GE get bounced? It probably has something to do with the company’s fortunes. While it still generates a tremendous amount of revenue—$120 billion in 2017—its margins have f
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The Atlantic

The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: A Sign of the Times-Written by Lena Felton ( @lenakfelton ) and Elaine Godfrey ( @elainejgodfrey ) Today in 5 Lines President Trump signed an executive order he said would end his administration’s policy of separating families at the border, but it could face court challenges over portions that direct the Department of Homeland Security to hold families indefinitely. Republican lawmakers still plan to vote on two i
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

Towards personalised medicine: One type of data is not enoughTo understand the biology of diseased organs researchers can use different types of molecular data. One of the biggest computational challenges at the moment is integrating these multiple data types. A new computational method jointly analyses different types of molecular data and disentangles the sources of disease variability to guide personalised treatment.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

What a pain: The iPad neck plagues women moreGender and posture — not screen time — are biggest factors behind developing 'iPad neck' and shoulder pain, new study finds.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

Forgetting may help improve memory and learningForgetting names, skills or information learned in class is often thought of as purely negative. However unintuitive it may seem, research suggests that forgetting plays a positive role in learning: It can actually increase long-term retention, information retrieval and performance.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

People who feel threatened by vegetarianism more likely to care less about animalsNew research suggests that if people perceive the rise of vegetarianism as a threat to their way of life they are more likely to care less for some animals.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

Miniaturized infrared cameras take colored photos of the eyeResearchers report a new miniaturized camera module that can be used to diagnose the eye. The module uses three wavelengths of near infrared light to give a clear image of the fundus that matches the performance of cameras in the clinic, but is small enough to mount on top a smartphone.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

New piece in the Huntington's disease puzzleResearchers have discovered a previously unknown error in the transport of glutamine between astrocytes and neurons in the brain of mice with Huntington's disease. At the same time, it is a relevant area on which to focus the effort of developing a future treatment for the disease, the researchers believe.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

Lyme disease cases among children are on the rise in western PennsylvaniaDoctors found that cases of Lyme disease in children have increased exponentially in western Pennsylvania.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

Reading risk behavior in the brainAnxious people take fewer risks — in itself this is not a surprising observation. However, psychologists have succeeded in making this decision process visible in the brain, allowing them to predict the behavior of individuals.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Boring barnacles prefer the shallow life on coral reefsScientists at Rice University, the University of the Virgin Islands and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration combine efforts to quantify how barnacles infest stony coral over a variety of conditions and reduce calcium carbonate on reefs. Coral reefs harbor diverse marine life and help prevent coastal erosion.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Rhesus macaque model offers route to study Zika brain pathologyRhesus macaque monkeys infected in utero with Zika virus develop similar brain pathology to human infants, according to a report by researchers at the California National Primate Research Center and School of Veterinary Medicine at UC Davis. The findings may open up new ways to study the infection in an animal model.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

GPM satellite probes soaking storms in Southern Texas and the GulfSouthern Texas and the western Gulf of Mexico is getting a soaking because of a low pressure system. The Global Precipitation Measurement mission or GPM core satellite passed over the western Gulf of Mexico and measured the rainfall from the system.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

DNA barcodes that reliably work: A game-changer for biomedical researchResearchers have developed a new method for correcting the errors that creep into DNA barcodes — labels used in a wide range of biological experiments — yielding far more accurate results and paving the way for more ambitious medical research in the future.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Martian dust storm grows global: Curiosity captures photos of thickening hazeA storm of tiny dust particles has engulfed much of Mars over the last two weeks and prompted NASA's Opportunity rover to suspend science operations. But across the planet, NASA's Curiosity rover, which has been studying Martian soil at Gale Crater, is expected to remain largely unaffected by the dust. The Martian dust storm has grown in size and is now officially a 'planet-encircling' (or 'global
1d
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

A mix of in-person and online learning may boost student performance, reduce anxietyBefore online learning existed, the traditional lecture was the only option for college courses. Students who skipped class risked missing valuable information. Researchers found that online content accompanied by weekly class meetings — a 'blended' course format — may improve performance in students at risk for failing. In addition, fewer students withdrew from the blended format class. The fin
1d
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

New medicare model produces expert nurses to address shortage of primary careIn an article published today in the New England Journal of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania researchers call for modernizing the way Medicare pays for training nurses, and highlight a successful new model of cost-effectively training more advanced practice nurses to practice community-based primary care.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

The sounds of climate changeResearchers describe a way to quickly sift through thousands of hours of field recordings to estimate when songbirds arrive at their Arctic breeding grounds. Their research could be applied to any dataset of animal vocalizations to understand how migratory animals are responding to climate change.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

Zero proof probiotics can ease your anxietyA study found evidence that probiotics can reduce anxiety in rodents, but not in humans.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

How pancreatic tumors lead to weight lossA study offers insight into the weight loss seen in pancreatic cancer patients, and suggests that weight loss may not necessarily affect patients' survival.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

Compound made inside human body stops viruses from replicatingA team of researchers has identified the mode of action of viperin, a naturally occurring enzyme in humans and other mammals that is known to have antiviral effects on viruses such as West Nile, hepatitis C, rabies, and HIV. This discovery could allow researchers to develop a drug that could act as a broad-spectrum therapy for a range of viruses, including Zika.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

Gene-edited pigs are resistant to billion-dollar virusScientists have produced pigs that can resist one of the world's most costly animal diseases, by changing their genetic code. Tests with the virus — called Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome, or PRRS — found the pigs do not become infected at all. The animals show no signs that the change in their DNA has had any other impact on their health or wellbeing.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

Why 9 to 5 isn't the only shift that can work for busy familiesA new study finds that the impacts of parent work schedules on children vary by age and gender, and often reflect which shift a parent works. Rotating shifts — a schedule that varies day by day or week by week — can be most problematic for children.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

Rare in-vivo study shows weak brain nodes have strong influence on memory networkThe majority of existing simulation studies show that the parts of the brain with high connectivity, the so-called 'hubs', are most important when it comes to several different cognitive tasks. But the results of a rare in-vivo study demonstrates that the nucleus accumbens (NAc) — a part of the brain with weak connections — plays an unexpectedly influential role in enhancing the memory network.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

Coconut oil prolongs life in peroxisomal disorders: fruit fly study'Lorenzo's Oil' was to help a seriously ill boy suffering from a peroxisomal disorder (adrenoleukodystrophy/ALD). The true story was turned into a film which made the rare disease well known. Scientists investigated such peroxisomal diseases on fruit flies. They were able to prove that a coconut oil diet significantly increases the vitality and lifespan of the flies.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

Dry landscapes can increase disease transmissionIn water-limited landscapes sick animals can have increased contact with healthy individuals, which can facilitate disease transmission.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

Beetles exploit warm winters to expand range, study confirmsA new study confirms that increasing minimum winter temperatures allow beetles to expand their range but reveals that overcrowding can put the brakes on population growth.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

When you're a sitting duck, you learn to adaptFor common loons, black flies are a common blood-feeding pest and can cause nest abandonment and decreased fledging rates. A new study presents some of the best data to date supporting hypotheses about the effects that black flies have on common loon nesting behavior and success.
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