Search Posts

Nyheder2018juni26

MOST POPULAR

Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Scientists find evidence of complex organic molecules from EnceladusEnceladus Saturn CassiniUsing mass spectrometry data from NASA's Cassini spacecraft, scientists found that large, carbon-rich organic molecules are ejected from cracks in the icy surface of Saturn's moon Enceladus. Southwest Research Institute scientists think chemical reactions between the moon's rocky core and warm water from its subsurface ocean are linked to these complex molecules.
3h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

US, South American paleontologists ID two new Miocene mammals in BoliviaResearchers at Case Western Reserve University and two other universities have discovered the 13-million-year-old fossils of a pair of new species of extinct hoofed mammals known as 'litopterns' from a site in Bolivia.
3h
Ingeniøren

Danmark undersøger to nye tunneler til SverigeSammen med det svenske Trafikverket skal Vejdirektoratet undersøge brugerbetalte vej- og banetunneler under Øresund. I 2020 skal politikerne beslutte, om der skal arbejdes videre med projektet.
9h
Slack

SlackIt's teamwork, but simpler, more pleasant and more productive.
Sponsored

LATEST

Scientific American Content: Global

NASA Defers Launch of James Webb Space Telescope Again–This Time to 2021The postponement brings the project's total estimated lifetime cost to $9.66 billion—and further delays are possible — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
3min
Live Science

Why Do Babies Kick in the Womb?The womb is a tight space in which to exercise, but kicking is vital for a baby's healthy development.
6min
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Summer dead zones in Chesapeake Bay breaking up earlierA new study shows that dead zones in the lower Chesapeake Bay are beginning to break up earlier in the fall, which may be an indication that efforts to reduce nutrient pollution to the Bay are beginning to make an impact. Scientists from the University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science found that dead zones in the lower part of the Chesapeake Bay are getting smaller in the late summer t
6min
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Study: Men with migraine may have higher estrogen levelsWhile it has been known that estrogen plays a role in migraine for women, new research shows that the female sex hormone may also play a role in migraine for men, according to a small study published in the June 27, 2018, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.
6min
Big Think

Scientists studied tattooed corpses to see if ink travelsIt turns out, that tattoo ink can travel throughout your body, and settle in lymph nodes. Read More
24min
Big Think

California marijuana farms are putting local animals on the endangered species listThe Humboldt marten, a (much cuter) cousin of the weasel, has been placed on the endangered species list thanks to marijuana croppers. Read More
24min
Big Think

Animals are becoming nocturnal to avoid humansA large analysis shows that many species are completely changing their habits to avoid humans. Read More
24min
Live Science

DARPA Wants to Boost Your Body's Defenses ― By 'Tuning' Your GenesA new DARPA program will explore ways to better protect people against biological and chemical threats by temporarily "tuning" gene expression.
26min
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Is the interstellar asteroid really a comet?The interstellar object Oumuamua was discovered back on Oct. 19, 2017, but the puzzle of its true nature has taken months to unravel, and may never be fully solved.Meaning 'scout from the distant past' in Hawaiian, Oumuamua was found by astronomers working with the University of Hawaii's Pan-STARRS1 survey as it came close to Earth's orbit. But what is it: an asteroid or a comet?
27min
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Breast cancer studies ignore race, socioeconomic factorsStudies of breast cancer risk and treatment outcomes are not taking sufficient account of race/ethnicity, economic status, education level, health insurance status and other social factors, according to scientists at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health.
27min
BBC News – Science & Environment

Flamingo that escaped a zoo in 2005 spotted in TexasThe bird, tagged as number 492, is seen near Lavaca Bay, Texas, after fleeing a Kansas zoo in 2005.
37min
Viden

5 fakta om Niels Bohr: Einstein kaldte hans teori for et mirakelNiels Bohr revolutionerede vores forståelse af verden. Vil du vide mere om danmarkshistoriensmåske mest berømte forsker? Så læs med her.
51min
Popular Science

Blame loose screws and ‘excessive optimism’ for the latest delay of NASA’s new space telescopeNASA JWST Webb TelescopeSpace James Webb is now slated for a 2021 launch—only a bajillion years late. NASA made a big announcement about the much-anticipated James Webb Space Telescope today.
58min
New on MIT Technology Review

Self-driving cars could make urban traffic jams worse[no content]
1h
Scientific American Content: Global

Ingredients for Life Found on Saturn's Moon, EnceladusA new look at old data from NASA’s Cassini orbiter shows complex organic molecules are gushing from the tiny moon — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
1h
The Atlantic

To Be a Good Citizen, First Pay AttentionHere are, in no particular order, some of the things that are happening in America right now: The Supreme Court has upheld President Donald Trump’s Muslim travel ban . The Supreme Court has dealt a major blow to public-sector unions and the labor movement. Anthony Kennedy has announced a retirement that will drastically change the Court’s makeup. A 28-year-old Democratic Socialist has beaten an i
1h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

THz spectroscopy could help explain water's anomaliesLiquid water sustains life on earth, but its physical properties remain mysterious among scientific researchers. Recently, a team of Swiss researchers used existing THz spectroscopy techniques to measure liquid water's hydrogen bonding. Future efforts with this technique could one day help explain water's peculiar properties. The team reports their findings in The Journal of Chemical Physics.
1h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Small classes reduce performance gaps in scienceFrom high-stakes multiple choice exams to the social climate of the classroom, research has shown those factors can contribute to the negative impact of large, introductory and undergraduate science courses on students. However, class size is often an overlooked factor despite research suggesting it influences student performance and, unlike other influences on student attrition, is subject to leg
1h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Study yields a new scale of earthquake understandingNanoscale knowledge of the relationships between water, friction and mineral chemistry could lead to a better understanding of earthquake dynamics, researchers said in a new study. Engineers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign used microscopic friction measurements to confirm that, under the right conditions, some rocks can dissolve and may cause faults to slip.
1h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Structure of major brain receptor that is treatment target for epilepsy, anxiety solvedUT Southwestern researchers today published the first atomic structure of a brain receptor bound to a drug used to reverse anesthesia and to treat sedative overdoses.
1h
Feed: All Latest

San Francisco's Climate Case Against Big Oil Gets Dismissed“Our litigation forced a public court proceeding on climate science, and now these companies can no longer deny it is real and valid.”
1h
NYT > Science

Central Park, Now More DeliciousWith cars being banished from the drives, New Yorkers get to taste an urban oasis that’s closer to nature.
1h
Feed: All Latest

Google Tries New Rules to Curtail Harassment of EmployeesThe rules encourage "productive conversations" and prohibit disclosing personal information about a Google employee to subject them to harassment.
1h
Latest Headlines | Science News

Japan’s Hayabusa2 spacecraft arrives at the asteroid RyuguThe Hayabusa2 spacecraft says “hello” to near-Earth asteroid Ryugu.
1h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Our solar system's first known interstellar object gets unexpected speed boostUsing observations from NASA's Hubble Space Telescope and ground-based observatories, an international team of scientists have confirmed ?Oumuamua (oh-MOO-ah-MOO-ah), the first known interstellar object to travel through our solar system, got an unexpected boost in speed and shift in trajectory as it passed through the inner solar system last year.
1h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Study yields a new scale of earthquake understandingNanoscale knowledge of the relationships between water, friction and mineral chemistry could lead to a better understanding of earthquake dynamics, researchers said in a new study. Engineers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign used microscopic friction measurements to confirm that, under the right conditions, some rocks can dissolve and may cause faults to slip.
1h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Research Brief: Small classes reduce performance gaps in scienceFrom high-stakes multiple choice exams to the social climate of the classroom, research has shown those factors can contribute to the negative impact of large, introductory and undergraduate science courses on students. However, class size is often an overlooked factor despite research suggesting it influences student performance and, unlike other influences on student attrition, is subject to leg
1h
Feed: All Latest

In Upholding Trump's Travel Ban, the Supreme Court Harms ScientistsThe repercussions of Tuesday’s decision will be felt not just by individual families, but by American universities and scientific fields more generally.
1h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Togo launches new energy scheme with focus on renewablesThe Togo government on Wednesday launched a new energy policy that aims to provide universal access to electricity in the small west African country by 2030.
1h
Popular Science

The weirdest things we learned this week: scientists doing sex magick, ancient mac and cheese, and contagious writer's blockScience Our editors scrounged up some truly bizarre facts. What’s the weirdest thing you learned this week? Well, whatever it is, we promise you’ll have an even weirder answer if you listen to this week's episode of PopSci’s…
1h
The Atlantic

Photos: Fans of the 2018 World CupTwo weeks into the 2018 World Cup, and 42 matches have already been played by 32 national teams in the 12 host arenas in Russia, with the Round of 16 matches set to begin this weekend. Fans from around the world have been cheering, following the drama, and sending their support, either in Russia or watching from home, riding emotional rollercoasters as their teams leave it all on the field.
1h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

New mechanism involved in memory loss associated with aging discoveredA study led by Luísa Lopes, Group Leader at Instituto de Medicina Molecular João Lobo Antunes (iMM; Portugal) and published today in the prestigious journal Molecular Psychiatry, describes a new mechanism involved in memory loss associated with aging.
1h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

New findings on bacteria in female bladdersA new study published in Nature Communications has found that the female bladder not only contains bacteria, but the microbes are similar to those found in the vagina. The finding could lead to improved diagnostic tests and treatments for urinary tract infections and other urinary tract disorders.
1h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Structure of major brain receptor that is treatment target for epilepsy, anxiety solvedUT Southwestern researchers today published the first atomic structure of a brain receptor bound to a drug used to reverse anesthesia and to treat sedative overdoses.
1h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

THz spectroscopy could help Explain water's anomaliesLiquid water sustains life on earth, but its physical properties remain mysterious among scientific researchers. Recently, a team of Swiss researchers used existing THz spectroscopy techniques to measure liquid water's hydrogen bonding. Future efforts with this technique could one day help explain water's peculiar properties. The team reports their findings in The Journal of Chemical Physics.
1h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

This curious animal grew larger over time — but its brain didn't quite keep upStudy finds that the ancestor of the modern day mountain beaver had a larger relative brain size, offering a rare example of brain size decrease over time.
1h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Researchers identify key protein involved in triggering inflammationResearchers from the University of Illinois at Chicago have identified a protein that is crucial for activating inflammation — both the good kind of inflammation that leads to healing wounds and fighting infection, as well as excessive inflammation where the immune system can damage tissues and organs.
1h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

US proposes shrinking last endangered red wolf habitatThe Trump administration announced a proposal Wednesday to shrink the habitat of the only endangered red wolves left in the wild, and to give landowners more leeway to kill any of the animals that stray onto private property.
1h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Mars' surface hardened quickly, boosting odds of life: studyThe crust that encases rocky planets and makes possible the emergence of life took shape on Mars earlier than thought and at least 100 million years sooner than on Earth, researchers said Wednesday.
1h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

This curious animal grew larger over time—but its brain didn't quite keep upNew U of T Scarborough research has found that the ancestor of the modern day mountain beaver had a larger relative brain size.
1h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Seismologists use massive earthquakes to unlock secrets of the outer coreBy applying new data and Princeton's supercomputers to the classic question of what lies beneath our feet, Princeton seismologist Jessica Irving and an international team of colleagues have developed a new model for the Earth's outer core, a liquid iron region deep in the Earth.
1h
Ingeniøren

Fronterne blødes op før afgørende forhandlinger om energiforligRegeringen er nu klar til at bygge tre havmølleparker mod tidligere én, sagde finansminister Kristian Jensen før de afgørende forhandlinger om et nyt energiforlig onsdag efterniddag
1h
Inside Science

For Aggressive Chameleons, Color Changes Outshine CamouflageFor Aggressive Chameleons, Color Changes Outshine Camouflage When assessing their enemies, chameleons may be better off looking at color rather than the size and shape of their opponents' bodies. 2048px-Yemen_Chameleon_mirror_cropped.jpg Image credits: B kimmel via Wikimedia Commons Rights information: Cc-by-sa-3.0 Creature Wednesday, June 27, 2018 – 14:00 Nala Rogers, Staff Writer (Inside Scienc
2h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Mandatory labels reduce GMO food fearsAs the U.S. Department of Agriculture prepares guidelines for labeling products that contain genetically modified ingredients, a new study from the University of Vermont reveals that a simple disclosure can improve consumer attitudes toward GMO food.
2h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Seismologist Jessica Irving uses massive earthquakes to unlock secrets of the outer coreBy applying new data and Princeton's supercomputers to the classic question of what lies beneath our feet, Princeton seismologist Jessica Irving and an international team of colleagues have developed a new model for the Earth's outer core, a liquid iron region deep in the Earth.
2h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Beer. Soup. Barley's next great use? A medical imaging drinkRoasted barley, when struck by a common laser beam, can illuminate the throat and the gastrointestinal track.The discovery could improve our ability to diagnose swallowing disorders, which affect more than 15 million Americans, as well as gut disorders. What's more, because many human diets already include barley, it could be fast-tracked for medical use.
2h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Hubble sees `Oumuamua getting a boost`Oumuamua, the first interstellar object discovered in the Solar System, is moving away from the Sun faster than expected. This anomalous behaviour was detected using the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope in cooperation with ground-based telescopes. The new results suggest that `Oumuamua is most likely a comet and not an asteroid. The discovery appears in the journal Nature.
2h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

ESO's VLT sees `Oumuamua getting a boost`Oumuamua, the first interstellar object discovered in the Solar System, is moving away from the Sun faster than expected. This anomalous behaviour was detected by a worldwide astronomical collaboration including ESO's Very Large Telescope in Chile. The new results suggest that `Oumuamua is most likely an interstellar comet and not an asteroid.
2h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Sounds of moving objects change perceptions of body sizeSound and object motion can be used to change perceptions about body size, according to a new study by an international team involving UCL researchers.
2h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

City-level action is the right way to tackle emissions, study showsCountries seeking to meet Paris Agreement targets on CO2 emissions must get a grip on the amount of pollution produced at city level, according to researchers at the University of East Anglia (UEA).In a new study, published in Science Advances, the researchers set out a framework for gathering and analysing local information about how cities contribute to pollution levels, and show how these insig
2h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Rethinking the orangutanThe evolution of the orangutan has been more heavily influenced by humans than was previously thought, new research reveals. Professor Mike Bruford, of Cardiff University, was part of the team of scientists shedding light on the development of the critically endangered species. Their findings offer new possibilities for orangutan conservation.
2h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

'Ring around bathtub' at giant volcano field shows movement of subterranean magmaA UW-Madison study is tracing the geologic changes in the Maule volcanoes, located in a region in Chile that has seen enormous eruptions during the last million years.
2h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Change in brain cells linked to opiate addiction, narcolepsyTwo discoveries — one in the brains of people with heroin addiction and the other in the brains of sleepy mice — shed light on chemical messengers in the brain that regulate sleep and addiction.
2h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

A wakefulness molecule is abundant in the brains of heroin addictsResearchers have discovered that the brains of heroin addicts harbor a greater number of neurons that produce hypocretin, a molecule involved in arousal and wakefulness, and one lacking in abundance in people with narcolepsy. In mice with narcolepsy, these researchers went on to show, administering morphine — an opioid similar.
2h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Labeling genetically engineered food in Vermont led to less opposition of these foodsMandatory labeling of genetically engineered (GE) foods reduced people's opposition to GE products in Vermont, a new study reports. This suggests that simple disclosures can lead to reductions in opposition of GE foods, a finding that provides insights into how to effectively communicate about GE technology — something that has been challenging. The findings are
2h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Personalized 'deep learning' equips robots for autism therapyResearchers at the MIT Media Lab have now developed a type of personalized machine learning that helps robots estimate the engagement and interest of each child during these interactions, using data that are unique to that child.Armed with this personalized 'deep learning' network, the robots' perception of the children's responses agreed with assessments by human experts, with a correlation score
2h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Map of Javan leopard distribution provides guidance for conservation effortsThe first robust estimate of the distribution of the Javan leopard offers reliable information on where conservation efforts must be prioritized to safeguard the Indonesian island's last remaining large carnivore. The findings were reported in the open-access journal PLOS ONE on June 27, 2018 by Hariyo Tabah Wibisono of the San Diego Zoo Institute for Conservation Research, USA, and colleagues.
2h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Rethinking the orangutanThe critically endangered orangutan has become a symbol of wild nature's vulnerability in the face of human actions. New research published June 27 in the journal Science Advances led by an anthropologist with the University of Wisconsin Oshkosh indicates this view overlooks how humans have fundamentally shaped the orangutan known today. The researchers call for a multifaceted approach to oranguta
2h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Mandatory labels reduce GMO food fearsAs national regulators work to develop labeling standards for foods containing genetically modified ingredients, UVM's Jane Kolodinsky finds that consumer opposition to GMOs dropped significantly after Vermont adopted mandatory labels.
2h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Genetically humanized mice could boost fight against aggressive hepatitisIn research that could lead to treatments for an aggressive type of liver disease, scientists describe a genetically humanized mouse that can be persistently infected with hepatitis delta virus.
2h
TED Talks Daily (SD video)

The story of 'Oumuamua, the first visitor from another star system | Karen J. MeechOumuamua Karen MeechIn October 2017, astrobiologist Karen J. Meech got the call every astronomer waits for: NASA had spotted the very first visitor from another star system. The interstellar comet — a half-mile-long object eventually named `Oumuamua, from the Hawaiian for "scout" or "messenger" — raised intriguing questions: Was it a chunk of rocky debris from a new star system, shredded material from a supernova e
2h
Big Think

Chocolate milk works extremely well as a post-workout drink, says studySports teams have yet to pour a celebratory cooler of chocolate milk over their coach after winning 'the big game' Read More
2h
Big Think

Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, democratic socialist, beats 10-term incumbent in NYC primaryAlexandria Ocasio-CortezIn a historic upset, Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, a young democratic socialist of Latina descent, has defeated political veteran Joe Crowley in their party's congressional primary in New York City. Read More
2h
New Scientist – News

Mars could have been habitable 100 million years before EarthThe magma ocean that covered early Mars crystallised into a crust faster than we thought, which would have given life on the Red Planet a head start
2h
New Scientist – News

The fading American dream may be behind rise in US suicidesShrinking life chances plus lack of a social safety net may have left middle-aged Americans more vulnerable to suicide than peers in other rich nations
2h
New Scientist – News

Enceladus is spewing out organic molecules necessary for lifeEnceladus Saturn CassiniSaturn’s moon Enceladus spews plumes of water into space, and it’s also spitting out complex organic molecules that could be the building blocks of life
2h
New Scientist – News

Interstellar visitor ‘Oumuamua may be a comet, not an asteroidThe path of the “interstellar asteroid” discovered last year can’t be explained by gravity alone – it was also pushed along by gas, so it might actually be a comet
2h
Popular Science

We're really bad at making babiesScience Anatomical compromises from millions of years ago have made birth hard for humans. Humans may have the most technological assists for having kids, but we’re also the only species that really needs them. Here’s how a series of evolutionary compromises…
2h
Viden

Robotter er klar til at vinde VM i kendt computerspilTech-virksomhed – med Elon Musk som medstifter – har trænet robotter til at kæmpe mod verdens bedste computerspillere.
2h
The Atlantic

Does GMO Labeling Actually Increase Support for GMOs?In 2014, Vermont became the first state to pass a law requiring labels for food that contains GMOs, or genetically modified organisms. GMO-labeling initiatives were soon popping up on ballots all over the country, and Congress eventually passed a national labeling law in 2016. In the heat of political battle, both sides presented the labeling situation as do-or-die. The Organic Consumers Associat
2h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Rethinking the orangutan: How 70,000 years of human interaction have shaped an icon of wild natureThe evolution of the orangutan has been more heavily influenced by humans than was previously thought, new research reveals.
2h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

City-level action is the right way to tackle emissions, study showsCountries seeking to meet Paris Agreement targets on CO2 emissions must get a grip on the amount of pollution produced at city level, according to researchers at the University of East Anglia (UEA).
2h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

'Ring around bathtub' at giant volcano field shows movement of subterranean magmaThe Laguna del Maule volcanic complex in Chile is a large, complicated and explosive landscape that, oddly, lacks the classic cone seen on many volcanoes, including Fuego, the Guatemalan volcano that killed hundreds in a June 3 eruption.
2h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Map of Javan leopard distribution provides guidance for conservation effortsThe first robust estimate of the distribution of the Javan leopard offers reliable information on where conservation efforts must be prioritized to safeguard the Indonesian island's last remaining large carnivore. The findings were reported in the open-access journal PLOS ONE on June 27, 2018 by Hariyo Tabah Wibisono of the San Diego Zoo Institute for Conservation Research, USA, and colleagues.
2h
Latest Headlines | Science News

A brain chemical tied to narcolepsy may play a role in opioid addictionLong-term use of opioids such as heroin is linked to having more brain cells that release a chemical that regulates wakefulness and arousal.
2h
The Atlantic

The Story of the Interstellar Space Rock Isn’t Over YetIf you’ve been walking around thinking that the mysterious, interstellar space rock that astronomers discovered last year is an asteroid, I have some news for you: It’s probably a comet. There is, of course, the chance that you haven’t been thinking about this space rock, or know the difference between a comet or an asteroid, or why any of it matters. So let’s return to October 2017, when an astr
2h
Feed: All Latest

Marketing Firm Exactis Leaked a Personal Info Database With 340 Million RecordsThe leak may include data on hundreds of millions of Americans, with hundreds of details for each, from demographics to personal interests.
2h
NYT > Science

Trilobites: Bumblebees Thrive in the City but Struggle on the FarmFacing two unnatural environments, these important pollinators are finding better niches to exploit in urban areas.
2h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Disney's bid for Fox clears US antitrust hurdleDisney 21st Century FoxThe Walt Disney Co. on Wednesday won U.S. antitrust approval for its $71.3 billion bid for Twenty-First Century Fox's entertainment assets.
2h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Dutch unveil ambitious law to cut greenhouse gasesDutch MPs unveiled ambitious new climate legislation Wednesday aimed at reducing the country's greenhouse gas emissions to almost zero by 2050, while introducing an annual review to ensure targets are met.
3h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Ticketmaster UK says customer info may have been stolenTicketmaster UK says personal information and credit card data from customers in Britain and other countries may have been stolen in a security breach.
3h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

More delay, cost for NASA's next-generation space telescopeNASA has delayed the launch of its next-generation space telescope—again.
3h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Africa's pollution killing thousands of infants, study saysModest reductions in air pollution can prevent the deaths of tens of thousands of infants in sub-Saharan Africa each year, according to a new scientific study that investigated the link between breathable air pollutants and premature deaths in 30 countries across the continent.
3h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Comet or asteroid? Scientists ID interstellar visitorOumuamua Karen MeechLast year's visitor from another star system—a cigar-shaped object briefly tumbling through our cosmic neck of the woods—has now been identified as a comet.
3h
NYT > Science

NASA Again Delays Launch of Troubled Webb Telescope; Cost Estimate Rises to $9.7 BillionNASA JWST Webb TelescopeThe successor to the Hubble has had a series of mishaps during testing. An independent review board pushed back the launch for three years.
3h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Facebook, Google 'manipulate' users to share data despite EU law: studyFacebook and Google are pushing users to share private information by offering "invasive" and limited default options despite new EU data protection laws aimed at giving users more control and choice, a government study said Wednesday.
3h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Why bacteria survive in space—biologists discover cluesIn professor George Fox's lab at the University of Houston, scientists are studying Earth germs that could be contaminating other planets. Despite extreme decontamination efforts, bacterial spores from Earth still manage to find their way into outer space aboard spacecraft. Fox and his team are examining how and why some spores elude decontamination. Their research is published in BMC Microbiology
3h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Team reports technology to enable precision antibioticsScientists are searching for ways to develop antibiotics that can accurately target infectious bacteria. Increased specificity could help to combat antibiotic resistance and also spare "good" bacteria from being attacked by broad-spectrum antibiotics.
3h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Surstromming: The secrets of this stinky Swedish fishIt has been called the smelliest food in the world.
3h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Immunotherapy drug for skin disease could boost hormone treatment for prostate cancerA new form of immunotherapy reactivates the response to hormone treatment in advanced prostate cancer, a study in mice and human tissue has found.Hormone therapy is a mainstay of prostate cancer treatment – but tumour cells can grow resistant, leading to a hard-to-treat, advanced form of the disease.The new study found that blocking a protein produced by a type of immune cell – known as granulocyt
3h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Nature: Tricky feat with stand-up moleculeScientists from Forschungszentrum Jülich have achieved a new level of precision working with single molecules. They succeeded in placing an ultrathin molecule in an upright position on a flat layer of silver atoms — and the molecule remained standing instead of reverting to its naturally favoured position. The artificial structure described in Nature illustrates the potential of novel molecular f
3h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Yosemite granite 'tells a different story' story about Earth's geologic historyA team of scientists including Carnegie's Michael Ackerson and Bjorn Mysen revealed that granites from Yosemite National Park contain minerals that crystalized at much lower temperatures than previously thought possible. This finding upends scientific understanding of how granites form and what they can teach us about our planet's geologic history.
3h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

SwRI scientists find evidence of complex organic molecules from EnceladusUsing mass spectrometry data from NASA's Cassini spacecraft, scientists found that large, carbon-rich organic molecules are ejected from cracks in the icy surface of Saturn's moon Enceladus. Southwest Research Institute scientists think chemical reactions between the moon's rocky core and warm water from its subsurface ocean are linked to these complex molecules.
3h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

First malaria-human contact mapped with Nobel Prize-winning technologyMelbourne scientists have taken a significant step toward developing a new vaccine for malaria, revealing for the first time an 'atomic-scale' blueprint of how the parasite invades human cells.Using the Nobel Prize-winning technology cryo-EM (cryo-electron microscopy), the researchers mapped the previously hidden first contact between Plasmodium vivax malaria parasites and young red blood cells th
3h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

When it comes to gonorrhea, gender mattersIn a new pilot study, a team led by researchers from Tufts University School of Medicine conducted the first full comparison of gonococcal gene expression and regulation in both men and women, identifying gender-specific signatures in infection and in antibiotic resistance genes.
3h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Research team identify genetic structure of Painted BuntingA University of Oklahoma researcher, Andrea Contina, and his team have identified the genetic structure of the Painted Bunting, a neotropical migratory songbird, using microsatellite DNA and single nucleotide polymorphisms to develop high-resolution markers to differentiate between individual birds breeding in different Oklahoma populations and across the United States. Through this research, Cont
3h
Quanta Magazine

Mathematicians Tame Turbulence in Flattened FluidsTurbulence, the splintering of smooth streams of fluid into chaotic vortices, doesn’t just make for bumpy plane rides. It also throws a wrench into the very mathematics used to describe atmospheres, oceans and plumbing. Turbulence is the reason why the Navier-Stokes equations — the laws that govern fluid flow — are so famously hard that whoever proves whether or not they always work will win a mi
3h
Science | The Guardian

Ocean spray on Saturn moon contains crucial constituents for lifeNasa probe detected complex organic molecules in plumes of water and ice as it flew over Enceladus Blasts of ocean spray that erupt from a moon of Saturn contain complex organic molecules, making it the only place beyond Earth known to harbour crucial constituents for life as we know it. Astronomers detected the compounds in plumes of water and ice that shoot from huge fractures in the south pole
3h
Science | The Guardian

Scientists solve mystery of interstellar object 'OumuamuaVisitor from another solar system is actually a comet in disguise, say researchers It isn’t a bird, and it isn’t a plane. But quite what the cigar-shaped interstellar object ‘Oumuamua is has remained something of a mystery. Now research suggests it is a comet in disguise. Named after the Hawaiian for messenger or scout – a nod to the fact it was initially spotted by researchers working at the Pan
3h
NYT > Science

Trilobites: Oumuamua Is a Comet, Really.Oumuamua Karen MeechFirst it was an alien comet, then maybe a spaceship, then an asteroid, now it’s a comet from way, way beyond.
3h
BBC News – Science & Environment

Interstellar visitor's identity solvedOumuamua Karen Meech'Oumuamua's shifting identity may reveal details about other solar systems.
3h
BBC News – Science & Environment

JWST: Launch of Hubble's successor pushed back to 2021The space telescope that will take over from the Hubble observatory suffers a further delay.
3h
The Atlantic

Bourbon Is the Latest Victim of Trump's Trade WarLONDON—It’s becoming a bourbon-soaked world out there. For about a decade now, more and more whiskey drinkers internationally, far beyond the drink’s home state of Kentucky, have been developing a taste for the American spirit. And Europe, which was the single largest destination for U.S. spirit exports in 2016, has been at the center of the world’s bourbon renaissance. “Bourbon has witnessed spe
3h
Ingeniøren

Cigarformet gæst i Solsystemet var alligevel en kometKategorien af det underlige aflange objekt, som sidste år passerede gennem Solsystemet og forvirrede astronomerne, er nu fastslået.
3h
BBC News – Science & Environment

Saturn moon a step closer to hosting lifeEnceladus Saturn CassiniResearchers have found complex molecules in the ocean of Enceladus, only previously known on Earth and in meteorites.
3h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Yosemite granite 'tells a different story' about Earth's geologic historyA team of scientists including Carnegie's Michael Ackerson and Bjorn Mysen revealed that granites from Yosemite National Park contain minerals that crystalized at much lower temperatures than previously thought possible. This finding upends scientific understanding of how granites form and what they can teach us about our planet's geologic history. Their work is published in Nature.
3h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

First malaria-human contact mapped with Nobel Prize-winning technologyMelbourne scientists have taken a significant step toward developing a new vaccine for malaria, revealing for the first time an 'atomic-scale' blueprint of how the parasite invades human cells.
3h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Tricky feat with stand-up moleculeIn recent decades, researchers have been able to produce structures from single atoms. One of the first examples was presented by D. M. Eigler and E. K. Schweizer in 1990 in Nature, a tiny IBM logo formed from just a few xenon atoms produced with a scanning probe microscope. But even today, almost 30 years later, we are still a long way from fabricating nanostructures directly from complex molecul
3h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Why bacteria survive in space — UH biologists discover cluesEarth germs could be contaminating other planets. Despite extreme decontamination efforts, bacteria from Earth still manages to find its way into outer space aboard spacecraft. University of Houston biologist George Fox is working to better understand how and why some spores elude decontamination.
3h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

OU research team identify genetic structure of Painted BuntingA University of Oklahoma researcher, Andrea Contina, and his team have identified the genetic structure of the Painted Bunting, a neotropical migratory songbird, using microsatellite DNA and single nucleotide polymorphisms to develop high-resolution markers to differentiate between individual birds breeding in different Oklahoma populations and across the United States. Through this research, Cont
3h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Boston College team reports technology to enable precision antibioticsBy inserting a chemical 'warhead' into a library of bacterial viruses, Boston College researchers have developed a novel approach to identifying specific strains of deadly bacteria and targeting them with antibiotics, the team reports in the Journal of the American Chemical Society.
3h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Lipid species offer insights into metabolic healthTwo new Morgridge Institute for Research studies suggest the current tests, which measure the abundance of lipid classes, are insufficient. Rather, lipids identified and studied at the individual species level — instead of grouped in classes — may be better signatures of metabolic health.
3h
Latest Headlines | Science News

Mars got its crust quicklyThe Martian crust had solidified within 20 million years of the solar system’s formation.
3h
Latest Headlines | Science News

‘Oumuamua may be a comet, not an asteroidThe solar system’s first known interstellar visitor doesn’t appear to be the asteroid that scientists thought it was.
3h
Scientific American Content: Global

Interstellar Mystery Object Now Thought to Be a Comet'Oumuamua, the first-known visitor from outside the solar system, may not have been an asteroid after all — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
3h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Researchers identify two new ancient mammals in Bolivia digResearchers at Case Western Reserve University and two other universities have discovered the 13-million-year-old fossils of a pair of new species of extinct hoofed mammals known as "litopterns" from a site in Bolivia.
3h
The Atlantic

The Four Rules for Setting Limits“No kid wakes up in the morning and thinks, ‘I'm going to disappoint my teachers and parents today,’” says Katherine Reynolds Lewis, author of The Good News About Bad Behavior . Every kid wants to behave, Lewis argues. They just don’t have the skills yet. In the latest episode of Home School , The Atlantic’s animated video series about parenting, Lewis explains how parents can effectively set lim
3h
The Atlantic

The Fragile Future of Reform in Saudi ArabiaThese are heady times in Saudi Arabia, as Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman pursues a series of changes—including liberalization in some areas, such as allowing women to drive, and crackdowns in others, through detention or imprisonment of activists. The pace of change, as well as admiring coverage in some precincts of the Western media, has perhaps obscured a crucial question: Can it last? MbS ma
3h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

UCalgary researchers discover antidepressant could be a promising treatment for PBCA team of scientists at the University of Calgary's Cumming School of Medicine (CSM) discovered what could be a new option for these hard to treat patients. A drug usually prescribed for depression appears to effectively stop progression of Primary Biliary Cholangitis (PBC).
3h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Teens with concussion may benefit from earlier physical therapyFor adolescents with symptoms following a concussion, starting physical therapy (PT) earlier — within less than three weeks after the injury — provides outcomes similar to those of later PT, suggests a study in the July issue of The Journal of Neurologic Physical Therapy (JNPT). The journal is published in the Lippincott portfolio by Wolters Kluwer.
3h
New on MIT Technology Review

The Trump administration is discussing America’s AI future today[no content]
3h
Ingeniøren

Analyse-skandalen: Minister sætter tilladelse til omstridte havbrug i beroAnalysefejlene, som har ført til for lave opgørelser af kvælstof i vandmiljøet, får miljøminister Jakob Ellemann-Jensen til at kræve yderligere sikkerhed, inden regeringen vil give tilladelse til Landbrugspakkens nye fiskeopdræt.
3h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

In surveys, people say they'll pay twice what they're actually willing to spendPerhaps people like to think of themselves as big spenders. Or maybe they just aren't very honest.
3h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Study signals dramatic change in way ancient diets are calculatedKnowing what extinct animals ate has long been determined by analyzing carbon isotopes locked inside fossil teeth. For two decades, a key isotope value in these equations has been assumed to be the same for all plant-eating mammals, but new research led by Julia Tejada-Lara from the American Museum of Natural History and Columbia University, and published in the journal Proceedings of the Royal So
3h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Whether bold or shy, seal personalities are steady over time, study saysFemale seals don't change their spots, according to a new study by University of Alberta biologists. In fact, individual differences in boldness remain consistent over time.
3h
Big Think

Are we all multiple personalities of universal consciousness?Bernardo Kastrup proposes a new ontology he calls “idealism” built on panpsychism, the idea that everything in the universe contains consciousness. He solves problems with this philosophy by adding a new suggestion: The universal mind has dissociative identity disorder. Read More
4h
BBC News – Science & Environment

Galapagos' Sierra Negra volcano eruption triggers evacuationThe volcano on Isabela Island is spewing lava from fissures which opened after two strong earthquakes.
4h
The Atlantic

Is This the End of Public-Sector Unions in America?The Supreme Court Wednesday dealt a huge blow to public-sector unions and the labor movement in general, ruling in Janus v. AFSCME that public employees do not have to pay fees to unions to cover the costs of collective bargaining. The court, split along partisan lines, overruled 41 years of precedent in deciding that requiring employees to pay fees violates their First Amendment rights. With the
4h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Inbred animals face greater threat from changes to environmentAnimals that are inbred make mistakes in response to changes in their surroundings, which threatens their survival, research has found.
4h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Special-purpose buildings bring together earliest Neolithic communitiesThe advent of food production took place in the Near East over 10,000 years and sparked profound changes in the ways human societies were organized. A new study, published in the journal PloS One by Prof. Cheryl Makarewicz of Kiel University and Prof. Bill Finlayson of the University of Reading, demonstrates that specialized buildings regularly featured in the world's earliest agricultural village
4h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Large scale study identifies core microbial community for maize rhizosphereA plant's health is affected not only by conditions such as water and temperature, but by the microorganisms that live around its roots. The rhizosphere microbiome, as this microbial community is known, regulates nutrient availability to the plant from the soil, and can impact plant growth and yields.
4h
Scientific American Content: Global

Poliovirus Therapy Shows Early Promise for Treating Aggressive Brain Cancer, but Questions LingerSurvival was better than expected with this genetically modified pathogen — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
4h
NYT > Science

Tech We’re Using: Now He Pulls Data Off the Web. In 1979, It Was Clips From the ‘Morgue.’Steve Lohr, a veteran New York Times reporter, reflects on how tech-free newsrooms used to be and how the progression to the internet has changed journalism.
4h
Viden

Hvad skete der lige dér? Derfor kan bolden pludselig knækkeSåkaldte knækbolde er noget af det sværeste at håndtere for en fodboldmålmand. Nogle spillere dyrker det uforudsigelige spark. Men hvad får egentlig bolden til at "knække"?
4h
Science : NPR

Japan's Hayabusa2 Spacecraft Arrives At Its Asteroid DestinationHayabusa2 Ryugu JapanThe mission includes a plan to bring a sample back to Earth. It's the first time humans have been able to study a C-type asteroid at such a close range for an extended period. (Image credit: JAXA, University of Tokyo and collaborators)
4h
The Atlantic

Why Joseph Crowley’s Defeat Should Scare Joe BidenThere are plenty of reasons to downplay the ideological significance of 28-year-old Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez’s upset win yesterday over House Democratic powerbroker Joseph Crowley. Even by the standards of congressional primaries, turnout was low. In a district of roughly 650,000 people, Ocasio-Cortez won with only 16,000 votes . Ocasio-Cortez’s victory can also be chalked up to ethnic succession
4h
The Atlantic

The Tech Industry Is Fighting Trump—and Mostly LosingIn the days after the presidential election, a liberal friend quoted the 1976 movie Network to me. It’s a film about how extensively corporations control politics and media in the United States, but in the context of Trump, it suddenly struck him as perversely reassuring. “There is no America. There is no democracy,” goes the quote. (It is delivered, fittingly, by a network executive.) “There is
4h
Science | The Guardian

Space is full of dirty, toxic grease, scientists revealResearch to calculate amount of ‘space grease’ in the Milky Way found enough for 40 trillion trillion trillion packs of butter It looks cold, dark and empty, but astronomers have revealed that interstellar space is permeated with a fine mist of grease-like molecules. The study provides the most precise estimate yet of the amount of “space grease” in the Milky Way, by recreating the carbon-based c
4h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Inbred animals face greater threat from changes to environmentAnimals that are inbred make mistakes in response to changes in their surroundings, at a cost to themselves and their young.
4h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

In surveys, people say they'll pay twice what they're actually willing to spendWhen researchers compared what study participants reported they were willing to spend on goods with what they actually shelled out in experiments designed to mimic a real-world shopping experience, there was a big gap.
4h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Study signals dramatic change in way ancient diets are calculatedKnowing what extinct animals ate has long been determined by analyzing carbon isotopes locked inside fossil teeth. For two decades, a key isotope value in these equations has been assumed to be the same for all plant-eating mammals, but new research led by the American Museum of Natural History and Columbia University, and published in the journal Proceedings of the Royal Society B, contradicts th
4h
Live Science

Yes, You Can See Tardigrades with a Cheap Optical MicroscopeWe bought a bunch of tardigrades online (thanks, internet!) and tried to see them with six inexpensive microscopes. Here is what we discovered.
5h
Scientific American Content: Global

Court Becoming Impatient with EPA Over Clean Power PlanThe judges’ remarks could pressure the agency to repeal or replace the plan to rein in carbon emissions — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
5h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

First Rwandan-made Volkswagen rolls off assembly lineThe first Rwandan-made Volkswagen car rolled off the assembly line on Wednesday at the country's first auto factory.
5h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

The bizarre world of topological materialsIn 2016, three physicists received the Nobel Prize for using the mathematical concept of "topology" to explain the strange behavior of certain materials—for example, those that are insulators in their bulk but conductors on their surface. Now, researchers are investigating applications for these exotic materials in electronics, catalysis and quantum computing, according to an article in Chemical &
5h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Co-op University of Guelph study finds new measure for stress in overtrained athletesOverload training — or, training to exhaustion followed by a period or rest and recovery before a race — is a method used by many endurance athletes in search of a personal best. A new University of Guelph study has found that overtraining might alter firing in the body's sympathetic nerve fibres which might hinder athletic performance.
5h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Reproducibility mattersA plant's health is affected not only by conditions such as water and temperature, but by the microorganisms that live around its roots. This rhizosphere microbiome regulates nutrient availability to the plant from the soil and can impact plant growth and yields. An international team reported on the results of a large-scale field study that partially replicates earlier trials to identify soil mic
5h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

UAlberta biologists show that female seals have consistent personalitiesFemale seals don't change their spots, according to a new study by University of Alberta biologists. In fact, individual differences in boldness remain consistent over time.The study is among the first to examine boldness in wild marine mammals in the burgeoning field of animal personality. Animal personality influences many ecological processes, like how individuals interact with other species or
5h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Rough terrain? No problem for beaver-inspired autonomous robotUniversity at Buffalo researchers are using stigmergy, a biological phenomenon that has been used to explain everything from the behavior of termites and beavers to the popularity of Wikipedia, to build new problem-solving autonomous robots.
5h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

CU Anschutz researchers find little association between suicide and hypoxiaFollowing an extensive analysis of published studies, researchers at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus have found that while suicide rates are higher at higher altitudes, they are unlikely caused by hypoxia, (low oxygen) at these elevations.
5h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Don't let depression keep you from exercisingExercise may be just as crucial to a depression patient's good health as finding an effective antidepressant.
5h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

What does fitness in midlife mean for depression, cardiovascular disease later in life?A high level of fitness in midlife was associated with a lower risk of depression after age 65 and a lower risk of cardiovascular death, including after a diagnosis of depression.
5h
The Atlantic

How Computers Parse the Ambiguity of Everyday LanguageIf you’re one of the 2.4 million Twitter followers of the Hamilton impresario Lin-Manuel Miranda, you’ve come to expect a delightful stream of observations, including tweets capturing conversations with his son Sebastian, now 3 years old. Earlier this month, Miranda offered one such exchange under the title, “ S’MORES. A Real-Life One-Act Play .” Me: So that’s the marshmallow but you’re going to
5h
The Atlantic

Read This Article!!!How many exclamation points does it take to exclaim something? One, a human of sound mind and a decent grasp of punctuation might say. The exclamation point denotes exclamation. That is its point. One should suffice. But, on the internet, it often doesn’t. Not anymore. Digital communication is undergoing exclamation-point inflation. When single exclamation points adorn every sentence in a busines
5h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Sweltering Europe loses its fizz as CO2 shortage hits drinkersIt's peak season for bars and barbecues in Europe as a summer heatwave coincides with the World Cup on TV. So probably not the best time for drinks companies to be running out of the gas that puts the fizz into beer and sodas.
5h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Appealing finding suggests why refrigeration dampens banana aromasBananas are one of the world's most popular fruits. But how they're stored prior to reaching grocery shelves can adversely affect their flavor and smell. Now in a study appearing in ACS' Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, scientists report that cold temperatures suppress the activity of proteins that play a key role in the formation of the banana's distinct aromas. They say this discovery
5h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

New results of Deepwater Horizon research to protect marine life against future oil spillsThe University of South Florida continues to play an integral role in discovering the extent of damage caused by the 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil spill. Researchers just published results of a seven-year study, recording the most comprehensive data available of marine life throughout the entire Gulf of Mexico.
5h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Endangered species listing considered for rare Nevada toadU.S. wildlife officials have agreed to consider Endangered Species Act protection for a rare toad in northern Nevada's high desert where one of the biggest producers of geothermal energy in the nation wants to build another power plant.
5h
Popular Science

Run, don't walk, to see New York City's latest corpse flower bloomEnvironment The Bronx's stinkiest resident will only blossom for a day or so. On the evening of June 26 the noxious-smelling corpse flower finally bloomed. Here's how you can watch the process—or go smell it for yourself.
5h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

UTMN scientists confirm the high speed of Siberia developmentFollowing the trail of Siberian pioneers, archaeologists from the University of Tyumen have investigated the camp on Karachinsky Island, the Lower Tobol River, where, according to chronicles, Yermak and his Cossacks spent a winter.The AMS Laboratory at the University of Arizona analysed wood samples and dated the found dugout to the middle of the 17th century, while Yermak's campaign took place in
5h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

A milestone on the path towards efficient solar cellsGenerating more electricity from solar cells and conducting further research into so-called singlet fission. This is what scientists at Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg (FAU) are currently working on as part of a joint research project conducted in collaboration with Argonne-Northwestern Solar Energy Research (ANSER) Center at Northwestern University in Evanston, USA. Singlet fiss
5h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Appealing finding suggests why refrigeration dampens banana aromasBananas are one of the world's most popular fruits. But how they're stored prior to reaching grocery shelves can adversely affect their flavor and smell. Now in a study appearing in ACS' Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, scientists report that cold temperatures suppress the activity of proteins that play a key role in the formation of the banana's distinct aromas. They say this discovery
5h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

New results of Deepwater Horizon research to protect marine life against future oil spillsResearchers from the US, Mexico and Cuba complete comprehensive study, creating baseline data for the Gulf of Mexico's entire marine ecosystem.
5h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Breastfeeding mothers stop nursing sooner when living with smokersNursing mothers who live with two or more smokers are more likely to stop breastfeeding sooner than those who live in nonsmoking households.
5h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

RUDN chemists have completely changed the direction of Diels-Alder reactionRUDN-based researchers together with Russian colleagues studied the Diels-Alder reaction in the derivatives of furan (a heterocyclic organic substance) and managed to reach 100 percent control over the composition of its products. The described patterns may be useful for creating new methods of agricultural waste processing. Moreover, the reaction may be used for the manufacture of graphene fragme
5h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

NIH study associates obesity with lower breast cancer risk in young womenYoung women with high body fat have a decreased chance of developing breast cancer before menopause, according to scientists at the National Institutes of Health and their collaborators. The finding, published online in the journal JAMA Oncology, may help researchers better understand the role obesity plays in breast cancer risk.

Vil du være med til at finde de mest interessante nyheder? Send email herom til BioNyt

Se nyheder fra en tidligere dato

Tegn abonnement på

BioNyt Videnskabens Verden (www.bionyt.dk) er Danmarks ældste populærvidenskabelige tidsskrift for naturvidenskab. Det er det eneste blad af sin art i Danmark, som er helliget international forskning inden for livsvidenskaberne.

Bladet bringer aktuelle, spændende forskningsnyheder inden for biologi, medicin og andre naturvidenskabelige områder som f.eks. klimaændringer, nanoteknologi, partikelfysik, astronomi, seksualitet, biologiske våben, ecstasy, evolutionsbiologi, kloning, fedme, søvnforskning, muligheden for liv på mars, influenzaepidemier, livets opståen osv.

Artiklerne roses for at gøre vanskeligt stof forståeligt, uden at den videnskabelige holdbarhed tabes.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *


CAPTCHA Image
Reload Image