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We Need to Talk About That 'Westworld' Season 2 FinaleThere's a lot to process.
49min
The Atlantic

There Is No Biological Difference Between Male And Female BrainsPop neuroscience has long been fascinated with uncovering secret biological differences between male and female brains. Just last year, the Google engineer James Damore caused an uproar after publishing a manifesto detailing the various ways women were biologically different from men. But according to Lise Eliot, a professor of neuroscience at the Chicago Medical School and the author of Pink Bra
22min
Futurity.org

Babysitting teaches bonobos how to be momsYoung female bonobos prepare for motherhood by taking care of babies, whether they’re related to them or not, a new study shows. What’s more, that babysitting helps to form alliances, which can pay off in times of hostility. “After studying bonobos for several years, I noticed that juveniles and adolescents were obsessed with the babies,” says Klaree Boose, an instructor in the department of anth
32min

LATEST

Futurity.org

A.I. recreates periodic table of elements from scratchA new artificial intelligence (AI) program recreated the periodic table of elements in just a few hours. It took nearly a century of trial and error for human scientists to organize the periodic table of elements, arguably one of the greatest scientific achievements in chemistry, into its current form. “Instead of feeding in all of the words and sentences from a collection of texts, we fed Atom2V
3min
Futurity.org

How a cockatoo ended up in 13th-century SicilyFour images 13th-century images in the Vatican’s library show a white cockatoo—but how did a bird native to Australia and surrounding regions end up in medieval Europe? Researcher Heather Dalton, honorary research fellow in the School of Historical and Philosophical Studies at the University of Melbourne, traces the likely story here—and argues that it reveals some misconceptions about the bounda
18min
Futurity.org

Phone-based savings program helps Afghans stash more cashResearchers have designed a mobile money-based wallet that could “nudge” people into saving. The researchers worked in collaboration with a mobile network provider in Afghanistan called Roshan Telecommunications to create the product. Billions of people worldwide, including those in developing countries, face challenges saving money. They may already hold a device that can assist them in the palm
18min
Futurity.org

Big data reveals how corn reacts to stressA new study describes the genetic pathways at work when corn plants respond to stress brought on by heat. The findings could lead to crops better capable of withstanding stress. The research, published as a “large-scale biology” paper in the academic journal the Plant Cell , maps the stress response detected by the endoplasmic reticulum, an organelle in cells of corn seedlings. The research was a
39min
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Closer monitoring of surgeons needed to stave off burn-out and heavy drinkingSurgeons need closer monitoring to stave off their risk of burn-out, heavy drinking, and other unhealthy behaviours, and it's time for the profession to fix this problem itself before the government steps in, urges a leading surgeon in an editorial published in the Journal of ISAKOS (JISAKOS).
43min
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Myth that persistent musculoskeletal pain with no obvious cause can be curedIt's a myth that most persistent musculoskeletal pain with no obvious cause can be cured, argue experts in an editorial published online in the British Journal of Sports Medicine.
43min
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Corporate interests may have influenced key public health declarationCorporate interests may have influenced a key public health declaration, intended to promote integrity and transparency at the interface of science and policy-making, warn a trio of leading academics* in an analysis published online in the journal Tobacco Control.
43min
Popular Science

Meet the designer who wants to make fruit labels out of soap and save the world from swizzle sticksTechnology Inside the mind of Scott Amron. Scott Amron, of the product design lab Amron Experimental, is known for his clever creations. But every design is downright useful.
49min
The Atlantic

The Atlantic Daily: How to Live With FearWhat We’re Following Around the White House: Jared Kushner, Donald Trump’s son-in-law and envoy for peace in the Middle East, gave his first interview with a Palestinian newspaper over the weekend, revealing an optimism that critics say suggests “he is living in a fantasy world.” For the past week, the Trump administration has faced a storm of controversy over its immigration policy. David Graham
1h
The Atlantic

How Post-Millennial Voters Could Change AmericaFor years, pundits have fixated on what the influx of Millennial voters will mean for American democracy. But now they’re getting old. Not the takes—though those are getting old, too—but the Millennials themselves. As that cohort ages into maturity and becomes the nation’s largest voting bloc , the next generation of voters will become important to watch. That could be especially true in November
1h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Want access to your Facebook group? In the future, you may have to payWant access to your Facebook group? In the future, you may have to pay.
1h
New Scientist – News

Calling men by their surname gives them an unfair career boostWe are more likely to refer to professional men by their surname than women in the same jobs – making them sound more famous, eminent and worthy of awards
1h
Popular Science

CRISPR could use gold nanoparticles to edit your brainScience Researchers were able to turn down behavioral problems in mice. Add this to the list of possible applications for the seemingly-magical CRISPR: helping people with neurological disorders edit their brains.
1h
Live Science

Will China's Second Space Station Fall Out of the Sky Soon?China's recently abandoned space station did a big, unexplained wobble in orbit this month. Here's the most likely reason.
1h
The Atlantic

Civic Tech in a Time of Technopessimism“When I look back at 2010 me, I think I had this naïve idea that tech would save government,” confessed Jen Pahlka, the founder of Code for America, a civic-tech nonprofit. In its early days, Code for America’s mission was to persuade people at the big tech companies to take a year or two away from their Silicon Valley gigs to serve the public, building technologies for all levels of government.
1h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

UCR team among scientists developing guidebook for finding life beyond earthSome of the leading experts in the field, including a UC Riverside team of researchers, have written a major series of review papers on the past, present, and future of the search for life on other planets.
1h
BBC News – Science & Environment

RemoveDebris: Mission to clear a huge mess above EarthThe moment the biggest satellite ever released from the space station was set free.
1h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Scientists take a journey into the lungs of mice infected with influenzaA new tool they call FluVision allows UW-Madison researchers to witness influenza infection in a living animal in action, helping them better understand what happens when a virus infects the lungs and the body responds.
1h
BBC News – Science & Environment

Plastic garbage patch: Medical tests 'inspired me to investigate'An all-women expedition sets out to gather scientific data on the world's largest accumulation of marine plastic.
2h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Researchers discover a new type of lung cancerResearchers have discovered a new kind of small-cell lung cancer (SCLC). The discovery paves the way for developing personalized medicine approaches to target this previously unnoticed form of the disease.
2h
The Atlantic

The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: Troubled Waters-Written by Elaine Godfrey ( @elainejgodfrey ) Today in 5 Lines Two days after California Representative Maxine Waters urged her supporters to publicly confront Trump administration officials, President Trump warned Waters to “be careful what you wish for.” House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi and Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer denounced Waters’s remarks . The Supreme Court rejected a challen
2h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Facebook has 'no plans' to listen in on your conversations (for now), but the creepy stories mountCalifornia technology analyst Brian Solis was having a conversation with a friend while the two were driving through Texas. His friend was buying a ranch in Texas but was having trouble with the financing because it was considered a "barndominium." Solis had never heard the term before nor had he ever researched it online.
2h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Amazon Prime discount coming to all Whole FoodsWhole Foods Prime APComing to a Whole Foods near you: Discounts, if you're an Amazon Prime member that is.
2h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

After years of searching, scientists can finally account for all the normal matter in the universeAstronomers using a powerful quasar to study an enormous invisible tendril full of superheated gas say they may have finally discovered the universe's 'missing' detectable matter.
2h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

James Webb Space Telescope to target Jupiter's Great Red SpotNASA's James Webb Space Telescope, the most ambitious and complex space observatory ever built, will use its unparalleled infrared capabilities to study Jupiter's Great Red Spot, shedding new light on the enigmatic storm and building upon data returned from NASA's Hubble Space Telescope and other observatories.
2h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Cost, coverage and more drive hearing aid inequalityA new study reveals gaps in whether older Americans get help for hearing loss — gaps that vary greatly with age, race, education and income. In all, just over a third of those who said they have hearing loss use a hearing aid to correct it. But those who are non-Hispanic white, college-educated or have higher incomes were about twice as likely as those of other races, education levels or income r
2h
The Atlantic

Turks Have Voted Away Their DemocracyFirst they ignored him. Then they laughed at him. Then they jailed him. Then he became perhaps Turkey’s most powerful leader in 80 years. Last night, Recep Tayyip Erdoğan extended his 16-year dominance over Turkey with a victory in the first round of the country’s snap elections, winning 52.5 percent of the vote. In the eyes of his roughly 26 million supporters, it was a resounding victory for th
2h
The Atlantic

James Madison Would Be Horrified by a Tweeting PresidentIn recent years, elected officials have flocked to social-media platforms to run their campaigns, stake their place on issues, and have a direct dialogue with their constituents and voters. To some, this signifies a more open and communicative approach to government. But James Madison, the Founding Father and America’s fourth president, would be appalled at how these platforms have eroded democra
2h
The Atlantic

Teyana Taylor’s Music Has Matured, but Has Her Label?Ten years ago, Teyana Taylor burst onto the music landscape with a simple edict: “ Google Me .” The Harlem-born starlet-in-training had signed with Pharrell Williams’s Star Trak Entertainment a year earlier, at 15, but it was the histrionics of her MTV debut on My Super Sweet 16 that catapulted Taylor into notoriety beyond her native New York. In the 2007 episode , the excitable teenager did not
2h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Lessons about a future warmer world using data from the pastSelected intervals in the past that were as warm or warmer than today can help us understand what the Earth may be like under future global warming.
2h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

New study explains Antarctica's coldest temperaturesTiny valleys near the top of Antarctica's ice sheet reach temperatures of nearly -100 degrees Celsius, according to a new study published this week in the AGU journal Geophysical Research Letters. The finding could change scientists' understanding of just how low temperatures can get at Earth's surface, and how it happens, according to the researchers.
2h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

How social media's powerful 'silent majority' moves Bitcoin pricesIn the past four years, the value of a single bitcoin has soared from approximately $500 in 2014 to a current value of $6,000 and has worked its way into every type of financial transaction, from buying phone credits to shopping for clothes online. Now, researchers led by Stevens Institute of Technology show that Bitcoin's value can be manipulated by public sentiment, verifying, for the first time
2h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Researchers decode molecule that gives living tissues their flexibilityThe stretchiness that allows living tissues to expand, contract, stretch, and bend throughout a lifetime is the result of a protein molecule called tropoelastin. Remarkably, this molecule can be stretched to eight times its length and always returns back to its original size.
2h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

NASA looks at Daniel's concentrated centerThe fourth tropical cyclone of the Eastern Pacific season formed on Saturday, June 23. It strengthened into a tropical storm, and on June 25, 2018, NASA's Aqua satellite passed overhead and analyze the storm in infrared light which provides valuable temperature data.
2h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Eye-in-the-sky to save olive treesA new airborne remote-imaging method that scans entire orchards can identify olive trees infected by a devastating bacterium before visible symptoms appear, according to new research.
2h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Nanomaterials could mean more algae outbreaks for wetlands, waterwaysThe last 10 years have seen a surge in the use of tiny substances called nanomaterials in agrochemicals like pesticides and fungicides. The idea is to provide more disease protection and better yields for crops, while decreasing the amount of toxins sprayed on agricultural fields.
2h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

The recipe for star clusters: Take one gas cloud 500 light years in diameter, add 5 million years, process for one monthClusters of stars across the vast reaches of time and space of the entire universe were all created the same way, researchers at McMaster University have determined.
2h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

A multifunctional, multiscale, reconfigurable surfaceAn international team of researchers, led by Harvard University, have developed a dynamic surface with reconfigurable topography that can sculpt and re-sculpt microscale to macroscale features, change its friction and slipperiness, and tune other properties based on its proximity to a magnetic field.
2h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Wendelstein 7-X achieves world record for fusion productIn the past experimentation round Wendelstein 7-X achieved higher temperatures and densities of the plasma, longer pulses and the stellarator world record for the fusion product. Moreover, first confirmation for the optimisation concept on which Wendelstein 7-X is based, was obtained. Wendelstein 7-X at Max Planck Institute for Plasma Physics (IPP) in Greifswald, the world's largest fusion device
2h
Feed: All Latest

Uber Tells London's Regulators 'We've Changed'The ride-sharing company needs the world to believe that it has reformed if it's going to get self-driving cars on the road.
2h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Lessons about a future warmer world using data from the pastSelected intervals in the past that were as warm or warmer than today can help us understand what the Earth may be like under future global warming.
2h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Proteins found in semen increase the spread of Ebola virus infectionProtein fragments, called amyloid fibrils, in human semen significantly increase Ebola virus infection and protect the virus against harsh environmental conditions such as heat and dehydration. Follow-up studies from the 2014 epidemic found that men can harbor the virus in their semen for at least 2.5 years, with the potential to transmit the virus sexually during that time. Targeting amyloids in
2h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Researchers decode molecule that gives living tissues their flexibilityThe stretchiness that allows living tissues to expand, contract, stretch, and bend throughout a lifetime is the result of a protein molecule called tropoelastin. Remarkably, this molecule can be stretched to eight times its length and always returns back to its original size. Now, for the first time, researchers have decoded the molecular structure of this complex molecule, as well as the details
2h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

'Workhorse' lithium battery could be more powerful thanks to new designCornell University chemical engineering professor Lynden Archer believes there needs to be a battery technology 'revolution' — and thinks that his lab has fired one of the first shots.
2h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Maximal running shoes may increase injury risk to some runnersLower leg pain and injuries have long been a problem for runners, but research at Oregon State University-Cascades has shown maximal running shoes may increase such risks for some runners.
2h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

New study explains Antarctica's coldest temperaturesTiny valleys near the top of Antarctica's ice sheet reach temperatures of nearly -100 degrees Celsius, according to a new study published this week in the AGU journal Geophysical Research Letters. The finding could change scientists' understanding of just how low temperatures can get at Earth's surface, and how it happens, according to the researchers.
2h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

New theranostic strategy developed for precise tumor diagnosis and therapyA novel, intelligent theranostic agent for precise tumor diagnosis and therapy has been developed that remains as small molecules while circulating in the bloodstream, can then self-assemble into larger nanostructures in the tumor, and be activated by the tumor microenvironment for therapy guided by photoacoustic imaging. The research was presented at the 2018 Annual Meeting of the Society of Nucl
2h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

NASA's James Webb Space Telescope to target Jupiter's Great Red SpotNASA's James Webb Space Telescope, the most ambitious and complex space observatory ever built, will use its unparalleled infrared capabilities to study Jupiter's Great Red Spot, shedding new light on the enigmatic storm and building upon data returned from NASA's Hubble Space Telescope and other observatories.
2h
Live Science

A Man Swallowed a Bleach Tablet Instead of a Pain Reliever. Then His Throat Tissue Started to Die.A man's headache turned into something much worse when he accidentally swallowed a bleach tablet instead of a pain reliever.
3h
The Atlantic

The Unpredictable Political Effects of 2020 Census TinkeringIt isn’t hard to discern a pattern in the way the Trump administration is planning to conduct the 2020 Census, in the same way that it’s not hard to discern the racial animus against Hispanics that undergirds the president’s moves on immigration. Yet even if the motives are apparent, the effects are not so easy to predict. Most notably, the Commerce Department has announced plans to add a questio
3h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

True nature of cells blamed in Alzheimer's revealedImmune cells commonly blamed in Alzheimer's and other neurodegenerative diseases are actually precision cleaning machines protecting the central nervous system, new research from the University of Virginia School of Medicine shows.
3h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

A multifunctional, multiscale, reconfigurable surfaceAn international team of researchers, led by Harvard University, have developed a dynamic surface with reconfigurable topography that can sculpt and re-sculpt microscale to macroscale features, change its friction and slipperiness, and tune other properties based on its proximity to a magnetic field.
3h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

NASA looks at Daniel's concentrated centerThe fourth tropical cyclone of the Eastern Pacific season formed on Saturday, June 23. It strengthened into a tropical storm, and on June 25, 2018, NASA's Aqua satellite passed overhead and analyze the storm in infrared light which provides valuable temperature data.
3h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

The McMaster recipe for star clustersClusters of stars across the vast reaches of time and space of the entire universe were all created the same way, researchers at McMaster University have determined.
3h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

New nuclear medicine technique could help tackle brain diseaseA new molecular imaging method can monitor the success of gene therapy in all areas of the brain, potentially allowing physicians to more effectively tackle brain conditions such as Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's disease and multiple sclerosis. The research was presented today at the SNMMI 2018 Annual Meeting, June 23-26 in Philadelphia.
3h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Nature creates its own plaster to protect wounds from infectionNew research has identified the way nature creates its own plaster to try and prevent bacteria and other micro-organisms from penetrating open wounds.
3h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Researchers find prostate cancer drug byproduct can fuel cancer cellsA genetic anomaly in certain men with prostate cancer may impact their response to common drugs used to treat the disease, according to new research at Cleveland Clinic. The findings may provide important information for identifying which patients potentially fare better when treated with an alternate therapy.In a newly published study, researchers found that abiraterone, a common prostate cancer
3h
NYT > Science

The Shortlist: How Elastic Is Your Brain?Three new books try to complicate our understanding of the brain — what it does, biologically, and how capable it is of changing.
3h
Latest Headlines | Science News

‘Aroused’ recounts the fascinating history of hormonesThe new book "Aroused" demystifies hormones, the chemicals that put the zing into life.
3h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Efficient, eco-friendly production of fine chemicalsThe chemical industry produces not just valuable vitamins, pharmaceuticals, flavours and pesticides, but often a large amount of waste, too. This is particularly true of pharmaceutical and fine-chemical production, where the volume of desired product may be just a fraction of the volume of waste and unsaleable by-products of synthesis.
3h
The Atlantic

Why Is the Media So Worried About the Parents of Trans Kids?Editor’s Note: This article is part of a series of responses to Jesse Singal’s Atlantic article “ When Children Say They’re Trans .” The first time I remember reading a story about parenting trans kids was in 2011, the same year a nurse at Fenway Community Health Center in Boston gave me my first injection of testosterone. An hour after my appointment, I was back at my desk at the Boston Phoenix
3h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

In melanoma, radiosurgery may combine well with immunotherapy, especially PD-1 inhibitorsOf 38 melanoma patients treated with immunotherapy and radiosurgery between 2012 and 2017, median overall survival was not reached.
3h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Eye-in-the-sky to save olive treesA devastating and fast-spreading infection killing olive trees and grapevines around the world can now be detected from the air, long before symptoms are visible to the human eye.
3h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Long-lasting radionuclide therapy for advanced neuroendocrine tumors proves effectiveA first-in-human study presented at the 2018 Annual Meeting of the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging (SNMMI) demonstrates the benefits and safety of a new, long-lasting type of radionuclide therapy for patients with advanced, metastatic neuroendocrine tumors (NETs).
3h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

How social media's powerful 'silent majority' moves Bitcoin pricesIn the past four years, the value of a single bitcoin has soared from approximately $500 in 2014 to a current value of $6,000 and has worked its way into every type of financial transaction, from buying phone credits to shopping for clothes online. Now, researchers led by Stevens Institute of Technology show that Bitcoin's value can be manipulated by public sentiment, verifying, for the first time
3h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Wendelstein 7-X achieves world recordIn the past experimentation round Wendelstein 7-X achieved higher temperatures and densities of the plasma, longer pulses and the stellarator record for the fusion product. Moreover, first confirmation for the optimisation concept on which Wendelstein 7-X is based, was obtained. Wendelstein 7-X at Max Planck Institute for Plasma Physics (IPP) in Greifswald, Germany, the world's largest fusion devi
3h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Nanomaterials could mean more algae outbreaks for wetlands, waterwaysThe last 10 years have seen a surge in the use of tiny substances called nanomaterials in agrochemicals like pesticides and fungicides. The idea is to provide more disease protection and better yields for crops, while decreasing the amount of toxins sprayed on agricultural fields. But when combined with nutrient runoff from fertilized cropland and manure-filled pastures, these 'nanopesticides' cou
3h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Two diabetes medications don't slow progression of type 2 diabetes in youthIn youth with impaired glucose tolerance or recent-onset type 2 diabetes, neither initial treatment with long-acting insulin followed by the drug metformin, nor metformin alone preserved the body's ability to make insulin, according to results published online June 25 in Diabetes Care. The publication is concurrent to a presentation of the results at the American Diabetes Association Scientific Se
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Big Think

Are we alone in the universe? New Drake equation suggests yesA fresh take on the decades-old Drake equation incorporates new factors and greater uncertainty, suggesting a high likelihood that humanity is alone in the universe. Read More
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Big Think

How music lessons can improve language skillsA new study from MIT has found that piano lessons have a very specific effect on kindergartners’ ability to distinguish different pitches, which translates into an improvement in discriminating between spoken words. Read More
3h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Efficient, eco-friendly production of fine chemicalsChemical engineers from ETH Zurich developed a new catalyst for forming a bond between two carbon atoms in a cost-effective and eco-friendly way. This technology could soon make its way into industry.
3h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Novel nuclear medicine approach shows promise for treating wide array of cancerous tumorsA novel nuclear medicine approach is showing great promise for precision treatment of solid tumors in many types of cancer–including lung, breast, pancreas and ovarian in adults and glioma, neuroblastoma and sarcoma in children. The research was presented today at the SNMMI 2018 Annual Meeting, June 23-26 in Philadelphia.
3h
Big Think

Survey: Millennials tip the least of any generationMillennials are the first generation on track to make less than their parents. Of course, there was that whole Great Recession starting in 2008… Read More
3h
Popular Science

The White House is calling for Space Traffic ControlSpace It's time to stop sending up so much garbage. Officials at the White House announced a new space policy directive today, focused on managing the increasing numbers of satellites that both companies and governments…
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Feed: All Latest

Using Library Science to Map the Child Separation CrisisScholars at Columbia University organized a six-day “crisis researchathon” to try to answer one question: Where are the children?
3h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Giving up on your goal? Read this firstSo you've set a goal to eat healthier and you've mapped out a plan of attack. You'll replace those chips with fruit for your late-night snack. You'll switch to whole-grain bread. You'll start buying fresh vegetables.
3h
Live Science

Little Kids Are Accidentally Taking an Opioid That's Meant to Treat AddictionParents might not be storing these dangerous pills properly, a new study finds.
4h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Russian and Korean scientists developed effective and cheap sound-absorbing nanofoamThe breakthrough material reduces a noise level by 100 percent more efficient comparing to standard analogs, cutting the level of noise transmission by 20-22 dB. The new foam reacts to sound waves not only of high but also of low frequencies, which can damage human health. A young scientist from the Far Eastern Federal University (FEFU) took part in the development.
4h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

'Substantial portion' of childhood cancer survivors not concerned about future healthA research team led by a St. Jude Children's Research Hospital epidemiologist has conducted the largest analysis to date of how adult survivors of childhood cancer view their health risk. The scientists found that a surprisingly high number of survivors showed a lack of concern for their future well-being. The analysis of questionnaire data from 15,620 survivors found that 31 percent said they wer
4h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Disparities in opioid abuse treatment increased among Medicaid recipients, study findsApproval of a new drug for the treatment of opioid abuse sharply increased the number of Medicaid recipients receiving medication-assisted therapy for opioid abuse disorders. But as the use of recommended treatment increased, economic and racial disparities also widened, according to a new study.
4h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Discovery of a major technical error will improve epigenetics researchAn error in one of the most widely used methods in epigenetics, DIP-seq, can cause misleading results. This may have major significance in the research field, where 'big data' and advanced methods of DNA analysis are used to study vast amounts of data. Correcting for the errors in existing DIP-seq data may lead to new discoveries from previous studies of human epigenetics. The findings, by researc
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Clinical outcomes and patient experiences vastly improved with hospital aA new study to be published online June 25 in JAMA Internal Medicine reports that hospital at home (HaH) care provides a shorter length of stay; reductions in hospital readmissions, emergency department visits, and transfers to skilled nursing facilities; and, improved patient experience versus traditional inpatient care. The study, which spans nearly three years, includes patients with the broade
4h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Journal explores database that quantifies environmental impacts in a 'global' worldIn a special issue, Yale's Journal of Industrial Ecology examines a new global database that offers new clarity on the complex links between international trade, consumption, and environmental impact.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Giving up on your goal? Read this firstAll too often, an action crisis may lead a person to reassess the cost-benefits of a goal and consider giving it up. New research from Penn State provides a better understanding of how people respond to action crises.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

New mutation in amyloid diseases discoveredResearchers have identified a one-of-a kind mutation in the DNA of a patient who died of transthyretin (TTR) amyloidosis, a progressive condition characterized by the buildup of abnormal deposits of a misfolded protein called amyloid in the body's organs and tissues.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Staying coherent while spinningScientists from EPFL show that photo-excited polyatomic molecules maintain their coherence in motion while undergoing spin changes within ultrashort timescales.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Scientists found means to inhibit capillary leakage in sepsisLeakage from the blood capillaries is a key mechanism leading to septic shock and multiorgan failure, which affect millions of patients annually worldwide. However, there is no effective way to inhibit the vessel leakiness. A new study by scientists at the University of Helsinki and Wihuri Research Institute demonstrates that vascular leakage can be inhibited by targeting vascular integrins.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

How music lessons can improve language skillsMIT researchers have found that piano lessons have a specific effect on kindergartners' ability to distinguish different pitches, which translates into an improvement in discriminating between words.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

How your brain decides between knowledge and ignoranceWe have a 'thirst for knowledge' but sometimes 'ignorance is bliss', so how do we choose between these two mind states at any given time?
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Delivering insulin in a pillHarvard researchers have developed an oral delivery method that could dramatically transform the way in which diabetics keep their blood sugar levels in check.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Inability to recognize faces linked to broader visual recognition problemsImagine that you're supposed to meet colleagues for dinner, only you can't remember what their faces look like. For some, this is a reality, as people with face blindness or developmental prosopagnosia (DP) have severe difficulties recognizing faces, including those of family and friends, despite having no history of brain damage (e.g., brain trauma, head injuries). A Dartmouth study finds that de
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Striking differences in brain morphology between wild and domestic rabbitsThe most characteristic feature of domestic animals is their tame behaviour. An international team of scientists has now used high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to study how domestication has affected brain morphology in domestic rabbits. The results show that domestication has had a profound effect on brain morphology in particular regions of the brain involved in fear processing, t
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Methane-producing microbial communities found in fracking wellsNew research has uncovered the genetic details of microbes found in fracking wells. Not only do a wide array of bacteria and viruses thrive in these crevices created by hydraulic fracturing – they also have the power to produce methane, according to a study led by scientists at The Ohio State University and published in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Journal explores database that quantifies environmental impacts in a 'global' worldHow do you measure a nation's environmental impact when half its goods are imported from China and other regions?
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Microbiologists and plant scientists find secret to tackling choleraWhile cholera rages across many regions of the world, a team of microbiologists and plant scientists has pinpointed a genetic weakness in the pandemic's armor, which could lead to future treatments.
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Inside Science

It’s Lightning Safety Awareness WeekIt’s Lightning Safety Awareness Week Do you know your risk? It’s Lightning Safety Awareness Week Video of It’s Lightning Safety Awareness Week Earth Monday, June 25, 2018 – 14:45 Emilie Lorditch, Staff Writer (Inside Science) — When you are outside, are you aware of your risk of being struck by lightning? Find out how meteorologists are identifying your risk of being struck to help keep you and
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Scientific American Content: Global

FDA Approves Country's First Marijuana-Based MedicineThe drug will treat two rare forms of epilepsy — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Big Think

How eye disorders may have influenced the work of famous paintersAre some of the most particular painting styles in history the result of impoverished vision, or a conscious artistic choice made by the artist? Read More
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Big Think

Why are you an emotional eater? You learned it at homeA new study shows that environment, not genetics, determines behavioral patterns of eating in youth that persist throughout life. Read More
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Science | The Guardian

Insulin pill may be on the horizon for diabeticsResearch team successfully administers insulin to rats in capsule form, raising hopes that a version for humans could be developed An insulin pill for people with diabetes could be in the offing, say researchers, providing hope that a daily regime of injections might one day become a thing of the past. Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune condition in which an individual’s pancreas does not produce i
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Futurity.org

Why the current cholera pandemic has lasted 50 yearsMicrobiologists and plant scientists say they’ve pinpointed a genetic weakness in cholera’s armor, which could lead to future treatments. The current cholera pandemic began in Indonesia in 1961. Rather than fade away like its six previous worldwide outbreak predecessors, the strain is thriving and actually picking up steam. Now, a new discovery shows the key genetic change the seventh pandemic ac
4h
Live Science

Future Astronauts Must Perform Surgery in Space — and It Will Be GrossMicrogravity makes everything harder … especially when bodily fluids are involved.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Methane-producing microbial communities found in fracking wellsDeep in the rocky earth, in the liquid-filled cracks created by fracking, lives a community of highly interactive microbes—one that could at once have serious implications for energy companies, human health and scientists investigating the potential for life on Mars.
4h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Microbiologists and plant scientists find secret to tackling choleraWhile cholera rages across many regions of the world, a team of microbiologists and plant scientists has pinpointed a genetic weakness in the pandemic's armor, which could lead to future treatments.
4h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

A galactic test will clarify the existence of dark matterResearchers at the University of Bonn and the University of California at Irvine used sophisticated computer simulations to devise a test that could answer a burning question in astrophysics: is there really dark matter? Or does Newton's gravitational law need to be modified? The new study, now published in the Physical Review Letters, shows that the answer is hidden in the motion of the stars wit
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The Atlantic

Photos From a Month of PrideWe’ve entered the final week of June—a month celebrated around the world as LGBTQ Pride month—commemorated with colorful parades, vocal protests, public art, and events. The events are a time for celebration, and for recognizing accomplishments and progress that has been made as a community, cheered on by supporters, neighbors, and advocates. Many of the month’s events work to continue to raise a
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BBC News – Science & Environment

Meet the 'forgotten' Victorian astronomer Annie MaunderA state-of-the-art telescope is named after Annie Maunder, a Victorian pioneer of space photography.
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Latest Headlines | Science News

How domestication changed rabbits’ brainsThe fear centers of the brain were altered as humans tamed rabbits.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Uber claims U-turn in bid to restore London licenceUber claimed Monday to have mended its ways as the ride-hailing app started its appeal against being stripped of its licence to operate in London.
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Popular Science

Last week in tech: Movies in the theater, TV on our phonesTechnology Shake off your Westworld hangover with a recap of last week's big tech stories. Dive into the latest episode of our podcast and catch up on the latest news in tech.
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BBC News – Science & Environment

Wildfire spreads across Northern CaliforniaHundreds of people have been evacuated from their homes as firefighters battle the blazes.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Smart probe detecting cancer cells may improve survival ratesA new Tel Aviv University study explores a novel smart probe for image-guided surgery that may dramatically improve post-surgical outcomes for cancer patients.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Looking to mosquitos for a way to develop painless microneedlesA mosquito can insert a needle-like probe into your skin and draw blood for several minutes without you even noticing. Researchers at The Ohio State University believe we can learn from nature's design of the mosquito to create a painless microneedle for medical purposes.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

New head of 'space nation' aims for the starsIt sounds appealing given the state of politics on Earth: a plan to launch a utopian "space nation" with the aim of transcending earthly divisions.
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New on MIT Technology Review

Chinese factories are producing banned chemicals that could delay ozone recovery[no content]
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Pulses raised as new study reveals secrets of the plant that keeps people calmChemical secrets of a plant used throughout history for its calming effects have been revealed in new research.
5h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Climate projections suggest Lancaster County corn yields in jeopardy by 2050Climate projections indicate more warming will occur in the Northeast than other sections of the United States, and that has implications for corn crops and dairy farms in the region by 2050, researchers warn.
5h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Control of quantum state of optical phonon in diamond induced by ultrashort light pulsesUltrashort Light-pulse-induced vibrations of atoms in a lattice, called optical coherent phonons, have been controlled in various materials. However, different experiments demonstrating such control have been explained differently through empirical theories, and a unified theory based on quantum mechanics is lacking. Scientists at Tokyo Institute of Technology successfully formulated a unified the
5h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

A new toxin in Cholera bacteria discovered by scientists in UmeåScientists from Umeå University have now discovered and characterised the structure and function of a so far unknown Vibrio toxin. A team led by Professor Sun Nyunt Wai at Department of Molecular Biology and MIMS used the worm Caenorhabditis elegans as a predatory host for the bacteria and identified by molecular genetic analysis the V. cholerae genes required for production and release of the new
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

You don't need to believe in free will to be a nice person, shows new researchSocial psychologist Damien Crone (University of Melbourne) and Philosophy professor Neil Levy (Macquarie University and the University of Oxford) conducted a series of studies of 921 of people and found that a person's moral behavior is not tied to their beliefs in free will. The results will appear in the journal Social Psychological and Personality Science.
5h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Climate projections suggest Lancaster County corn yields in jeopardy by 2050Climate projections indicate more warming will occur in the Northeast than other sections of the United States, and that has implications for corn crops and dairy farms in the region by 2050, researchers warn.
5h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Virtual reality technology transforming cardiovascular medicineRapid advancements in the field of virtual reality are leading to new developments in cardiovascular treatment and improved outcomes for patients, according to a review paper published today in JACC: Basic to Translational Science. Extended reality applications in cardiac care include education and training, pre-procedural planning, visualization during a procedure and rehabilitation in post-strok
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Inside Science

Cameras Spot Fatal Olive Tree Diseases Before the Symptoms ShowCameras Spot Fatal Olive Tree Diseases Before the Symptoms Show Drones may spare groves from mass infestation. OliveTree.jpg Image credits: KatieThebeau/ Flickr Rights information: CC BY 2.0 Earth Monday, June 25, 2018 – 13:45 Joel Shurkin, Contributor (Inside Science) — Researchers at a European science center have developed a camera that spots an incurable infection in olive trees before the d
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

Plaster which sticks inside the mouth will revolutionize treatment of oral conditionsA new biodegradable patch administers steroids directly to oral ulcers and forms a protective barrier.
5h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

New mechanism for the plant hormone auxin discoveredAuxin is a hormone that is essential for the development of plants as it controls a wide range of processes. Previously, it was believed that auxin's main signaling mechanism acted only by regulating gene transcription. Now, scientists have demonstrated that another mechanism exists, and that cells in the roots must be able to respond to auxin immediately. This mechanism enables rapid adaption of
5h
New Scientist – News

AI trained on 3500 years of games finally beats humans at Dota 2OpenAI Dota 2 AI BrockmanAI finally beats the world’s best amateurs at the video game Dota 2, after playing 180-years’ worth of games every day for 19 days
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New Scientist – News

There are two types of worrier – which you are depends on genesThe genomes of half a million people reveal that there are two kinds of worrier, providing new clues about how genes help form our personalities
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Creature feature: Twisting cracks impart superhero toughness to animalsSuper-resilient materials found in the animal kingdom owe their strength and toughness to a design strategy that causes cracks to follow the twisting pattern of fibers, preventing catastrophic failure.
5h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

Can the kids wait? Today's youngsters able to delay gratification longer than those of the 1960sSome 50 years since the original 'marshmallow test' in which most preschoolers gobbled up one treat immediately rather than wait several minutes to get two, today's youngsters may be able to delay gratification significantly longer to get that extra reward.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

Men's testosterone levels largely determined by where they grow upMen's testosterone levels are largely determined by their environment during childhood, according to new research.
5h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

CRISPR editing reduces repetitive behavior in mice with a form of autismMice with fragile X syndrome are a common model for autism because the mice exhibit exaggerated repetitive behavior typical of the disorder. Researchers have for the first time gotten CRISPR into the brain to successfully edit a gene and reduce repetitive behavior. The CRISPR-Gold technique knocked out a gene for a neurotransmitter receptor, damping overexcitation and associated burying behavior.
5h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

Skeleton formation in young corals documented for first time in multidisciplinary studyResearchers have identified the biological process of mineralization that occurs in a young coral that shifts from the plankton (swimming) stage to the 'settled' stage in which it forms the skeleton from minerals that protect its colony. The discovery is important for understanding the process of coral reef formation and protecting marine creatures from ecological damage associated with global war
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

Exposure to air pollution in pregnancy does not increase symptoms of attention-deficitA study of 30,000 children from seven European countries found no association between prenatal exposure to air pollution and symptoms of attention-deficit and hyperactivity.
5h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

Hearing-related problems common among preschool teachersSeven out of ten female preschool teachers suffer from sound-induced auditory fatigue, one out of two has difficulty understanding speech and four out of ten become hypersensitive to sound. This is a considerably higher share than among women in general and also higher than in occupational groups exposed to noise, according to research.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

Citizen scientists developing expertise on galaxy imagesResearchers have studied large amounts of data in a citizen science project that turns to volunteers for help classifying images of galaxies.
5h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Creature feature: Twisting cracks impart superhero toughness to animalsSuper-resilient materials found in the animal kingdom owe their strength and toughness to a design strategy that causes cracks to follow the twisting pattern of fibers, preventing catastrophic failure.
5h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Reducing CO2 with common elements and sunlightAn international collaborative research group including Tokyo Institute of Technology, Universite PARIS DIDEROT and CNRS has discovered that CO2 is selectively reducedto CO when a photocatalyst composed of an organic semiconductor material and an iron complex is exposed to visible light. They have made clear that it is possible to convert CO2, the major factor of global warming, into a valuable ca
5h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Pulses raised as new study reveals secrets of the plant that keeps people calmChemical secrets of a plant used throughout history for its calming effects have been revealed in new research.
5h
Popular Science

Why it would have been impossible for a T. rex to stick out its tongueAnimals Everything we thought we knew about dinosaur tongues is wrong. A mouthful of bone-crunching teeth might be the scariest thing about a dinosaur. But there’s something about a wet, waggling T. rex tongue that’s particularly…
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

Increase in storms could have 'catastrophic impact' on fishing industryPotential changes in the frequency and intensity of storms off the coast of the UK and around the world could have a 'catastrophic impact' on the livelihood of fishermen and sustainability of fishing industries, research has shown.
5h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

Who shares similar experiences of climate change in a 1.5°C world and beyond?A new framework to understand how uneven the effects of a 1.5°C world are for different countries around the world has been published today.
5h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

Cranium of a four-million-year-old hominin shows similarities to that of modern humansA cranium of a four-million-year-old fossil, that, in 1995 was described as the oldest evidence of human evolution in South Africa, has shown similarities to that of our own, when scanned through high resolution imaging systems.
5h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

Why life on Earth first got bigSome of the earliest complex organisms on Earth — possibly some of the earliest animals to exist — got big not to compete for food, but to spread their offspring as far as possible.
5h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

In the brain, dislike and dehumanization are not the same thingIt has long been thought that when people characterized others as less-than-human, it was an expression of extreme dislike. New research shows that in fact judgements about dislike and dehumanization of people occur in separate brain regions, suggesting they are different psychological processes. This has implications for how we understand the migrant detention crisis in America as well as intergr
5h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

Monarchs ride West Coast winds: Proof of butterfly migration gatheredAfter five years and nearly 15,000 tagged butterflies, scientists now have proof that Monarch butterflies migrate from the Pacific Northwest to California in late summer and fall, a journey averaging nearly 500 miles.
5h
NYT > Science

Japan’s Hayabusa2 Spacecraft Creeps Up on the Ryugu AsteroidAfter a journey that started in 2014, the probe will reach the space rock on Wednesday to begin studying it for clues to the solar system’s origins.
5h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Neanderthals hunted in bands and speared prey up close: studyNeanderthals were capable of sophisticated, collective hunting strategies, according to an analysis of prehistoric animal remains from Germany that contradicts the enduring image of these early humans as knuckle-dragging brutes.
5h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Hundreds of birds stricken after Rotterdam oil spillAnimal rescue workers on Monday were frantically cleaning hundreds of birds after an oil spill in the Rotterdam harbour at the weekend, when an oil tanker hit a jetty dumping some 200 tonnes of bunker fuel.
5h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Government reforms could deter foreign investmentProposals to extend the role played by politicians in scrutinising mergers and investments in the UK could discourage foreign investment, according to new research from the University of East Anglia (UEA).
5h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Who shares similar experiences of climate change in a 1.5 C world and beyond?A new framework to understand how uneven the effects of a 1.5°C world are for different countries around the world has been published today in Geophysical Research Letters, led by researchers from the Environmental Change Institute (ECI) at the Oxford University Department of Geography.
5h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Nicotine alters neurotransmission in habit-forming brain regionA study of rat brain slices published in JNeurosci demonstrates how nicotine interacts with cells that regulate the output of a brain region involved in habit formation. The research could inform efforts to help people quit smoking and avoid relapse.
6h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Mind over matter: Amygdala circuit counteracts pain-driven emotionTwo pathways in the brain converging at the amygdala regulate the anxiety and depression that often accompanies chronic pain, suggests research in male rats published in JNeurosci. One of these pathways may represent a top-down mechanism that controls negative emotion under stress.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

New target for treating alcoholismActivation of a receptor with no known function in the brain reduces excessive alcohol use and the pain of withdrawal, according to preclinical research in male rats. The study, published in eNeuro, suggests a new approach towards the treatment of alcohol use disorder.
6h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Glia and axons: A match made in evolutionThe evolutionary prerequisites of myelin — the fatty substance that insulates axons and enables rapid communication between cells of the nervous system in jawed vertebrates — are described in new research in fish published in JNeurosci.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Increase in storms could have 'catastrophic impact' on fishing industryPotential changes in the frequency and intensity of storms off the coast of the UK and around the world could have a "catastrophic impact" on the livelihood of fishermen and sustainability of fishing industries, research led by the University of Exeter has shown.
6h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Monarchs ride west coast winds: Proof of butterfly migration gatheredAfter five years and nearly 15,000 tagged butterflies, scientists now have proof that Monarch butterflies migrate from the Pacific Northwest to California in late summer and fall, a journey averaging nearly 500 miles.
6h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Skeleton formation in young corals documented for first time in multidisciplinary studyThe skeleton formed by a coral plays a key role in the storage of atmospheric carbon dioxide. Previous studies have focused on the process by which adult corals produce minerals that harden existing tissues to form the skeleton, but the exact stage at which corals initiate the entire mineralization process has remained a mystery—until now.
6h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

New wasps named after Crocodile Dundee and Toblerone amongst 17 new genera and 29 speciesA total of 17 new genera and 29 new species of parasitoid wasps were identified following a study into the material deposited at major natural history collections around the globe in an attempt to further uncover the megadiverse fauna of the group of microgastrine wasps.
6h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Citizen scientists developing expertise on galaxy imagesTwo researchers from the University of Gothenburg have studied large amounts of data in a citizen science project that turns to volunteers for help classifying images of galaxies.
6h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Cranium of a four-million-year-old hominin shows similarities to that of modern humansA cranium of a four-million-year-old fossil, that, in 1995 was described as the oldest evidence of human evolution in South Africa, has shown similarities to that of our own, when scanned through high resolution imaging systems.
6h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Pain relief at a lower opioid doseA team of researchers at Johns Hopkins have found that activating nerve cell receptors along two chemical pathways — one that has previously been linked to how the brain senses 'itch' — may improve pain relief when combined with conventional ways to blunt pain using opioid drugs, such as morphine.
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cognitive science

Childhood trauma can change the way your genes behave and leave you more vulnerable to illness. And it starts happening quickly.submitted by /u/symonsymone [link] [comments]
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Big Think

France has just one Riviera, but 36 coastsName one French coastline. Great. Now name another. Can't? Here are all 36. Read More
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Quanta Magazine

Real-Life Schrödinger’s Cats Probe the Boundary of the Quantum WorldSchrödinger’s kittens have never been very cute, and the latest litter is no exception. Images of nebulous clouds of ultracold atoms or microscopic strips of silicon are unlikely to go viral on the internet. All the same, these exotic objects are worth heeding, because they show with unprecedented clarity that quantum mechanics is not just the physics of the extremely small. “Schrödinger’s kitten
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NYT > Science

Some Birds Are Better Off With Weak Immune SystemsEurope’s migratory songbirds can’t fight off diseases as well as African species that stay put. But that may be to the European birds’ advantage.
6h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Cranium of a four-million-year-old hominin shows similarities to that of modern humansA cranium of a four-million-year-old fossil, that, in 1995 was described as the oldest evidence of human evolution in South Africa, has shown similarities to that of our own, when scanned through high resolution imaging systems.
6h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Government reforms could deter foreign investmentProposals to extend the role played by politicians in scrutinising mergers and investments in the UK could discourage foreign investment, according to new research from the University of East Anglia (UEA).Researcher Dr David Reader argues that the 'resurrection' of ministerial decision-making could yet deter foreign investment by creating perceptions of an assessment process based on furthering th
6h
Feed: All Latest

It’s Time You Learned About Quantum ComputingA researcher explains quantum computing in terms anyone can understand—even an 8-year-old.
6h
Big Think

New study reveals alarming shortage of mental health professionals in rural AmericaIn rural America, the odds of having access to a specialized mental health professional are slim, according to new research. Read More
6h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Who shares similar experiences of climate change in a 1.5°C world and beyond?A new framework to understand how uneven the effects of a 1.5°C world are for different countries around the world has been published today in Geophysical Research Letters, led by researchers from the Environmental Change Institute (ECI) at the Oxford University Department of Geography.
7h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Fluorescent molecules reveal how cancer cells are inhibitedA team of researchers at Lund University in Sweden has developed a fluorescent variant of a molecule that inhibits cancer stem cells. Capturing images of when the molecule enters a cell has enabled the researchers, using cell-biological methods, to successfully describe how and where the molecule counteracts the cancer stem cells.
7h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Citizen scientists developing expertise on galaxy imagesTwo researchers from the University of Gothenburg have studied large amounts of data in a citizen science project that turns to volunteers for help classifying images of galaxies.'We can see how interested volunteers have developed expertise that we didn't foresee,' says Dick Kasperowski, associate professor of theory of science and co-author of the study.
7h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Concern over low vitamin D intakes among UK South AsiansPublic health strategies are urgently required to tackle low intakes of vitamin D in the UK South-Asian population, finds a new study in the Journal Public Health Nutrition.
7h
New Scientist – News

An entire Arctic ecosystem could vanish within the next decadeThe Barents Sea, home to a diverse array of wildlife, could be completely gone in just a few years – perhaps the most dramatic impact of climate change yet seen
7h
Scientific American Content: Global

New Group Aims to Bolster Science in PolicymakingFunding will be granted to early-career scientists concerned about government retreat from science — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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BBC News – Science & Environment

Bird family tree shaken by discovery of feathered fossilA beautifully preserved fossil bird from 52 million years ago is shaking up the family tree of the birds.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Increase in storms could have 'catastrophic impact' on fishing industryPotential changes in the frequency and intensity of storms off the coast of the UK and around the world could have a 'catastrophic impact' on the livelihood of fishermen and sustainability of fishing industries, research led by the University of Exeter has shown.
7h
Big Think

Why emotional intelligence is a key pillar of diversity and inclusionEmotional intelligence can have massive benefits for any organization, but why? How do we maximize our groups' EQ? Read More
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Popular Science

Thinking about aliens could help us beat climate changeNexus Media News “Climate change is not our fault. Not doing something about it — that will be our fault.” We are not the first civilization to face climate change. But how we decide to deal with it could determine the fate of our existence.
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Live Science

These Skeletons from an Ancient Egypt Cemetery Were Riddled with CancerThe finds include a toddler with leukemia, a mummified man in his 50s with rectal cancer and individuals with cancer possibly caused by human papillomavirus (HPV).
7h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Exposure to air pollution in pregnancy does not increase symptoms of attention-deficitA study of 30,000 children from seven European countries found no association between prenatal exposure to air pollution and symptoms of attention-deficit and hyperactivity.
7h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Authentication of patients in medicine via online system should be discussed ethicallyA group of researchers led by Osaka University indicated that the authentication system for medical research/treatment using ICT needs consideration to ethical issues including 1) respect for autonomy, 2) privacy protection and 3) relationship of trust.. With that in mind, they proposed two-factor authentication: (1) login authentication using a user ID and password and (2) authentication using a
7h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Putting oneself in another person's place is the best antidote against prejudiceResearch performed by a team at the School of Education at the University of Cordoba shows an indirect relationship between empathy and the development of prejudices by means of personality and ideological attitudes.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

USTC contributes to LHC experiment discovery on Higgs BosonResearch team from University and Science and Technology of China contributed much to the results of the ATLAS and CMS experiments at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC).
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

New wasps named after Crocodile Dundee and Toblerone amongst 17 new genera and 29 speciesA total of 17 new genera and 29 new species of parasitoid wasps are described from across all tropical regions of the world. Amongst the novel taxa, there are three genera named after the action comedy 'Crocodile Dundee', the chocolate brand 'Toblerone', and the Madagascar spiny forests. In addition, five species are named after institutions holding some of the largest wasp collections. The findin
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Otago researchers help find answers to growing typhoid problem in the PacificUniversity of Otago researchers have been key partners in a study which has found poor sanitation facilities appear to be a major source of Salmonella typhi, the cause of typhoid fever, in Fiji.
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The Atlantic

Is Ben Jealous What Progressives Want?B en Jealous, a tall , gregarious man wearing a suit, stepped to the center of the room at Morgan State University. The comedian Dave Chappelle, wearing stylishly torn clothes and clutching a cup of coffee, took a seat on a table to the left. Jealous launched into one of his favorite stories, punctuated by Chappelle’s occasional interjections—the time Chappelle saved his life. It was the early ‘9
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The Atlantic

Jared Kushner’s Middle East FantasyJared Kushner, it seems, is feeling optimistic. On Sunday, in his first-ever interview with a Palestinian newspaper, the U.S. president’s son-in-law and Middle East peace envoy said that despite appearances to the contrary, “prospects for peace are very much alive” and confirmed that the administration is getting ready to release its long-awaited plan for Israeli-Palestinian peace. Asked how that
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Live Science

Has This Startup Cracked the Secret to Fusion Energy?Fusion energy is only 30 years away. Again.
7h
Scientific American Content: Global

Will Launching Plants into Orbit Yield New Medicines?Many Earth-bound efforts focus on synthetic chemicals, but some researchers hope the stress of space could provide new insights — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Ingeniøren

Vi fik 380.550 nye robotter i 2017På verdensplan steg salget af industrirobotter sidste år med 29 procent. Langt de fleste endte på bilfabrikker i Asien.
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Live Science

Is 'Pregnancy Brain' Real?If you've ever found yourself at a real loss for words while pregnant, or feel like you just keep forgetting to book appointments during those nine months of expecting, you're not the only one.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Structure of S. agalactiae toxin identified by USTC biologistsBiologists team of University of Science and Technology of China and University of Waterloo revealed the structure of S. agalactiae CAMP factor and the mechanism behind for the first time.
8h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Photon loss won't hurt in quantum sampling, USTC researchers findResearch group of University of Science and Technology of China and Shanghai Institute of Microsystem and Information Technology carried out an experiment which brings a demonstration of quantum supremacy closer to reality.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

New catalyst upgrades carbon dioxide to fuels found by USTCA research team led by professors University of Science and Technology of China and University of Toronto uncovered a catalysis strategy intermediates during CO2 electrochemical reduction reaction.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Having more allies may decrease a country's powerResearchers at Yale University developed a simple, yet sophisticated, computer game to examine relationships between countries and the resulting strategic environments, and have found that the more allies a country has, the less power it has. The scientists say the findings have potential implications for current events.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Closing the loop for robotic graspingRoboticists at QUT have developed a faster and more accurate way for robots to grasp objects, including in cluttered and changing environments, which has the potential to improve their usefulness in both industrial and domestic settings.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

'Electrogeochemistry' captures carbon, produces fuel, offsets ocean acidificationLimiting global warming to 2 degrees Celsius will require not only reducing emissions of carbon dioxide, but also active removal of carbon dioxide from the atmosphere. This has prompted heightened interest in 'negative emissions technologies.' A new study evaluates the potential for recently described methods that capture carbon dioxide from the atmosphere through an 'electrogeochemical' process t
8h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

CRISPR editing reduces repetitive behavior in mice with a form of autismMice with fragile X syndrome are a common model for autism because the mice exhibit exaggerated repetitive behavior typical of the disorder. UC Berkeley and UT San Antonio researchers have for the first time gotten CRISPR into the brain to successfully edit a gene and reduce repetitive behavior. The CRISPR-Gold technique knocked out a gene for a neurotransmitter receptor, damping overexcitation an
8h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Gut bacteria markers could be a 'smoking gun' for liver diseaseChemical compounds produced by the bacteria in our gut could be used to spot the early stages of liver disease, according to new research.
8h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

New mechanism for the plant hormone auxin discoveredAuxin is a hormone that is essential for the development of plants as it controls a wide range of processes. Previously, it was believed that auxin's main signaling mechanism acted only by regulating gene transcription. Now, scientists led by Ji?í Friml at IST Austria have demonstrated that another mechanism exists, and that cells in the roots must be able to respond to auxin immediately. This mec
8h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Cholera spread tracked at household levelFor the first time, the transmission of cholera has been tracked at the household level across Dhaka, Bangladesh, a city with a 'hyper-endemic' level of the disease. Researchers from the Wellcome Sanger Institute and their collaborators found that nearly 80 per cent of the cholera transmission in Dhaka occurred between people who shared a household. The results of the large-scale genomic study cou
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Enzyme boost could hasten production of biofuels and other bioprocessed materialsImperial scientists have enhanced the process of using biology to make products such as fuels, plastics, medicines, and cosmetics.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Men's testosterone levels largely determined by where they grow upMen's testosterone levels are largely determined by their environment during childhood, according to new research.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Immune profile for successful cancer immunotherapy discoveredIn a new study published online June 25, 2018 in Nature Medicine, UC San Francisco researchers have identified a key biological pathway in human cancer patients that appears to prime the immune system for a successful response to immunotherapy drugs known as checkpoint inhibitors.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

A new tactic for starving tumorsScientists have found a metabolic particularity in tumor cells that are low on oxygen. The discovery might point to new drugs to target the most difficult-to-treat spots within a tumor.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Are gestational age at birth and symptoms of ADHD associated?Early premature birth at less than 34 weeks was associated with symptoms of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in preschool-age children and inattention symptoms in school-age children.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

'Embattled' breast cancer drugs could be revived by UCSF discoveryMore than 60 percent of breast cancer cases involve defects in the same biochemical chain of events within cancer cells– known as the PI3 kinase (PI3K) pathway–but efforts to develop therapies targeting this pathway have met with little success after hundreds of mostly failed clinical trials. And researchers still don't understand why.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Why life on Earth first got bigSome of the earliest complex organisms on Earth — possibly some of the earliest animals to exist — got big not to compete for food, but to spread their offspring as far as possible.
8h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Clean power is not enoughCoal power versus wind and solar energy — debates about the Paris climate targets often center around electricity supply. Yet, even in a world of stringent climate policies and a clean power generation, the remaining use of fossil fuels in industry, transport and heating in buildings could still cause enough CO2 emissions to endanger the climate targets agreed on by the international community, a
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

How do tropical cyclones affect the air quality of Hong Kong?A new study finds tropical cyclones, one of the major atmospheric activities in summer and autumn, have an important influence on air quality.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Novel nuclear medicine probe will help assess new drugs for neurodegenerative diseasesNew nuclear medicine tracers could help medical researchers find a cure for Alzheimer's and other neurodegenerative diseases. The research was presented today at the SNMMI 2018 Annual Meeting, June 23-26 in Philadelphia.
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NYT > Science

This Coral Must DieIn a lab in Philadelphia, scientists are studying what it takes to kill “super coral” to understand the impact of human activities on the mysterious reefs of the deep ocean.
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New on MIT Technology Review

China tops the US as the number one supercomputer manufacturer[no content]
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Science | The Guardian

Flying cameras can spot lethal disease sweeping through world's olive grovesFast-spreading Xylella fastidiosa is devastating species from citrus to oak trees, but can now be detected from the air A devastating and fast-spreading infection killing olive trees and grapevines around the world can now be detected from the air, long before symptoms are visible to the human eye. The new technique offers hope in the battle against one of the world’s most dangerous plant pathoge
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Dana Foundation

International Neuroethics Society Essay ContestSubmissions are being accepted through July 9 for the International Neuroethics Society’s (INS) Student/Postdoc Essay Contest in Neuroethics . The contest aims to promote interest in neuroethics among students and postdocs from around the world. Those looking to enter can submit in one of two categories: academic or science communication. From the INS website : One winner from each category will
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NYT > Science

Let the Stream Run Through ItIt’s taken two decades to clean up most of Silver Bow Creek, polluted from a century of mining. Now some Butte residents want the last two miles restored, to babble on through the city.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

'Electrogeochemistry' captures carbon, produces fuel, offsets ocean acidificationLimiting global warming to 2 degrees Celsius will require not only reducing emissions of carbon dioxide, but also active removal of carbon dioxide from the atmosphere. This conclusion from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change has prompted heightened interest in "negative emissions technologies."
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Enzyme boost could hasten production of biofuels and other bioprocessed materialsImperial scientists have enhanced the process of using biology to make products such as fuels, plastics, medicines, and cosmetics.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Men's testosterone levels largely determined by where they grow upMen's testosterone levels are largely determined by their environment during childhood, according to new research.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Why life on Earth first got bigSome of the earliest complex organisms on Earth—possibly some of the earliest animals to exist—got big not to compete for food, but to spread their offspring as far as possible.
8h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Combining targeted radionuclide therapy and immunotherapy could improve melanoma survivalResearch presented at the 2018 Annual Meeting of the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging (SNMMI) shows that combining targeted radionuclide therapy with immunotherapy could improve the survival of patients with metastatic melanoma.
8h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

A new way to improve automated systemsResearchers from Zhejiang University in China have developed a new way to boost the performance of automated systems such as energy plants, airplanes and electronics. Prof. Su and his team have designed an algorithm that computes the feasible set using constraints represented by geometric shapes. The program can quickly determine the angle of the inner connections within each shape, resulting in t
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TED Talks Daily (SD video)

How we can design timeless cities for our collective future | Vishaan ChakrabartiThere's a creeping sameness in many of our newest urban buildings and streetscapes, says architect Vishaan Chakrabarti. And this physical homogeneity — the result of regulations, mass production, safety issues and cost considerations, among other factors — has blanketed our planet in a social and psychological homogeneity, too. In this visionary talk, Chakrabarti calls for a return to designing
8h
New on MIT Technology Review

Orlando’s airport will require face scans on all international travelers[no content]
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

New carbon could signal step-change for the world's most popular batteriesScientists have created a new type of carbon that could make the batteries in our phones, tablet computers and laptops safer, more powerful, quicker to charge and longer lasting.
8h
Ingeniøren

DTU til biotekbranchen: Fokusér bakteriernes arbejde hvis I vil booste produktionenCellefabrikker bliver langt mere effektive, hvis man sætter flere genotyper af mikroorganismer til at arbejde sammen i stedet for at lade en enkelt bakterie eller svamp multitaske. Det viser forskning fra DTU.
8h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

T-cell leukaemia: Cancer cells take advantage of 'survival protein'Cancer researchers at KU Leuven have shown that some patients with T-cell leukaemia produce too much of the BCL-2 protein. Cancer cells take advantage of this 'survival protein' which allows them to escape chemotherapy. A drug suppressing this BCL-2 shows promising results.
8h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Skeleton formation in young corals documented for first time in multidisciplinary studyResearchers have identified the biological process of mineralization that occurs in a young coral that shifts from the plankton (swimming) stage to the 'settled' stage in which it forms the skeleton from minerals that protect its colony. The discovery is important for understanding the process of coral reef formation and protecting marine creatures from ecological damage associated with global war
8h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Improved PSMA-targeting agent more effective for prostate cancer diagnosis/therapy in miceResearch presented at the 2018 Annual Meeting of the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging (SNMMI) demonstrates a potentially more effective method of imaging and treating prostate cancer that modifies a prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA)-targeted radioligand by adding an albumin-binding Evans blue (an azo dye) derivative.
8h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Novel PET tracer successfully images cardiovascular infectionsA novel positron emission tomography (PET) tracer has been developed that can accurately image cardiovascular infections, which are extremely dangerous and have a high fatality rate. The research was presented at the 2018 Annual Meeting of the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging (SNMMI).
8h
Ingeniøren

Vilkårlige udflytninger avler afmagt blandt medarbejdereHvis de udflyttede statslige styrelser skal vende stemningen, må de gen(op)finde deres mission og bruge ekstra tid på motivation.
9h
Ingeniøren

Miniaturechip booster små droners navigationsevneNy drone-miniaturechip med et ultralavt strømforbrug kan databehandle 171 billedframes i sekundet.
9h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Monarchs ride west coast winds: Proof of butterfly migration gatheredAfter five years and nearly 15,000 tagged butterflies, scientists now have proof that Monarch butterflies migrate from the Pacific Northwest to California in late summer and fall, a journey averaging nearly 500 miles.
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Futurity.org

How Chinese officials hide corruption from their bossesChina US Donald TrumpIn a new study, researchers found that citizen complaints of lower management wrongdoing in one Chinese city were routinely concealed from senior authorities. When Chinese President Xi Jinping took office in 2012, he launched the most extensive anti-corruption drive since Maoist rule in China. For many in the country, the campaign was considered a success: It put government authorities under inte
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Futurity.org

‘Transport error’ in the brain sheds light on Huntington’sScientists have discovered a previously unknown error in the transport of glutamine in the brains of mice with Huntington’s disease. The finding may lead to the development of new treatments, the researchers believe. There is currently no cure for Huntington’s, which causes personality alterations and loss of motor control. Now researchers have come one step closer to uncovering what actually hap
9h
New on MIT Technology Review

A team of AI algorithms just crushed humans in a complex computer gameOpenAI Dota 2 AI BrockmanAlgorithms capable of collaboration and teamwork can outmaneuver human teams.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Researchers work toward systematic assessment of climate modelsA research team based at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory has published the results of an international survey designed to assess the relative importance climate scientists assign to variables when analyzing a climate model's ability to simulate real-world climate.
9h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

New carbon could signal step-change for the world's most popular batteriesScientists have created a new type of carbon that could make the batteries in our phones, tablet computers and laptops safer, more powerful, quicker to charge and longer lasting.An international team of researchers, led by Lancaster University and Jilin University in China, have announced the first organically synthesised porous carbon, called OSPC-1, in the journal Angewandte Chemie.
9h
The Atlantic

Who Gets to Live in Silicon Valley?“Silicon Valley” was not always just a name for the computer-technology industry. Today, the phrase mostly conjures up a catalog of corporate successes: Hewlett-Packard, Oracle, Facebook, Google, Apple, Uber, and all the start-ups aspiring to similar wealth and glory. But Silicon Valley is also a real geographic place, with a real history, where real people live and work—and not just in tech, but
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Elon Musk’s OpenAI Takes on Pro Gamers in Dota 2—And Could WinOpenAI Dota 2 AI BrockmanA five-bot team from Elon Musk's OpenAI will compete against professional players of Dota 2, in a test of the powers of machine learning.
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Popular Science

Yes, you can stop snoring. Here's how.DIY Finally sleep soundly (and silently). We’ve all lost sleep from someone sawing logs. And this habit isn’t just a nuisance—it actually affects your health. Luckily, there are a few ways to stop it.
9h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Lipid-based nanoparticles enable improved therapy for cystic fibrosis patientsResearchers are working on a nanotechnology-based treatment that holds great promise for improving the lives of cystic fibrosis patients.
9h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

National Zoo closes panda habitat for possible pregnancyPaws are crossed at the Smithsonian's National Zoo in Washington, where a panda baby watch is underway.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

How to train your robot: Research provides new approachesIf your friend is sad, you can say something to help cheer them up. If you ask your co-worker to make coffee, they know the steps to complete this task.
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Futurity.org

Just 1 gene triggers a key step in cell agingScientists seeking to unlock the secrets of cellular aging have identified a gene that triggers senescence, a phenomenon in which cells stop dividing. Senescence is a natural occurrence in the life of a cell, and researchers wanted to learn about it for a couple of reasons: It’s connected to old age: Senescent cells are thought to contribute to heart disease, arthritis, cataracts, and a bevy of o
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Australia failing to protect Great Barrier Reef: activistsAustralia is breaching commitments to protect the embattled Great Barrier Reef from the effects of land clearing, environmental groups claimed Monday and called on the UN to probe the alleged failures.
10h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Lethal prostate cancer treatment may benefit from combination immunotherapyResearchers at the Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center and the Bloomberg~Kimmel Institute for Cancer Immunotherapy (BKI) released a study investigating the use of combination checkpoint immunotherapy in the treatment of a lethal form of advanced prostate cancer. The study suggested a genetic subset of prostate cancer may benefit from this form of immunotherapy.
10h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Can the kids wait? Today's youngsters able to delay gratification longer than those of the 1960sSome 50 years since the original 'marshmallow test' in which most preschoolers gobbled up one treat immediately rather than wait several minutes to get two, today's youngsters may be able to delay gratification significantly longer to get that extra reward. This was the key finding of a new study published by the American Psychological Association.
10h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Researchers identify brain cells responsible for removing damaged neurons after injuryResearchers at the University of Virginia School of Medicine have discovered that microglia, specialized immune cells in the brain, play a key role in clearing dead material after brain injury. The study, which will be published June 25 in the Journal of Experimental Medicine, reveals that microglia gobble up the remnants of injured neurons, which could prevent the damage from spreading to neighbo
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Experiments of the Russian scientists in space lead to a new way of 3D-bioprintingThanks to the research of magnetic levitation in the conditions of microgravity, a new technology for 3D printing of biological tissues was developed. In the future, this technology will help to create radiation-sensitive biological constructs and repair damaged tissues and human organs. The results are published in Biofabrication. The technology is based on the results of the experimental studies
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

3, 2, 1…liftoff! The science of launching rockets from AustraliaAustralia's space agency will officially commence operations on July 1 2018.
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Fujifilm Instax Square SQ6 Review: Simple Square ShotsFuji's first square analog instant camera is finally here. Was it worth the wait?
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Thiol molecules drive gold atoms to form a forest of nanowires with useful propertiesAdjustments to sulfur-containing molecules have enabled researchers to precisely control the growth of gold nanowires, which are potentially useful in various applications including biosensors and catalysis.
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Dagens Medicin

Bevar værdifuld viden fra papirjournalerneFlere regioner er grundet økonomi og pladsmangel begyndt at kassere papirjournaler. Det er en historieløs handling, der kan koste både nuværende og kommende patienter dyrt. Derfor opfordrer vi regionerne til at stoppe praksis af hensyn til befolkningens sundhed.
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Dagens Medicin

Refleksioner over lægeløftetTil mine meddimittender: Bær vidnesbyrd og vis hinanden sårbarhed i lægelivet.
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Scientific American Content: Global

No More Chicken Soup: Data Is the Answer to Fighting the FluComputational approaches can help fulfill the promise of creating a universal flu vaccine — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
10h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

TGen-led study identifies gene expression patterns associated with fatty liver diseaseIn an effort towards discovering a drug target, scientists at the Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen), an affiliate of City of Hope, for the first time have identified significant gene expression patterns associated with obesity-related NASH inflammation and fibrosis.The study, which was done in collaboration with the Geisinger Obesity Institute and Temple University, was published Ju
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Discovery (uploads) on YouTube

The Rivalry | Gold Rush: The Ballad of Parker and ToddParker and Todd tell the origin story about how they met, how their stories cross, and how friends turned to bitter enemies. May the best miner win! Stream Every Episode of Gold Rush: https://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/gold-rush/ Download the Discovery GO app now! Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Discovery Follow us on Twitter:
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Shining a light on gene regulationCancer treatments—from radiation to surgery to chemotherapy—are designed to remove or kill cancerous cells, but healthy cells often become collateral damage in the process. What if you could use lasers to pinpoint the treatment area and deliver medicine to cancer cells only?
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Nobarrier to applications for a remarkable 2-D materialMass production of large, uniform sheets of single-layer molybdenum disulfide, MoS2, is difficult, which limits its commercial application. A*STAR researchers have modified an existing manufacturing technique to enable the use of MoS2 in a range of technologies from photodevices to flexible, transparent sensors.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

China's online service giant Meituan plans massive IPOChinese online services giant Meituan-Dianping filed for an initial public offering in Hong Kong on Monday, in what could become one of the the biggest IPOs of the year.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

China's Didi steps up challenge to Uber with Australia pushChinese ride-sharing giant Didi has intensified its drive for global business, launching in Melbourne Monday as it joins rivals Uber, Taxify and Ola in Australia's taxi market.
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cognitive science

An Argument for Behaviorism – Mediumsubmitted by /u/rachelsmantra [link] [comments]
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Improved forecasting of sunlight could help increase solar energy generationThe Sun is becoming an increasingly important source of clean electricity. Accurate sunlight forecasts being developed by A*STAR researchers could greatly improve the performance of solar energy plants, making it a viable alternative to carbon-based sources of power.
10h
Live Science

The New York Times May Have Solved the Biggest Environmental Mystery in DecadesA report from Xingfu, China may point to the source of a bizarre spike in ozone layer-depleting CFCs reported in May.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Palm oil giant still linked to Indonesia logging: GreenpeaceThe world's largest palm oil trader is still linked to deforestation in Indonesia despite committing five years ago to stop logging the archipelago's vast tracts of jungle, Greenpeace said Monday.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Uber argues it should remain in business in LondonUber argued Monday that is should be allowed to keep driving on the streets of London, telling a court that the ride-hailing app has made significant changes since a regulator refused to renew the company's operating license last year.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Rare collection of Jewish texts finds home at Brown's libraryThe Brown University Library is now home to a collection of rare illustrated texts that depict how Jewish communities have celebrated the Passover Seder across the globe, spanning more than 400 years and in a wide range of languages.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Climbing the ladder to life detectionIn the past two decades, NASA spacecraft have identified potentially habitable environments throughout the solar system and beyond. Spacecraft on Mars have found evidence that lakes and streams once covered the planet, protected by a long-gone thick atmosphere. At Saturn's moon Enceladus, the Cassini spacecraft sniffed plumes of water jetting out of Enceladus's icy shell—detecting chemistry akin t
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Ahard look at polymers in cement mixModelling how superplasticizers can reduce water proportions in cement mixtures may help develop more efficient superplasticizers, as well as enhance concrete performance, shows the first comprehensive study conducted by A*STAR.
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Futurity.org

Sibling bonds protect kids against fighting parentsStrong sibling bonds can offset the negative effects of parental strife, according to a new study. The study finds that adolescents who witnessed high levels of acrimony between their parents had greater distressed responses to parental conflict a year later. Those responses, in turn, predicted mental health problems in the subsequent year. Yet, the researchers show that teens with strong sibling
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Stable, predictable work schedules elusive for many Illinois workers, paper saysMore than 40 percent of hourly workers and 30 percent of salaried workers in Illinois have variable or unpredictable work schedules, resulting in underemployment and work-life conflicts with child care, parenting and other family obligations, says new research conducted by a pair of University of Illinois experts who study labor issues affecting the working class.
10h
Ingeniøren

Overraskede fysikere: Vands grænselag er elektrisk set helt dødtMeget tynde vandlag påvirkes ikke af elektriske felter på samme måde, som det er tilfældet for vand i større mængder.
11h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Children with existing allergies should be screened for an emerging, severe chronic food allergyChildren with known skin, food and respiratory allergies should be screened for an emerging, chronic food allergy called eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE), a painful inflammation of the esophagus, the food tube between the mouth and stomach. Pediatric allergists who analyzed a very large group of children from birth to adolescence say that EoE should be considered a later component of the 'allergic m
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Hubble sees galaxy with 3 supernovasIn astronomy, the devil is in the details—as this image, taken by the NASA/ESA (European Space Agency) Hubble Space Telescope's Advanced Camera for Surveys and Wide-Field Camera 3, demonstrates.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Uncovering a missing link from methane to methanolMicroscopic crystalline structures called metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) may provide a way to solve one of the biggest problems in methane functionalization catalysis, an economically important chemical process.
11h
Popular Science

Trying to figure out where you fit on the sexuality spectrum? Dabbling in these tests might help.Health Human sexuality spans too wide a scope to possibly be covered by a single test. It’s by far the best-known sexuality scale, both for its creator’s fame and for its simplicity, but it’s far from the most accurate or most helpful. In fact, it probably…
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Striking the right balance between wind energy and biodiversityEPFL researchers have developed a simulator that can calculate the performance of wind farms over 30 years while also factoring in the need to preserve local biodiversity. Tested at a site in the Carpathian Mountains in Romania, the simulator could be applied to the Swiss Jura region, which has a similar landscape.
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Feed: All Latest

The Quest to Make Super-cold Quantum Blobs in SpacePhysicists launched a custom-made freezer and then let it plummet back to Earth—for science!
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Cockatoo discovery reveals flourishing medieval trade routes around Australia's northImages of an Australasian cockatoo have been discovered in a manuscript dating from 13th century Sicily, now held in the Vatican library.
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New on MIT Technology Review

City-crippling ransomware, crypto hijackings, and more: our 2018 mid-year cybersecurity updateSo far this year, some of our January predictions have been spot-on. But we also failed to foresee one very big, looming threat.
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The Atlantic

The Changing Sound of Male Rage in Rock MusicChloe Scheffe At the end of 2017 , U2’s Bono made one of his periodic pronouncements about the state of rock and roll. “I think music has gotten very girly,” he told Rolling Stone . “There are some good things about that, but hip-hop is the only place for young male anger at the moment—and that’s not good … In the end, what is rock & roll? Rage is at the heart of it.” He was airing the sort of co
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The Atlantic

Letters From the Archives: Atlantic Readers Had Mixed Feelings About HippiesLetters from the Archives is a series in which we highlight past Atlantic stories and reactions from readers at the time. The hippie movement was “easier to see than understand,” wrote Mark Harris in his September 1967 Atlantic Monthly article “The Flowering of the Hippies.” In Haight-Ashbury that summer, people came from all over to see the men who “by design or by accident resembled Jesus Chris
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Scientific American Content: Global

Policy Makers Can Harness Digital Innovations to Reduce Carbon EmissionsLeft to itself, the digitalization of energy supply and consumption is just as likely to raise emissions as lower them — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

In the brain, dislike and dehumanization are not the same thingIt has long been thought that when people characterized others as less-than-human, it was an expression of extreme dislike. New research shows that in fact judgements about dislike and dehumanization of people occur in separate brain regions, suggesting they are different psychological processes. This has implications for how we understand the migrant detention crisis in America as well as intergr
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Futurity.org

Seeing TB in 3D makes finding the right treatment way fasterA computer-generated model allows clinicians to tailor effective therapies for individual patients with multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB). While many of us may think of tuberculosis as a historical disease, it actually remains one of the top ten causes of death worldwide. In 2016, around 10.4 million people fell ill with TB globally and 1.7 million lost their lives as a result of the dise
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Engineers turn to Argonne's Mira supercomputer to study supersonic turbulenceAviation's frontier is supersonic. The military is seeking ever-faster aircraft, planes that can fly five times the speed of sound. Fifteen years after the Concorde's last transatlantic flight, Japan Airlines and the Virgin Group are investing in jets that could slash overseas travel time by more than half.
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Ingeniøren

Forstå disruption – ved at kende mønstreneDet ligner en tsunami der kommer buldrende med rævl og krat. Singularity, Silicon Valley, Unicorns, AI, VR, AR, mixed reality, fintec, SMACI, eksponentialkurver osv. Du har sikkert hørt 100 mere eller mindre skræmmende begreber slynget rundt. Derfor er mange trætte af begrebet Disruption, som er…
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Futurity.org

‘Patterns in the noise’ could predict how crops performNew research identifies clear patterns in how plants react to different environments, which could lead to new ways of predicting crop performance. The research focuses on flowering time in sorghum, a globally cultivated cereal plant, but the results could have implications for nearly all crops, says Jianming Yu, professor of agronomy and chair in maize breeding at Iowa State University. “In any e
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Australian cities are lagging behind in greening up their buildingsCovering roofs and walls of buildings with vegetation is a good way of reducing greenhouse gas emissions. And these green roofs and walls make cities look nicer. Toronto's central business district adopted a policy of establishing green roofs on around half of all city buildings in 2009. Research shows this could reduce maximum city temperatures by up to 5℃.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

The strange origins of the free speech warriorsMany free speech warriors today base their position on a proclamation articulated by Oliver Wendell Holmes, the early 20th century United States Supreme Court justice.
12h
Live Science

Your Summer May Be Full of MosquitoesNot only are their bites itchy and annoying, but mosquitoes also carry diseases. Here's a look at why some years are worse for the pesky insects.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

If you need a PhD to read your power bill, buying wisely is all but impossibleA recent survey found that Australia's power companies are less trusted than media companies, banks and telcos. Customers hate electricity bills – not least because they are so complicated. But we can learn much by analysing them closely.
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The Atlantic

The Anguished Comedy of Helen DeWittIf you didn’t already know that Helen DeWitt is a writer with a troubled relationship to the publishing establishment, her new book of stories, Some Trick , would make it obvious. DeWitt was the subject of a memorable 2016 profile in New York magazine, which told the tale of an ornery prodigy afflicted by unusually bad luck, and by her own inability to conform to the customs of commercial publish
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Latest Headlines | Science News

This volcano revealed its unique ‘voice’ after an eruptionIdentifying patterns in a volcano’s low-frequency sounds could help monitor its activity.
12h
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The Stock Market Loophole That Screws The Little GuyThe stock market was supposed to be a level playing field, but investing in private companies allows the ultra-rich to reap unparalleled gains.
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The Troubled End of an Ethically Compromised Booze StudyNIH pulled the plug on what would have been a grand experiment in “healthy” drinking. Where can the field go now?
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Feed: All Latest

Cities Are Watching You—Urban Sciences Graduates Watch BackAmerican Wi-Fi networks, smart traffic lights, security cameras, cell phones, and vehicles are throwing off truckloads of data. A new program at MIT (and others like it) teaches students to handle it in ways that make residents’ lives better.
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New on MIT Technology Review

This is how the robot uprising finally beginsAI and robotics have been separate fields up to now. Combining them could transform manufacturing and warehousing— and take AI to the next level.
12h
Live Science

'Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom' Skimps on Dinosaur ScienceWe're not asking for much — at least cover those dinos in a few feathers.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

The tools humanity will need for living in the year 1 trillionSince the 1990s, astrophysicists have known that for the past few billion years, the Universe has been experiencing an accelerated rate of expansion. This gave rise to the theory that the Universe is permeated by a mysterious invisible energy known as "dark energy", which acts against gravity and is pushing the cosmos apart. In time, this energy will become the dominant force in the Universe, caus
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Scientific American Content: Global

Can Robotics Solve Its Diversity Problem?Fetch Robotics CEO Melonee Wise talks about the need for standardizing robots and diversifying engineering teams — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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The Atlantic

I Delivered Packages for Amazon and It Was a NightmareI’m sure I looked comical as I staggered down a downtown San Francisco street on a recent weekday, arms full of packages—as I dropped one and bent down to pick it up, another fell, and as I tried to rein that one in, another toppled. Yet it wasn’t funny, not really. There I was, wearing a bright-yellow safety vest and working for Amazon Flex, a program in which the e-commerce giant pays regular p
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Georgia malware, cybersecurity research helps make internet saferThe internet has made many things easier.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Researchers discover volcanic heat source under major Antarctic glacierA researcher from the University of Rhode Island's Graduate School of Oceanography and five other scientists have discovered an active volcanic heat source beneath the Pine Island Glacier in Antarctica.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

The fifty-percenters: the economic value of educationAlmost half of young people in the UK now go to university. Who gets in – and what and where they study – affects a person's place in society and their future earnings, as well as the skills available to the job market. Can big data help the 'fifty percenters' make one of the most important decisions of their lives – and advance the success of the UK's graduate economy?
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Image: Chaotic clouds of JupiterThis image captures swirling cloud belts and tumultuous vortices within Jupiter's northern hemisphere.
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cognitive science

Our Brain is a Digital Devicesubmitted by /u/chopchop1980 [link] [comments]
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Physicists investigate home run increaseHome run rates in Major League Baseball have increased steadily since 2015. In 2017, the rate was 35 percent greater than it was before the All-Star Game in 2015. To understand the reason behind this sudden surge, the organization convened a committee of 10 scientists representing various fields to dig into pitching and batting behavior as well as physical features of the balls themselves.
13h
Ingeniøren

Techtopia #58: Kunstig intelligens hjælper sejlsportPodcast: Volvo Ocean Race er verdens hårdeste kapsejlads, som kræver det yderste af besætningerne. Men nu kan de få hjælp af kunstig intelligens og IoT.
13h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Revolutionizing the jet fuel industry with biofuel made from oilseedThe Boeing 787-9 Dreamliner roared down the runway before sailing serenely up into the skies over Los Angeles International Airport. The recent Qantas flight, heading for Melbourne, Australia, seemed like any other leaving LAX, except for the fact that this plane was partially powered by biojet fuel, making for a reduced carbon footprint.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Planetary nebula lasersAstronomical masers (the radio wavelength analogs of lasers) were first identified in space over fifty years ago and have since been seen in many locations; astronomical lasers have since been seen as well. Some of the most spectacular masers are found in regions of active star formation; in one case the region radiates as much energy in a single spectral line as does our Sun in its entire visible
13h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Image: Dance of the asteroidsAs if this Hubble Space Telescope picture isn't cluttered enough with myriad galaxies, nearby asteroids photobomb the image, their trails sometimes mimicking background astronomical phenomena.
13h
New Scientist – News

Crewed missions to the moon and Mars need dreamers and doersSince the moon landings, we have come crashing back down to Earth. Getting back into space will take wild ambition and serious amounts of hard work
13h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Rocket development gets a 'colossal' boostThe University of California San Diego's chapter of Students for the Exploration and Development of Space (SEDS) conducted a successful live fire test of its static rocket engine test stand, Colossus, in the Mojave Desert on June 16.
13h
The Atlantic

Under Mueller's Scrutiny, Trump Allies Cry FBI EntrapmentPresident Donald Trump’s repeated claims that the FBI planted a “spy” in his campaign has handed his associates a new way to characterize any suspicious interactions they may have had during the election: those interactions, especially those being examined by Special Counsel Robert Mueller, were an FBI setup. Mueller is investigating whether the Trump campaign abetted a Russian disinformation cam
13h
Ingeniøren

VW's elektrisk superbil smadrer rekorden på Pikes PeakDen elektriske racerbil I.D. R fra VW slog rekorden for at nå hurtigst til toppen af Pikes Peak med over 16 sekunder.
13h
Ingeniøren

Ny rekord: Verdens mindste computer er 0,04 kubikmillimeterDen nye computer får et riskorn til at se enormt ud. Forskerne bag maskinen ser mange muligheder indenfor sundhedsforskning og -behandling, men apparatet har også en lang række begrænsninger.
13h
Ingeniøren

USA: Kinesiske selskaber må ikke købe vores tech-firmaer længereAmerikanerne er trætte af, at kinesere følger med i teknologiudviklingen i de store firmaer. Derfor vil de nu begrænse muligheden for at kinesere opkøber tech-virksomheder, og de kigger endda på muligheden for at stoppe bestemte varer fra at blive eksporteret til Kina.
13h
Ingeniøren

Fjernvarmeselskab: Vi er tvunget til at lagre solvarmeLagring af solvarme er eneste udvej for selskaberne, når grundbeløbet forsvinder i 2019.
14h
Science : NPR

Red Meat Allergies Caused By Tick Bites Are On The RiseIf you are bitten by a Lone Star tick, you could develop an unusual allergy to red meat. And as this tick's territory spreads beyond the Southeast, the allergy seems to be spreading with it. (Image credit: Robert Noonan/Science Source)
14h
Science : NPR

Pregnant Women: Avoid Soft Cheeses, But Do Get These ShotsDoctors want to remind moms to get certain vaccines while pregnant. Whooping cough in particular can be deadly for newborns, but only about 50 percent of pregnant women get the vaccine. (Image credit: Nicole Xu for NPR)
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NYT > Science

Nonfiction: Must Science Conflict With Spirituality?The astrophysicist and novelist Alan Lightman doesn’t think so. And his new book, “Searching for Stars on an Island in Maine,” explains why.
14h
NYT > Science

The New Health Care: I Learned I Have Sleep Apnea. It’s More Serious Than Many People Realize.There are many treatment options for a problem that can be downright deadly.
14h
The Atlantic

Can Anyone Fill the U.S. Leadership Vacuum on Climate Change?One year ago, President Trump announced that he planned to withdraw the United States from the Paris climate agreement. The decision derived from Trump’s insistence that climate change is a “hoax” and his determination to overturn as much of his predecessor’s legacy as possible. It also matches with Trump’s insistence that the U.S. doesn’t need the rest of the world. In a material sense, that’s a
14h
Science | The Guardian

World of weird: the new exhibits at London's eccentric Horniman MuseumMuseum’s director on how its epic anthropology collection fulfils its founder’s brief to “bring the world to Forest Hill” The Horniman Museum’s new director is surrounded by more than 3,000 objects collected over a century ago to show the English how fascinating, different and frankly weird the rest of the world was, but the object he loves most was made in the past year. The “eco-warrior’s helme
14h
Ingeniøren

Kronik: Milliard-oprydning på havet gavner ikke havmiljøet[no content]
15h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Water use across the US declines to levels not seen since 1970Reductions in water use first observed in 2010 continue, show ongoing effort towards "efficient use of critical water resources."
15h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Could you help build a galaxy?Have you ever wanted to help build a galaxy? Now's your chance.
15h
Ingeniøren

Fejlaffyret missil brænder ud under dækket på tysk fregatEn missilulykke ud for den norske kyst resulterede torsdag i skader på en tysk fregat af Sachsen-klassen.
16h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Graphene company partners with university to commercialise egg-unboiling machineTechnology capable of producing high-grade graphite at a price and scale viable for use in energy storage devices, coatings and polymers is being commercialised following the establishment of a new Australian company.
16h
Science-Based Medicine

Clínica 0-19: False hope in Monterrey for brain cancer patientsDrs. Alberto Sille and Alberto Garcia run Clínica 0-19 in Monterrey, Mexico, which has become a magnet for patients with diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma (DIPG), a deadly brain cancer. Unfortunately, their treatment is an unproven combination of 11 chemotherapy drugs injected into an artery feeding the brainstem, plus an unknown and unproven "immunotherapy." Of course it all costs $300,000 or more
16h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Australian feral cats kill a million reptiles a day: studyFeral cats kill more than one million reptiles every day in Australia, a new study showed Monday, with the staggering slaughter threatening many species.
16h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Plaster which sticks inside the mouth could improve treatment of oral conditionsA plaster which sticks to the inside of your mouth is revolutionising the treatment of painful recurring ulcers.
16h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Justice not blind to gender biasIn a quiet courtroom, an attorney steps up to a lectern to deliver a closing argument. The defendant in the case is charged with murder, having stabbed a woman to death in front of her infant child.
16h
NYT > Science

A Leading Climate Agency May Lose Its Climate FocusThe Trump Administration appears to be removing references to climate from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s mission statement.
17h
Ingeniøren

Jurist: Tvivlsomt om Facebook kan redde sideadministratorer med opdaterede vilkårFacebook lover handling for at redde virksomheder, organisationer og myndigheder på virksomhedens platform ud af GDPR-knibe efter ny EU-dom. Det er dog tvivlsomt, om virksomhedens udmeldte skridt er tilstrækkelige, mener persondatajurist.
17h
Viden

Kæmpe DNA-database: Nu kan en spytklat afsløre din hårfarveForskningsresultat giver helt nye muligheder for DNA-forskning.
18h
Science | The Guardian

Star attraction: Royal Observatory seeks volunteers to use new telescopeCutting-edge telescope makes Greenwich a working observatory for the first time in 60 years Pull on the right ropes and the dome at the Altazimuth pavilion at the Royal Observatory Greenwich swings around and opens up to reveal a thick band of London sky. The Victorian building is about to emerge from a major refurbishment and inside the dome sits the main attraction: a cutting-edge telescope tha
18h
Feed: All Latest

'Westworld' Recap, Season 2 Episode 10: What *Is* Real?Westworld The PassengerAll of Season 2 has toyed with perceptions of reality—and the finale took that to the extreme.
18h
Viden

Fodboldspillerne udnytter fysikkens loveFodboldspillere kan fascinere millioner af seere med deres kringlede kunstner på det grønne tæppe. Vi dykker ned i fysikken bag nogle af VM historiens højdepunkter.
18h
Viden

Forskere finder ny abeart i oldgammel kinesisk gravDen nye abeart tilhører gibbonfamilien, og forskerne regner med, at den allerede er uddød.
18h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Plaster which sticks inside the mouth will revolutionize treatment of oral conditionsA new biodegradable patch administers steroids directly to oral ulcers and forms a protective barrier.
19h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Clostridium difficile infections have decreased 36 percent in Canadian hospitalsRates of C. difficile infections have decreased 36 percent in hospitals across Canada, although the virulent NAP1 strain associated with severe illness and deaths is the most common strain, according to research published in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal).
19h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Justice not blind to gender biasStudy participants found male attorneys delivering a fiery closing argument to be commanding and powerful, and found female attorneys delivering the same argument to be shrill and ineffective.
19h
Ingeniøren

Robotternes indtog på byggepladsen vil tvinge ingeniørerne til at stramme opSnart står robotterne klar til at rykke ind i byggeriet. Men ufærdigt projekteringsmateriale, rod på byggepladsen og traditionelle kontrakter står i vejen.
20h
The Atlantic

Westworld: Is This Now?Every week for the second season of Westworld , three Atlantic staffers will discuss new episodes of HBO’s cerebral sci-fi drama. Sophie Gilbert : So much of the last half hour of “The Passenger” felt like a series finale. Dolores was reborn (born isn’t quite the right word but we do the best we can) into Charlotte Hale’s body, waved through security protocols by a (perhaps) in-on-the-secret Stub
20h
BBC News – Science & Environment

UK's forgotten woman astronomer honouredThe Royal Observatory Greenwich is to start serious study of the sky again with a facility named after astronomer Annie Maunder.
22h
Futurity.org

Spray coating could pave way for cheaper solar cellsResearchers say they’ve solved a major fabrication challenge for perovskite cells—the intriguing potential challengers to silicon-based solar cells. These crystalline structures show great promise because they can absorb almost all wavelengths of light. Perovskite solar cells are already commercialized on a small scale, but recent vast improvements in their power conversion efficiency (PCE) are d
23h
Futurity.org

Water gets weird at extreme pressures and tempsWhen exposed to unimaginably high temperatures and pressures, water exhibits all sorts of weird phases and properties, from remaining a liquid at temperatures 10 times higher than the boiling point to existing as a liquid and a solid at the same time. This strange world is still not fully understood, but scientists ran quantum simulations to develop a new model of the behavior of water at extreme
1d
Futurity.org

Genome analysis solves Mexican Wolf mysteryNew research uses genomic technology to investigate a long-standing question about the Mexican wolf. In October 2015, two small minnows in the Lower Colorado River Basin—the headwater chub and the roundtail chub—were proposed for listing as threatened species under the Endangered Species Act of 1973. In April 2017, that proposal was withdrawn after new science identified the two small fish as mem
1d
Futurity.org

Lava and ash aren’t the only threats from volcanoesThe eruptions of Guatemala’s Fuego volcano and Hawaii’s Kilauea volcano this spring offer reminders that lava, ash, and size don’t fully explain why volcanoes are so dangerous. Dozens of people have died and thousands more have been evacuated in the area around Fuego as a result of its June 3 eruption. Like Kilauea, which, in early May 2018, began a violent episode in an eruption that has carried
1d
Futurity.org

Here’s some good news about Antarctica’s iceThe earth is rising in a region of Antarctica at one of the fastest rates ever recorded, as ice rapidly disappears and weight lifts off the bedrock, according to a new study. The findings, which appear in the journal Science , contain surprising and positive implications for the survival of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet (WAIS), which scientists had previously thought could be doomed because of the
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Futurity.org

Parent-child emotion therapy eases depressionAn interactive therapy involving parents and their depressed children can reduce rates of depression and lower the severity of children’s symptoms, research finds. Children as young as three can be clinically depressed, and often that depression recurs as kids get older and go to school. It also can reappear during adolescence and throughout life. “By identifying depression as early as possible a
1d
Science : NPR

How Police Killings Lead To Poor Mental Health In The Black CommunityA recent study published in The Lancet Medical journal shows that police killings of unarmed black men leads to poor mental. NPR's Michel Martin talks with study co-author Dr. Atheendar Venkataramani.
1d
cognitive science

New studies link obesity to lower breast cancer An analysis has linked higher body mass index, to lower breast cancer risk for younger women, even for women within a normal weight range.submitted by /u/davyeminy [link] [comments]
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Science | The Guardian

Starwatch: mooning around for a glimpse of Saturn in SagittariusThis constellation is not the easiest to identify, because its stars are rather faint and it never rises high in the UK sky The full Moon is always a beautiful sight in the night sky, but this month it is particularly useful as well. Those with a good southern horizon can use it to identify two rather more elusive celestial sights: the planet Saturn and the constellation Sagittarius, the Archer.
1d
Big Think

Why we don't need to prepare young people for the 'future of work'Young workers experience insufficient opportunities for work experience, a mismatch between work and education, a lack of career management skills and scant entry-level jobs. Read More

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