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Den klimavenlige ønskeøFørst blev Samsø CO2-neutral og inspirationskilde til den grønne omstilling for resten af verden. Nu vil de droppe benzin og blive fossilfri inden 2030.
2h
BBC News – Science & Environment

Marine plastic: Hundreds of fragments in dead seabirdsFlesh-footed shearwater chicks are starving to death because of plastic, a BBC documentary reveals.
2h
Feed: All Latest

Apple Will Fix Your Messed Up MacBook Pro Keyboard for FreeApple MacBook KeyboardThe squeaky butterfly switch gets the grease.
7h
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BBC News – Science & Environment

The birds filling up with plasticOn a remote island in the Tasman Sea scientists are battling to save flesh-footed Shearwater chicks.
31min
Viden

Verdenskendt isforsker i Grønland: Jeg frøs mine tånegle afJason Box rejste langt ind på indlandsisen i Grønland for at måle og veje sneen. Det afslørede, at klimaforandringerne giver enorme mængder sne.
2h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

Tiny jumping roundworm undergoes unusual sexual developmentBiologists have shown that gonad development varies in other nematodes relative to C. elegans. Specifically, they focused on Steinernema carpocapsae, a nematode used in insect biocontrol applications in lawns and gardens.
3h
cognitive science

High salty foods has been linked to early deathsubmitted by /u/davyeminy [link] [comments]
3h
Live Science

What Is Transgender?The term transgender describes people whose gender identity differs from the sex to which they were assigned at birth.
4h
Live Science

Polycystic Ovary Syndrome: Symptoms and Treatment
4h
Science : NPR

Officials Say Illegal Pesticide Caused Deaths Of 13 Bald Eagles In MarylandAuthorities said there is an "epidemic on the Eastern Shore" of wildlife-poisoning crimes because it's "cheaper and easier" than trapping a nuisance animals or building a fence. (Image credit: Rob Carr/AP)
4h
Live Science

The Everglades: River of GrassThe Everglades is an intricate system of subtropical wetlands, lakes and rivers in south Florida.
4h
Live Science

The Galápagos Islands: Laboratory of EvolutionThe Galápagos Islands archipelago is home to a complex ecosystem that inspired renowned naturalist Charles Darwin to formulate his theory of evolution.
5h
Feed: All Latest

How Tesla Is Building Cars in Its Parking LotWe dug through the permits Elon Musk's automaker filed for the right to start building Model 3 sedans in a semi-permanent tent outside its Fremont factory.
6h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Social bonding key cause of football violenceAs World Cup fever sets in, increased hooliganism and football related violence are legitimate international concerns. Previous research has linked sports-related hooliganism to 'social maladjustment' e.g. previous episodes of violence or dysfunctional behaviour at home, work or school etc. However, social bonding and a desire to protect and defend other fans may be one of the main motivations not
7h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

New research on avian response to wildfiresNew research explores the effects fire has on ecosystems and the wildlife species that inhabit them. Scientists examined the impacts of fires of different severity levels on birds and how that changes as the time since fire increases. Scientists looked across 10 fires after they burned through forests in the Sierra Nevada. A key finding was that wildfire had strong, but varied, effects on the dens
7h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

Repellent research: Navy developing ship coatings to reduce fuel, energy costsIt can repel water, oil, alcohol and even peanut butter. And it might save the US Navy millions of dollars in ship fuel costs, reduce the amount of energy that vessels consume and improve operational efficiency.
7h
Live Science

Mars Will Soon 'Reverse Its Course' in the SkyMars continues to approach Earth as the Red Planet grows steadily brighter, but on June 28, it will halt its normal eastward motion among the stars and turn back toward the west — a strange change in its nightly wandering that befuddled ancient stargazers
8h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

The photoelectric effect in stereoIn the photoelectric effect, a photon ejects an electron from a material. Researchers have now used attosecond laser pulses to measure the time evolution of this effect in molecules. From their results they can deduce the exact location of a photoionization event.
8h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

Challenging our understanding of how platelets are madeCorrelative light-electron microscopy is being used to increase our knowledge of how platelets are made in the body and the results are challenging previously held understandings.
8h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

Uncovering lost images from the 19th centuryArt curators will be able to recover images on daguerreotypes, the earliest form of photography that used silver plates, after a team of scientists learned how to use light to see through degradation that has occurred over time.
8h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

Dynamic modeling helps predict the behaviors of gut microbesA new study provides a platform for predicting how microbial gut communities work and represents a first step toward understanding how to manipulate the properties of the gut ecosystem. This could allow scientists to, for example, design a probiotic that persists in the gut or tailor a diet to positively influence human health.
8h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

'Stealth' material hides hot objects from infrared eyesInfrared cameras are the heat-sensing eyes that help drones find their targets even in the dead of night or through heavy fog. Hiding from such detectors could become much easier, thanks to a new cloaking material that renders objects — and people — practically invisible.
8h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

Estimate of 8.5 billion barrels of oil in Texas' Eagle Ford GroupThe Eagle Ford Group of Texas contains estimated means of 8.5 billion barrels of oil, 66 trillion cubic feet of natural gas, and 1.9 billion barrels of natural gas liquids, according to a new assessment.
8h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

New therapeutic target for slowing the spread of flu virusInfluenza A (flu A) hijacks host proteins for viral RNA splicing and blocking these interactions caused replication of the virus to slow, which could point to novel strategies for antiviral therapies.
8h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

Low-cost plastic sensors could monitor a range of health conditionsAn international team of researchers have developed a low-cost sensor made from semiconducting plastic that can be used to diagnose or monitor a wide range of health conditions, such as surgical complications or neurodegenerative diseases.
8h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

Scientists discover how antiviral gene worksIt's been known for years that humans and other mammals possess an antiviral gene called RSAD2 that prevents a remarkable range of viruses from multiplying. Now, researchers have discovered the secret to the gene's success: The enzyme it codes for generates a compound that stops viruses from replicating. The newly discovered compound offers a novel approach for attacking many disease-causing virus
8h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

Biorenewable, biodegradable plastic alternative synthesizedPolymer chemists have taken another step toward a future of high-performance, biorenewable, biodegradable plastics. The team describes chemical synthesis of a polymer called bacterial poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) ­- or P3HB. The compound shows early promise as a substitute for petroleum plastics in major industrial uses.
8h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

Broken shuttle may interfere with learning in major brain disordersA broken shuttle protein may hinder learning in people with intellectual disability, schizophrenia, or autism.
8h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

What causes the sound of a dripping tap — and how do you stop it?Scientists have solved the riddle behind one of the most recognizable, and annoying, household sounds: the dripping tap. And crucially, they have also identified a simple solution to stop it, which most of us already have in our kitchens.
8h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

Drug compound stops cancer cells from spreading in miceNew research shows that it may be possible to freeze cancer cells and kill them where they stand.
8h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

Miniature testing of drug pairs on tumor biopsiesCombinations of cancer drugs can be quickly and cheaply tested on tumour cells using a novel device developed by scientists. The research marks the latest advancement in the field of personalized medicine.
8h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

Mosquito-borne diseases in Europe: Containment strategy depends on when the alarm sets offNew research based on the Italian experience with outbreaks of Chikungunya, a disease borne by the tiger mosquito, in 2007 and 2017, shows that different vector control strategies are needed, depending on the time when the first cases are notified, 'thus providing useful indications supporting urgent decision-making of public health authorities in response to emerging mosquito-borne epidemics', on
8h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

Important step towards a computer model that predicts the outcome of eye diseasesUnderstanding how the retina transforms images into signals that the brain can interpret would not only result in insights into brain computations, but could also be useful for medicine. As machine learning and artificial intelligence develop, eye diseases will soon be described in terms of the perturbations of computations performed by the retina. A newly developed model of the retina can predict
8h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

People with schizophrenia account for more than one in 10 suicide casesA new study shows that people with schizophrenia account for more than one in 10 cases of suicide in Ontario, and that young people are disproportionately affected. People with schizophrenia also had more contact with the health care system, pointing to an opportunity to intervene. The researchers emphasize the need for early suicide risk assessments to reduce risks.
8h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

Starving fungi could save millions of lives each yearResearchers have identified a potentially new approach to treating lethal fungal infections that claim more than 1.6 million lives each year: starving the fungi of key nutrients, preventing their growth and spread.
8h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

Wolf reintroduction: Yellowstone's 'landscape of fear' not so scary after allAfter wolves were reintroduced to Yellowstone National Park in the mid-1990s, some scientists thought the large predator reestablished a 'landscape of fear' that caused elk, the wolf's main prey, to avoid risky places where wolves killed them. But according to recent findings, Yellowstone's 'landscape of fear' is not as scary as first thought.
8h
NYT > Science

She Wanted You to See a Family, Not Just a Pregnant ManThe photographer Jackie Molloy followed Tanner and David for a year and a half, during which time she took some 20,000 pictures.
8h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

Normalization of 'plus-size' risks hidden danger of obesityNew research warns that the normalization of 'plus-size' body shapes may be leading to an increasing number of people underestimating their weight – undermining efforts to tackle England's ever-growing obesity problem. Analysis of data from almost 23,460 people who are overweight or obese revealed that weight misperception has increased in England. Men and individuals with lower levels of educatio
8h
The Atlantic

The Atlantic Daily: Up the MountainWhat We’re Following Presidential Process: President Donald Trump’s executive order not to separate families at the border reversed a policy set by his close adviser Stephen Miller —illustrating how the president often disregards the recommendations of his staff. Yet on multiple occasions, he’s backed down from his policy stances under public pressure, a pattern that belies the image he’s cultiva
9h
Popular Science

Connections between Alzheimer’s Disease and viruses are building, but stop freaking out about herpesHealth First of all, it's not the herpes you're thinking of. This new study offers further evidence to support the idea that Alzheimer’s could have something to do with viruses and bacterial infections.
9h
Big Think

Study: People with personality pathologies more interested in casual sexThe findings are among the few to detail the intersection of pathological personalities and sex preferences. Read More
9h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

USGS estimates 8.5 billion barrels of oil in Texas' Eagle Ford GroupThe Eagle Ford Group of Texas contains estimated means of 8.5 billion barrels of oil, 66 trillion cubic feet of natural gas, and 1.9 billion barrels of natural gas liquids, according to a new assessment by the U.S. Geological Survey. This estimate consists of undiscovered, technically recoverable resources in continuous accumulations.
9h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

IMERG examines flooding in southern Texas from tropical disturbanceWhile Tropical Storm Bud was lashing parts of western Mexico and causing flooding that extended into the American Southwest, a tropical disturbance was spinning over the Gulf of Mexico and straddling southeastern Texas. This system sat in place for almost a week bringing extremely heavy rainfall and causing a flash flood emergency. More than 15 inches (381 mm) of rain fell in Hidalgo County, Texas
9h
Science : NPR

3 Charts That Show What's Actually Happening Along The Southern BorderThe number of people taken into custody at the southern U.S. border with Mexico has been decreasing since 2000. Economists say the reasons people choose to cross the border illegally are changing. (Image credit: Vanessa Qian and Katie Park/NPR)
9h
The Atlantic

The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: You've Barely Got Mail-Written by Elaine Godfrey ( @elainejgodfrey ) Today in 5 Lines President Trump told Republican lawmakers they should “stop wasting their time on immigration” until after the midterms. House Republican leadership has spent days struggling to get members on board with an immigration-reform bill, which is set for a vote next week after being postponed twice. Trump also spoke at a White House event
10h
Scientific American Content: Global

Bird's Song Staying Power Implies CultureCertain motifs in swamp sparrow songs can last hundreds, even thousands of years—evidence of a cultural tradition in the birds. Christopher Intagliata reports. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
10h
NYT > Science

Q&A: From One Mineral, Brilliant Reds and Bright BluesRubies and sapphires are made of the same stuff, but trace elements alter their appearances.
10h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Penn study reveals new therapeutic target for slowing the spread of flu virusInfluenza A (flu A) hijacks host proteins for viral RNA splicing and blocking these interactions caused replication of the virus to slow, which could point to novel strategies for antiviral therapies.
10h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

New research on avian response to wildfiresNew research explores the effects fire has on ecosystems and the wildlife species that inhabit them. Scientists examined the impacts of fires of different severity levels on birds and how that changes as the time since fire increases. Scientists looked across 10 fires after they burned through forests in the Sierra Nevada. A key finding was that wildfire had strong, but varied, effects on the dens
10h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

NASA's IMERG examines flooding in southern Texas from tropical disturbanceWhile Tropical Storm Bud was lashing parts of western Mexico and causing flooding that extended into the American Southwest, a tropical disturbance was spinning over the Gulf of Mexico and straddling southeastern Texas. This system sat in place for almost a week bringing extremely heavy rainfall and causing a flash flood emergency. More than 15 inches (381 mm) of rain fell in Hidalgo County, Texas
10h
Live Science

Is This Leonardo Da Vinci's Oldest Surviving Work? It's Doubtful.It's a small piece — merely a square tile depicting a curly-haired Archangel Gabriel — but it may be the oldest surviving artwork by the Renaissance master Leonardo da Vinci.
10h
Feed: All Latest

Family DNA Testing at the Border Would Be an Ethical QuagmireNew offers from consumer genetic testing companies raise more questions than they answer.
10h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Tiny jumping roundworm undergoes unusual sexual developmentNathan Schroeder, assistant professor in the Department of Crop Sciences at the University of Illinois, has shown that gonad development varies in other nematodes relative to C. elegans. Specifically, he and graduate student Hung Xuan Bui focused on Steinernema carpocapsae, a nematode used in insect biocontrol applications in lawns and gardens.
11h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

USGS estimates 8.5 billion barrels of oil in Texas' Eagle Ford GroupThe Eagle Ford Group of Texas contains estimated means of 8.5 billion barrels of oil, 66 trillion cubic feet of natural gas, and 1.9 billion barrels of natural gas liquids, according to a new assessment by the U.S. Geological Survey. This estimate consists of undiscovered, technically recoverable resources in continuous accumulations.
11h
NYT > Science

James Gips, Who Extended Computer Use to the Disabled, Dies at 72He helped develop two technologies that allowed people who could not use a mouse to communicate with a computer, and thus with the world.
11h
Feed: All Latest

Gadget Lab Podcast: Our Vertical-Video FutureWith a new long-form video app called IGTV, Instagram is giving us a glimpse of our vertical-video future.
11h
The Atlantic

Will Erdoğan Cheat His Way to Victory?ISTANBUL—Few members of Turkey’s battered political opposition were surprised when President Recep Tayyip Erdoğan won the constitutional referendum of April 2017, which transformed the country from a European-style parliamentary government into a presidential system. What did surprise them: that after campaigning relentlessly, partnering with nationalists who were once his enemies, stirring up te
11h
Futurity.org

Dinosaurs couldn’t stick out their tonguesDinosaurs often appear as fierce creatures, baring their teeth, with tongues wildly stretching from their mouths. But a new study reveals a major problem with this classic image: Dinosaurs couldn’t stick out their tongues. Instead of having tongues similar to lizards, dinosaur tongues were probably rooted to the bottoms of their mouths in a manner akin to those of alligators, researchers say. “To
11h
Big Think

The incredible sci-fi stories of Octavia E. Butler, honored today on Google DoodleGoogle’s homepage doodle for today, June 22, honors the memory of renowned science fiction author Octavia E. Butler. It would have been her 71st birthday. Read More
11h
Latest Headlines | Science News

Fighting sexual harassment in science may mean changing science itselfSexual harassment is disturbingly prevalent in academia. But a course correction may involve tearing down the hierarchy that makes science run.
11h
Popular Science

The discount airline model is coming to rocket launchesSpace A slew of new startups are vying to serve the booming market for small satellites by launching small rockets more frequently and cheaply When a sleek 17 meter-tall rocket called Electron blasts off from a pad at Mahia, New Zealand it will become the first flight bearing the payload for actual paying…
11h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Strong sibling bond protects against negative effects of fighting parentsGenerally, children who experience recurrent destructive conflicts between their parents are at a higher risk of developing mental health problems. However, a new longitudinal study published in Child Development finds that strong sibling bonds can offset the negative effects of parental strife.
11h
Big Think

How Buzz Aldrin took the first selfie in spaceAstronaut Buzz Aldrin captured the first selfie in space, and he doesn't want kids these days to forget it. Read More
12h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Oregon email restored; official says hack fed schemeAfter a multi-day freeze triggered by a wave of spam messages, officials confirmed late Thursday that Oregon government emails could once again reach the public—and described the attack as part of a sophisticated scheme.
12h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Saudis say 12,000 pirating devices seized amid Qatar riftSaudi Arabia has said it has confiscated more than 12,000 pirating devices in the country, after rival Qatar's beIN Media accused broadcasters in the kingdom of bootlegging its World Cup broadcasts.
12h
Live Science

Mars Had a Seriously Crazy Volcanic Past, New Study of 'UFO' Rocks RevealsBizarre rock formation known as Medusae Fossae weren't created by UFOs crash-landing, but rather by massive volcanism on the Red Planet.
12h
The Atlantic

How Do You Know When It's Officially a Trade War?It’s been coming for a while, but a tweet made the threat official (and specific): On Friday, President Trump denounced European duties on American automobiles and said if they were not removed, the U.S. would hit back twice as hard. Based on the Tariffs and Trade Barriers long placed on the U.S. and it great companies and workers by the European Union, if these Tariffs and Barriers are not soon
12h
Popular Science

We might have started kissing to share chewed up food (and other delicious facts about smooching)Science Science for your smoocheroos. Is there anything as swoony as a long kiss? The simple act of pressing your lips to someone else’s can fuel everything from lust to love. But what does science say about…
12h
Viden

Den verdensberømte gorilla Koko er dødKoko kunne tegnsprog, var venner med Robin Williams og elskede killinger, ifølge hendes trænere.
12h
New on MIT Technology Review

A court case over memory chip tech shows why America is so worried about Chinese IP theft[no content]
12h
The Atlantic

What Krauthammer Meant to Conservatives of My GenerationIn 1993, Charles Krauthammer delivered the commencement address at McGill University. Some 20 years earlier, he told the graduates, he had been sitting in the same seats. “What I shall offer you today,” he said, “is a reconnaissance report from a two-decade life expedition into the world beyond McGill College Avenue.” Sardonically likening himself to Marco Polo, Krauthammer said he had returned t
12h
The Atlantic

Photos of the Week: Smoggy Santiago, Miniature Taipei, Mermaid ParadeA watery rescue in Russia, dragon boat racing in China, a soap box derby in France, Hawaiian lava viewed from Earth orbit, a welcome to the summer solstice in the U.K., World Cup celebrations and sadness, International Yoga Day in India, flamingos in Kenya, a boxer dressed as a lion in Germany, and much more.
12h
Inside Science

Water May Not Be the Only Sign of Alien LifeWater May Not Be the Only Sign of Alien Life A new study suggests also looking for "bioessential" elements when searching for alien life. planet.jpg Saturn's moon Enceladus in infrared, green and ultraviolet light. Image credits: Kevin Gill via Flickr Space Friday, June 22, 2018 – 14:00 Charles Q. Choi, Contributor (Inside Science) – When it comes to looking for alien life, scientists mostly focu
12h
Live Science

The 'Perfect' Human Body Is Not What You ThinkWhat makes a so-called perfect body?
13h
Live Science

How Parents and Doctors Can Support Transgender ChildrenThere's a lot of misinformation out there for parents about doctors and gender non-conforming and transgender children. Here's the truth.
13h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

About face: Special collection of papers celebrates research on how the human face formsOur faces can reveal a lot about us, and now scientists are revealing a lot about faces. PLOS Genetics announces a special collection of papers to highlight recent advances in our understanding of how faces form, curated by Seth Weinberg of the University of Pittsburgh, and colleagues. The collection, entitled "Craniofacial genetics: where have we been and where are we going," publishes June 22 an
13h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

When low batteries are a good thingA new study led by Marc Veldhoen, group leader at Instituto de Medicina Molecular João Lobo Antunes (iMM) shows how these cells are kept under control. The work published now in Science Immunology, reveals that the "batteries" of these cells have a different composition that reduces their capacity of producing energy, keeping them in a controlled activated mode.
13h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Low-cost plastic sensors could monitor a range of health conditionsAn international team of researchers have developed a low-cost sensor made from semiconducting plastic that can be used to diagnose or monitor a wide range of health conditions, such as surgical complications or neurodegenerative diseases.
13h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Detecting metabolites at close rangePairing a conjugated polymer with a redox enzyme generates a fast, selective, and sensitive electrochemical biosensor for metabolites.
13h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

California officials call for endangered listing for martenA cat-sized, weasel-like animal whose habitat in forests along California's northern coast is under threat from marijuana cultivation should receive endangered species status, state fish and wildlife officials said.
13h
New on MIT Technology Review

Supreme Court rules police must have a warrant to track your cellphone[no content]
13h
Feed: All Latest

Bill Could Give Californians Unprecedented Control Over DataLawmakers in California have introduced a sweeping privacy bill that could reign in the power of their Silicon Valley neighbors.
13h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Detecting metabolites at close rangeA novel concept for a biosensor of the metabolite lactate combines an electron transporting polymer with lactate oxidase, which is the enzyme that specifically catalyzes the oxidation of lactate. Lactate is associated with critical medical conditions, so its detection is important for healthcare.
13h
The Scientist RSS

World First: Human Case of Keystone Virus IdentifiedA Florida teenager is the first person with a confirmed infection by the mosquito-borne virus.
13h
The Atlantic

The 3 Reasons the U.S. Health-Care System Is the WorstAccording to the Commonwealth Fund, which regularly ranks the health systems of a handful of developed countries, the best countries for health care are the United Kingdom, the Netherlands, and Australia. The lowest performer? The United States, even though it spends the most. “And this is consistent across 20 years,” said the Commonwealth Fund’s president, David Blumenthal, on Friday at the Aspe
13h
The Atlantic

Fallen Kingdom: Why Won’t Humans Just Leave the Dinosaurs Alone?To the creators of Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom , I offer words of wisdom uttered 25 years ago by the legendary Dr. Ian Malcolm (Jeff Goldblum), a character in both this film and the 1993 original. “You stood on the shoulders of geniuses to accomplish something as fast as you could, and before you even knew what you had, you patented it, and packaged it, and slapped it on a plastic lunchbox, an
13h
Feed: All Latest

Another Failed Silicon Valley Exec Gets a Crypto ProjectAfter mismanaging digital-payments company Clinkle, Lucas Duplan has resurfaced with a venture fund of his own.
13h
Popular Science

Finding Qianlong III: China's New UnderWater DronesEastern Arsenal Finding Nemo/Cars Crossover China's clown fish like underwater drone isn't for kids' movies, but for deep sea science- and maybe submarine hunting.
13h
New Scientist – News

Physics of knitting shows why your sweater is so nice and comfyThe spacing of stitches in knitted fabrics lets friction cascade through the material, which allows it to stretch without the yarn getting any longer
13h
New on MIT Technology Review

The citizen scientist who finds killers from her couchHow CeCe Moore is using her genetic knowledge to expose murderers.
13h
Scientific American Content: Global

Oil and Gas Facilities Leak More Methane than Previously ThoughtPlugging those leaks would be a cost-effective way to slow the rate of warming, experts say — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
13h
Big Think

Philosophy shrugged: ignoring Ayn Rand won’t make her go awayAyn Rand champions self-sufficiency, attacks altruism, demonizes public servants, and vilifies government regulations because they hinder individual freedom. Read More
14h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Paris slams brakes on electric car-sharing schemeThe city of Paris is pulling the plug on an electric car-sharing system once hailed as the future of urban transport, with officials voting to cancel the contract in the face of mounting losses.
14h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

GM to build new SUV in MexicoGeneral Motors confirmed Friday that it will produce a new sport-utility model in Mexico, despite President Donald Trump's efforts to pressure US companies to add manufacturing at home.
14h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Justices adopt digital-age privacy rules to track cellphonesPolice generally need a warrant to look at records that reveal where cellphone users have been, the Supreme Court ruled Friday in a big victory for privacy interests in the digital age.
14h
Science | The Guardian

'Irish giant' may finally get respectful burial after 200 years on displaySkeleton of Charles Byrne, who had gigantism, could now be buried at sea in accordance with his final wishes The “Irish giant”, a centrepiece of the Hunterian anatomical museum in London, could be released to allow the remains to be given a respectful burial after more than two centuries on display. The skeleton is that of Charles Byrne , an 18th-century man who had a genetic form of gigantism th
14h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Federal study: Chemicals toxic at levels EPA thought safeThe chemicals used by a West Virginia factory to make non-stick products are dangerous at levels the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency had thought were safe, according to a federal study that had been previously blocked from publication.
14h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

First step to lasting wheat healthSubstantial reductions in a deadly root disease of wheat crops and corresponding increases in yields of grain and straw mark a significant advance in the continuing war to protect the staple cereal from the ravages of the take-all soil pathogen, to which it is highly susceptible.
14h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

GA4GH streaming API htsget a bridge to the future for modern genomic data processingThe Large Scale Genomics Work Stream of the Global Alliance for Genomics and Health (GA4GH) has announced eight new implementations of its htsget protocol, a standard released in October 2017 for accessing large-scale genomic sequencing data online without using file transfers. The protocol and interoperability testing are reported in a paper released online this week in the journal Bioinformatics
14h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Research team uncovers lost images from the 19th centuryArt curators will be able to recover images on daguerreotypes, the earliest form of photography that used silver plates, after a team of scientists led by Western University learned how to use light to see through degradation that has occurred over time.
14h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Men tolerate stress incontinence years before seeking helpMen often tolerate stress urinary incontinence for more than two years before seeking medical help — and one-third put up with it for more than five years, making it important for doctors to check for this problem, a new study from UT Southwestern researchers advises.
14h
The Scientist RSS

Trump Admin Restricts Federal Scientists Talking with ReportersUSGS researchers must get approval from the Department of the Interior before speaking to the media.
14h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Video: Hydrangeas, the strange color-changing flowersSavvy gardeners know that they can adjust the color of hydrangea blossoms between pink and blue by altering the pH of the soil. But pH isn't the entire story.
14h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Using tree-fall patterns to calculate tornado wind speedDaniel M. Rhee, a PhD student at University of Illinois specializing in Structures in Civil Engineering, focuses his research on modeling tornadoes and near-surface wind speeds using tree-fall and damage patterns. With this method, Rhee and his research advisor, Franklin T. Lombardo, estimated the near-surface wind speeds of an actual tornado event in Naplate, IL. Rhee will present this research a
14h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

GA4GH streaming API htsget a bridge to the future for modern genomic data processingIn a paper in the journal Bioinformatics released on June 20, the Large Scale Genomics Work Stream announced six new implementations of its htsget protocol for streaming genomic without using file transfers.
14h
Popular Science

Five rad and random playing cards I found this weekGadgets The end-of-week dispatch from PopSci's commerce editor. Vol. 48. My job is to find cool stuff. Throughout the week I spend hours scouring the web for things that are ingenious or clever or ridiculously cheap. Often times, these…
14h
Feed: All Latest

Carpenter v. United States Decision Strengthens Digital PrivacyThanks to Carpenter v. United States, the government will now generally need a warrant to obtain your cell site location information.
14h
NYT > Science

Family Separation: It’s a Problem for U.S. Citizens, TooThe police, prosecutors and child welfare agencies split children from their parents every day.
14h
Big Think

Study: Herpes viruses common in brains with Alzheimer’s diseaseScientists have long known of an association between Alzheimer’s disease and viruses, but whether that link is meaningful has been a mystery for decades. A new study published in the journal Neuron sheds light on the connection, suggesting that certain types of herpes viruses in the brain … Read More
14h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Dynamic modeling helps predict the behaviors of gut microbesA new study provides a platform for predicting how microbial gut communities work and represents a first step toward understanding how to manipulate the properties of the gut ecosystem. This could allow scientists to, for example, design a probiotic that persists in the gut or tailor a diet to positively influence human health.
15h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

First step to lasting wheat healthSubstantial reductions in a deadly root disease of wheat crops and corresponding increases in yields of grain and straw mark a significant advance in the continuing war to protect the staple cereal from the ravages of the take-all soil pathogen. Researchers have now shown that careful selection of the variety of the first wheat in a new cropping cycle can reduce the disease's severity and increase
15h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

'Stealth' material hides hot objects from infrared eyesInfrared cameras are the heat-sensing eyes that help drones find their targets even in the dead of night or through heavy fog. Hiding from such detectors could become much easier, thanks to a new cloaking material that renders objects — and people — practically invisible.
15h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Collaborative model for post-disaster behavioral health recovery may serve as standardFaculty in LSU Health New Orleans schools of Medicine and Public Health and colleagues report that a collaborative effort to build capacity to address behavioral health and promote community resilience after the 2016 Great Flood in Baton Rouge, LA successfully expanded local behavioral health services delivery capacity and that the model may be useful to other disaster-struck communities.
15h
The Atlantic

It’s Not the HolocaustThe Trump administration’s policy of separating children from their parents brought a flood of comparisons to the Holocaust. Some described the facilities used to hold the children as “concentration camps.” ICE officials have been called Nazis . President Trump and those around him have been described as Hitler and kapos. Former CIA Director Michael Hayden posted a picture of the entrance to Birk
15h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

An emerging drug discovery approach to combat cancerThis review paper will cover recent advances in the development of chemotherapeutic agents against several metabolic targets for cancer therapy, including glucose transporters, hexokinase, pyruvate kinase M2, glutaminase, and isocitrate dehydrogenase.
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Blog » Languages » English

Eyewire Cup HuntThe Eyewire Cup is getting closer! But first let’s do an exercise in merger finding with a good old fashioned Hunt. If you’re looking for a promo to Scout or Scythe after this competition, the Hunt is a good place to test out your skills! The Hunt goes from 12:01 AM ET on 6/23 to 12:00 PM ET on 6/28 . There are 12 mergers in the Hunt cell. You have 24 guesses to catch ’em all! How to identify and
15h
The Atlantic

Schrödinger’s CoatIt started, as controversies so often will, with fast fashion. On Thursday, as Melania Trump made a hastily planned trip to McAllen, Texas, to visit migrant children being kept in a holding facility at the Mexican–American border, she donned an olive-green anorak, gathered at the waist, that was printed on the back with the following words, seemingly painted in white: “I REALLY DON’T CARE, DO U?”
15h
The Atlantic

But, Seriously, Where Are the Aliens?Enrico Fermi was an architect of the atomic bomb, a father of radioactivity research, and a Nobel Prize–winning scientist who contributed to breakthroughs in quantum mechanics and theoretical physics. But in the popular imagination, his name is most commonly associated with one simple, three-word question, originally meant as a throwaway joke to amuse a group of scientists discussing UFOs at the
15h
The Atlantic

Transitioning on YouTubeWhen Mary first stumbled upon Miles McKenna’s YouTube channel via a search for the platform’s LGBT tag, she was 12 years old and had never heard of a woman identifying as gay before. She was raised in a very conservative Catholic environment, and “being anything other than a straight, cisgender female was never really presented to me as an option,” Mary, now 16, said via Instagram direct message.
15h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Overdose risk quintuples with opioid and benzodiazepine useIn the first 90 days of concurrent opioid and benzodiazepine use, the risk of opioid-related overdose increases five-fold compared to opioid-only use among Medicare recipients, according to a new study from the University of Pittsburgh School of Pharmacy.
16h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Health insurance plans may be fueling opioid epidemicHealth care insurers including Medicare, Medicaid and major private insurers have not done enough to combat the opioid epidemic, suggests a study led by researchers at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health.
16h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

What are insurance coverage policies for drug treatments for low back pain?An analysis of prescription drug coverage policies for the treatment of low back pain suggests insurers could help to reduce opioid overuse by expanding access to opioid alternatives through coverage and reimbursement policies.
16h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

How are chronic opioid use, 2016 presidential voting patterns associated?An analysis of Medicare claims data suggests chronic opioid use in US counties corresponded with support for Republican Donald Trump in the 2016 presidential election, with much of the correlation explained by socioeconomic factors.
16h
Popular Science

These 1950s experiments showed us the trauma of parent-child separation. Now experts say they're too unethical to repeat—even on monkeys.Science A childhood without affection can be devastating, even if basic needs are met. Harlow’s monkey experiments proved a pivotal turning point in animal research, scientific ethics, and our understanding of primate attachment.
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Ingeniøren

Nye EU-studier skyder omstridt professors rottestudier nedTre europæiske studier har set på, om den omdiskuterede franske molekylærbiolog Séralini har ret i, at der er risiko for kræft forbundet med brug af Roundup og Roundup-tolerante afgrøder over længere tid. Svaret fra dem er nej.
16h
TED Talks Daily (SD video)

The nightmare videos of children's YouTube — and what's wrong with the internet today | James BridleWriter and artist James Bridle uncovers a dark, strange corner of the internet, where unknown people or groups on YouTube hack the brains of young children in return for advertising revenue. From "surprise egg" reveals and the "Finger Family Song" to algorithmically created mashups of familiar cartoon characters in violent situations, these videos exploit and terrify young minds — and they tell u
16h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Biorenewable, biodegradable plastic alternative synthesized by CSU chemistsColorado State University polymer chemists have taken another step toward a future of high-performance, biorenewable, biodegradable plastics. Publishing in Nature Communications, the team led by Professor of Chemistry Eugene Chen describes chemical synthesis of a polymer called bacterial poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) – or P3HB. The compound shows early promise as a substitute for petroleum plastics in
16h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Western-led research team uncovers lost images from the 19th centuryArt curators will be able to recover images on daguerreotypes, the earliest form of photography that used silver plates, after a team of scientists led by Western University learned how to use light to see through degradation that has occurred over time.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Scientists discover how antiviral gene worksIt's been known for years that humans and other mammals possess an antiviral gene called RSAD2 that prevents a remarkable range of viruses from multiplying. Now, researchers at Albert Einstein College of Medicine, part of Montefiore, have discovered the secret to the gene's success: The enzyme it codes for generates a compound that stops viruses from replicating. The newly discovered compound, des
16h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Challenging our understanding of how platelets are madeCorrelative light-electron microscopy is being used to increase our knowledge of how platelets are made in the body and the results are challenging previously held understandings.
16h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Blood test predicts spastic cerebral palsyResearchers at Nemours and the University of Delaware have developed a blood test predictive of spastic cerebral palsy. Their study, published in BMC Bioinformatics, showed that DNA patterns in circulating blood cells can be used to help identify spastic CP patients (Crowgey et al.). New and better ways to identify infants with CP are needed so that interventions can start earlier for more childre
16h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

New social services for the elderly in modern Russian non-state social workA team of Lobachevsky University researchers led by Professor Zaretkhan Saralieva is exploring the potential of social services for the elderly by public and religious organizations of modern Russia. Their work is focused on the transformation of social work with the elderly during the last four years in the context of contractual relations in social services and participation of socially-oriented
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Futurity.org

Will Trump’s executive order change things at Mexican border?US Attorney General Jeff Sessions recently announced changes to asylum requirements, leading to thousands of asylum seekers being charged with federal crimes and imprisoned—their children detained separately. Here, Jayashri Srikantiah, a professor of law and director of the Immigrants’ Rights Clinic at Stanford University, and Lisa Weismann-Ward, clinical supervising attorney and lecturer in law
16h
Big Think

85% of the world’s 1 billion guns are in civilian handsA trio of new reports by the Small Arms Survey finds that 85% of the world’s one billion guns are in the hands of its citizens who far outgun the militaries and police responsible for their protection. Read More
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New on MIT Technology Review

This is how many people we’d have to send to Proxima Centauri to make sure someone actually arrivesSince it would take at least 6,300 years to reach the closest star to our sun, enough men and women to produce many genetically healthy generations would need to make the trip.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Decellularized cartilage-based scaffold promotes bone regeneration at fracture siteTo help prevent possible complications such as nonunion at large fracture sites, researchers have developed a cartilage matrix that mimics the early stages of repair and provides the essential structural and biological properties needed by bone-forming cells to divide and grow.
16h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

People with schizophrenia account for more than one in 10 suicide casesA new CAMH and Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences study shows that people with schizophrenia account for more than one in 10 cases of suicide in Ontario, and that young people are disproportionately affected.People with schizophrenia also had more contact with the health care system, pointing to an opportunity to intervene. The researchers emphasize the need for early suicide risk assessme
16h
Ingeniøren

Regionerne: Vi skal arbejde mere målrettet med jordrensningTil efteråret vil en mere præcis kortlægning af jordforureningen i Danmark gøre det nemmere at prioritere indsatsen. Men samtidig forventer Danske Regioner markant flere penge.
16h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Self-assembled energetic coordination polymers based on multidentate pentazole cyclo-N5-In this work, guanidine cation CN3H6+ and 3-amino-1,2,4-triazole C2H4N4 were crystallized into NaN5 and two novel energetic coordination polymers (CPs), (NaN5)5[(CH6N3)N5](N5)3- and (NaN5)2(C2H4N4) were prepared respectively via a self-assembly process. The decomposition temperatures of both polymers increase to 118.4 and 126.5°C respectively. Moreover, no crystallized H2O was generated in product
17h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Superconducting vortices quantize ordinary metalRussian researchers together with their French colleagues discovered that a genuine feature of superconductors — quantum Abrikosov vortices of supercurrent — can also exist in an ordinary nonsuperconducting metal put into contact with a superconductor. The observation of these vortices provides direct evidence of induced quantum coherence. These fundamental results enable a better understanding
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

The photoelectric effect in stereoIn the photoelectric effect, a photon ejects an electron from a material. Researchers at ETH have now used attosecond laser pulses to measure the time evolution of this effect in molecules. From their results they can deduce the exact location of a photoionization event.
17h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

UMBC researchers report novel method to quickly make therapeutic proteins from human bloodA new paper in Scientific Reports looks at how to extract cellular protein synthesis machinery from human blood, and, by adding recombinant DNA to the extract, to produce therapeutic proteins within two hours.
17h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Origin Quantum Company and LQCC have successfully simulated a 64-qubit circuitOrigin Quantum Company cooperates with the team of Prof. Guang-Can Guo from the CAS Key Laboratory of Quantum Information, USTC (LQCC). They have performed a 64-qubit circuit simulation, and even revealed the possibility of a 72-qubit circuit simulation.
17h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Important step towards a computer model that predicts the outcome of eye diseasesUnderstanding how the retina transforms images into signals that the brain can interpret would not only result in insights into brain computations, but could also be useful for medicine. As machine learning and artificial intelligence develop, eye diseases will soon be described in terms of the perturbations of computations performed by the retina. A newly developed model of the retina can predict
17h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

New evidence brief shows long-term effects of child-family separationParent-child separation has long-term effects on child well-being, even if there is subsequent reunification. After being separated, reunited children can experience lasting difficulty with emotional attachment to their parents, self-esteem, and physical and psychological health, according to a new brief released by the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). The brief, written by schola
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Futurity.org

Tiny device forces us to rethink ‘What is a computer’?Researchers have developed a computer device that measures just 0.3 mm to a side—dwarfed by a grain of rice. IBM’s announcement that they had produced the world’s smallest computer back in March raised a few eyebrows at the University of Michigan, home of the previous champion of tiny computing. “We are not sure if they should be called computers or not. It’s more of a matter of opinion whether t
17h
New Scientist – News

Cannabis oil: what is it and does it really work as medicine?The UK government is reviewing medicinal cannabis after two boys with severe epilepsy were withheld cannabis oil treatments. Here's everything you need to know
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Ingeniøren

Video: Kæmpeblæser skal tørre defekt fjernvarmelagerLageret skulle gemme på solvarmen. Men den siver ud, og nu skal låget tørres.
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The Mystics Seeking Eternal Life Through Liquid NitrogenPhotographer Giuseppe Nucci documents cosmists, transhumanists, and cryonicists in Russia.
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Science : NPR

Emails Raise Questions About Interior Secretary Zinke's Link With Oil ExecutiveCongressional Democrats and a public watchdog group are calling for an ethics investigation into the secretary over a land deal between Zinke's family foundation and oil and gas company Halliburton. (Image credit: Alex Wong/Getty Images)
17h
The Atlantic

The Wisdom of Going Back to School in RetirementNot a lot of artwork covered the walls of the historian Nell Painter’s childhood home, but the art that did was political. The work of Charles White and Elizabeth Catlett, both African American artists concerned with black subjects, lurked in the background of Painter’s life as a child. Her family was not an art family—her mother worked in education, and later wrote books, and her father worked a
17h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Sex, drugs, and heart failureHeart failure is almost as common in women as men, but its characteristics vary by sex. A new review summarizes the current state of sex-sensitive issues related to heart failure drugs included in treatment guidelines, and suggests future directions for improved care.
17h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Miniature testing of drug pairs on tumor biopsiesCombinations of cancer drugs can be quickly and cheaply tested on tumour cells using a novel device developed by EMBL scientists. The research, reported in Nature Communications on June 22, marks the latest advancement in the field of personalised medicine.
17h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Starving fungi could save millions of lives each yearResearchers have identified a potentially new approach to treating lethal fungal infections that claim more than 1.6 million lives each year: starving the fungi of key nutrients, preventing their growth and spread.
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Latest Headlines | Science News

What is it about hogweed — and lemons and limes — that can cause burns?Some plants have compounds that, after exposure to sunlight, produce streaky or spotty burns.
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Science : NPR

Laws That Criminalize Spread Of Infectious Diseases Can Increase Their StigmaAbout a dozen states have added hepatitis C to the list of medical conditions for which people can face criminal prosecution if they knowingly engage in activities that could spread the disease. (Image credit: James Cavallini/Science Source)
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Scientific American Content: Global

Why Our Brains See the World as "Us" Versus "Them"Is there something in our neural circuits that leads us to find comfort in those like us and unease with those who may differ? — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
17h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Problem solved—Internet of Things with SDN network scalabilityA fresh blueprint outlining how to rebuild the Internet to make it super slick at handling rising traffic from new technologies has been unveiled by scientists.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

EU lawmakers miffed over new Facebook snubEuropean Union lawmakers are unhappy that Facebook is refusing to comply with their request to send two senior officials to testify at a hearing into the Cambridge Analytica data scandal.
17h
Dagens Medicin

Regionsrådsmedlem rystet over nye tal for omkostninger af SundhedsplatformenRegionsrådsmedlem Jacob Rosenberg (LA) er rystet over, at det ifølge en ny redegørelse koster 450 årsværk at holde Sundhedsplatformen kørende.
17h
Popular Science

Our love of palm oil is destroying forests. Here's how to use less of it.DIY Cut down on deforestation. Palm oil turns up in everything from processed foods to cosmetics to biofuel. But the farms that grow this ubiquitous ingredient are destroying the rainforest. Here's…
17h
Live Science

Here's What Killed 13 Bald Eagles … and Their Raccoon DinnerWildlife experts have partially solved a murder mystery regarding the deaths of 13 bald eagles, but they still don't know who did it.
17h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Mosquito-borne diseases in Europe: Containment strategy depends on when the alarm sets offNew research based on the Italian experience with outbreaks of Chikungunya, a disease borne by the tiger mosquito, in 2007 and 2017, shows that different vector control strategies are needed, depending on the time when the first cases are notified, 'thus providing useful indications supporting urgent decision-making of public health authorities in response to emerging mosquito-borne epidemics', Bo
17h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Rapid and efficient oil-water separation achieved by newly-developed particlesRecently, researchers from the Technical Institute of Physics and Chemistry have developed an emulsion interfacial polymerization approach to synthesize anisotropic Janus particles with controllable topological and chemical anisotropy. This method can also be expanded to large-area fabrication of two-dimensional Janus film actuators.
17h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Physical exercise improves the life quality of those living in care homes for the elderlyAn exercise programme adapted to the capabilities of each person has shown how effective it is in improving the physical as well as mental health of elderly people who live in residential care homes. The UPV/EHU's Ageing-On research group, responsible for developing it, has prepared a strategy to be able to spread its application not just across care homes.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Five groups get $250,000 to research Florida lionfish removalFlorida wildlife officials are awarding $250,000 to five organizations to research new ways to remove invasive lionfish from deep-water habitats.
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NYT > Science

The New Old Age: Breathing Tubes Fail to Save Many Older PatientsOne-third of patients over age 65 die in the hospital after they are put on ventilators. Doctors are beginning to wonder if the procedure should be used so often.
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NYT > Science

Can a DNA Database Save the Trees? These Scientists Hope SoThey hope to fight the thriving black markets for illegally logged timber.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Chinese island eyes oasis from web censorship for foreignersChina's Hainan island has proposed allowing foreign visitors access to censored websites such as YouTube and Facebook, a double standard that has raised cries of indignation from the country's internet users.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

African wild dogs make comeback at Mozambican wildlife parkThe African wild dogs are back.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

How community structure affects the resilience of a networkNetwork theory is a method for analyzing the connections between nodes in a system. One of the most compelling aspects of network theory is that discoveries related to one field, such as cellular biology, can be abstracted to a form that applies directly to a completely different field, like interstate traffic patterns. The most well-known application of network theory is social networking. In a s
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Image: Lake HuronThe Copernicus Sentinel-2A satellite takes us over Lake Huron, the second largest of the five Great Lakes of North America. Bound on the north and east by the Canadian province of Ontario and on the south and west by the state of Michigan in the U.S., Lake Huron was the first of the Great Lakes to be seen by Europeans in 1615.
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Science : NPR

Finding The Lost World: Can Scientists Bring Back Dinosaurs?We're won't be so preoccupied asking whether we could that we'll forget to ask whether we should. (Image credit: TOLGA AKMEN/AFP/Getty Images)
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

What can natural disasters teach the world?Historians from Murdoch University have joined a global study that will shed light on how to better deal with the prediction and aftermath of environmental disasters in the Indian Ocean region, including tsunamis, volcanic eruptions and earthquakes.
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The Atlantic

Beyoncé and Jay-Z’s New Vision of Gender in ‘Apeshit’“The strongest thing a man can do is cry, to expose your feelings, to be vulnerable in front of the world,” Jay-Z told The New York Times after releasing his confessional record 4:44 in 2017. “You feel like you have to be this guarded person. That’s not real. It’s fake.” Just a year earlier, Beyoncé went on her own public journey in her album Lemonade , not solely to reckon with her husband’s inf
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New Scientist – News

Why is the UK running out of CO2 and what will it mean?UK beer, fizzy drinks and meat producers have all warned of CO2 shortages disrupting supplies and have called on the government to act. So what's going on, and how bad is it?
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Permanently clean drinking water for people in slumsSolving problems in an interdisciplinary and humanitarian manner: TU Darmstadt and the German Aerospace Centre are developing a sustainable system for supplying water to slum areas that is based on satellite data.
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Ingeniøren

Fisk fra Stillehavet: Sportsfiskere melder havbrug til politietFritidsfiskere kulegravede selv sag om ulovligt opdrættede laks. Danmarks Sportsfiskerforbund har mistet tilliden til miljømyndighederne.
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A Plea for AI That Serves Humanity Instead of Replacing ItA new group formed by MIT's Media Lab and IEEE thinks artificial intelligence should complement human endeavors, not just serve the corporate bottom line
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Hayley Kiyoko, Troye Sivan, and the New Age of Queer PopThe next generation of LGBTQ pop artists knows what it stands for. And when you’re producing songs people have been waiting a long time to hear, word spreads fast.
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Pain Is Weird. Making Bionic Arms Feel Pain Is Even WeirderResearchers get a robotic prosthesis to feel pain. But is that something amputees would even want?
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Digitalisation meets the Middle AgesSmartphones and touchscreens could turn museum visits into a digital and multimedia experience. In the months ahead, an example of this can be seen in Admont Abbey in Austria. In a special exhibition, the abbey is presenting fragments of the 'Admonter Abrogans', a Latin-German dictionary from the period of around 800. The cultural treasures have been made accessible through a multi-media presentat
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Photographic processing unlocks more secrets from HMAS AE1 shipwreckAustralia's first submarine, lost at sea for over 100 years, continues to reveal its secret history through advanced 3-D processing techniques of underwater still photography.
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Discovery (uploads) on YouTube

Dominator: Nice Guys Don't Always Finish Last | Street Outlaws: Crash CourseHe's one of the few OKC OG racers that's never cracked the Top 2, but we love him anyway. Learn why Dominator is a fan favorite and an all-around good guy to have on your side. Full episodes streaming now on DiscoveryGO: https://discovery.com/tv-shows/street-outlaws/ Binge watch all Street Outlaws: Crash Course now! https://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/street-outlaws-crash-course/ Subscribe to Disc
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Futurity.org

Whirlpools are hot spots for great white sharksMarine biologists studying the movements of adult female white sharks in the Gulf Stream and North Atlantic Ocean have discovered, to their surprise, that they prefer warm-water eddies—the clockwise-spinning whirlpools in the ocean. “We’ve decimated some open-ocean shark populations to a fraction of what they were 100 years ago. And yet we don’t know the basics of their biology,” says lead author
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Science : NPR

Food Aid To Puerto Rico Is Salty, Sugary, And Unbalanced, Researcher SaysA professor of public health found boxes filled with sugary or high-sodium snacks was sent to people in need of meals after Hurricane Maria, and says food aid needs to be more nutritious. (Image credit: Mario Tama/Getty Images)
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The Scientist RSS

Image of the Day: Ray of LightThe discovery of the world's first known manta ray nursery will offer a glimpse into the animals' juvenile stage.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

New model predicts that we're probably the only advanced civilization in the observable universeThe Fermi Paradox remains a stumbling block when it comes to the search for extra-terrestrial intelligence (SETI). Named in honor of the famed physicist Enrico Fermi who first proposed it, this paradox addresses the apparent disparity between the expected probability that intelligent life is plentiful in the universe, and the apparent lack of evidence of extra-terrestrial intelligence (ETI).
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

European eels found to suffer muscle damage due to cocaine in the waterA team of researchers from the University of Naples Federico II and the University of Salerno has found that eels exposed to very small amounts of cocaine in the water suffer health problems. In their paper published in Science of The Total Environment, the group describes their study of the eels and what they found.
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Dagens Medicin

Forbedringer på trods af djøfferneSteffen Jacobsens nyeste bog er helt igennem sand – sundhedssystemet er sygt.
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Dagens Medicin

Scleroselæge: Nej til sclerosemiddel har betydning for unge sclerosepatienterOverlæge fra Rigshospitalets Sclerosecenter mener, at Medicinrådets ‘nej’ til Ocrevus betyder, at yngre patienter med primær progressiv sclerose går glip af optimal behandling.
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Dagens Medicin

Det fine hospital og de forkerte patienterEn historie om fornemme patienter, KBU-læger, hverdag og festtaler – og om prügelknabe-afdelingen
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Feeding frenzy—public accuse the media of deliberately fuelling shark fearAre you scared of sharks? If you never read or watched the news, would you still be?
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Chemists report biorenewable, biodegradable plastic alternativeColorado State University polymer chemists have taken another step toward a future of high-performance, biorenewable, biodegradable plastics.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Researchers make advances with new automated driving algorithmA self-driving vehicle has to detect objects, track them over time, and predict where they will be in the future in order to plan a safe manoeuvre. These tasks are typically trained independently from one another, which could result in disasters should any one task fail.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

The risky business of government-run pipelinesWhen the Canadian government announced its acquisition of Kinder Morgan's ownership interest in the Trans Mountain pipeline expansion, it did more than commit the country to the controversial project.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Wildlife death match—ants versus termitesAnts and termites are at war, and it's not the strongest one who wins, but the fastest.
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Futurity.org

How managers can spark, not squelch, our motivationDoes your boss empower you to make your own decisions? Or are you stuck with a micro-manager? New research from Gavin R. Slemp and Lara H. Mossman at the University of Melbourne identifies the best ways for bosses to foster motivation—and it’s not through overseeing every little thing. Here, Slemp and Mossman offer practical tips resulting from their study in the journal Motivation and Emotion :
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Repurposing promising cancer drugs may lead to a new approach to treating TBPromising experimental cancer chemotherapy drugs may help knock out another life-threatening disease: tuberculosis (TB). A new study published by scientists at Texas Biomedical Research Institute in San Antonio pinpoints a mechanism in regulating cell death called apoptosis that is a potential new target for helping to control the bacterial infection (Mycobacterium tuberculosis or M.tb) that cause
19h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Yellowstone's 'landscape of fear' not so scary after allAfter wolves were reintroduced to Yellowstone National Park in the mid-1990s, some scientists thought the large predator reestablished a 'landscape of fear' that caused elk, the wolf's main prey, to avoid risky places where wolves killed them. But according to findings from Michel Kohl and Dan MacNulty, Yellowstone's 'landscape of fear' is not as scary as first thought.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Doomsaying about new technology helps make it betterThat new technologies could actually be bad for us, by sapping our attention or ruining our memories, is an argument that goes back to Socrates. It's tempting to summarily dismiss these concerns, but such tech-doomsaying is actually an important part of economic discovery.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

South-East Queensland is droughtier and floodier than we thoughtNew data recording the past 1,500 years of flows in the Brisbane River have revealed that South-East Queensland's climate – once assumed to be largely stable – is in fact highly variable.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Better, faster wireless communication on the horizon for mobile device usersAn EU initiative shows promising developments towards improved wireless connectivity between networks and users.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Seniors will soon outnumber children, but the U.S. isn't readyThe population of the United States is not as young as it used to be, and the year 2035 represents a major demographic turning point.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Research conducted to obtain glass-ceramic materials from abandoned mine wasteResearch shows that abandoned mine waste can be transformed into glass-ceramic materials, and at a cheaper cost compared to traditional composite materials. This waste, located in open-air tanks, could be used to cover facades or as flooring for areas with high usage levels, such as supermarkets.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Combating hunger with artificial intelligenceIn order to improve world food conditions, a team around computer science professor Kristian Kersting was inspired by the technology behind Google News.
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Popular Science

Weather got you down? The entire planet of Mars is buried in a dust storm right now.Space But that's not too weird for the red planet. Mars is no stranger to dust storms, but this one isn’t a run-of-the-mill tempest. It’s far more gargantuan. In fact, it's happening worldwide.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Polar ice may be softer than previously thoughtIce is a material that can flow like a very viscous liquid. In the polar ice sheets, it flows towards the oceans under its own weight. Knowing how fast the ice flows is of crucial importance to predict future sea level rises, particularly under changing climate conditions. Professor Paul Bons and Junior Professor Ilka Weikusat from the University of Tübingen's Geosciences Department, working with
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Extraordinary hydrothermal vent discovery in the mid-Atlantic oceanAn international team of scientists has discovered a new hydrothermal field near the Gigante Seamount in the Azores, a rare finding they are very excited about. The team, including scientists from the EU Horizon 2020-funded project ATLAS, have been surveying the largely untouched seas of the Azores, an archipelago in the mid-Atlantic which harbours some of the most important deep-sea ecosystems in
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Receptor networks underpin plant immunityFresh insights into plant immunity amount to a new field of discovery that could advance the next generation of disease-resistant crops.
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Ingeniøren

Ugen med energi: Geotermisk satsning og EU-aftale om energieffektivitetA.P. Møller Holding vil bruge boreerfaringen til geotermi. Mens EU lander energiaftaler på stribe, venter vi stadig på et dansk energiforlig.
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It's Business Time for Rocket Lab, Launcher of Small SatellitesThe question now is: Can it loft its rockets inside the newly opened launch window, or will it stay on the launch pad for ever and ever and ever?
19h
Feed: All Latest

6 Best Cold Brew Coffee Makers (2018)Learn how to make fantastic cold brew with our picks for the best cold brew coffee makers, best cold brew coffee grounds, and our advice.
19h
Live Science

Some Paranormal Experiences May Be Explained by Sleep Paralysis, Exploding Head SyndromeIf you believe in the paranormal you might not be surprised if you hear stories of deceased loved ones appearing during the night, huge explosions heard just as someone is drifting off with no obvious cause, and other peculiar occurrences.
19h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Driverless cars offer new forms of control – no wonder governments are keenImagine a state-of-the-art driverless car is zipping along a road with a disabled 90-year-old-passenger. A young mother with a toddler steps into the road. The car must make a decision: drive into the mother and child and kill them, or career into a wall and kill the passenger.
19h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Data ethics is more than just what we do with data, it's also about who's doing itIf the recent Cambridge Analytica data scandal has taught us anything, it's that the ethical cultures of our largest tech firms need tougher scrutiny.
19h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

CryoEM study captures opioid signaling in the actOpioid drugs like morphine and fentanyl are a mainstay of modern pain medicine. But they also cause constipation, are highly addictive, and can lead to fatal respiratory failure if taken at too high a dose. Scientists have long sought to develop new opioid drugs that can drive away pain without these dangerous side effects, but holes in our understanding of exactly how opioids exert their various
19h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Yellowstone's 'landscape of fear' not so scary after allAfter wolves were reintroduced to Yellowstone National Park in the mid-1990s, some scientists thought the large predator reestablished a 'landscape of fear' that caused elk, the wolf's main prey, to avoid risky places where wolves killed them. This fueled the emerging idea that predators affect prey populations and ecosystems not only by eating prey animals, but by scaring them too. But according
19h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Plants have unique lock to control expression of genes, study findsPurdue University scientists have discovered evidence that the repressive structures that plants use to keep genes turned off is built with a potential self-destruct switch. The findings offer insight into ways to control gene expression to alter plants' characteristics.
19h
The Atlantic

Of Course Trump Backed Down on Family SeparationsPresident Trump’s abrupt decision Wednesday to issue an executive order directing that immigrant children be detained with their parents, rather than separated, was surprising for its suddenness, but not for its substance. The president has worked hard to portray himself as a Churchillian rock, a leader who cannot be moved and never gives in. Even the press, which tends to be particularly skeptic
19h
Scientific American Content: Global

Einstein's Greatest Theory Validated on a Galactic ScaleAstronomers have used a pair of galaxies far beyond the Milky Way to test general relativity with unprecedented precision — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
19h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Allowing employees to be self-driven improves performance, study showsManagers who encourage staff to take more control over their workflow by putting them in the driver's seat find themselves with more competent and connected teams with motivated, engaged, high-performing and loyal employees, research by the University of Melbourne shows.
19h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

In old age, efficiency is key to successful parentingOld albatrosses that are more efficient at finding food during migration are more likely to successfully raise young, new research shows.
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BBC News – Science & Environment

Why does India's air look different from space?Europe's Sentinel-5P satellite tracks formaldehyde emissions in the air over the Indian sub-continent.
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BBC News – Science & Environment

How to shop in Birmingham's plastic-free supermarketReusable bags, bottles and containers are the key to success for these buyers in Birmingham.
19h
New Scientist – News

Swarm of robot wildlife will check for life in an Italian lagoonRobotic lily pads, mussels, and a robofish are drifting through the water in a Venetian lagoon, checking oxygen levels and signs of microscopic life
19h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Study: Women's impact on economy undervaluedStatistical agencies and government bodies have significantly undervalued women's contribution to the economy, according to Western researchers.
19h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

NASA, NSF expedition to study ocean carbon embarks in August from SeattleDozens of scientists, as well as underwater drones and other high-tech ocean instruments, will set sail from Seattle in mid-August. Funded by NASA and the National Science Foundation, the team will study the life and death of the small organisms that play a critical role in removing carbon dioxide from the atmosphere, and in the ocean's carbon cycle.
19h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

OMG, the water's warm! NASA study solves glacier puzzleA new NASA study explains why the Tracy and Heilprin glaciers, which flow side by side into Inglefield Gulf in northwest Greenland, are melting at radically different rates.
19h
Futurity.org

These brains cells don’t die, but they do moveScientists have thought for decades that one area of the brain simply disappears during human development. Now, genetic similarities between cells in the subplate and neurons linked to autism suggest a different scenario. In a new paper, researchers demonstrate that subplate neurons survive, and in fact become part of the adult cerebral cortex, a brain area involved in complex cognitive functions
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Dagens Medicin

Forretningsudvalg er indkaldt til ekstraordinært møde om SundhedsplatformenRegion Hovedstadens forretningsudvalg er blevet indkaldt til et ekstraordinært møde, hvor Sundhedsplatformen er på dagsordenen. Flere politikere kritiserer it-systemet og regionsdirektionen.
19h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Dynamic modeling helps predict the behaviors of gut microbesThe human gut is teeming with microbes, each interacting with one another in a mind-boggling network of positive and negative exchanges. Some produce substances that serve as food for other microbes, while others produce toxins—antibiotics—that kill their neighbors.
19h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

New discoveries about a lost ship from Britain's real 'Game of Thrones'A team of maritime historians and archaeologists, led by academics at the University of Bristol, has published compelling new evidence about the remains of the largest and best-preserved late medieval ship ever discovered.
19h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Copernicus 20 years onThis week marks 20 years since the manifesto was signed that gave rise to Europe's Copernicus environmental programme. With seven Sentinel satellites already in orbit delivering terabytes of data every day, Copernicus is the biggest provider of Earth observation data in the world.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Rosetta image archive completeAll high-resolution images and the underpinning data from Rosetta's pioneering mission at Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko are now available in ESA's archives, with the last release including the iconic images of finding lander Philae, and Rosetta's final descent to the comet's surface.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Unconfirmed near-Earth objectsNear-Earth objects (NEOs) are small solar system bodies whose orbits sometimes bring them close to the Earth, potentially threatening a collision. NEOs are tracers of the composition, dynamics and environmental conditions throughout the solar system and of the history of our planetary system. Most meteorites come from NEOs, which are thus one of our key sources of knowledge about the solar system'
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Scientists suggest making electronic devices from 'carbon peas'Scientists from the National Research Nuclear University MEPhI (Russia) have studied the properties of fullerene nanotubes, also known as "carbon peas," during stretching. The article on the project, which will help develop sophisticated nano-electronics, has been published in Diamond and Related Materials.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Understanding how to control 'jumping' genesA team of Texas A&M University and Texas AgriLife Research scientists have made a new discovery of how a single protein, Serrate, plays dual roles in controlling jumping genes.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

New insights into DNA 'melting' reveal chink in bacteria's armourScientists have shed light on DNA 'melting' – a crucial process fundamental to all life.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

The pho­to­elec­tric ef­fect in stereoIn the photoelectric effect, a photon ejects an electron from a material. Researchers at ETH have now used attosecond laser pulses to measure the time evolution of this effect in molecules. From their results they can deduce the exact location of a photoionization event.
19h
Big Think

Pythagoras was a cult leader, Socrates loved to dance + 8 other revelationsPhilosophers often get depicted like sages in ivory towers without a practical or human side. A gossip-filled book from the 3rd century can fix that. Read More
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

New gibbon genus discovered in ancient Chinese tombScientists studying bones excavated from an ancient tomb in Shaanxi Province, central China, have discovered an entirely new but already extinct genus of gibbons.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Lipid metabolism discovered in cell nucleusThe cell nucleus is an organelle, in which the DNA of an organism is protected and duplicated. The nucleus of this organ-like structure in the cell plasma is surrounded by an outer and an inner nuclear envelope, which is penetrated by openings – so-called nuclear pores. The outer nuclear envelope is also connected to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), another organelle. Up until now, scientists assum
19h
BBC News – Science & Environment

Deeply dippyDippy the diplodocus is proving a huge draw on its UK-wide tour. Why are some people so fascinated with dinosaurs?
20h
New Scientist – News

US Army has made a plastic bandage that swells to patch woundsMost soldiers who die from potentially survival wounds suffer from uncontrolled bleeding. The US Army developed a bandage material that can seal wounds faster and more effectively
20h
The Atlantic

Corruption in the Trump Administration Is SpreadingYou’ve got to at least give credit to Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross for finding the silver lining—or the gold one, as it were. It was late October 2017, just days before the so-called Paradise Papers, a tranche of leaked documents, would reveal that when he divested some of his holdings upon taking office, Ross had retained assets in a shipping company enmeshed in Vladimir Putin’s inner circle.
20h
The Atlantic

Nine Inch Nails Enters Its Least Compromising Phase YetIn December 2016, I opened an envelope that arrived in the mail, and a fine black dust—like magnet shavings, or gunpowder, or ground-up malice—poured out onto my countertop. It gunked my fingers, and it to this day contaminates the file drawer where I’ve kept the envelope. This was how Nine Inch Nails delivered the band’s then-new album: as something that might stain you. Three decades into makin
20h
The Atlantic

The New Model for a Health-First Approach to Legalizing WeedRecreational marijuana will no longer be a priority for Canada’s criminal-justice system. This week the Senate passed legislation that will make the country the second in the world to strictly regulate weed—but technically legalize it—beginning in October. The first was Uruguay, so Canada is the first major economy, and an experimental model for the rest of the world that will inform policy for d
20h
The Atlantic

When a Mars Simulation Goes WrongT he drive to the little white dome on the northern slope of Mauna Loa is a bumpy one. Mauna Loa, the “Long Mountain,” is a colossal volcano that covers half of the island of Hawaii. The rocky terrain, rusty brown and deep red, crunches beneath car tires and jostles passengers. Up there, more than 8,000 feet above sea level and many miles away from the sounds of civilization, it doesn’t feel like
20h
New Scientist – News

Japan’s Hayabusa 2 spacecraft is gearing up to bomb an asteroidA Japanese spacecraft is closing in on the tiny asteroid Ryugu, where it will drop off landers and explosively take samples of dust to analyse back on Earth
20h
Ingeniøren

Ansat fik kraftigt stød: Løsningen hedder potentialudligningskablerRenoveringen af Gl. Lillebæltsbro har stået stille siden 29. maj, hvor en entreprenøransat fik et kraftigt stød.
20h
Feed: All Latest

Twitter Users Are Analytical in the Morning, Angsty at NightWhat an analysis of 800 million tweets and 7 billion words published to Twitter between 2010 and 2014, across the 54 largest cities in the UK, reveals (and doesn't) about the British state of mind.
20h
Feed: All Latest

VW's Electrifying Bid to Dominate the Pikes Peak RaceTo conquer the Race to the Clouds, Volkswagen ditched the engine for a pair of batteries and a clever new charging setup.
20h
Feed: All Latest

China Escalates Hacks Against the US as Trade Tensions RiseA hacking truce between China and the US doesn't address government espionage operations, a workaround both countries exploit.
20h
Latest Headlines | Science News

How a squishy clam conquers a rockOld boring clam research is upended after 82 years.
20h
The Atlantic

I Detransitioned. But Not Because I Wasn't Trans.Editor’s Note: This article is part of a series of responses to Jesse Singal’s Atlantic article, “ When Children Say They’re Trans .” I had my first kiss with a boy long before I transitioned. At 17, I knew I was a girl, but also that adults in my life weren’t ready for that. I figured if I couldn’t be a girl, then I might as well fake being a boy who likes boys. It was the winter of 2004. I reme
20h
Scientific American Content: Global

How to Fix Recommendation Bias and Evaluation InflationIt’s rampant in academia, but the U.S. Marine Corps can help — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
20h
New on MIT Technology Review

Rebuilding Germany’s centuries-old vocational programThe Ausbildung is widely touted as an example other countries should follow. But it’s struggling to keep up with technological change.
20h
New Scientist – News

First evidence that gut bacteria help wire young brainsExperiments in mice have shown for the first time that bacteria found in the gut of babies and children seem to play a role in brain development
20h
New Scientist – News

These eerie rock towers may have been built by microorganismsRock “chimneys” twice as tall as a person that tower above a lake in California may have been built, in part, by microorganisms
20h
Scientific American Content: Global

Analysis of a Million-Plus Genomes Points to Blurring Lines among Brain DisordersSchizophrenia shares some genetic variants with several psychiatric conditions—and similar overlaps are seen for personality traits and migraines in a massive study — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
20h
Live Science

The 'Keystone Virus' Had Never Been Seen in People, Until a Florida Teen Caught ItA teenager in Florida is the first person known to be infected with a virus called Keystone virus, which is spread by mosquitoes.
20h
Live Science

Summer Could Trigger Major Earthquakes (It's Not Why You Think)There’s a new theory on what may have triggered the 2014 earthquake that tore through California’s Napa-Sonoma Valley.
21h
The Atlantic

Don’t Blame Trump’s Advisers for TrumpWho can influence President Trump? Since the days of his presidential campaign, Trump-watchers have sought to explain his behavior by identifying whichever adviser influenced him on an issue. Trump’s critics see the president, ill-versed on policy, as an empty vessel for other people’s agendas. Liberals have focused on a rotating cast of Trump advisers as the villain of the moment, settling on wh
21h
The Atlantic

The Republican Party Moves From Family Values to White NationalismSitting in the Cabinet Room on Wednesday, surrounded by a largely white, male group of Republican lawmakers and administration officials, President Trump attempted to defuse a bomb of his own making. “We have compassion, we want to keep families together,” he said as he signed an executive order ending the family separations that commenced at his own administration’s directive. “It’s very importa
21h
New Scientist – News

Why memes are the latest casualty in EU’s war on Silicon ValleyThe European Union is attempting to stand up to the might of Google, Facebook and Twitter with a new copyright law, but it could just kill off memes
21h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

CWI researchers make power grid more reliable with mathematicsResearchers from Centrum Wiskunde & Informatica (CWI), the national research institute for mathematics and computer science in the Netherlands, discovered how large fluctuations in solar and wind energy, combined with the physical network dynamics of electricity, can cause failures in power grids. The mathematical framework developed by the researchers helps to predict the appearance of potential
21h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

When fluid flows almost as fast as light—with quantum rotationQuark-gluon plasma is formed as a result of high-energy collisions of heavy ions. After a collision, for a dozen or so yoctoseconds (10-24 seconds), this most perfect of all known fluids undergoes rapid hydrodynamic expansion with velocities close to the velocity of light. An international team of scientists, associated with the IFJ PAN and the GSI Centre, has presented a new model describing thes
21h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Super-resolution imaging reveals mechanism of GLUT1 clusteringGlucose is the primary source of energy and substrate for cells, and its uptake through the cell plasma membrane is largely dependent on the glucose transport (GLUT) family. GLUT1, one of the GLUT family members, is a ubiquitously expressed membrane protein. It is responsible for the constant uptake of glucose in many tissues.
21h
Latest Headlines | Science News

New studies add evidence to a possible link between Alzheimer’s and herpesvirusResearchers saw higher levels of herpesvirus in the brains of Alzheimer’s patients, which may contribute to plaque formation.
21h
Ingeniøren

Podcast: Damvarmelagre og malerobotKun ét af landets fem damvarmelagre lever op til rådgivernes løfter om et billigt varmelager. Ny byggerobot skal først 3D-printe og siden male en ny udsmykning på tre gavle i Odense­.
21h
Ingeniøren

ANALYSE: Spørgsmålene som skandalen Sundhedsplatformen aldrig vil give svar påIndførelsen af Sundhedsplatformen har været en lang række af inkompetence, ignorance, elendige projektledelse, fortielse over for politikerne og et indsats, der kun gjorde ondt værrre. Læs historien her.
21h
Ingeniøren

Ekspert: EU-lov kan gøre det umuligt at dele nyheder onlineDet er umuligt at vide, hvordan det vil blive implementeret i praksis, men et EU-lovforslag ser ud til at gøre det enten svært eller dyrt at dele indhold online, hvis du ikke selv har skabt det.
21h
Ingeniøren

Forskere frygter ændringer, når Microsoft køber populær udviklingsplatformPlatformen blev brugt til at nedkæmpe ebola. Men vil forskere fortsat bruge den med Microsoft for bordenden?
21h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Sticklebacks infected with parasites influence behavior of healthy fishParasites passed on via the food chain often influence the behaviour of their host to their own benefit. One example of this is the tapeworm Schistocephalus solidus, which makes three-spined sticklebacks behave carelessly. The infected fish venture more often into open waters, making themselves easier prey for piscivorous birds, e.g. kingfishers. This is just what the tapeworm wants, because it re
21h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Chile wants to start taxing companies like Uber and NetflixChile wants to start taxing digital giants like Uber, Spotify and Netflix to level the playing field for their more traditional counterparts, a minister has said.
21h
Dagens Medicin

Region Hovedstaden indgår forlig i sag om Bispebjerg HospitalHovedstaden skal betale 14 mio. kr. i erstatning til arkitektfirmaet C.F. Møller, efter regionen handlede i strid med reglerne ved byggeriet om det nye akuthus på Bispebjerg Hospital.
21h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Discovery of a new vehicle peptide opens up a drug delivery routeIn the field of anticancer therapeutics, cationic antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) have gained prominence because of their cytotoxic and anticancer activity in drug-resistant cancer cells. Peptides are compounds consisting of two or more amino acids linked in a chain.
21h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Printing microelectrode array sensors on gummi candyMicroelectrodes can be used for direct measurement of electrical signals in the brain or heart. These applications require soft materials, however. With existing methods, attaching electrodes to such materials poses significant challenges. A team at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) has now succeeded in printing electrodes directly onto several soft substrates.
21h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Artificial vision enables solar field calibration overnightResearchers have developed a prototype for calibrating an entire solar field in a single night, shaving months off the current calibration system for large size concentrated solar power (CSP) tower plants.
21h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Broken shuttle may interfere with learning in major brain disordersA broken shuttle protein may hinder learning in people with intellectual disability, schizophrenia, or autism.
22h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Research team discovers drug compound that stops cancer cells from spreadingNew research, published in the journal Nature Communications, shows that it may be possible to freeze cancer cells and kill them where they stand.
22h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

What causes the sound of a dripping tap — and how do you stop it?Scientists have solved the riddle behind one of the most recognisable, and annoying, household sounds: the dripping tap. And crucially, they have also identified a simple solution to stop it, which most of us already have in our kitchens.
22h
The Atlantic

Separating Kids From Their Families Can Permanently Damage Their BrainsPresident Trump on Wednesday signed an executive order intended to end the separation of immigrant children from their parents at the border, reversing his own administration’s policy after a national outcry. However, many immigrant children will likely still face great turmoil, beyond the stress of the immigration experience itself. According to the new rules, immigrant families can still be det
22h
Nyheder – Forskning – Videnskab

Professor i motion ny prorektorKøbenhavns Universitets nye prorektor ved, hvordan man ved hjælp af fysisk aktivitet kan…
22h
Ingeniøren

Fjernvarmelager for fuglene: Utætheder sender solvarmen og pengene op i det blåFjernvarmeselskaber, der har investeret i damvarmelagre i håb om at redde økonomien, er strandet i opgør med rådgivere og entreprenører, mens varmen lækker ud gennem våd isolering.
22h
Ingeniøren

Bugatti 3D-printer bremsekaliber i titanium41 procent af vægten barberes af. Men så tager det også printer 45 timer at lave den.
22h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

What causes the sound of a dripping tap—and how do you stop it?Scientists have solved the riddle behind one of the most recognisable, and annoying, household sounds: the dripping tap. And crucially, they have also identified a simple solution to stop it, which most of us already have in our kitchens.
22h
Science | The Guardian

If Labour is really progressive, it will pledge to decriminalise drugs | Michael SegalovYears of DIY-testing the dubious stashes of festival-goers have convinced me that urgent reform is needed to keep people safe While discussion of drugs and drug policy often revolve around facts, figures and complex science, perhaps it’s worth reflecting on what I have witnessed at British music festivals over the past four years. Summer after summer, I arrive in fields across the UK on a mission
22h
Dagens Medicin

Nye kræftpakker sætter fokus livet efter behandlingHele patientforløbet fra udredning til rehabilitering er samlet i nye pakkeforløb for patienter bryst- og lungekræft, mens den faglige information er overladt til de landsdækkende kliniske retningslinjer.
23h
Dagens Medicin

Ny forskning skal kaste lys over produktion af glukagonSteno Diabetes Center Copenhagen indleder stort forskningsprojekt, der skal kortlægge leverens indflydelse på produktionen af glukagon.
23h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Environment the loser in Gabon capital's rush for growth"It's an environmental disaster," said Magloir-Desire Mounganga as he strode across the soggy, spongy soil where mangroves have been ripped up for development near the Gabonese capital Libreville, threatening its fragile ecosystem.
23h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Airbus warns could leave UK if no Brexit dealAviation giant Airbus has warned it could pull out of Britain if it leaves the European Union without a deal, upping the pressure Friday on Prime Minister Theresa May to make progress in negotiations with Brussels.
23h
Ingeniøren

Spørg Scientariet: Er der ingen regler til begrænsning af brande i naturen?En læser vil gerne vide, om der ikke findes brandregler, der skal overholdes for at undgå fx skovbrande, som vi ser dem i Californien. Vi har indhentet svar fra både Danmark og Californien.
23h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Oregon water scare: Algae blooms happening more oftenThe words blasted to cellphones around Salem, Oregon were ominous: "Civil emergency. prepare for action."
23h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Trapped campers, swimming bears in Montana as floods hit USHelicopters rescued people stranded by flooding in Texas and Montana, including 140 children and counselors stuck in a mountain bible camp for two days, as severe storms swept the Rockies and the Midwest.
23h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Normalization of 'plus-size' risks hidden danger of obesity, study findsNew research warns that the normalisation of 'plus-size' body shapes may be leading to an increasing number of people underestimating their weight – undermining efforts to tackle England's ever-growing obesity problem.Analysis of data from almost 23,460 people who are overweight or obese revealed that weight misperception has increased in England. Men and individuals with lower levels of education
1d
Science | The Guardian

Celestial Motion: a virtual dance experience – 360-degree videoAn immersive dance performance in virtual reality, Celestial Motion is inspired by the imagery of solar physics. Choreographed by Alexander Whitley and made in association with Sadler's Wells, the experience features 360-degree filming and motion-capture technology. The dancers are visualised both in human form and as other-worldly digital figures in a cosmic landscape, showcasing the choreograph
1d
Science | The Guardian

Celestial Motion: a virtual dance with the starsIn the Guardian’s new VR 360 film, inspired by solar physics, contemporary dancers from the Alexander Whitley Dance Company explore movement across human and astronomical scales Celestial Motion uses a combination of contemporary dance and motion-capture technology to explore the human relationship with the Sun. The VR piece was made by the Guardian’s in-house VR studio with Alexander Whitley Dan
1d
Science-Based Medicine

Certification in chiropractic techniques: legitimate care or tomfoolery?Chiropractic vertebral subluxation theory breeds a variety of questionable diagnostic and treatment methods. Certification in use of a subluxation-based technique offers no assurance that the technique is effective or scientifically acceptable.
1d
Dagens Medicin

Hektisk politisk efterår i venteSundhedsområdet er sat til at spille en hovedrolle i den kommende tid, efterhånden som folketingsvalget nærmer sig. Samtidig presser flere reformer af sundhedsvæsenet sig på.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

Accurate measurements of sodium intake confirm relationship with mortalityEating foods high in salt is known to contribute to high blood pressure, but does that linear relationship extend to increased risk of cardiovascular disease and death? Recent cohort studies have contested that relationship, but a new study using multiple measurements confirms it.
1d
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

Crisis can force re-evaluation and derail efforts to reach goalsSetbacks are to be expected when pursuing a goal, whether you are trying to lose weight or save money. The challenge is getting back on track and not giving up after a difficulty or crisis, says a marketing professor working on practical ways to help people stick to health-related goals.
1d
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

Coining less expensive currency: Bringing down the cost of making nickelsCashing in on materials science, makes a new nickel for use in the U.S. Mint. The work might be useful for building durable high-tech devices like smartphones, too.
1d
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

Deep data dive helps predict cerebral palsyA pioneering technique developed to analyze genetic activity of Antarctic worms is helping to predict cerebral palsy. The technique uses next-generation genetic sequencing data to measure how cells control the way genes are turned on or off, and can also be used in other human health care research.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

Ketamine acts fast to treat depression and its effects last — but how?Researchers describe the molecular mechanisms behind ketamine's ability to squash depression and keep it at bay.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

US oil & gas methane emissions 60 percent higher than estimatedThe US oil and gas industry emits 13 million metric tons of the potent greenhouse gas methane from its operations each year, 60 percent more than estimated by the US Environmental Protection Agency, according to a new study.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

Six new species of goblin spiders named after famous goblins and browniesA remarkably high diversity of goblin spiders is reported from the Sri Lankan forests. Nine new species are described in a recent paper, where six are named after goblins and brownies from Enid Blyton's children's books. There are now 45 goblin spider species belonging to 13 genera known to inhabit the island country.
1d
Viden

Superforsker får millioner til at undersøge menneskets opførselAarhusianske forskere får 15 millioner kroner til at udvikle computerspil, der skal bruges til videnskabelige formål.
1d
Ingeniøren

Københavnsk markedsplads for salg af smart-city data flopper – nu lukker denCity Data Exchange lukker. Platformen skulle gøre det muligt for virksomheder og kommune at sælge og udveksle data, men Hitachi mistede penge på projektet og måtte trække stikket.
1d
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

Template to create superatoms could make for better batteriesResearchers have discovered a novel strategy for creating superatoms — combinations of atoms that can mimic the properties of more than one group of elements of the periodic table. These superatoms could be used to create new materials, including more efficient batteries and better semiconductors; a core component of microchips, transistors and most computerized devices.
1d
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

Scientists solve the case of the missing subplate, with wide implications for brain scienceA new study shows that a group of neurons, previously thought to die in the course of development, in fact become incorporated into the brain's cortex. This research has implications for understanding — and possibly treating –several brain disorders.
1d
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

Not junk: 'Jumping gene' is critical for early embryoA so-called 'jumping gene' that researchers long considered either genetic junk or a pernicious parasite is actually a critical regulator of the first stages of embryonic development, according to a new study.
1d
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

Cross-species prion adaptation depends on prion replication environmentA hamster prion that replicated under conditions of low RNA levels in mouse brain material resulted in altered disease features when readapted and transmitted back to hamsters, according to new research.
1d
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

How competition and cooperation between bacteria shape antibiotic resistanceNew computational simulations suggest that the effects of antibiotics on a bacterial community depend on whether neighboring species have competitive or cooperative relationships, as well as their spatial arrangement.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

Bogong moths first insect known to use magnetic sense in long-distance nocturnal migrationResearchers reporting in Current Biology on June 21 have found that nocturnal Bogong moths, like migratory birds, depend on the Earth's magnetic field to guide them on their way. The discovery offers the first reliable evidence that nocturnal insects can use the Earth's magnetic field to steer flight during migration, the researchers say.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

Genetic variation in progesterone receptor tied to prematurity riskHumans have unexpectedly high genetic variation in the receptor for a key pregnancy-maintaining hormone, according to research. The finding may help explain why some populations of pregnant women have an elevated risk of premature birth.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

Your brain anatomy may play a role in determining your food choicesOur ability to exercise self-control is linked to our neurobiology.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

Sticklebacks infected with parasites influence behavior of healthy fishCertain types of tapeworm make sticklebacks behave carelessly and thus become easier prey for birds. A team of biologists have now demonstrated for the first time that the tapeworm not only influences the behavior of the infected fish — indirectly, it can also induce risky behavior in other fish in the group.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

Opening up a drug delivery route: Discovery of a new vehicle peptideThe bottleneck of cationic antimicrobial peptides as anticancer therapeutics is their limited ability to penetrate cell membranes. Researchers discovered a cyclic decapeptide (termed peptide 1) that serves as a promising lead compound as a new intracellular delivery vehicle for therapeutically effective peptides. When conjugated with another membrane impermeable proapoptotic domain (PAD) peptide,
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

Fright and flight: Deciding when to escapeHow does your brain decide what to do in a threatening situation? A new article describes a mechanism by which the brain classifies the level of a threat and decides when to escape.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

Transport of lipid-conjugated floxuridine by natural serum albumin for delivery to cancer cellsHow can elimination of therapeutics from the bloodstream or their early enzymatic degradation be avoided in systemic delivery? Scientists have new developed a method to bind an established cancer therapeutic, floxuridine, with natural serum albumin for its transport and delivery to target cancer cells.
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The Guardian's Science Weekly

Gene-edited pigs: can we engineer immunity? – Science Weekly podcastPigs have been rendered immune to a disease that has cost billions. Hannah Devlin questions whether this could be the future of eliminating debilitating and costly viruses in livestock
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Science | The Guardian

Gene-edited pigs: can we engineer immunity? – Science Weekly podcastPigs have been rendered immune to a disease that has cost billions. Hannah Devlin questions whether this could be the future of eliminating debilitating and costly viruses in livestock Subscribe and review on Acast , Apple Podcasts , Soundcloud , Audioboom and Mixcloud . Join the discussion on Facebook and Twitter Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome is the most significant disease affec
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Ingeniøren

Leder: Slut med årtiers nøl – nu skal giften væk[no content]
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Viden

Tyskland vil teste flyvende by-taxierAudis hjemby Ingolstadt skal være forsøgskanin for fremtidens flyvende bytransport.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Inhaled nitric oxide may reduce kidney complications from heart surgeryAdministration of nitric oxide gas during and for 24 hours following heart surgery decreased the risk of patients developing acute and chronic kidney problems, a randomized, controlled trial conducted in China found.
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Scientific American Content: Global

Alaskan Beluga Whales Ace Hearing ExamResearchers tested the hearing of beluga whales in an Alaskan bay and found that they seem to have suffered little hearing loss due to ocean noise. Christopher Intagliata reports. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Science : NPR

Keystone Virus Makes First Known Jump From Mosquitoes To HumansA 16-year-old Florida boy is the first person known to have become infected, researchers say. Symptoms in humans include a rash and mild fever. (Image credit: Alan Diaz/AP)
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Ingeniøren

Solvarmen siver ud af nye fjernvarmelagreOverdækkede kunstige søer skulle være den nye måde at gemme varmen fra solen. Men efter at have brugt 540 mio. kr. på projektet, bliver økonomien væltet af huller i lågene.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Accurate measurements of sodium intake confirm relationship with mortalityEating foods high in salt is known to contribute to high blood pressure, but does that linear relationship extend to increased risk of cardiovascular disease and death? Recent cohort studies have contested that relationship, but a new study published in the International Journal of Epidemiology by investigators from Brigham and Women's Hospital and their colleagues using multiple measurements conf
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NeuWrite San Diego

Apply now for ComSciCon-SD 2018!In many ways, science is like a foreign language. While the technical words that scientists use often mean very little to those not daily immersed in science, science is–at its heart–a logical process of asking questions and searching for answers. This journey of asking and answering does not require any extraordinary intelligence. It instead necessitates […]
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Study suggests bias for sons remains among second-generation women of South Asian descentA preference for male children persists among second-generation mothers of South Asian descent, according to new study that found a skewed ratio of male-to-female babies born to these women in Ontario.
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Feed: All Latest

Massachusetts Welcomes Self-Driving Cars—With a Couple CaveatsThe state's DOT and cities in the Boston area are pioneering a new regulatory regime to encourage testing of this new tech, without letting developers do whatever they like.
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BBC News – Science & Environment

Cyan colour hidden ingredient in sleepAdding or removing the colour cyan can have an impact on sleep, according to biologists.
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Ingeniøren

Bagsiden: Hydrometer til måling af kornstørrelsesfordeling i jordUgens forklaring
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Ingeniøren

Bagsiden: Kemibog for liebhaverUgens foræringstilbud
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Ingeniøren

Bagsiden: Volapyk: Elmålerkommunikation fra RadiusUgens sære påmindelse
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Ingeniøren

Bagsiden: Ugens Juno 004-rapport[no content]
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Feed: All Latest

YouTube Will Let Creators Sell Subscriptions, Merchandise, and MoreThe Alphabet-owned video giant is now offering creators merchandise deals, a $4.99 subscription service for fans, and more ways to monetize.
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Futurity.org

Blood test may offer better heart attack predictionA new blood test improves the prediction of the long-term risk of heart attack in people with severe coronary artery disease. In coronary artery disease, the arteries carrying oxygen-rich blood away from the heart become clogged with fatty plaque. The enzyme ACE2 has been associated with cardiovascular disease for a decade, but researchers have recently found that the higher the level of circulat
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Science : NPR

Mars Dust Storm Now 'Planet-Encircling,' Dimming Hopes For NASA RoverAs the dust storm grows and the solar-paneled Opportunity remains asleep, the younger Curiosity rover has been able to power through. (Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech via AP)
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Futurity.org

How setbacks make us rethink our goalsNew research digs into how setbacks affect the pursuit of our goals, such as weight loss. Setbacks are to be expected when pursuing a goal, whether you’re trying to lose weight or save money. The challenge is getting back on track and not giving up after a difficulty or crisis, says José Rosa, marketing professor in Iowa State University’s Ivy College of Business. “We know it’s hard to get back o
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Futurity.org

Team finds hidden state of matter in superconductive alloyUsing the physics equivalent of strobe photography, researchers have used ultrafast spectroscopy to visualize electrons interacting as a hidden state of matter in a superconductive alloy. It takes intense, single-cycle pulses of photons—flashes—hitting the cooled alloy at terahertz speed—trillions of cycles per second—to switch on this hidden state of matter by modifying quantum interactions down
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Futurity.org

Sodium-based batteries could be great alternative to lithiumNew evidence suggests batteries based on sodium and potassium hold promise as a potential alternative to lithium-based batteries. The growth in battery technology has led to concerns that the world’s supply of lithium, the metal at the heart of many of the new rechargeable batteries, may eventually be depleted. “One of the biggest obstacles for sodium- and potassium-ion batteries has been that th
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The Atlantic

Your Brain on DepressionDepression is a multifaceted and insidious disorder, nearly as complex as the brain itself. As research continues to suggest, the onset of depression can be attributed to an interplay of the many elements that make us human—namely, our genetics, the structure and chemistry of our brains, and our lived experience. Second only, perhaps, to the confounding mechanics of anesthesia , depression is the
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Futurity.org

How 1 ‘super tumor suppressor gene’ shields us from cancerNew research reveals how a so-called “super tumor suppressor gene” known as p53 prevents cancer. In our bodies, we all have genes working hard to prevent cancer. If they don’t do their job properly, rogue cells can mutate and develop into the life-threatening disease. The malfunction of p53 causes at least half of all cancers. When it works, p53 regulates how a cell reacts to various stresses and
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

Our intestinal microbiome influences metabolism — through the immune systemThe innate immune system, our first line of defense against bacterial infection, has a side job that's equally important: fine-tuning our metabolism.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

First major study comparing robotic to open surgery published in The LancetThe first comprehensive study comparing the outcomes of robotic surgery to those of traditional open surgery in any organ has found that the surgeries are equally effective in treating bladder cancer.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Police killings of unarmed black Americans affect mental health of black communityBlack Americans are nearly three times more likely to be killed by police than their white counterparts, with even larger disparities among those who are unarmed. The trend is also harming the mental health of the black community, according to new research published in The Lancet.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

The Lancet: Police killings of unarmed black Americans impact mental health of wider black American populationPolice killings of unarmed black Americans have adverse effects on the mental health of black American adults in the general population, according to a new population-based study. With police killings of unarmed black Americans widely perceived to be a symptom of structural racism, the findings highlight the role of structural racism as a driver of population health disparities, and support recent
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

New technology helps to improve treatment for NHS patients with depressionNew technology that has been found to reduce the probability of patients with depression and anxiety deteriorating during NHS psychological treatment by 74 percent.
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NYT > Science

The Final Hours of the Iceman’s ToolsWhat the implements found with the body of Ötzi revealed about the Copper Age.
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