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Nyheder2018juni27

 

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Scientists find evidence of complex organic molecules from EnceladusEnceladus Saturn Cassini

Using mass spectrometry data from NASA's Cassini spacecraft, scientists found that large, carbon-rich organic molecules are ejected from cracks in the icy surface of Saturn's moon Enceladus. Southwest Research Institute scientists think chemical reactions between the moon's rocky core and warm water from its subsurface ocean are linked to these complex molecules.

3h

US, South American paleontologists ID two new Miocene mammals in Bolivia

Researchers at Case Western Reserve University and two other universities have discovered the 13-million-year-old fossils of a pair of new species of extinct hoofed mammals known as 'litopterns' from a site in Bolivia.

3h

Danmark undersøger to nye tunneler til Sverige

Sammen med det svenske Trafikverket skal Vejdirektoratet undersøge brugerbetalte vej- og banetunneler under Øresund. I 2020 skal politikerne beslutte, om der skal arbejdes videre med projektet.

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NASA Defers Launch of James Webb Space Telescope Again–This Time to 2021

The postponement brings the project's total estimated lifetime cost to $9.66 billion—and further delays are possible — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

3min

Why Do Babies Kick in the Womb?

The womb is a tight space in which to exercise, but kicking is vital for a baby's healthy development.

6min

Summer dead zones in Chesapeake Bay breaking up earlier

A new study shows that dead zones in the lower Chesapeake Bay are beginning to break up earlier in the fall, which may be an indication that efforts to reduce nutrient pollution to the Bay are beginning to make an impact. Scientists from the University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science found that dead zones in the lower part of the Chesapeake Bay are getting smaller in the late summer t

6min

Study: Men with migraine may have higher estrogen levels

While it has been known that estrogen plays a role in migraine for women, new research shows that the female sex hormone may also play a role in migraine for men, according to a small study published in the June 27, 2018, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

6min

Scientists studied tattooed corpses to see if ink travels

It turns out, that tattoo ink can travel throughout your body, and settle in lymph nodes. Read More

24min

California marijuana farms are putting local animals on the endangered species list

The Humboldt marten, a (much cuter) cousin of the weasel, has been placed on the endangered species list thanks to marijuana croppers. Read More

24min

Animals are becoming nocturnal to avoid humans

A large analysis shows that many species are completely changing their habits to avoid humans. Read More

24min

DARPA Wants to Boost Your Body's Defenses ― By 'Tuning' Your Genes

A new DARPA program will explore ways to better protect people against biological and chemical threats by temporarily "tuning" gene expression.

26min

Is the interstellar asteroid really a comet?

The interstellar object Oumuamua was discovered back on Oct. 19, 2017, but the puzzle of its true nature has taken months to unravel, and may never be fully solved.Meaning 'scout from the distant past' in Hawaiian, Oumuamua was found by astronomers working with the University of Hawaii's Pan-STARRS1 survey as it came close to Earth's orbit. But what is it: an asteroid or a comet?

27min

Breast cancer studies ignore race, socioeconomic factors

Studies of breast cancer risk and treatment outcomes are not taking sufficient account of race/ethnicity, economic status, education level, health insurance status and other social factors, according to scientists at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health.

27min

Flamingo that escaped a zoo in 2005 spotted in Texas

The bird, tagged as number 492, is seen near Lavaca Bay, Texas, after fleeing a Kansas zoo in 2005.

37min

5 fakta om Niels Bohr: Einstein kaldte hans teori for et mirakel

Niels Bohr revolutionerede vores forståelse af verden. Vil du vide mere om danmarkshistoriensmåske mest berømte forsker? Så læs med her.

51min

Blame loose screws and ‘excessive optimism’ for the latest delay of NASA’s new space telescopeNASA JWST Webb Telescope

Space James Webb is now slated for a 2021 launch—only a bajillion years late. NASA made a big announcement about the much-anticipated James Webb Space Telescope today.

58min

1h

Ingredients for Life Found on Saturn's Moon, Enceladus

A new look at old data from NASA’s Cassini orbiter shows complex organic molecules are gushing from the tiny moon — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

1h

To Be a Good Citizen, First Pay Attention

Here are, in no particular order, some of the things that are happening in America right now: The Supreme Court has upheld President Donald Trump’s Muslim travel ban . The Supreme Court has dealt a major blow to public-sector unions and the labor movement. Anthony Kennedy has announced a retirement that will drastically change the Court’s makeup. A 28-year-old Democratic Socialist has beaten an i

1h

THz spectroscopy could help explain water's anomalies

Liquid water sustains life on earth, but its physical properties remain mysterious among scientific researchers. Recently, a team of Swiss researchers used existing THz spectroscopy techniques to measure liquid water's hydrogen bonding. Future efforts with this technique could one day help explain water's peculiar properties. The team reports their findings in The Journal of Chemical Physics.

1h

Small classes reduce performance gaps in science

From high-stakes multiple choice exams to the social climate of the classroom, research has shown those factors can contribute to the negative impact of large, introductory and undergraduate science courses on students. However, class size is often an overlooked factor despite research suggesting it influences student performance and, unlike other influences on student attrition, is subject to leg

1h

Study yields a new scale of earthquake understanding

Nanoscale knowledge of the relationships between water, friction and mineral chemistry could lead to a better understanding of earthquake dynamics, researchers said in a new study. Engineers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign used microscopic friction measurements to confirm that, under the right conditions, some rocks can dissolve and may cause faults to slip.

1h

Structure of major brain receptor that is treatment target for epilepsy, anxiety solved

UT Southwestern researchers today published the first atomic structure of a brain receptor bound to a drug used to reverse anesthesia and to treat sedative overdoses.

1h

San Francisco's Climate Case Against Big Oil Gets Dismissed

“Our litigation forced a public court proceeding on climate science, and now these companies can no longer deny it is real and valid.”

1h

Central Park, Now More Delicious

With cars being banished from the drives, New Yorkers get to taste an urban oasis that’s closer to nature.

1h

Google Tries New Rules to Curtail Harassment of Employees

The rules encourage "productive conversations" and prohibit disclosing personal information about a Google employee to subject them to harassment.

1h

Japan’s Hayabusa2 spacecraft arrives at the asteroid Ryugu

The Hayabusa2 spacecraft says “hello” to near-Earth asteroid Ryugu.

1h

Our solar system's first known interstellar object gets unexpected speed boost

Using observations from NASA's Hubble Space Telescope and ground-based observatories, an international team of scientists have confirmed ?Oumuamua (oh-MOO-ah-MOO-ah), the first known interstellar object to travel through our solar system, got an unexpected boost in speed and shift in trajectory as it passed through the inner solar system last year.

1h

Study yields a new scale of earthquake understanding

Nanoscale knowledge of the relationships between water, friction and mineral chemistry could lead to a better understanding of earthquake dynamics, researchers said in a new study. Engineers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign used microscopic friction measurements to confirm that, under the right conditions, some rocks can dissolve and may cause faults to slip.

1h

Research Brief: Small classes reduce performance gaps in science

From high-stakes multiple choice exams to the social climate of the classroom, research has shown those factors can contribute to the negative impact of large, introductory and undergraduate science courses on students. However, class size is often an overlooked factor despite research suggesting it influences student performance and, unlike other influences on student attrition, is subject to leg

1h

In Upholding Trump's Travel Ban, the Supreme Court Harms Scientists

The repercussions of Tuesday’s decision will be felt not just by individual families, but by American universities and scientific fields more generally.

1h

Togo launches new energy scheme with focus on renewables

The Togo government on Wednesday launched a new energy policy that aims to provide universal access to electricity in the small west African country by 2030.

1h

The weirdest things we learned this week: scientists doing sex magick, ancient mac and cheese, and contagious writer's block

Science Our editors scrounged up some truly bizarre facts. What’s the weirdest thing you learned this week? Well, whatever it is, we promise you’ll have an even weirder answer if you listen to this week's episode of PopSci’s…

1h

Photos: Fans of the 2018 World Cup

Two weeks into the 2018 World Cup, and 42 matches have already been played by 32 national teams in the 12 host arenas in Russia, with the Round of 16 matches set to begin this weekend. Fans from around the world have been cheering, following the drama, and sending their support, either in Russia or watching from home, riding emotional rollercoasters as their teams leave it all on the field.

1h

New mechanism involved in memory loss associated with aging discovered

A study led by Luísa Lopes, Group Leader at Instituto de Medicina Molecular João Lobo Antunes (iMM; Portugal) and published today in the prestigious journal Molecular Psychiatry, describes a new mechanism involved in memory loss associated with aging.

1h

New findings on bacteria in female bladders

A new study published in Nature Communications has found that the female bladder not only contains bacteria, but the microbes are similar to those found in the vagina. The finding could lead to improved diagnostic tests and treatments for urinary tract infections and other urinary tract disorders.

1h

Structure of major brain receptor that is treatment target for epilepsy, anxiety solved

UT Southwestern researchers today published the first atomic structure of a brain receptor bound to a drug used to reverse anesthesia and to treat sedative overdoses.

1h

THz spectroscopy could help Explain water's anomalies

Liquid water sustains life on earth, but its physical properties remain mysterious among scientific researchers. Recently, a team of Swiss researchers used existing THz spectroscopy techniques to measure liquid water's hydrogen bonding. Future efforts with this technique could one day help explain water's peculiar properties. The team reports their findings in The Journal of Chemical Physics.

1h

This curious animal grew larger over time — but its brain didn't quite keep up

Study finds that the ancestor of the modern day mountain beaver had a larger relative brain size, offering a rare example of brain size decrease over time.

1h

Researchers identify key protein involved in triggering inflammation

Researchers from the University of Illinois at Chicago have identified a protein that is crucial for activating inflammation — both the good kind of inflammation that leads to healing wounds and fighting infection, as well as excessive inflammation where the immune system can damage tissues and organs.

1h

US proposes shrinking last endangered red wolf habitat

The Trump administration announced a proposal Wednesday to shrink the habitat of the only endangered red wolves left in the wild, and to give landowners more leeway to kill any of the animals that stray onto private property.

1h

Mars' surface hardened quickly, boosting odds of life: study

The crust that encases rocky planets and makes possible the emergence of life took shape on Mars earlier than thought and at least 100 million years sooner than on Earth, researchers said Wednesday.

1h

This curious animal grew larger over time—but its brain didn't quite keep up

New U of T Scarborough research has found that the ancestor of the modern day mountain beaver had a larger relative brain size.

1h

Seismologists use massive earthquakes to unlock secrets of the outer core

By applying new data and Princeton's supercomputers to the classic question of what lies beneath our feet, Princeton seismologist Jessica Irving and an international team of colleagues have developed a new model for the Earth's outer core, a liquid iron region deep in the Earth.

1h

Fronterne blødes op før afgørende forhandlinger om energiforlig

Regeringen er nu klar til at bygge tre havmølleparker mod tidligere én, sagde finansminister Kristian Jensen før de afgørende forhandlinger om et nyt energiforlig onsdag efterniddag

1h

For Aggressive Chameleons, Color Changes Outshine Camouflage

For Aggressive Chameleons, Color Changes Outshine Camouflage When assessing their enemies, chameleons may be better off looking at color rather than the size and shape of their opponents' bodies. 2048px-Yemen_Chameleon_mirror_cropped.jpg Image credits: B kimmel via Wikimedia Commons Rights information: Cc-by-sa-3.0 Creature Wednesday, June 27, 2018 – 14:00 Nala Rogers, Staff Writer (Inside Scienc

2h

Mandatory labels reduce GMO food fears

As the U.S. Department of Agriculture prepares guidelines for labeling products that contain genetically modified ingredients, a new study from the University of Vermont reveals that a simple disclosure can improve consumer attitudes toward GMO food.

2h

Seismologist Jessica Irving uses massive earthquakes to unlock secrets of the outer core

By applying new data and Princeton's supercomputers to the classic question of what lies beneath our feet, Princeton seismologist Jessica Irving and an international team of colleagues have developed a new model for the Earth's outer core, a liquid iron region deep in the Earth.

2h

Beer. Soup. Barley's next great use? A medical imaging drink

Roasted barley, when struck by a common laser beam, can illuminate the throat and the gastrointestinal track.The discovery could improve our ability to diagnose swallowing disorders, which affect more than 15 million Americans, as well as gut disorders. What's more, because many human diets already include barley, it could be fast-tracked for medical use.

2h

Hubble sees `Oumuamua getting a boost

`Oumuamua, the first interstellar object discovered in the Solar System, is moving away from the Sun faster than expected. This anomalous behaviour was detected using the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope in cooperation with ground-based telescopes. The new results suggest that `Oumuamua is most likely a comet and not an asteroid. The discovery appears in the journal Nature.

2h

ESO's VLT sees `Oumuamua getting a boost

`Oumuamua, the first interstellar object discovered in the Solar System, is moving away from the Sun faster than expected. This anomalous behaviour was detected by a worldwide astronomical collaboration including ESO's Very Large Telescope in Chile. The new results suggest that `Oumuamua is most likely an interstellar comet and not an asteroid.

2h

Sounds of moving objects change perceptions of body size

Sound and object motion can be used to change perceptions about body size, according to a new study by an international team involving UCL researchers.

2h

City-level action is the right way to tackle emissions, study shows

Countries seeking to meet Paris Agreement targets on CO2 emissions must get a grip on the amount of pollution produced at city level, according to researchers at the University of East Anglia (UEA).In a new study, published in Science Advances, the researchers set out a framework for gathering and analysing local information about how cities contribute to pollution levels, and show how these insig

2h

Rethinking the orangutan

The evolution of the orangutan has been more heavily influenced by humans than was previously thought, new research reveals. Professor Mike Bruford, of Cardiff University, was part of the team of scientists shedding light on the development of the critically endangered species. Their findings offer new possibilities for orangutan conservation.

2h

'Ring around bathtub' at giant volcano field shows movement of subterranean magma

A UW-Madison study is tracing the geologic changes in the Maule volcanoes, located in a region in Chile that has seen enormous eruptions during the last million years.

2h

Change in brain cells linked to opiate addiction, narcolepsy

Two discoveries — one in the brains of people with heroin addiction and the other in the brains of sleepy mice — shed light on chemical messengers in the brain that regulate sleep and addiction.

2h

A wakefulness molecule is abundant in the brains of heroin addicts

Researchers have discovered that the brains of heroin addicts harbor a greater number of neurons that produce hypocretin, a molecule involved in arousal and wakefulness, and one lacking in abundance in people with narcolepsy. In mice with narcolepsy, these researchers went on to show, administering morphine — an opioid similar.

2h

Labeling genetically engineered food in Vermont led to less opposition of these foods

Mandatory labeling of genetically engineered (GE) foods reduced people's opposition to GE products in Vermont, a new study reports. This suggests that simple disclosures can lead to reductions in opposition of GE foods, a finding that provides insights into how to effectively communicate about GE technology — something that has been challenging. The findings are

2h

Personalized 'deep learning' equips robots for autism therapy

Researchers at the MIT Media Lab have now developed a type of personalized machine learning that helps robots estimate the engagement and interest of each child during these interactions, using data that are unique to that child.Armed with this personalized 'deep learning' network, the robots' perception of the children's responses agreed with assessments by human experts, with a correlation score

2h

Map of Javan leopard distribution provides guidance for conservation efforts

The first robust estimate of the distribution of the Javan leopard offers reliable information on where conservation efforts must be prioritized to safeguard the Indonesian island's last remaining large carnivore. The findings were reported in the open-access journal PLOS ONE on June 27, 2018 by Hariyo Tabah Wibisono of the San Diego Zoo Institute for Conservation Research, USA, and colleagues.

2h

Rethinking the orangutan

The critically endangered orangutan has become a symbol of wild nature's vulnerability in the face of human actions. New research published June 27 in the journal Science Advances led by an anthropologist with the University of Wisconsin Oshkosh indicates this view overlooks how humans have fundamentally shaped the orangutan known today. The researchers call for a multifaceted approach to oranguta

2h

Mandatory labels reduce GMO food fears

As national regulators work to develop labeling standards for foods containing genetically modified ingredients, UVM's Jane Kolodinsky finds that consumer opposition to GMOs dropped significantly after Vermont adopted mandatory labels.

2h

Genetically humanized mice could boost fight against aggressive hepatitis

In research that could lead to treatments for an aggressive type of liver disease, scientists describe a genetically humanized mouse that can be persistently infected with hepatitis delta virus.

2h

The story of 'Oumuamua, the first visitor from another star system | Karen J. MeechOumuamua Karen Meech

In October 2017, astrobiologist Karen J. Meech got the call every astronomer waits for: NASA had spotted the very first visitor from another star system. The interstellar comet — a half-mile-long object eventually named `Oumuamua, from the Hawaiian for "scout" or "messenger" — raised intriguing questions: Was it a chunk of rocky debris from a new star system, shredded material from a supernova e

2h

Chocolate milk works extremely well as a post-workout drink, says study

Sports teams have yet to pour a celebratory cooler of chocolate milk over their coach after winning 'the big game' Read More

2h

Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, democratic socialist, beats 10-term incumbent in NYC primaryAlexandria Ocasio-Cortez

In a historic upset, Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, a young democratic socialist of Latina descent, has defeated political veteran Joe Crowley in their party's congressional primary in New York City. Read More

2h

Mars could have been habitable 100 million years before Earth

The magma ocean that covered early Mars crystallised into a crust faster than we thought, which would have given life on the Red Planet a head start

2h

The fading American dream may be behind rise in US suicides

Shrinking life chances plus lack of a social safety net may have left middle-aged Americans more vulnerable to suicide than peers in other rich nations

2h

Enceladus is spewing out organic molecules necessary for lifeEnceladus Saturn Cassini

Saturn’s moon Enceladus spews plumes of water into space, and it’s also spitting out complex organic molecules that could be the building blocks of life

2h

Interstellar visitor ‘Oumuamua may be a comet, not an asteroid

The path of the “interstellar asteroid” discovered last year can’t be explained by gravity alone – it was also pushed along by gas, so it might actually be a comet

2h

We're really bad at making babies

Science Anatomical compromises from millions of years ago have made birth hard for humans. Humans may have the most technological assists for having kids, but we’re also the only species that really needs them. Here’s how a series of evolutionary compromises…

2h

Robotter er klar til at vinde VM i kendt computerspil

Tech-virksomhed – med Elon Musk som medstifter – har trænet robotter til at kæmpe mod verdens bedste computerspillere.

2h

Does GMO Labeling Actually Increase Support for GMOs?

In 2014, Vermont became the first state to pass a law requiring labels for food that contains GMOs, or genetically modified organisms. GMO-labeling initiatives were soon popping up on ballots all over the country, and Congress eventually passed a national labeling law in 2016. In the heat of political battle, both sides presented the labeling situation as do-or-die. The Organic Consumers Associat

2h

Rethinking the orangutan: How 70,000 years of human interaction have shaped an icon of wild nature

The evolution of the orangutan has been more heavily influenced by humans than was previously thought, new research reveals.

2h

City-level action is the right way to tackle emissions, study shows

Countries seeking to meet Paris Agreement targets on CO2 emissions must get a grip on the amount of pollution produced at city level, according to researchers at the University of East Anglia (UEA).

2h

'Ring around bathtub' at giant volcano field shows movement of subterranean magma

The Laguna del Maule volcanic complex in Chile is a large, complicated and explosive landscape that, oddly, lacks the classic cone seen on many volcanoes, including Fuego, the Guatemalan volcano that killed hundreds in a June 3 eruption.

2h

Map of Javan leopard distribution provides guidance for conservation efforts

The first robust estimate of the distribution of the Javan leopard offers reliable information on where conservation efforts must be prioritized to safeguard the Indonesian island's last remaining large carnivore. The findings were reported in the open-access journal PLOS ONE on June 27, 2018 by Hariyo Tabah Wibisono of the San Diego Zoo Institute for Conservation Research, USA, and colleagues.

2h

A brain chemical tied to narcolepsy may play a role in opioid addiction

Long-term use of opioids such as heroin is linked to having more brain cells that release a chemical that regulates wakefulness and arousal.

2h

The Story of the Interstellar Space Rock Isn’t Over Yet

If you’ve been walking around thinking that the mysterious, interstellar space rock that astronomers discovered last year is an asteroid, I have some news for you: It’s probably a comet. There is, of course, the chance that you haven’t been thinking about this space rock, or know the difference between a comet or an asteroid, or why any of it matters. So let’s return to October 2017, when an astr

2h

Marketing Firm Exactis Leaked a Personal Info Database With 340 Million Records

The leak may include data on hundreds of millions of Americans, with hundreds of details for each, from demographics to personal interests.

2h

Trilobites: Bumblebees Thrive in the City but Struggle on the Farm

Facing two unnatural environments, these important pollinators are finding better niches to exploit in urban areas.

2h

Disney's bid for Fox clears US antitrust hurdleDisney 21st Century Fox

The Walt Disney Co. on Wednesday won U.S. antitrust approval for its $71.3 billion bid for Twenty-First Century Fox's entertainment assets.

2h

Dutch unveil ambitious law to cut greenhouse gases

Dutch MPs unveiled ambitious new climate legislation Wednesday aimed at reducing the country's greenhouse gas emissions to almost zero by 2050, while introducing an annual review to ensure targets are met.

3h

Ticketmaster UK says customer info may have been stolen

Ticketmaster UK says personal information and credit card data from customers in Britain and other countries may have been stolen in a security breach.

3h

More delay, cost for NASA's next-generation space telescope

NASA has delayed the launch of its next-generation space telescope—again.

3h

Africa's pollution killing thousands of infants, study says

Modest reductions in air pollution can prevent the deaths of tens of thousands of infants in sub-Saharan Africa each year, according to a new scientific study that investigated the link between breathable air pollutants and premature deaths in 30 countries across the continent.

3h

Comet or asteroid? Scientists ID interstellar visitorOumuamua Karen Meech

Last year's visitor from another star system—a cigar-shaped object briefly tumbling through our cosmic neck of the woods—has now been identified as a comet.

3h

NASA Again Delays Launch of Troubled Webb Telescope; Cost Estimate Rises to $9.7 BillionNASA JWST Webb Telescope

The successor to the Hubble has had a series of mishaps during testing. An independent review board pushed back the launch for three years.

3h

Facebook, Google 'manipulate' users to share data despite EU law: study

Facebook and Google are pushing users to share private information by offering "invasive" and limited default options despite new EU data protection laws aimed at giving users more control and choice, a government study said Wednesday.

3h

Why bacteria survive in space—biologists discover clues

In professor George Fox's lab at the University of Houston, scientists are studying Earth germs that could be contaminating other planets. Despite extreme decontamination efforts, bacterial spores from Earth still manage to find their way into outer space aboard spacecraft. Fox and his team are examining how and why some spores elude decontamination. Their research is published in BMC Microbiology

3h

Team reports technology to enable precision antibiotics

Scientists are searching for ways to develop antibiotics that can accurately target infectious bacteria. Increased specificity could help to combat antibiotic resistance and also spare "good" bacteria from being attacked by broad-spectrum antibiotics.

3h

Surstromming: The secrets of this stinky Swedish fish

It has been called the smelliest food in the world.

3h

Immunotherapy drug for skin disease could boost hormone treatment for prostate cancer

A new form of immunotherapy reactivates the response to hormone treatment in advanced prostate cancer, a study in mice and human tissue has found.Hormone therapy is a mainstay of prostate cancer treatment – but tumour cells can grow resistant, leading to a hard-to-treat, advanced form of the disease.The new study found that blocking a protein produced by a type of immune cell – known as granulocyt

3h

Nature: Tricky feat with stand-up molecule

Scientists from Forschungszentrum Jülich have achieved a new level of precision working with single molecules. They succeeded in placing an ultrathin molecule in an upright position on a flat layer of silver atoms — and the molecule remained standing instead of reverting to its naturally favoured position. The artificial structure described in Nature illustrates the potential of novel molecular f

3h

Yosemite granite 'tells a different story' story about Earth's geologic history

A team of scientists including Carnegie's Michael Ackerson and Bjorn Mysen revealed that granites from Yosemite National Park contain minerals that crystalized at much lower temperatures than previously thought possible. This finding upends scientific understanding of how granites form and what they can teach us about our planet's geologic history.

3h

SwRI scientists find evidence of complex organic molecules from Enceladus

Using mass spectrometry data from NASA's Cassini spacecraft, scientists found that large, carbon-rich organic molecules are ejected from cracks in the icy surface of Saturn's moon Enceladus. Southwest Research Institute scientists think chemical reactions between the moon's rocky core and warm water from its subsurface ocean are linked to these complex molecules.

3h

First malaria-human contact mapped with Nobel Prize-winning technology

Melbourne scientists have taken a significant step toward developing a new vaccine for malaria, revealing for the first time an 'atomic-scale' blueprint of how the parasite invades human cells.Using the Nobel Prize-winning technology cryo-EM (cryo-electron microscopy), the researchers mapped the previously hidden first contact between Plasmodium vivax malaria parasites and young red blood cells th

3h

When it comes to gonorrhea, gender matters

In a new pilot study, a team led by researchers from Tufts University School of Medicine conducted the first full comparison of gonococcal gene expression and regulation in both men and women, identifying gender-specific signatures in infection and in antibiotic resistance genes.

3h

Research team identify genetic structure of Painted Bunting

A University of Oklahoma researcher, Andrea Contina, and his team have identified the genetic structure of the Painted Bunting, a neotropical migratory songbird, using microsatellite DNA and single nucleotide polymorphisms to develop high-resolution markers to differentiate between individual birds breeding in different Oklahoma populations and across the United States. Through this research, Cont

3h

Mathematicians Tame Turbulence in Flattened Fluids

Turbulence, the splintering of smooth streams of fluid into chaotic vortices, doesn’t just make for bumpy plane rides. It also throws a wrench into the very mathematics used to describe atmospheres, oceans and plumbing. Turbulence is the reason why the Navier-Stokes equations — the laws that govern fluid flow — are so famously hard that whoever proves whether or not they always work will win a mi

3h

Ocean spray on Saturn moon contains crucial constituents for life

Nasa probe detected complex organic molecules in plumes of water and ice as it flew over Enceladus Blasts of ocean spray that erupt from a moon of Saturn contain complex organic molecules, making it the only place beyond Earth known to harbour crucial constituents for life as we know it. Astronomers detected the compounds in plumes of water and ice that shoot from huge fractures in the south pole

3h

Scientists solve mystery of interstellar object 'Oumuamua

Visitor from another solar system is actually a comet in disguise, say researchers It isn’t a bird, and it isn’t a plane. But quite what the cigar-shaped interstellar object ‘Oumuamua is has remained something of a mystery. Now research suggests it is a comet in disguise. Named after the Hawaiian for messenger or scout – a nod to the fact it was initially spotted by researchers working at the Pan

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Trilobites: Oumuamua Is a Comet, Really.Oumuamua Karen Meech

First it was an alien comet, then maybe a spaceship, then an asteroid, now it’s a comet from way, way beyond.

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Interstellar visitor's identity solvedOumuamua Karen Meech

'Oumuamua's shifting identity may reveal details about other solar systems.

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JWST: Launch of Hubble's successor pushed back to 2021

The space telescope that will take over from the Hubble observatory suffers a further delay.

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Bourbon Is the Latest Victim of Trump's Trade War

LONDON—It’s becoming a bourbon-soaked world out there. For about a decade now, more and more whiskey drinkers internationally, far beyond the drink’s home state of Kentucky, have been developing a taste for the American spirit. And Europe, which was the single largest destination for U.S. spirit exports in 2016, has been at the center of the world’s bourbon renaissance. “Bourbon has witnessed spe

3h

Cigarformet gæst i Solsystemet var alligevel en komet

Kategorien af det underlige aflange objekt, som sidste år passerede gennem Solsystemet og forvirrede astronomerne, er nu fastslået.

3h

Saturn moon a step closer to hosting lifeEnceladus Saturn Cassini

Researchers have found complex molecules in the ocean of Enceladus, only previously known on Earth and in meteorites.

3h

Yosemite granite 'tells a different story' about Earth's geologic history

A team of scientists including Carnegie's Michael Ackerson and Bjorn Mysen revealed that granites from Yosemite National Park contain minerals that crystalized at much lower temperatures than previously thought possible. This finding upends scientific understanding of how granites form and what they can teach us about our planet's geologic history. Their work is published in Nature.

3h

First malaria-human contact mapped with Nobel Prize-winning technology

Melbourne scientists have taken a significant step toward developing a new vaccine for malaria, revealing for the first time an 'atomic-scale' blueprint of how the parasite invades human cells.

3h

Tricky feat with stand-up molecule

In recent decades, researchers have been able to produce structures from single atoms. One of the first examples was presented by D. M. Eigler and E. K. Schweizer in 1990 in Nature, a tiny IBM logo formed from just a few xenon atoms produced with a scanning probe microscope. But even today, almost 30 years later, we are still a long way from fabricating nanostructures directly from complex molecul

3h

Why bacteria survive in space — UH biologists discover clues

Earth germs could be contaminating other planets. Despite extreme decontamination efforts, bacteria from Earth still manages to find its way into outer space aboard spacecraft. University of Houston biologist George Fox is working to better understand how and why some spores elude decontamination.

3h

OU research team identify genetic structure of Painted Bunting

A University of Oklahoma researcher, Andrea Contina, and his team have identified the genetic structure of the Painted Bunting, a neotropical migratory songbird, using microsatellite DNA and single nucleotide polymorphisms to develop high-resolution markers to differentiate between individual birds breeding in different Oklahoma populations and across the United States. Through this research, Cont

3h

Boston College team reports technology to enable precision antibiotics

By inserting a chemical 'warhead' into a library of bacterial viruses, Boston College researchers have developed a novel approach to identifying specific strains of deadly bacteria and targeting them with antibiotics, the team reports in the Journal of the American Chemical Society.

3h

Lipid species offer insights into metabolic health

Two new Morgridge Institute for Research studies suggest the current tests, which measure the abundance of lipid classes, are insufficient. Rather, lipids identified and studied at the individual species level — instead of grouped in classes — may be better signatures of metabolic health.

3h

Mars got its crust quickly

The Martian crust had solidified within 20 million years of the solar system’s formation.

3h

‘Oumuamua may be a comet, not an asteroid

The solar system’s first known interstellar visitor doesn’t appear to be the asteroid that scientists thought it was.

3h

Interstellar Mystery Object Now Thought to Be a Comet

'Oumuamua, the first-known visitor from outside the solar system, may not have been an asteroid after all — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Researchers identify two new ancient mammals in Bolivia dig

Researchers at Case Western Reserve University and two other universities have discovered the 13-million-year-old fossils of a pair of new species of extinct hoofed mammals known as "litopterns" from a site in Bolivia.

3h

The Four Rules for Setting Limits

“No kid wakes up in the morning and thinks, ‘I'm going to disappoint my teachers and parents today,’” says Katherine Reynolds Lewis, author of The Good News About Bad Behavior . Every kid wants to behave, Lewis argues. They just don’t have the skills yet. In the latest episode of Home School , The Atlantic’s animated video series about parenting, Lewis explains how parents can effectively set lim

3h

The Fragile Future of Reform in Saudi Arabia

These are heady times in Saudi Arabia, as Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman pursues a series of changes—including liberalization in some areas, such as allowing women to drive, and crackdowns in others, through detention or imprisonment of activists. The pace of change, as well as admiring coverage in some precincts of the Western media, has perhaps obscured a crucial question: Can it last? MbS ma

3h

UCalgary researchers discover antidepressant could be a promising treatment for PBC

A team of scientists at the University of Calgary's Cumming School of Medicine (CSM) discovered what could be a new option for these hard to treat patients. A drug usually prescribed for depression appears to effectively stop progression of Primary Biliary Cholangitis (PBC).

3h

Teens with concussion may benefit from earlier physical therapy

For adolescents with symptoms following a concussion, starting physical therapy (PT) earlier — within less than three weeks after the injury — provides outcomes similar to those of later PT, suggests a study in the July issue of The Journal of Neurologic Physical Therapy (JNPT). The journal is published in the Lippincott portfolio by Wolters Kluwer.

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Analyse-skandalen: Minister sætter tilladelse til omstridte havbrug i bero

Analysefejlene, som har ført til for lave opgørelser af kvælstof i vandmiljøet, får miljøminister Jakob Ellemann-Jensen til at kræve yderligere sikkerhed, inden regeringen vil give tilladelse til Landbrugspakkens nye fiskeopdræt.

3h

In surveys, people say they'll pay twice what they're actually willing to spend

Perhaps people like to think of themselves as big spenders. Or maybe they just aren't very honest.

3h

Study signals dramatic change in way ancient diets are calculated

Knowing what extinct animals ate has long been determined by analyzing carbon isotopes locked inside fossil teeth. For two decades, a key isotope value in these equations has been assumed to be the same for all plant-eating mammals, but new research led by Julia Tejada-Lara from the American Museum of Natural History and Columbia University, and published in the journal Proceedings of the Royal So

3h

Whether bold or shy, seal personalities are steady over time, study says

Female seals don't change their spots, according to a new study by University of Alberta biologists. In fact, individual differences in boldness remain consistent over time.

3h

Are we all multiple personalities of universal consciousness?

Bernardo Kastrup proposes a new ontology he calls “idealism” built on panpsychism, the idea that everything in the universe contains consciousness. He solves problems with this philosophy by adding a new suggestion: The universal mind has dissociative identity disorder. Read More

4h

Galapagos' Sierra Negra volcano eruption triggers evacuation

The volcano on Isabela Island is spewing lava from fissures which opened after two strong earthquakes.

4h

Is This the End of Public-Sector Unions in America?

The Supreme Court Wednesday dealt a huge blow to public-sector unions and the labor movement in general, ruling in Janus v. AFSCME that public employees do not have to pay fees to unions to cover the costs of collective bargaining. The court, split along partisan lines, overruled 41 years of precedent in deciding that requiring employees to pay fees violates their First Amendment rights. With the

4h

Inbred animals face greater threat from changes to environment

Animals that are inbred make mistakes in response to changes in their surroundings, which threatens their survival, research has found.

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Special-purpose buildings bring together earliest Neolithic communities

The advent of food production took place in the Near East over 10,000 years and sparked profound changes in the ways human societies were organized. A new study, published in the journal PloS One by Prof. Cheryl Makarewicz of Kiel University and Prof. Bill Finlayson of the University of Reading, demonstrates that specialized buildings regularly featured in the world's earliest agricultural village

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Large scale study identifies core microbial community for maize rhizosphere

A plant's health is affected not only by conditions such as water and temperature, but by the microorganisms that live around its roots. The rhizosphere microbiome, as this microbial community is known, regulates nutrient availability to the plant from the soil, and can impact plant growth and yields.

4h

Poliovirus Therapy Shows Early Promise for Treating Aggressive Brain Cancer, but Questions Linger

Survival was better than expected with this genetically modified pathogen — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Tech We’re Using: Now He Pulls Data Off the Web. In 1979, It Was Clips From the ‘Morgue.’

Steve Lohr, a veteran New York Times reporter, reflects on how tech-free newsrooms used to be and how the progression to the internet has changed journalism.

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Hvad skete der lige dér? Derfor kan bolden pludselig knække

Såkaldte knækbolde er noget af det sværeste at håndtere for en fodboldmålmand. Nogle spillere dyrker det uforudsigelige spark. Men hvad får egentlig bolden til at "knække"?

4h

Japan's Hayabusa2 Spacecraft Arrives At Its Asteroid DestinationHayabusa2 Ryugu Japan

The mission includes a plan to bring a sample back to Earth. It's the first time humans have been able to study a C-type asteroid at such a close range for an extended period. (Image credit: JAXA, University of Tokyo and collaborators)

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Why Joseph Crowley’s Defeat Should Scare Joe Biden

There are plenty of reasons to downplay the ideological significance of 28-year-old Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez’s upset win yesterday over House Democratic powerbroker Joseph Crowley. Even by the standards of congressional primaries, turnout was low. In a district of roughly 650,000 people, Ocasio-Cortez won with only 16,000 votes . Ocasio-Cortez’s victory can also be chalked up to ethnic succession

4h

The Tech Industry Is Fighting Trump—and Mostly Losing

In the days after the presidential election, a liberal friend quoted the 1976 movie Network to me. It’s a film about how extensively corporations control politics and media in the United States, but in the context of Trump, it suddenly struck him as perversely reassuring. “There is no America. There is no democracy,” goes the quote. (It is delivered, fittingly, by a network executive.) “There is

4h

Space is full of dirty, toxic grease, scientists reveal

Research to calculate amount of ‘space grease’ in the Milky Way found enough for 40 trillion trillion trillion packs of butter It looks cold, dark and empty, but astronomers have revealed that interstellar space is permeated with a fine mist of grease-like molecules. The study provides the most precise estimate yet of the amount of “space grease” in the Milky Way, by recreating the carbon-based c

4h

Inbred animals face greater threat from changes to environment

Animals that are inbred make mistakes in response to changes in their surroundings, at a cost to themselves and their young.

4h

In surveys, people say they'll pay twice what they're actually willing to spend

When researchers compared what study participants reported they were willing to spend on goods with what they actually shelled out in experiments designed to mimic a real-world shopping experience, there was a big gap.

4h

Study signals dramatic change in way ancient diets are calculated

Knowing what extinct animals ate has long been determined by analyzing carbon isotopes locked inside fossil teeth. For two decades, a key isotope value in these equations has been assumed to be the same for all plant-eating mammals, but new research led by the American Museum of Natural History and Columbia University, and published in the journal Proceedings of the Royal Society B, contradicts th

4h

Yes, You Can See Tardigrades with a Cheap Optical Microscope

We bought a bunch of tardigrades online (thanks, internet!) and tried to see them with six inexpensive microscopes. Here is what we discovered.

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Court Becoming Impatient with EPA Over Clean Power Plan

The judges’ remarks could pressure the agency to repeal or replace the plan to rein in carbon emissions — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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First Rwandan-made Volkswagen rolls off assembly line

The first Rwandan-made Volkswagen car rolled off the assembly line on Wednesday at the country's first auto factory.

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The bizarre world of topological materials

In 2016, three physicists received the Nobel Prize for using the mathematical concept of "topology" to explain the strange behavior of certain materials—for example, those that are insulators in their bulk but conductors on their surface. Now, researchers are investigating applications for these exotic materials in electronics, catalysis and quantum computing, according to an article in Chemical &

5h

Co-op University of Guelph study finds new measure for stress in overtrained athletes

Overload training — or, training to exhaustion followed by a period or rest and recovery before a race — is a method used by many endurance athletes in search of a personal best. A new University of Guelph study has found that overtraining might alter firing in the body's sympathetic nerve fibres which might hinder athletic performance.

5h

Reproducibility matters

A plant's health is affected not only by conditions such as water and temperature, but by the microorganisms that live around its roots. This rhizosphere microbiome regulates nutrient availability to the plant from the soil and can impact plant growth and yields. An international team reported on the results of a large-scale field study that partially replicates earlier trials to identify soil mic

5h

UAlberta biologists show that female seals have consistent personalities

Female seals don't change their spots, according to a new study by University of Alberta biologists. In fact, individual differences in boldness remain consistent over time.The study is among the first to examine boldness in wild marine mammals in the burgeoning field of animal personality. Animal personality influences many ecological processes, like how individuals interact with other species or

5h

Rough terrain? No problem for beaver-inspired autonomous robot

University at Buffalo researchers are using stigmergy, a biological phenomenon that has been used to explain everything from the behavior of termites and beavers to the popularity of Wikipedia, to build new problem-solving autonomous robots.

5h

CU Anschutz researchers find little association between suicide and hypoxia

Following an extensive analysis of published studies, researchers at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus have found that while suicide rates are higher at higher altitudes, they are unlikely caused by hypoxia, (low oxygen) at these elevations.

5h

Don't let depression keep you from exercising

Exercise may be just as crucial to a depression patient's good health as finding an effective antidepressant.

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What does fitness in midlife mean for depression, cardiovascular disease later in life?

A high level of fitness in midlife was associated with a lower risk of depression after age 65 and a lower risk of cardiovascular death, including after a diagnosis of depression.

5h

How Computers Parse the Ambiguity of Everyday Language

If you’re one of the 2.4 million Twitter followers of the Hamilton impresario Lin-Manuel Miranda, you’ve come to expect a delightful stream of observations, including tweets capturing conversations with his son Sebastian, now 3 years old. Earlier this month, Miranda offered one such exchange under the title, “ S’MORES. A Real-Life One-Act Play .” Me: So that’s the marshmallow but you’re going to

5h

Read This Article!!!

How many exclamation points does it take to exclaim something? One, a human of sound mind and a decent grasp of punctuation might say. The exclamation point denotes exclamation. That is its point. One should suffice. But, on the internet, it often doesn’t. Not anymore. Digital communication is undergoing exclamation-point inflation. When single exclamation points adorn every sentence in a busines

5h

Sweltering Europe loses its fizz as CO2 shortage hits drinkers

It's peak season for bars and barbecues in Europe as a summer heatwave coincides with the World Cup on TV. So probably not the best time for drinks companies to be running out of the gas that puts the fizz into beer and sodas.

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Appealing finding suggests why refrigeration dampens banana aromas

Bananas are one of the world's most popular fruits. But how they're stored prior to reaching grocery shelves can adversely affect their flavor and smell. Now in a study appearing in ACS' Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, scientists report that cold temperatures suppress the activity of proteins that play a key role in the formation of the banana's distinct aromas. They say this discovery

5h

New results of Deepwater Horizon research to protect marine life against future oil spills

The University of South Florida continues to play an integral role in discovering the extent of damage caused by the 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil spill. Researchers just published results of a seven-year study, recording the most comprehensive data available of marine life throughout the entire Gulf of Mexico.

5h

Endangered species listing considered for rare Nevada toad

U.S. wildlife officials have agreed to consider Endangered Species Act protection for a rare toad in northern Nevada's high desert where one of the biggest producers of geothermal energy in the nation wants to build another power plant.

5h

Run, don't walk, to see New York City's latest corpse flower bloom

Environment The Bronx's stinkiest resident will only blossom for a day or so. On the evening of June 26 the noxious-smelling corpse flower finally bloomed. Here's how you can watch the process—or go smell it for yourself.

5h

UTMN scientists confirm the high speed of Siberia development

Following the trail of Siberian pioneers, archaeologists from the University of Tyumen have investigated the camp on Karachinsky Island, the Lower Tobol River, where, according to chronicles, Yermak and his Cossacks spent a winter.The AMS Laboratory at the University of Arizona analysed wood samples and dated the found dugout to the middle of the 17th century, while Yermak's campaign took place in

5h

A milestone on the path towards efficient solar cells

Generating more electricity from solar cells and conducting further research into so-called singlet fission. This is what scientists at Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg (FAU) are currently working on as part of a joint research project conducted in collaboration with Argonne-Northwestern Solar Energy Research (ANSER) Center at Northwestern University in Evanston, USA. Singlet fiss

5h

Appealing finding suggests why refrigeration dampens banana aromas

Bananas are one of the world's most popular fruits. But how they're stored prior to reaching grocery shelves can adversely affect their flavor and smell. Now in a study appearing in ACS' Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, scientists report that cold temperatures suppress the activity of proteins that play a key role in the formation of the banana's distinct aromas. They say this discovery

5h

New results of Deepwater Horizon research to protect marine life against future oil spills

Researchers from the US, Mexico and Cuba complete comprehensive study, creating baseline data for the Gulf of Mexico's entire marine ecosystem.

5h

Breastfeeding mothers stop nursing sooner when living with smokers

Nursing mothers who live with two or more smokers are more likely to stop breastfeeding sooner than those who live in nonsmoking households.

5h

RUDN chemists have completely changed the direction of Diels-Alder reaction

RUDN-based researchers together with Russian colleagues studied the Diels-Alder reaction in the derivatives of furan (a heterocyclic organic substance) and managed to reach 100 percent control over the composition of its products. The described patterns may be useful for creating new methods of agricultural waste processing. Moreover, the reaction may be used for the manufacture of graphene fragme

5h

NIH study associates obesity with lower breast cancer risk in young women

Young women with high body fat have a decreased chance of developing breast cancer before menopause, according to scientists at the National Institutes of Health and their collaborators. The finding, published online in the journal JAMA Oncology, may help researchers better understand the role obesity plays in breast cancer risk.

5h

Dangerous reptiles

Attacks by crocodiles have been rising in South East Asia since they became protected animals, a study finds.

5h

Facebook halts production of drones for internet delivery

Facebook is ending a program launched in 2014 to build a fleet of drones that could deliver internet to underserved areas of the world.

5h

Google prepping its Duplex bot for a summer rolloutGoogle Duplex AI Human

When Google first introduced its phone-calling digital concierge Duplex in May, some thought it sounded too human. Others worried that it would secretly record calls with people.

5h

'The eyes have it'—Photoreceptors in marine plankton form a depth gauge to aid survival

The eyes of some marine-dwelling creatures have evolved to act like a "depth gauge", allowing these creatures to swim in the open ocean at a certain depth .

5h

What Ben Jealous’ Win Means for Democrats

Ben Jealous has a theory of the 2018 Maryland gubernatorial election: that an enthusiastically progressive candidate can defeat the state’s popular Republican governor, Larry Hogan. After his victory in Tuesday night’s Democratic primary, Jealous will get to put that theory to the test. “If someone voted for Hogan last time, I’m not trying to convince them to do different this time. If somebody d

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A Shocking Insurgent Victory in New York

Less than a year ago, 28-year-old Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez was bartending and waiting tables in Manhattan to support her family. On Tuesday night, she unseated a potential speaker of the House, and is on her way to becoming the youngest woman in Congress. “We meet a machine with a movement,” Ocasio-Cortez told a TV reporter as returns from the primary election rolled in. “That is what we have don

5h

Your brain with a migraine

When migraine sufferers see the tell-tale squiggly lines, light flashes and blind spots of a migraine aura, they prepare for a migraine. When researchers see the brain image of an aura, they try to figure out what causes it and if there is a way to stop the start of the migraine. Now an international team of researchers has identified the electrical activity specific to the start of migraines and

5h

'The eyes have it' — Photoreceptors in marine plankton form a depth gauge to aid survival

The eyes of some marine-dwelling creatures have evolved to act like a 'depth gauge', allowing these creatures to swim in the open ocean at a certain depth.

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Vacation time recharges US workers, but positive effects vanish within days, new survey finds

Taking time off helps the majority of US workers recover from stress and experience positive effects that improve their well-being and job performance, but for nearly two-thirds of working adults, the benefits of time away dissipate within a few days, according to a survey released by the American Psychological Association.

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Bridges should be beautiful | Ian Firth

Bridges need to be functional, safe and durable, but they should also be elegant and beautiful, says structural engineer Ian Firth. In this mesmerizing tour of bridges old and new, Firth explores the potential for innovation and variety in this essential structure — and how spectacular ones reveal our connectivity, unleash our creativity and hint at our identity.

5h

How going for a run changes your brain

Going for a run does a brain and body good. Read More

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Robotter skal fjerne farlig maling

Når man i dag skal fjerne blyholdig maling, skal der laves hermetisk aflukning, og de ansatte skal bruge ‘rumdragter.’ Nedriveren J. Jensen vil udvikle robotter til at klare opgaven.

5h

What caused the mass extinction of Earth's first animals?

Fossil records tell us that the first macroscopic animals appeared on Earth about 575 million years ago. Twenty-four million years later, the diversity of animals began to mysteriously decline, leading to Earth's first know mass extinction event.

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Stealthy, Sub-Launched Torpedo Will Be Deadlier Than Ever

The U.S. Navy's most commonly used torpedo — the MK 48 — is getting a makeover that will make it stealthier, deadlier and farther-reaching than ever before, according to news sources.

6h

Study provides insight into the physics of the Higgs particle

Physicists at the University of Bonn have succeeded in putting a superconducting gas into an exotic state. Their experiments allow new insights into the properties of the Higgs particle, but also into fundamental characteristics of superconductors. The publication, which is already available online, will soon appear in the journal Nature Physics.

6h

Probing nobelium with laser light

Sizes and shapes of nuclei with more than 100 protons were so far experimentally inaccessible. Laser spectroscopy is an established technique in measuring fundamental properties of exotic atoms and their nuclei. For the first time, this technique was now extended to precisely measure the optical excitation of atomic levels in the atomic shell of three isotopes of the heavy element nobelium. This w

6h

Researchers present new strategy for extending ductility in a single-phase alloy

Research group led by Prof. WU Xiaolei at Institute of Mechanics, in collaboration with Prof. En Ma at the Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, USA, have demonstrated a strategy for exploiting a dynamically reinforced multilevel heterogeneous grain structure (HGS).

6h

Finding the right balance for catalysts in the hydrogen evolution reaction

A collaboration led by the University of Tsukuba optimized the balance between the catalytic activity in hydrogen generation and stability of metal nanoparticles coated with different numbers of graphene layers. The team found that coating the catalyst nanoparticles with three to five graphene layers provided samples that displayed high catalytic activity in hydrogen evolution as well as high stab

6h

Cancer-causing virus HTLV-1 changes DNA loops to 'affect tens of thousands of genes'

A human virus that causes a rare form of leukaemia increases the risk of disease by changing the way DNA loops inside our cells.

6h

Scientists identify geographic sectors controlling the Hadley circulation

A Chinese-French team pinpointed the zonal diversity of regional meridional circulations (RMC) in the tropics and distinctive roles in the interannual variability of Hadley circulation strength and its edges in boreal winter.

6h

Adhering to Paris Agreement climate goal could significantly decrease heat-related summer deaths

As much of the UK and Europe swelters under heatwave conditions, new research led by scientists from the University of Bristol has produced compelling evidence that loss of life through increased heat stress during heatwaves can be limited if we stabilise climate at the lower of the Paris Agreement climate goals.

6h

Electrospun sodium titanate speeds up the purification of nuclear waste water

Electrospun sodium titanate speeds up the purification of water based on selective ion exchange — effectively extracts radio-active strontium.

6h

Grease in space

The galaxy is rich in grease-like molecules, according to an Australian-Turkish team. Astronomers at the University of New South Wales in Sydney (UNSW), and Ege University in Turkey used a laboratory to manufacture material with the same properties as interstellar dust and used their results to estimate the amount of 'space grease' found in the Milky Way. Their results appear in a paper in Monthly

6h

Twisted cracks give some animals super strength

Some animals owe their strength and toughness to a design strategy that causes cracks to follow the twisting pattern of fibers to prevent catastrophic failure. Researchers documented the behavior in two papers and are creating new composite materials modeled after the phenomenon. They studied the preternatural strength of a composite material in a sea creature called the mantis shrimp, which uses

6h

Squeezed graphene gets crinkles with a neat power

Gently compressed stacks of graphene form sharp crinkles that carry an electric charge, which could be useful in nanoscale self-assembly and other applications. A study published in Proceedings of the Royal Society A demonstrates mathematically what happens to stacks of graphene sheets under slight lateral compression—a gentle squeeze from their sides. Rather than forming smooth, gently sloping w

6h

Finding the right balance for catalysts in the hydrogen evolution reaction

Hydrogen produced from water by the hydrogen evolution reaction is an attractive clean fuel source. Production of hydrogen on a large scale at low cost is necessary to realize its viability as an alternative energy source to fossil fuels. To achieve this goal, durable, inexpensive catalysts are required. Most present catalysts based on non-precious metals suffer from instability in the acidic solu

6h

There Is No Immigration Crisis

Are Democrats walking into a trap on immigration? Three of America’s most astute and iconoclastic political commentators— David Frum , Andrew Sullivan , and Fareed Zakaria —all immigrants themselves, fear the answer is yes. In recent days, each has made a version of the same argument. Yes, they acknowledge, President Trump’s policy of separating families at America’s southwestern border was monst

6h

35 Innovators Under 35

Better gene editing. Cheaper solar cells. Stretchable electronics. And smarter robots. Meet Jonas Cleveland, CEO of COSY, and the rest of our 2018 list of 35 Innovators Under 35.

6h

MIT Technology Review’s new design—and new mission

Tech journalism shouldn’t just explain technology, but seek to make it more of a force for good.

6h

Deep biosphere microbes expand the chemical signatures of life

Search for signs of ancient microbial life in the geological record is challenging due to degradation of the primary organic material. Therefore, proof of biogenic origin often relies on chemical signatures that microorganisms leave behind. A new study of minerals in rock cracks presents chemical signatures that are definite proofs of widespread ancient life processes in the energy-poor continenta

6h

New combined treatment shows promise in hepatocellular carcinoma

New combined treatment shows promise in Hepatocellular Carcinoma. A combination of mTOR inhibitors and Phenformin leads to an increase in overall survival.

6h

BNAs improve performance of Li-ion batteries

Recent research published in a paper in NANO by a group of researchers from Northeastern University investigated the effect of hierarchical Bi2MoO6 nanosheet arrays on the performance of Li-ion batteries (LIBs) and found that it improves the cycle stability and capacity and is expected to be used in portable electronic devices in the future.

6h

Newly discovered Xenomorph wasp has alien-like lifecycle

A University of Adelaide PhD student has discovered a new species of wasp, named Xenomorph because of its gruesome parasitic lifecycle that echoes the predatory behaviour of the Alien movie franchise monster.

6h

Rethinking existing method opens new doors for cancer diagnostics

Osaka University researchers overcame limitations of current DNA sequencers by using current-tunneling measurements to measure the base sequence and quantities of DNA and microRNA simultaneously. They successfully determined the entire base sequences of four types of DNA corresponding to the let-7 microRNA, a 22-base cancer marker. The method also permits counting of DNA molecules that contain a s

6h

Image: Sterilising an antenna for Mars

A ground penetrating radar antenna for ESA's ExoMars 2020 rover being pre-cleaned in an ultra-cleanroom environment in preparation for its sterilisation process, in an effort to prevent terrestrial microbes coming along for the ride to the red planet.

6h

'Tipping the balance' against domestic abuse

Police body-worn cameras are increasingly being used to ensure the perpetrators of domestic violence are charged and brought before the courts, according to new research.

6h

Climate shift may have spurred migration across now submerged land bridge

A new study by Canadian, UK and US researchers has found that climate conditions shifted to become wetter and warmer around 15,000 years ago and contributed to the first human migration between Asia and North America.

6h

Eight ethical questions about exploring outer space that need answers

Metallic shrapnel flying faster than bullets; the Space Shuttle smashed to pieces; astronauts killed or ejected into space. The culprit? Space debris – remnants of a Russian satellite blown up by a Russian missile. The one survivor, Ryan Stone, has to find her way back to Earth with oxygen supplies failing and the nearest viable spacecraft hundreds of miles away.

6h

Is there a new volcano on Hawaii?

Kilauea, the most active volcano on Hawaii, has been in continual eruption since 1983. It entered a new phase in early May when fractures along a rift on the eastern side of the volcano opened during a series of earthquakes – some of which became volcanic fissures from which lava was erupted.

6h

Adhering to Paris Agreement climate goal could significantly decrease heat-related summer deaths

As much of the UK and Europe swelters under heatwave conditions, new research led by scientists from the University of Bristol has produced compelling evidence that loss of life through increased heat stress during heatwaves can be limited if we stabilise climate at the lower of the Paris Agreement climate goals.

6h

VRE4EIC releases video tutorials on how to build virtual research environments

VRE4EIC, an H2020 European research project, has released a series of video tutorials. Short online videos explain how to build a virtual research environment (VRE) or to enhance an existing VRE.

6h

Quantum mechanics: entanglements in ultracold atomic clouds

A system's state is characterised as entangled or quantum correlated if two or more particles cannot be described as a combination of separate, independent states but only as a whole. Researchers at the Kirchhoff Institute for Physics of Heidelberg University recently succeeded in verifying so-called non-local quantum correlations between ultracold clouds of rubidium atoms. Under the direction of

6h

Cancer-causing virus HTLV-1 changes DNA loops to 'affect tens of thousands of genes'

A human virus that causes a rare form of leukaemia increases the risk of disease by changing the way DNA loops inside our cells.

6h

Grease in space

The galaxy is rich in grease-like molecules, according to an Australian-Turkish team. Astronomers at the University of New South Wales in Sydney (UNSW), and Ege University in Turkey used a laboratory to manufacture material with the same properties as interstellar dust and used their results to estimate the amount of 'space grease' found in the Milky Way. Their results appear in a paper in Monthly

6h

Remembering Donald Hall, a Poet of Love and Loss

The death of Donald Hall comes at a moment when his poetry feels newly relevant. Hall’s hospitable poems, which approach difficult ideas in the idioms of common speech, defend the sense and meaning of ordinary language from the daily barrage of a debased and weaponized English. At a time when straightforward “tough talk” is giving popular license to open racism, sexism, and anti-intellectualism,

6h

Probing nobelium with laser light

Sizes and shapes of nuclei with more than 100 protons were so far experimentally inaccessible. Laser spectroscopy is an established technique in measuring fundamental properties of exotic atoms and their nuclei. For the first time, this technique was now extended to precisely measure the optical excitation of atomic levels in the atomic shell of three isotopes of the heavy element nobelium, which

6h

A big data platform to take on the EU's seven societal challenges

Big Data is such a huge change for businesses that it can easily seem overwhelming. The BigDataEurope project meets interested companies half way by providing an integrated stack of tools to manipulate, publish and use large-scale data resources.

6h

Big Data mining for better contact centre performance

Customers generally frustrated with the experience of reaching out to contact centres may finally get to change their mind, thanks to a Big Data mining solution brought by the BISON project.

6h

Evolution of metabolic dependency as base for ancestral symbiosis

Kiel research team describes the fundamental mechanisms which control the evolutionary ancient symbiotic relationship between algae and cnidarians for the first time

6h

What Can Cancer Specialists Learn From Patients Who Beat All The Odds?

A Harvard Medical School project aims to become the first national registry for exceedingly rare cancer patients who respond mysteriously well to treatments that failed to help others. (Image credit: Jesse Costa/WBUR)

6h

Solar activities can affect the East Asian winter monsoon at the multidecadal time scale

Scientists used a four-member ensemble of 600-year simulations and observational data to examine the influence of low-frequency solar forcing on the East Asian winter monsoon (EAWM). Their results, published in Advances in Atmospheric Sciences, show that the EAWM is strengthened when total solar irradiance (TSI) increases on the multidecadal time scale. Specifically, the Siberian high and low-leve

6h

Australian shrub contains new class of organic compound

A Japanese research team led by Kanazawa University analyzed the structure of six natural products from an Australian shrub, Cryptocarya laevigata. The compounds contained a spiro[3.5]nonane moiety — cyclohexene sharing a single carbon with cyclobutane — never previously seen in nature, as well as a lactone. The cyclobutane ring is possibly biosynthesized from two dissimilar alkenes, which is ra

6h

New study shows lower prevalence of type 2 diabetes among those who consume walnuts

A new epidemiological study representing more than 34,000 American adults suggests that those who consume walnuts may have about half the risk of developing type 2 diabetes compared to adults who do not eat nuts.

6h

New regulator of neuron formation identified

The protein NEK7 regulates neuron formation, as it is required for dendrite growth and branching, as well as the formation and shaping of dendritic spines. These are the main conclusions of a study published in Nature Communications and led by Jens Lüders at the Institute for Research in Biomedicine (IRB Barcelona), in collaboration with colleagues at the University of Barcelona and the Molecular

6h

Key protein providing defense against 'jumping genes' identified

International researchers revealed the crucial function of the protein HP1a for piRNA biogenesis, which is important for transposon silencing. Transposons are DNA sequences that have the potential to move to new positions within the genome, causing infertility and diseases. Knockdown of the gene HP1a in the fruit fly model revealed HP1a predominantly functions to repress transposons located at per

6h

Oxide sintering by air pressure control

Professor Hiromi Nakano of the Toyohashi University of Technology has collaborated with a company to develop a small and light-weight air-pressure control atmosphere furnace that can rapidly and uniformly synthesize periodical structures of Li2O-Nb2O5-TiO2 (LNT) solid solution materials at 3x the ordinary pressure. The mechanism behind this was discovered using detailed composition/structure analy

6h

Of hearts and giants: Moving a cardiac regulatory protein to the right place

An international research team revealed a nuclear localization role for a conserved short stretch of a cardiac muscle regulator. Mutations within the RSRSP stretch of RBM20 cause the left ventricle to enlarge and weaken, and were shown to interrupt nuclear transport of RBM20, preventing it from controlling a giant spring-like protein of cardiac muscle cells. The findings and animal model developed

6h

Why are Russians so stingy with their smiles?

In the lead-up to the World Cup, articles appeared noting that Russian workers were being taught how to properly smile at the foreign soccer fans who would soon be visiting their country.

6h

To appreciate its power, think of design as a drug

The search for some concoction or contraption to improve our performance at work is nothing new. Lawyers, bankers and other professionals have famously used performance-enhancing drugs to gain a competitive advantage.

6h

IBM to release world's largest facial analytics dataset

Society is paying more attention than ever to the question of bias in artificial intelligence systems, and particularly those used to recognize and analyze images of faces. At IBM, we are taking the following actions to ensure facial recognition technology is built and trained responsibly:

6h

Study provides insight into the physics of the Higgs particle

Physicists at the University of Bonn have succeeded in putting a superconducting gas into an exotic state. Their experiments allow new insights into the properties of the Higgs particle, but also into fundamental characteristics of superconductors. The publication, which is already available online, will soon appear in the journal Nature Physics.

6h

6h

Højspændingsbøvl udsætter Viking Links driftstart til 2023

Ballade om placering af 500 nye elmaster i Syd- og Vestjylland udsætter nu idriftsættelsen af det omdiskuterede Viking Link-kabel til England med et år.

6h

Research identifies barley beer in Bronze Age Mesopotamian drinking vessels

People living some 3500 years ago in Mesopotamia, which now is modern-day Iraq, enjoyed a pint as much as we do today.

6h

'Nuru' becomes African farmers' newest ally against fall armyworm

Penn State researchers have joined forces with the United Nations' Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) to release the first app, called Nuru, to help African farmers recognize fall armyworm—a new and fast-spreading crop pest in sub-Saharan Africa—so that they can take immediate steps to destroy it and curb its spread.

6h

Bioinspired material mimics color changes of living organisms

A range of creatures, including chameleons, octopuses and frogs, can change color in response to changes in the environment. Some insights into the mechanisms behind this at the anatomical, cellular and molecular levels have been obtained. However, much work is still required to obtain sufficient understanding of this phenomenon and to translate it into useful artificial applications.

6h

Astronomers investigate type IIP supernova with a long plateau

Astronomers have investigated a type IIP supernovae known as SN 2015ba, which exhibits a long plateau in its light curve. The new study provides essential information about the properties of this explosion and could be helpful in improving our understanding of type IIP supernovae. The research is presented in a paper published June 14 on the arXiv pre-print server.

6h

A performance review from the future

MIT Technology Review envisions feedback for future workers.

7h

Vertical retirement villages are on the rise, and they're high-tech too

It is no secret people are living longer, thanks to advances in medical technology. Futurist Ray Kurzweil predicts we are approaching a point of breaking even – where for every year lived, science can extend lifespans by at least that much. And more than 80% of Kurzweil's predictions have so far proved correct.

7h

New coal doesn't stack up – just look at Queensland's renewable energy numbers

As the federal government aims to ink a deal with the states on the National Energy Guarantee in August, it appears still to be negotiating within its own ranks. Federal energy minister Josh Frydenberg has reportedly told his partyroom colleagues that he would welcome a new coal-fired power plant, while his former colleague (and now Queensland Resources Council chief executive) Ian Macfarlane urge

7h

Low expectations are stopping young disabled people going to university

Almost half of all young people in England now go on to higher education. This means that teenagers in the UK are more likely to go to university than ever before.

7h

Experimental forecasts could help Guatemala recover from volcanic eruption

Guatemala's Volcán de Fuego erupted in early June, killing at least 110 people, while hundreds more remain missing. Streams of lava and plumes of smoke and ash have displaced thousands of Guatemalans, and destroyed an estimated 21,000 acres of crops.

7h

Tiny sensors may avert earthquake damage, track sonar danger, 'listen' to pipelines

Could a few seconds of warning be enough to mitigate the devastation of an impending earthquake? Tiny sensors being developed in a Simon Fraser University lab could help to give a pre-emptive head's up, enough to secure critical infrastructure, such as bridges or power lines, and potentially save lives.

7h

As solar energy makes headlines, apartment dwellers find sustainability options

Kelly T. Sanders takes short showers. Whenever possible, she avoids turning on the air conditioner. And she hasn't owned a car in years.

7h

It's go time for Hawaiian bird conservation, and luckily there's a playbook

A new study in The Condor: Ornithological Applications presents some of the best guidance to date on the priorities and actions that can be taken to help Hawaii's endemic birds. This new paper lays out a plan to better guide and empower conservation efforts for Hawaiian birds.

7h

What caused the mass extinction of Earth's first animals?

Fossil records tell us that the first macroscopic animals appeared on Earth about 575 million years ago. Twenty-four million years later, the diversity of animals began to mysteriously decline, leading to Earth's first know mass extinction event. A research team, led by scientists from Arizona State University, is helping to unravel this mystery and understand why this extinction event happened, w

7h

This is what it’s like to speak with Google’s reservation-making AI service

Technology Google Duplex is slowly rolling out. No big deal. Just an artificial intelligence system calling to make a reservation at a Thai place on a city corner.

7h

Scientist mines supercomputer simulations of protein dynamics for biological energy-conversion principles

An energy crisis can trigger years of fuel shortages and high gas prices. Energy shortages in biological cells are even more serious. Consequences include amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and aging-related disorders such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases.

7h

Nanette Is a Radical, Transformative Work of Comedy

The most radical thing Hannah Gadsby does in Nanette is simple: She stops being funny. It’s about 35 minutes into her 70-minute comedy show, filmed live at the Sydney Opera House, and Gadsby, a 40-year-old Tasmanian comic, has riffed on the gay pride flag (“six very shouty, assertive colors stacked on top of each other”), the pointlessness of bald babies wearing pink headbands (“Would you put a b

7h

Key protein providing defense against 'jumping genes' identified

Though they occasionally play a role in animal development, transposons, also known as "jumping genetic elements," are in fact DNA sequences that have the potential to move to new positions within the genome. They constitute a large portion of the genome in the majority of eukaryotes, and their mobilization in the genome of the gametes—eggs and sperm– poses a threat to genomic instability, thus le

7h

Watch Out, Pro Racers: These Drones Just Learned to Fly Solo

A new system allows robot drones to navigate an obstacle course with 100 percent accuracy—that is, the robots almost never crash and explode.

7h

Stop Expecting Games to Build Empathy

Games, the thinking goes, can make you a better person. But can they? Do they?

7h

Sonos Beam Review: Support for Alexa in a Great Soundbar

The Sonos Beam is a $400 soundbar that comes with full support for Amazon Alexa.

7h

Google Duplex Gets a Second, More Subdued, Demo

Google's talking telephone bot began life as a staged demo. Now, it's closer to being ready for the real world.

7h

Region H og TDC forlader statens sniffernetværk: Ingen nye deltagere i 2017

Ingen danske virksomheder tilsluttede sig sidste år statens sensornetværk. Til gengæld trak flere sig ud.

7h

How to make CAR-T cell therapies for cancer safer and more effective

CAR-T cell therapy was approved by the FDA in late 2017. Now, scientists are working to tame the cancer treatment’s side effects.

7h

Extreme sea levels predicted to increase along global coastlines

A new study has predicted that future global warming will lead to an increase in 'extreme sea levels', with consequent flood risks to coastal infrastructure and human populations.

7h

It's go time for Hawaiian bird conservation, and luckily there's a playbook

A new study in The Condor: Ornithological Applications presents some of the best guidance to date on the priorities and actions that can be taken to help Hawaii's endemic birds. Hawaii's ecosystems, including its native bird populations, are struggling. Of the 21 species of forest birds left on the islands, almost two thirds (12 species) of are endangered or threatened. The current conservation st

7h

Google demos Duplex, its AI that sounds exactly like a very weird, nice humanGoogle Duplex AI Human

After ethical concerns marred its announcement in May, Google showed off its retooled aural AI that helps you connect with people who still answer the phone.

7h

The Book of Todd | Gold Rush: The Ballad of Parker and Todd

Facing financial ruin at the height of the recession, a small businessman with big dreams embarks on an adventure to find gold. The original Gold Rusher, Todd Hoffman, tells his side of the story to where it stands now. From: Discovery

7h

Bumblebees found to do better in urban settings than in agricultural areas

A team of researchers with the University of London and Imperial College London has found through field experiments that bumblebee colonies tend to do better in urban environments than agricultural environments. In their paper published in Proceedings of the Royal Society B, the group describes their study and what they found.

7h

Habitat fragmentation can promote disease outbreaks

Fragmentation of landscapes and habitat loss—driven by urbanization and climate change—can put wildlife species at risk of extinction. Some ecological theory suggests habitat fragmentation may be beneficial to wildlife facing disease because populations of sick animals may remain isolated from healthy populations or dispersal might allow healthy animals to escape infection from otherwise sick popu

7h

Girls Who Code: Is There A Wave Coming?

Ten large tech companies did not employ a single black woman in 2016, according to a new report from The Center for Investigative Reporting.

7h

Cost keeps many from getting hearing aids

Only a little more than a third of older adults who say they have hearing loss are using a hearing aid to correct it, research shows. A new national study reveals major gaps in whether Americans over age 55 get help for their hearing loss—gaps that vary greatly with age, race, education, and income. People who are non-Hispanic white, college-educated, or have incomes in the top 25 percent are abo

7h

Platforms for investigating lncRNA functions

To aid in the discovery and understanding of lncRNA biology, newly published work from Richard and Eichhorn in SLAS Technology features the technological platforms and methodology presently used to identify the roles of lncRNA in biology. This work highlights the databases and tools used to study lncRNA and techniques used to study their function.

7h

Volkswagen to stash cars at Berlin's problem airport

Car giant Volkswagen will stock cars awaiting strict new emissions tests at Berlin's under-construction airport, combining the German national embarrassments of the carmaker's "dieselgate" scandal and the much-delayed travel hub.

7h

Gary Reback: Technology’s trustbuster

Big-money politics is making it harder than ever to tame Big Tech.

7h

Scientists develop thermal camouflage that can fool infrared cameras

Invention can make an object appear to have the same temperature as its background Scientists have developed a thin, lightweight and flexible film that can outfox infrared cameras, allowing hot bodies to appear cool and cold items to appear warm. The invention can also help camouflage an object by making it appear the same temperature as its background. The design was inspired by the colour-shift

8h

Supercompensation: Why a Break in Your Training Is Necessary

But how long does it take to lose fitness? — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

8h

That beer after your workout probably isn’t helping you

Health It might even ruin your gains. To a lot of folks, a cold drink with your buds after a tough workout sounds like the epitome of relaxation. But it's not doing you any favors.

8h

New nerve gas detector built with legos and a smartphone

Researchers at The University of Texas at Austin have designed a way to sense dangerous chemicals using, in part, a simple rig consisting of a smartphone and a box made from Lego bricks, which could help first responders and scientists in the field identify deadly and difficult-to-detect nerve agents such as VX and sarin.

8h

Break it down: Understanding the formation of chemical byproducts during water treatment

To improve water treatment, researchers use modeling to understand how chemical byproducts form during the advanced oxidation process.

8h

The ultimate 'smell test': Device sends rotten food warning to smartphones

When it comes to the 'smell test,' the nose isn't always the best judge of food quality. Now in a study appearing in ACS' journal Nano Letters, scientists report that they have developed a wireless tagging device that can send signals to smartphones warning consumers and food distributors when meat and other perishables have spoiled. They say this new sensor could improve the detection of rotten f

8h

Thermal camouflage disguises hot and cold

Hunters don camouflage clothing to blend in with their surroundings. But thermal camouflage – or the appearance of being the same temperature as one's environment – is much more difficult. Now researchers, reporting in ACS' journal Nano Letters, have developed a system that can reconfigure its thermal appearance to blend in with varying temperatures in a matter of seconds.

8h

Building a chemical weapons detector with Legos®

Nerve agents are scary stuff. They are among the most deadly substances on earth, yet can be odorless, tasteless and difficult to detect. But researchers now report in ACS Central Science that they have adapted building materials normally associated with children's toys and a cell phone to help sense these compounds. The new method can sensitively detect these poisons, quantify the amount and dist

8h

LG C8 OLED 4K TV: The Best-Looking TV of 2018

When it comes to picture quality, LG's OLED 4K TV lineup beats all comers.

8h

Here’s One Way to Reform an Internet Conspiracy Theorist

A new study looks at millions of Reddit posts to determine who constructs online conspiracy theories, and how they might be convinced to rejoin reality.

8h

Tech Companies Deflect Blame for Opioid Crisis Ahead of FDA Summit

The tech and pharmaceutical industries are sparring over who bears more responsibility for an opioid crisis that kills more than 115 Americans a day.

8h

9 Killer Tech Deals on the Bitdefender Box, SNES Classic, and More

Two Nintendo consoles are on sale this week, along with a secure router and other great tech!

8h

Dear Therapist: I Don’t Know How to Help My Angry, Unmotivated, Adult Son

Editor’s Note: Every Wednesday, Lori Gottlieb answers questions from readers about their problems, big and small. Have a question? Email her at dear.therapist@theatlantic.com . Dear Therapist, My 26-year-old son has been through a lot in his life, and I think he has some anger-management issues as a result. He was adopted as a newborn, though stayed in touch with his birth mother, who went on to

8h

Westworld’s Virtual Afterlife Might Not Be Fiction

This post contains spoilers through the end of the second season of Westworld . When Westworld premiered in October of 2016, the show quickly made clear that it would ask viewers to question the nature of its reality. But it can be easy to forget now, after 20 episodes of labyrinthine plotting and philosophizing, how even the most basic aspects about the show were once mysteries. Viewers initiall

8h

Lego-detektor med mobiltelefon skal identificere kemiske våben

En meget simpel, men effektiv detektor til at skelne mellem to former for nervegifte kan bygges med legoklodser.

8h

New nerve gas detector built with legos and a smartphone

Researchers at The University of Texas at Austin have designed a way to sense dangerous chemicals using, in part, a simple rig consisting of a smartphone and a box made from Lego bricks, which could help first responders and scientists in the field identify deadly and difficult-to-detect nerve agents such as VX and sarin. The new methodology described in a paper published Wednesday in the open-acc

8h

Break it down: Understanding the formation of chemical byproducts during water treatment

Synthetical chemicals are ever-present in modern life—in our medications, cosmetics and clothing—but what happens to them when they enter our municipal water supplies?

8h

Thermal camouflage disguises hot and cold

Hunters don camouflage clothing to blend in with their surroundings. But thermal camouflage—or the appearance of being the same temperature as one's environment—is much more difficult. Now researchers, reporting in ACS' journal Nano Letters, have developed a system that can reconfigure its thermal appearance to blend in with varying temperatures in a matter of seconds.

8h

The ultimate 'smell test': Device sends rotten food warning to smartphones

When it comes to the "smell test," the nose isn't always the best judge of food quality. Now in a study appearing in ACS' journal Nano Letters, scientists report that they have developed a wireless tagging device that can send signals to smartphones warning consumers and food distributors when meat and other perishables have spoiled. They say this new sensor could improve the detection of rotten f

8h

Freedom from fear: Dopamine's role in unlearning fearful associations

Researchers have discovered a circuit in the brain that is necessary for unlearning fear. The study details the role of dopamine in ensuring that rats stop being afraid when there isn't anything to be afraid of anymore.

8h

Recreating the chameleon: Material mimics color changes of living organisms

Researchers created a material containing photochromic dyes, crystals providing structural coloration, and a colored background that mimics the color changes that animals such as frogs, chameleons, and octopuses can display. This material could display different patterns and images depending on whether it was exposed to visible or ultraviolet light, or had a white or black background, which sugges

8h

Graphene forms electrically charged crinkles

Gently compressed stacks of graphene form sharp crinkles that carry an electric charge, which could be useful in nanoscale self-assembly and other applications.

8h

Mobilising global capital in aftermath of disaster is essential to economic recovery

A new report from has conducted a large-scale research study examining different Protection Gap Entities (PGEs) around the world.

8h

Poor parents in South America must cross digital divide

A new study shows poor people in South America use some ingenious strategies to keep in digital touch with their children throughout the day.

8h

When is a croc not a croc? When it's a thoracosaur

The fearsome Thoracosaurus, a dinosaur-era reptile from North America with jaws like giant pincers, bears an uncanny resemblance to a modern fish-eating croc called a gharial.

8h

Scaling up biohybrid systems to synthesize fuels, chemicals

Bioelectrochemical systems combine the best of both worlds – microbial cells with inorganic materials – to make fuels and other energy-rich chemicals with unrivaled efficiency. Yet technical difficulties have kept them impractical anywhere but in a lab. Now researchers at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) have developed a novel nanoscale membrane that could address these issues

8h

10 of the most diabolical crop pests in North Carolina

Arthropod pests (both insects and mites) rob North Carolina farmers every year by eating into their crop yields. No matter what a grower does, it seems like there is always a destructive pest waiting in the wings. We've curated a list of 10 of the most vexing pests that prey on agriculture in North Carolina.

8h

At any point in life, people spend their time in 25 places

At any given time, people regularly return to a maximum of 25 places. This is the finding of a scientific study that reveals entirely new aspects of human behavior.

8h

Polio Outbreak in Papua New Guinea

A recent case of polio on Papua New Guinea shows that we cannot rest until the eradication of polio is complete. Close is not good enough.

8h

World's first green energy storage demonstrator

The world's first green energy storage demonstrator is now live in the UK and has brought carbon-free fuel, that can be stored or transported for later use, a step closer.

8h

A digital capitalism Marx might enjoy

The conflict between labor and capital has shifted in capital’s favor. But there are some ways labor could fight back.

9h

Platforms for investigating lncRNA functions

To aid in the discovery and understanding of lncRNA biology, newly published work features the technological platforms and methodology presently used to identify the roles of lncRNA in biology. This work highlights the databases and tools used to study lncRNA and techniques used to study their function.

9h

Coastal resilience linked to national security

Talk about a perfect storm. As the Atlantic hurricane season kicks off this month, some coastal communities are still recovering from last year's record-breaking extreme weather damage. Meanwhile, the National Flood Insurance Program is again on life support – over $20 billion in debt and requiring reauthorization before its temporary extension ends on July 31.

9h

Citizen scientists capture penguin breeding dynamics

Using data from nearly 74,000 images, volunteer armchair scientists have helped Oxford University researchers to capture and better understand, the breeding habits of penguin breeding colonies across the Antarctic Peninsula, South Shetland Islands and South Georgia.

9h

The origins of fine-particle pollution in Guangzhou, China

Haze pollution is an integrated result of emissions, chemical reactions and regional transport under unfavorable weather conditions. Numerical simulation has the potential to strengthen knowledge on the underlying mechanisms of haze formation. As a result, policymakers might benefit and efficient control strategies should emerge.

9h

Manufacturing process provides low-cost, sustainable option for food packaging

Purdue University researchers have developed a large-scale manufacturing process that may change the way some grocery store foods are packaged.

9h

Fire crews prepare ‘heavy attack’ on massive moorland wildfire

Pockets of fire continue to burn across a six-kilometre area of Saddleworth Moor today as 50 firefighters worked to contain the situation

9h

Will we ever go on holiday in an electric-powered plane?

Norway showcased an aircraft that runs on batteries recently to much acclaim, but are ambitions to power routine flights this way realistic, wonders Peter Wilson

9h

Amazon Alexa devices in hotels raise privacy concerns for some

Amazon recently announced a program called Alexa for Hospitality, bringing its digital voice assistant to hotels and vacation rentals. The devices will likely make requesting services more convenient, but some people have privacy concerns.

9h

Can tariffs be used to enforce Paris climate commitments?

On June 14 the Trump administration announced new tariffs on $50 billion of Chinese goods, which prompted China to launch retaliatory measures in a trade war it claims the U.S. has started. A few days later, the U.S. president threatened to impose a 10 percent tariff on $200 billion of Chinese goods, sparking another warning from Beijing that it would hit back again. The administration had earlier

9h

Sandbox craters reveal secrets of planetary splash marks and lost meteorites

Every day, Earth is constantly bombarded by about 100 tons of falling objects from space, mostly simple dust or sand-sized particles that are destroyed as they hit the upper atmosphere. But very rarely, a piece large enough to survive the intense heat of entry manages to fall all the way down to the Earth's surface, where its galactic journey ends with a bump.

9h

Make America talk again: the lab teaching sworn enemies to have decent conversations

Could the secret to healing a riven politics lie in a Difficult Conversations Laboratory? This is an edited version of a longer piece that you can find here In a hard-to-find windowless room deep inside a New York university, some difficult conversations are taking place. But this is not unusual, because this is a Difficult Conversations Laboratory. Though it does not physically resemble a dungeo

9h

The Smithsonian Had To Dig Up Their Dinosaurs Again

In 1913 , Barnum Brown, the man who discovered Tyrannosaurus rex , unearthed a similar but smaller dinosaur near the Red Deer River in Alberta, Canada. Now known as Gorgosaurus , the dinosaur was half-encased in plaster, and positioned in the classic “death pose” with its head arching backward over its spine. It stayed that way for decades on the wall of the Smithsonian Museum of Natural History’

9h

What Does ABC Want From The Conners?

Did Roseanne ’s audience only watch the show for its star? There are good reasons for ABC, the program’s longtime network, to think not: Roseanne Barr never made a hit TV series that wasn’t about the Conner family, she never starred in a successful movie, and her various attempts to launch talk shows and reality series over the years have never worked. Of course, Barr’s identity as a comedian was

9h

Finnish forest management guidelines fail to protect the flying squirrel

A new study determined the habitat requirements for flying squirrels and compared them to those included in the recently amended Forest Act. The main finding was that the Finnish Nature Conservation Act does not adequately protect the old growth forests where flying squirrels live.

9h

Twelfth impact structure discovered in Central Finland

A Finnish-Estonian scientific collaboration by Geological Survey of Finland, University of Tartu, and University of Helsinki has led to a discovery of ancient meteorite impact crater in Central Finland. The crater has a diameter of 2.6 km and it is covered by the Lake Summasjärvi (Summanen), about 9 km south-east of the nearest city, Saarijärvi, and 275 km north of Helsinki. The age of the impact

9h

History of side-necked turtle diversification revealed

A work authored by a group of paleontologists affiliated to University of São Paulo's Biology Department in Ribeirão Preto, Brazil, published in Royal Society Open Science, is the most comprehensive phylogeny of the Pleurodira suborder of side-necked turtles produced. Pleurodira includes the yellow-spotted Amazon River turtle (Podocnemis unifilis).

9h

In search of biomarkers to detect patients with latent 'Plasmodium vivax' infection

Proteins derived from the latent liver stage of Plasmodium vivax can be detected in small extracellular vesicles that circulate in blood, according to a study led by ISGlobal. The results pave the way for identifying patients with asymptomatic infections, an essential requirement to stop parasite transmission.

9h

Relational mobility may influence your interpersonal behaviors

A large-scale analysis has suggested that it's easier for people to form and replace relationships in North America, Europe and Latin America, compared to Asia and the Middle East, what causes these differences, and how they may influence people's thoughts and behavior?

9h

Asymmetric plasmonic antennas deliver femtosecond pulses for fast optoelectronics

A team headed by the TUM physicists Alexander Holleitner and Reinhard Kienberger has succeeded for the first time in generating ultrashort electric pulses on a chip using metal antennas only a few nanometers in size, then running the signals a few millimeters above the surface and reading them in again a controlled manner. The technology enables the development of new, powerful terahertz component

9h

Distracted Driving Is Out of Control, and There's No Single Cure

What with phones and in-car infotainment systems, it's harder than ever to watch the road—and it's becoming a problem.

9h

Trump's Trade War Won't Hurt China. It Could Hurt US Tech

Proposed restrictions take aim at Chinese investments in the US that are declining anyway.

9h

These Beating Mini-Hearts Could Save Big Bucks—And Maybe Lives

The pharma industry is increasingly using miniature hearts as part of their drug screening and discovery process.

9h

The Digital Privacy Wins Keep Coming

From *Carpenter v. United States* to a landmark bill in California, privacy advocates sense a shift in what people will accept from Facebook, mobile carriers, and more.

9h

Researchers Gather for the International Workshop on Emoji Understanding

Linguists and data scientists see a new way to study language and communication in our little digital ideograms.

9h

Detection of arboreal feeding signs by Asiatic black bears

Feeding signs give researchers information about ecology in a given area. Feeding signs also provide information on animal distribution, habitat selection, and abundance. But feeding signs do not necessarily reflect the distribution or density of animals directly. In addition, it is difficult to recognize the presence of endangered species only from feeding signs. Thus, scientists need to understa

9h

Let’s make private data into a public good

The internet giants depend on our data. A new relationship between us and them could deliver real value to society.

9h

How a Simple Technology Helped Ease Racial Tensions in the 1950s

The lowly spindle—essentially a nail sticking out of a piece of wood—helped two mutually hostile groups work together — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

9h

A new arms race threatens to unleash laser warfare in the skies

The increasing use of military lasers that can damage the eyes of pilots has opened a fresh front in low-level international conflict, says David Hambling

9h

Here's How Much Cities Contribute to the World's Carbon Footprint

A new analysis maps residents’ carbon dioxide emissions in 13,000 cities, revealing some unanticipated results — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

9h

Godt og nødvendigt at Løkke lover løft af sundhedsvæsenet

Tak for de meget positive signaler om at investere i sundhedsvæsenet – det er tiltrængt, også langt ud over den ene mia. kr., som blev forhandlet på plads ved økonomiaftalen.

9h

Tierra y libertad

Science fiction: a robot rebellion in the pistachio fields.

10h

This Website Tells You How Prepared Your Country Is for a Disease Epidemic

The website, PreventEpidemics.org, provides information about how prepared a country is to find, stop and prevent epidemics.

10h

Buried Volcanic Vent Heats Up Antarctica's Fastest-Melting Glacier

What lurks beneath West Antarctica's frozen surface? Heat — and lots of it.

10h

Recreating the chameleon: material mimics color changes of living organisms

Researchers at Nagoya University created a material containing photochromic dyes, crystals providing structural coloration, and a colored background that mimics the color changes that animals such as frogs, chameleons, and octopuses can display. This material could display different patterns and images depending on whether it was exposed to visible or ultraviolet light, or had a white or black bac

10h

Lægemanglen i almen praksis kan løses uden at det koster én øre

Arbejdsstyrken til almen praksis har ændret sig uden, at der har været foretaget de helt afgørende og nødvendige tilretninger. Her er et forslag til genopretning.

10h

Hæstorp freder Sundhedsplatformen: Vi skal ikke have monopoler

Sophie Hæstorp Andersen (S) ser det ikke som en reel mulighed at skrotte Sundhedsplatformen. »Det handler om at sikre det, vi politisk bestilte i sin tid; nemlig et system der gør det lettere at være patient og medarbejder. Det bliver vi nødt til at holde fast i,« siger hun.

10h

Første måned med GDPR: Mange datalæk er kommet op til overfladen

Den første måned med GDPR har vist, at der var langt flere sager end forventet, hvilket presser Datatilsynets ressourcer.

10h

Danmark sætter pant på juice- og saftflasker

Regeringen udvider Dansk Retursystem til også at omfatte juice- og saftflasker af plastic, de vil kunne smides i flaskeautomaten fra 1. januar 2020.

10h

A Template for ‘Incivility’

Political incivility has become a hot topic this week after the owner of the Red Hen restaurant in Lexington, Virginia, asked White House Press Secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders to leave, as an act of protest against the Trump administration’s policies. After the California Democrat Maxine Waters called for more pushback against Trump officials to let them know they were “not welcome anymore,” Pre

10h

Bioanalysis publishes special focus issue on 'Biomarker Assay Validation'

The Future Science Group (FSG) published journal, Bioanalysis, which is a leading MEDLINE indexed journal for bioanalysts, today announced the release of its Special Focus Issue on 'Biomarker Assay Validation (BAV) '.This Special Focus Issue hopes to offer readers of the journal an insight into the various issues that exist surrounding the BAV, how these issues have evolved over the years, as well

10h

Using artificial intelligence to understand volcanic eruptions from tiny ash

Scientists led by Daigo Shoji from the Earth-Life Science Institute (Tokyo Institute of Technology) have shown that a type of artificial intelligence called a convolutional neural network can be trained to categorize volcanic ash particle shapes. Because the shapes of volcanic particles are linked to the type of volcanic eruption, this categorization can provide information on eruptions and aid vo

10h

Sådan kan Søren Pinds filosofiske kæphest flytte ind på universiteterne

En inspirationsgruppe kommer med en række anbefalinger til, hvor et 'nyt filosofikum' kan indføres på universiteterne og med et forslag til, hvad faget bør hedde.

10h

New 'promiscuous' enzyme helps turn plant waste into sustainable products

A new family of enzymes has been discovered which paves the way to convert plant waste into sustainable and high-value products such as nylon, plastics, chemicals, and fuels.

11h

Freedom from fear: dopamine's role in unlearning fearful associations

Researchers at the RIKEN Center for Brain Science have discovered a circuit in the brain that is necessary for unlearning fear. Published in Nature Communications, the study details the role of dopamine in ensuring that rats stop being afraid when there isn't anything to be afraid of anymore.

11h

Young binge drinkers may have higher heart risks

Young adults who said they frequently binge drink were more likely to have certain risk factors for cardiovascular disease than non-binge drinkers. Young men who reported that they repeatedly binge drink had higher systolic blood pressure and total cholesterol while young women who repeatedly binge drink had higher blood sugar levels compared to non-binge drinkers.

11h

Bumblebees in cities are healthier than those in the countryside

Cities provide a refuge for bumblebees, which have been found to grow bigger colonies and store more food in urban areas than they do in the countryside

11h

Tropical Forests Suffered Near-Record Tree Losses in 2017

New satellite data reveals that the world’s tropical forests lost roughly 39 million acres of trees last year — an area the size of Bangladesh.

11h

A Flamingo? In Texas? A Zoo Fugitive Since 2005 Is Still Surviving in the Wild

No. 492 escaped from a zoo in Wichita, Kan., more than 13 years ago. A sighting in May confirmed it’s still alive, but what happened to its companion?

11h

India’s mess of complexity is just what AI needs

The country’s diversity of scripts, dialects, dress, and culture is a challenge that will make artificial intelligence more resilient.

11h

New 'promiscuous' enzyme helps turn plant waste into sustainable products

A new family of enzymes has been discovered which paves the way to convert plant waste into sustainable and high-value products such as nylon, plastics, chemicals, and fuels.

11h

Facebook eases ban on cryptocurrency ads

Facebook said Tuesday it was easing a ban on ads for cryptocurrencies while keeping a prohibition on initial coin offerings to raise assets.

12h

New York's Central Park goes officially car-free

New York's iconic Central Park officially goes car-free Wednesday after the final vehicle drives through the green oasis and tourist magnet in the heart of America's most populous urban jungle.

12h

70K opioid-related deaths likely went unreported due to incomplete death certificates

Several states are likely dramatically underestimating the effect of opioid-related deaths because of incomplete death certificate reporting, with Pennsylvania leading the pack, according to a new analysis by the University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public Health.

12h

Who rules the world? Narcissists. Let’s stop giving them all the breaks | Stuart Heritage

So, research shows narcissists do life better. The meek among us must keep them in check with our conventional social morality According to new research from Queen’s University Belfast, narcissists are some of the most successful people in the world . If you spend your life marauding around with a bellyful of unearned self-worth, it’s claimed, you’ll soon develop a mental toughness that will driv

12h

Japan to seek partial resumption of commercial whaling

Japan will seek a partial resumption of commercial whaling at a meeting of the International Whaling Commission later this year, officials said Wednesday.

12h

Vestas flytter fokus fra vindkraft til hybridværker

Verdens største vindmølleproducent vil nu også være nummer et på hybrid-kraftværker i erkendelse af, at energiverdenen ændrer sig med ekspresfart.

12h

Twitter to confirm new accounts in spam fight

Twitter on Tuesday said it will begin asking for email addresses or phone numbers to confirm new accounts as part of a battle against manipulation, particularly by automated bots.

12h

Tropical forests see high loss of tree cover for 2nd year

Colombia saw a dramatic increase in forest degradation last year and levels in Brazil remain historically high, according to new satellite data released Wednesday.

12h

Robotics Barbie aims to inspire young scientists

An inspirational new version of Barbie will encourage young girls to embark on careers in engineering and the sciences, the iconic doll's manufacturer Mattel said on Tuesday.

12h

Rent-a-captain: S. Africa plugs global pilot shortage

The next time you stow your tray table, fasten your seatbelt and prepare for take-off, there's a good chance your pilot could be South African.

12h

Air New Zealand fined in Australia air cargo cartel case

Air New Zealand was Wednesday fined Aus$15 million (US$11 million) by an Australian court for its part in a global air cargo cartel involving major international airlines.

12h

Japan space probe reaches asteroid in search for origin of lifeHayabusa2 Ryugu Japan

A Japanese probe has reached an asteroid 300 million kilometres away to collect information about the birth of the solar system and the origin of life after a more than three-year voyage through deep space.

12h

Broadcasters are World Cup losers owing to piracy trend in Africa

Blaise has a beer in his hand, he's in front of a TV screen showing the World Cup, and the smile on his face suggests life doesn't get much better than this.

13h

Airbnb, Uber woes show Japan does not share easily

Thousands of Airbnb reservations scrapped, Uber reduced to delivering food: life is hard in Japan for giants of the sharing economy, stuck between tough regulation and popular suspicion.

13h

The rockets that are pushing the boundaries of space travel

Friday morning at 5:24 am (0924 GMT), a rocket owned by the US company SpaceX will blast off from Florida carrying two and a half tons of gear from NASA, only to dock three days later and 250 miles (400 kilometers) above Earth at the International Space Station.

13h

Do people change? You asked Google – here's the answer | Eleanor Morgan

Every day millions of people ask Google life’s most difficult questions. Our writers answer some of the commonest queries Give a person the right resources and, within an hour or so, they could dramatically change their physical appearance. They might dye their hair or shave it all off. Change the colour of their eyes. Wear a prosthetic nose. Fake teeth. Seven-inch heels. The list of potential su

13h

Huawei executive warns Australia risks economy with 5G ban

Australia could damage its economic future if it bans Huawei from the nation's next-generation mobile network technology, the Chinese telecommunication giant's Australian boss said on Wednesday.

13h

Scientists find a link between cancer and aging inside our cells

Scientists at Hollings Cancer Center at the Medical University of South Carolina have found that human lung cancer cells resist dying by controlling parts of the aging process, in results published online May 10th in the Journal of Biological Chemistry. The discovery could help us better understand aging and eventually could lead to new treatments for cancer.

13h

Prehistoric stone hunt under way in Devon salt marsh

Historic England is funding the excavation of a stone monument in Isley Marsh A team of archaeologists is braving horse flies, spiky vegetation and murky ditches to hunt for mysterious standing stones lost beneath a West Country salt marsh. The Yelland stone row at Isley Marsh disappeared beneath a thick blanket of silt after the closure of a power station changed the flow of sediment in the Taw

14h

A new toxin discovered in Cholera bacteria

Scientists have now discovered and characterised the structure and function of a so far unknown Vibrio toxin. A team used the worm Caenorhabditis elegans as a predatory host for the bacteria and identified by molecular genetic analysis the V. cholerae genes required for production and release of the new protein toxin, now called MakA.

14h

In melanoma, radiosurgery may combine well with immunotherapy, especially PD-1 inhibitors

Of 38 melanoma patients treated with immunotherapy and radiosurgery between 2012 and 2017, median overall survival was not reached.

14h

Nicotine alters neurotransmission in habit-forming brain region

A study of rat brain slices demonstrates how nicotine interacts with cells that regulate the output of a brain region involved in habit formation. The research could inform efforts to help people quit smoking and avoid relapse.

14h

New target for treating alcoholism

Activation of a receptor with no known function in the brain reduces excessive alcohol use and the pain of withdrawal, according to preclinical research in male rats. The study suggests a new approach towards the treatment of alcohol use disorder.

14h

Being human: how realistic do we want robots to be?

With Google’s AI assistant able to make phone calls and androids populating households in games and films, the line between machine and man is getting scarily blurred As our dependence on technology builds and the privacy-destroying, brain-hacking consequences of that start to come to light, we are seeing the return of a science-fiction trope: the rise of the robots. A new wave of television show

14h

Glia and axons: A match made in evolution

The evolutionary prerequisites of myelin — the fatty substance that insulates axons and enables rapid communication between cells of the nervous system in jawed vertebrates.

14h

Fluorescent molecules reveal how cancer cells are inhibited

A team of researchers has developed a fluorescent variant of a molecule that inhibits cancer stem cells. Capturing images of when the molecule enters a cell has enabled the researchers, using cell-biological methods, to successfully describe how and where the molecule counteracts the cancer stem cells.

14h

Brain cells responsible for removing damaged neurons after injury identified

Researchers have discovered that microglia, specialized immune cells in the brain, play a key role in clearing dead material after brain injury. The study reveals that microglia gobble up the remnants of injured neurons, which could prevent the damage from spreading to neighboring neurons and causing more extensive neurodegeneration.

14h

Undersøgelse: Hver 3. leder vil hellere betale til ransomware end investere i sikkerhed

Mere end en tredjedel af adspurgte beslutningstagere foretrækker at betale løsesummen ved ransomwareangreb frem for at investere i sikkerhed nu. Sikkerhedseksperter advarer mod at udbetale løsesum til kriminelle.

14h

Derfor har vi ikke set nogle GDPR-bøder endnu

Der er nu gået en måned, siden GDPR trådte i kraft og siden da er data-skeletterne væltet ud af skabet. Men hvor bliver de frygtede bøder af? Hverken politi eller Datatilsyn kan sige, hvornår den første dom falder – men den er på vej.

14h

Anger overlooked as feature of postnatal mood disorders

Women in the postpartum period should be screened for anger in addition to depression and anxiety, new research from the University of British Columbia suggests.

15h

Twisted meta-molecules as they really are

Physicists have devised a new and highly sensitive method to truly test the chirality of a material, eliminating the risk of false positives from competing effects.

15h

What nipple size means for evolutionary biology

Nipple size varies markedly from woman to woman, whereas male nipples are more uniform. This finding goes against a common assumption of evolutionary biology, say researchers.

15h

Narcissistic adolescents may perform better at school

A researcher suggests that the growing rate of narcissism in society could be linked with school achievement.

15h

Polymer professor develops safer component for lithium batteries

What would happen if a lithium battery failed in an electric car or a much-needed biomedical device? Polymer scientists are trying to prevent such failures with a new way involving polymer to make lithium batteries safer and perform better.

15h

New tech improves ability to reflect sound back to its source

Researchers have developed a device that reflects sound in the direction it came from, rather than deflecting it at an angle. The 'retroreflector' can reflect sound across an operating range of 70 degrees in either direction — more than doubling the effective range of previous technologies.

15h

Control of quantum state of optical phonon in diamond induced by ultrashort light pulses

Ultrashort Light-pulse-induced vibrations of atoms in a lattice, called optical coherent phonons, have been controlled in various materials. However, different experiments demonstrating such control have been explained differently through empirical theories, and a unified theory based on quantum mechanics is lacking. Scientists have now successfully formulated a unified theory for this phenomenon

15h

New type of lung cancer

Researchers have discovered a new kind of small-cell lung cancer (SCLC). The discovery paves the way for developing personalized medicine approaches to target this previously unnoticed form of the disease.

15h

Plastic coffee cup waste is being cut by a simple change

A university campus has cut the use of disposable cups with a simple change.

15h

Aliens may not exist – but that’s good news for our survival | Jim Al-Khalili

A new study suggests that we could well be on our own in the universe. Yet loneliness might have its advantages In 1950 Enrico Fermi, an Italian-born American Nobel prize-winning physicist, posed a very simple question with profound implications for one of the most important scientific puzzles: whether or not life exists beyond Earth. The story goes that during a lunchtime chat with colleagues at

15h

Proteins found in semen increase the spread of Ebola virus infection

Protein fragments, called amyloid fibrils, in human semen significantly increase Ebola virus infection and protect the virus against harsh environmental conditions such as heat and dehydration. Follow-up studies from the 2014 epidemic found that men can harbor the virus in their semen for at least 2.5 years, with the potential to transmit the virus sexually during that time. Targeting amyloids in

15h

Mind over matter: Amygdala circuit counteracts pain-driven emotion

Two pathways in the brain converging at the amygdala regulate the anxiety and depression that often accompanies chronic pain, suggests research in male rats. One of these pathways may represent a top-down mechanism that controls negative emotion under stress.

15h

Brandsår, rifter og bid: Sådan heler du dine sår bedst

Når du får et sår, laver kroppen sit eget plaster, viser ny forskning. Men du kan også selv hjælpe til med helingen.

15h

Can older, frail patients benefit from 'prehabilitation' before heart surgery?

High risk, frail heart patients might derive benefits from 'prehabilitation,' a strategy designed to enhance the recovery process after heart surgery by maintaining or improving the patient's overall physical and mental status before surgery, according to a group of eminent cardiac specialists writing in the Canadian Journal of Cardiology. The authors reviewed the current evidence regarding the be

16h

War, lack of democracy and urbanisation contribute to double burden of malnutrition in adolescents in developing countries

A new study from the University of Warwick blames macro-level factors for the double burden of malnutrition among adolescents in developing countries. The double burden of malnutrition refers to the coexistence of undernutrition along with overweight and obesity, or diet-related noncommunicable diseases such as type 2 diabetes.

16h

Student-run mental health education efforts may improve college mental health climate

Studies estimate that 20 percent to 36 percent of college students cope with some form of serious psychological distress, yet only about a third receive any services despite the fact they often have access to on-campus help. A new study finds that getting college students to engage with peer-run organizations that focus on mental health awareness can improve college students' knowledge about menta

16h

Sandbox craters reveal secrets of planetary splash marks and lost meteorites

OIST researchers inspired by school science to crack the conundrum of planetary craters.

16h

16h

Japan's Hayabusa 2 spacecraft reaches cosmic 'diamond'Hayabusa2 Ryugu Japan

A Japanese spacecraft has arrived at a diamond-shaped asteroid on a key fact-finding mission.

16h

Minister om Kattegat-tal: Et rimeligt bud på en skønsmæssig vurdering med stor usikkerhed

Transportminister Ole Birk Olesen afviser, at prisen på en vejbro over Kattegat er beregnet på et useriøst grundlag.

16h

Rare White Alligator Stolen During Fire That Killed 43 Reptiles, Officials Say

Robbie Keszey, who once hosted the reality show “Swamp Brothers,” said a leucistic alligator, Snowball, was missing from a Florida sanctuary and “was like my best friend.”

17h

‘Smart’ prosthetic ankle takes the pain out of stairs

Researchers have created a “smart” prosthetic ankle that moves with the user to tackle one of the main challenges with current prosthetic ankles: stairs and irregular terrain. It’s virtually impossible to know Mike Sasser’s left leg is a prosthetic one—after a decade of practice, he moves surely and swiftly through his busy days as a consultant and father. “I talked to one person whose favorite r

19h

Gene editing cures blood disorder in fetal mice

Researchers conducted the first demonstration of site-specific gene editing in a mouse fetus, correcting a mutation that causes a severe form of anemia. The technique, described in a paper in Nature Communications , involves an intravenous injection of nanoparticles carrying a combination of donor DNA and synthetic molecules known as peptide nucleic acids (PNAs). The PNAs, which mimic DNA, bind t

19h

Climate: Clean power is not enough

Coal power versus wind and solar energy — debates about the Paris climate targets often center around electricity supply. Yet, even in a world of stringent climate policies and a clean power generation, the remaining use of fossil fuels in industry, transport and heating in buildings could still cause enough CO2 emissions to endanger the climate targets agreed on by the international community, a

20h

Enzyme boost could hasten production of biofuels and other bioprocessed materials

Scientists have enhanced the process of using biology to make products such as fuels, plastics, medicines, and cosmetics.

20h

Cholera spread tracked at household level

For the first time, the transmission of cholera has been tracked at the household level across Dhaka, Bangladesh, a city with a 'hyper-endemic' level of the disease. Researchers found that nearly 80 per cent of the cholera transmission in Dhaka occurred between people who shared a household. The results of the large-scale genomic study could be used by public health officials to improve cholera co

20h

Children with existing allergies should be screened for an emerging, severe chronic food allergy

Children with known skin, food and respiratory allergies should be screened for an emerging, chronic food allergy called eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE), a painful inflammation of the esophagus, the food tube between the mouth and stomach. Pediatric allergists who analyzed a very large group of children from birth to adolescence say that EoE should be considered a later component of the 'allergic m

20h

Gut bacteria markers could be a 'smoking gun' for liver disease

Chemical compounds produced by the bacteria in our gut could be used to spot the early stages of liver disease, according to new research.

20h

Computational model analysis reveals serotonin speeds learning

A new computational-model reveals that serotonin, one of the most widespread chemicals in the brain, can speed up learning.

20h

Tropical 'banana eater' birds lived in North America 52 million years ago

A fossil of an ancestor of modern tropical birds has been found in North America, proving they also used to live in the Northern Hemisphere, say scientists.

20h

Geologists detail likely site of San Andreas Fault's next major quake

Geologists identify the San Andreas Fault's 'Durmid Ladder' structure, a a nearly 15.5-mile-long, sheared zone with two, nearly parallel master faults and hundreds of smaller, rung-like cross faults that could be the site of the region's next major earthquake.

20h

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