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Nyheder2018juni28

 

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The plateau of human mortality: Demography of longevity pioneers

Theories about biological limits to life span and evolutionary shaping of human longevity depend on facts about mortality at extreme ages, but these facts have remained a matter of debate. Do hazard curves typically level out into high plateaus eventually, as seen in other species, or do exponential increases persist? In this study, we estimated hazard rates from data on all inhabitants of Italy

2h

Spectral cloaking could make objects invisible under realistic conditions

Researchers and engineers have long sought ways to conceal objects by manipulating how light interacts with them. A new study offers the first demonstration of invisibility cloaking based on the manipulation of the frequency (color) of light waves as they pass through an object, a fundamentally new approach that overcomes critical shortcomings of existing cloaking technologies.

5h

14 jernbaneoverkørsler bliver først sikret om otte år

Folketinget vedtog i 2009 at sikre landets farligste jernbaneoverkørsler, men 119 overkørsler er stadig ikke sikret.

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LATEST

The Travel Ban, the Law, and What’s ‘Right’

In January 2017, when President Donald Trump’s so-called Muslim ban was first announced, I was passionately against it . It was one of the most frightening texts I’ve read from U.S. government officials in my lifetime. The Supreme Court just upheld the third iteration of the travel ban in Trump v. Hawaii , and I find myself in the odd position of opposing the court’s ruling on personal and moral

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Global surface area of rivers and streams is 45 percent higher than previously thought

Researchers used satellite images, on-the-ground measurements and a statistical model to determine how much of the earth is covered by rivers and streams. They found that global river and stream surface area is about 45 percent greater than what was indicated by previous studies.

12min

Empathetic police are less effective in the face of public criticism

Police officers who endorse an empathetic approach to criminal justice do not perform as well when they sense they are underappreciated, according to new research.

12min

New nerve gas detector built with Legos and a smartphone

Researchers have designed a way to sense dangerous chemicals using, in part, a simple rig consisting of a smartphone and a box made from Lego bricks, which could help first responders and scientists in the field identify deadly and difficult-to-detect nerve agents such as VX and sarin.

12min

Rapid 3D analysis of rockfalls in Yosemite

Yosemite National Park contains some of the world's most iconic landforms, including Half Dome, Yosemite Falls, and El Capitan. Although the cliffs of Yosemite Valley may appear static, rockfalls from these cliffs are common, with a rockfall occurring every four to five days on average. Rockfalls are key to shaping this iconic landscape but also pose risk to the four- to five-million visitors to t

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Beyond politics: Facebook to release limited info on all ads

Facebook says it will release more information on all advertisements running on its service. The move is part of a broader effort to encourage "transparency" in its operations.

15min

Spacewatch: Ryugu, an asteroid under close inspection

Japan’s Hayabusa2 spacecraft plans to strike the asteroid creating a crater and dislodging rocks for analysis Japan’s Hayabusa2 spacecraft has arrived at its target asteroid, Ryugu , after a journey of nearly 2bn miles (3.2bn km), which has taken three and a half years to accomplish. The spacecraft is now tracking the 900-metre-wide asteroid, from about 12 miles above its surface. Following analy

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Atomic movie of melting gold could help design materials for future fusion reactors

Researchers have recorded the most detailed atomic movie of gold melting after being blasted by laser light. The insights they gained into how metals liquefy have potential to aid the development of fusion power reactors, steel processing plants, spacecraft and other applications where materials have to withstand extreme conditions for long periods of time.

26min

Study debunks notion that large chunks of Medicare go to lost causes

Around 25 percent of Medicare spending in the US occurs in the last year of people's lives. This is sometimes discussed as a questionable use of resources: Is society throwing large amounts of medical treatment at some patients in a futile, if noble, effort to extend lives that are bound to end soon? A new study by health care economists offers a resounding answer: No.

26min

Injectable electronics offer powerful new tool in understanding how retinal cells work

For decades, scientists hoping to understand how the retina interprets visual input have often had to resort to invasive techniques to dissect the retina from the animal in an effort to record the cells' activity, but a new system could make it possible to track the firing patterns of dozens of cells chronically in awake animals.

26min

The problem with solving problems

As demonstrated in a series of new studies, researchers show that as the prevalence of a problem is reduced, humans are naturally inclined to redefine the problem itself. The result is that as a problem becomes smaller, people's conceptualizations of that problem become larger, which can lead them to miss the fact that they've solved it.

26min

Perceptions on Zika

To understand people's perceptions, behaviors, and knowledge about the Zika outbreak, and whether county media campaigns had an effect in helping educate the public about the virus, a research team at the University of Miami surveyed 149 women and 113 men in approximately 262 county households.

34min

URI drug study produces 'promising therapy' for alcohol abuse

A University of Rhode Island College of Pharmacy professor is working to change that, and a new clinical trial is right around the corner. Fatemeh Akhlaghi, the Ernest Mario Distinguished Chair in Pharmaceutics, is part of a team working to develop a novel medication to treat alcohol use disorder, the term scientists and health practitioners use.

34min

CAR-T immunotherapies may have a new player

Emerging CAR-T immunotherapies leverage modified versions of patient's T-cells to target and kill cancer cells. In a new study, published June 28 online in Cell Stem Cell, researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine and University of Minnesota report that similarly modified natural killer (NK) cells derived from human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) also displayed h

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'Sonar Anomaly' Isn't a Shipwreck, and It's Definitely Not Aliens, NOAA Says

The suspenseful wait is over: the unusual "sonar anomaly" detected by an aquatic robot off the coast of North Carolina isn't a shipwreck, nor is it aliens, according to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA).

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Utopia is a dangerous ideal: we should aim for ‘protopia’

Utopias are idealised visions of a perfect society. Utopianisms are those ideas put into practice. This is where the trouble begins. Thomas More coined the neologism utopia for his 1516 work that launched the modern genre for a good reason. The word means ‘no place’ because when imperfect humans … Read More

55min

The Wasp: Male superheroes could man up

Actress Evangeline Lilly wonders if the reason male Marvel superheroes complain about their costumes so much is that they're not used to being uncomfortable to look good, as all women are. Read More

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New study: Wind power will work on Mars. This is a game-changer.

Wind power on Mars makes it possible for any rover or other craft to collect power at the poles or other areas on the planet that don't get constant sunlight. Read More

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Meet the indestructible phone case that springs open when dropped

It looks like a medieval torture device when sprung open. But it might prevent any more smashed screens. Read More

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The Generosity of Innovation

Now that The Last Jedi is on Netflix, it’s easier to scrutinize and understand all the ways in which the director, Rian Johnson, reimagined what a Star Wars film could be. The plot twists— Leia Poppins and all that—received plenty of attention , positive and negative, when the movie made its box-office splash at the end of 2017. But with each viewing, I catch camera angles, lines of dialogue, and

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Path to zero emissions starts out easy, but gets steep

Carbon dioxide emissions from human activities must approach zero within several decades to avoid risking grave damage from the effects of climate change. This will require creativity and innovation, because some types of industrial sources of atmospheric carbon lack affordable emissions-free substitutes, according to a new article.

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Carbon dioxide-to-methanol process improved by catalyst

Dramatic improvements have been made to the process of converting carbon dioxide, a greenhouse gas, to methanol, a fuel and building block for a wide range of everyday materials, according to Penn State researchers.

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Dollar for dollar: Consumers willing to pay more for financial advisers with designations

Whether it's buying a car, purchasing a home, or preparing to start a family, consumers are faced with many financial decisions throughout their lives. They turn towards advisers to help manage and guide their finances. But how do consumers decide which planner to trust?

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Complex organics bubble from the depths of ocean-world Enceladus

Data from the international Cassini spacecraft have revealed complex organic molecules originating from Saturn's icy moon Enceladus, strengthening the idea that this ocean-world hosts conditions suitable for life.

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Carbon dioxide-to-methanol process improved by catalyst

Dramatic improvements have been made to the process of converting carbon dioxide, a greenhouse gas, to methanol, a fuel and building block for a wide range of everyday materials, according to Penn State researchers.

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Perceived race of victims, location determine concern in terrorist attack

In response to an international terrorist attack, the public's level of concern has to do with the locations of the attacks and the perceived identities of the victims, according to a new study by two University of Kansas researchers.

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Dollar for dollar: Consumers willing to pay more for financial advisers with designations

Whether it's buying a car, purchasing a home, or preparing to start a family, consumers are faced with many financial decisions throughout their lives. They turn towards advisers to help manage and guide their finances. But how do consumers decide which planner to trust?A new study from the University of Illinois investigates the value consumers place on financial advisers based on their credentia

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Self-heating, fast-charging battery makes electric vehicles climate-immune

Californians do not purchase electric vehicles because they are cool, they buy EVs because they live in a warm climate. Conventional lithium-ion batteries cannot be rapidly charged at temperatures below 50 degrees Fahrenheit, but now a team of Penn State engineers has created a battery that can self-heat, allowing rapid charging regardless of the outside chill.

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Our first contact with aliens might be with their robots

Space Cyborgs, and interstellar probes and AI, oh my SETI researchers are casting a wide net, tracking down as many promising leads as they can. But one thing they’ve started to realize is that if a civilization from…

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Perceived race of victims, location determine concern in terrorist attack

In response to an international terrorist attack, the public's level of concern has to do with the locations of the attacks and the perceived identities of the victims, according to a new study by two University of Kansas researchers.

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California data privacy bill heads to Gov. Jerry Brown

A California internet privacy bill that experts call the nation's most far-reaching effort to give consumers more control over their data is headed to Gov. Jerry Brown after passing both chambers of the Legislature on Thursday.

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New insights bolster Einstein's idea about how heat moves through solids

A discovery supports a century-old theory by Albert Einstein that explains how heat moves through everything from travel mugs to engine parts.

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Should America’s Universities Stop Taking So Many International Students?

The University of California at Berkeley fields more than 85,000 freshman applications every year. About 15,500 of those applicants are accepted, including 4,500 or so students who aren’t from California; roughly 9 percent of those offered admission aren’t from the United States . Global diversity has inherent value in a college setting, but at Berkeley—a public institution that receives substant

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New study reveals the function of a mysterious component of the inner ear

A new study finds that a mysterious component of the inner ear acts as a pressure-relief valve, formed by a thin barrier of cellular projections that opens and closes to regulate the release of inner ear fluid.

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Men and women have different genetic risk factors for developing brain cancer

A team from Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine, together with an international consortium of researchers, have discovered that men and women have different genetic risk factors for developing glioma.

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Facebook Continues Transparency Push With View Ads Feature

Sheryl Sandberg says the company will take a “broad” approach to transparency, even if it means slowing down the process for advertisers.

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Crows 'reverse engineer' tools from memory: study

New Caledonian crows use mental pictures to twist twigs into hooks and make other tools, according to a provocative study that suggests the notoriously clever birds pass on successful designs to future generations, a hallmark of culture.

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New Airbus transport aircraft BelugaXL sports whale's grin

A whale of a transport aircraft will be flying high later this summer sporting the grin of a Beluga whale.

1h

A new telescope expands Big Bear Solar Observatory's view of the Sun

A solar telescope that captures images of the entire disk of the Sun, monitoring eruptions taking place simultaneously in different magnetic fields in both the photosphere and chromosphere, is now being installed beside the Goode Solar Telescope (GST) at NJIT's California-based Big Bear Solar Observatory (BBSO).

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Rapid Zika detection test uses smartphone technology

The Zika virus, which continues to cause microcephaly and other neurological complications in infants whose mothers were infected during pregnancy, remains a public health concern. Investigators from Brigham and Women's Hospital are working to develop a new way to rapidly and accurately diagnose Zika using mobile health technologies that could potentially be deployed in resource-limited settings.

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'Waterproof' can have many meanings when it comes to gadgets

Gadgets Can your device withstand a dip in the pool? That depends. Waterproof, weather-resistant, splash-proof, weather-proof, and all the other buzzwords that describe your liquid-friendly devices.

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NASA finds depression strengthening into Tropical Storm Emilia

The Global Precipitation Measurement mission or GPM core satellite passed over Tropical Depression Six-E in the Eastern Pacific Ocean and found heavy rainfall occurring in two areas. Shortly after GPM passed overhead, the depression strengthened into Tropical Storm Emilia.

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Genetic ancestry test users 'cherry-pick' which races to identify with

Genetic ancestry tests are often advertised as a tool to uncover new connections to diverse cultures and ancestries, but new research from the University of British Columbia has found people tend to pick and choose which races they identify with based on preconceived biases.

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Global surface area of rivers and streams is 45 percent higher than previously thought

Researchers from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and Texas A&M University used satellite images, on-the-ground measurements and a statistical model to determine how much of the earth is covered by rivers and streams. They found that global river and stream surface area is about 45 percent greater than what was indicated by previous studies.

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Open relationships just as satisfying as monogamous ones, study reveals

A new University of Guelph study has revealed that people in open relationships are as happy as their coupled-up counterparts

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More clues that Earth-like exoplanets are indeed Earth-like

A new study from the Georgia Institute of Technology provides new clues indicating that an exoplanet 500 light-years away is much like Earth.

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Rapid Zika detection test uses smartphone technology

Leveraging nanoparticles and digital health technology, BWH investigators develop rapid, deployable, low-cost diagnostic test for Zika virus.

1h

Obesity + aging linked to Alzheimer's markers in the brain

A new study suggests that when a high-fat, high-sugar diet that leads to obesity is paired with normal aging, it may contribute to the development of Alzheimer's disease. In addition, researchers discovered that certain areas of the brain respond differently to risk factors associated with Alzheimer's. The study is published in Physiological Reports.

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NASA observes the formation of Tropical Depression 09W in Northwestern Pacific

NASA's Aqua satellite passed over the Northwestern Pacific Ocean early on June 28 and caught an image of newly formed Tropical Depression 09W.

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Smoking associated with delayed shinbone healing

In an interdisciplinary study, Hannah Dailey and Ping-Shi Wu, both of Lehigh University, examined 1,003 tibia fracture patient records and found that 12 percent experience nonunion–or arrested healing; Findings include increased risk of arrested healing among women aged 30-49, significant delay in bone healing among smokers

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NASA observes the formation of Tropical Depression 09W in Northwestern Pacific

NASA's Aqua satellite passed over the Northwestern Pacific Ocean early on June 28 and caught an image of newly formed Tropical Depression 09W.

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The Despondent Mind: Are Our Brains Wired for Doom and Gloom?

Research could help explain why people think things are getting worse when they are actually getting better — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

2h

How crows can use a vending machine

Watch how Emma the crow creates the currency required to operate a vending machine.

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Congress Grills Cambridge Analytica Alum on New Firm’s Data Use

Democrats on the House Energy and Commerce Committee are asking Matt Oczkowski about how his new firm, Data Propria, will treat consumer privacy.

2h

Computational models provide novel genetic insights into atherosclerosis

Researchers have identified a new gene-activation pathway caused by lipids associated with coronary artery disease, a finding that could help identify new directions in research and drug development. The study was published in June in Nature Communications. The researchers used a computational model of the cells lining blood vessels in the human heart developed at Mount Sinai.

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Study provides promise in search for simple, early test for Alzheimer's disease

Researchers at Indiana University have found early evidence that tiny snippets of genetic material called microRNA may help with early detection of conditions such as Alzheimer's disease.

2h

Genetic ancestry test users 'cherry-pick' which races to identify with

Genetic ancestry tests are often advertised as a tool to uncover new connections to diverse cultures and ancestries, but new research from the University of British Columbia has found people tend to pick and choose which races they identify with based on preconceived biases.

2h

NASA finds depression strengthening into Tropical Storm Emilia

The Global Precipitation Measurement mission or GPM core satellite passed over Tropical Depression Six-E in the Eastern Pacific Ocean and found heavy rainfall occurring in two areas. Shortly after GPM passed overhead, the depression strengthened into Tropical Storm Emilia.

2h

How we discovered three poisonous books in our university library

Science Arsenic and old manuscripts. We found that three rare books in the University of Southern Denmark’s library collection contain large concentrations of arsenic on their covers.

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Genetic 'Fossils' Solve Mystery of Descended Testicles

Genetic 'Fossils' Solve Mystery of Descended Testicles Elephants and other mammals that lost their scrotums offer a peek at the genitals of our common ancestor. elephant-3031112.jpg Image credits: CreativePassion via Pixabay Creature Thursday, June 28, 2018 – 14:00 Nala Rogers, Staff Writer (Inside Science) — It may seem that there's nothing ballsier than a big bull elephant — but if you looked

2h

Change Is Coming to Mexico

This Sunday, Mexicans will go to the polls to elect a new president. Of all the things we will be voting on, Donald Trump is not one of them. We are not voting as a reaction to his constant attacks on Mexico. Nor are we looking for the candidate most willing to stand up to him. Indeed, every Mexican agrees that there’s no edge in running against him. Trump is so despised that he is simply not an

2h

Global surface area of rivers and streams is 45 percent higher than previously thought

Researchers from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and Texas A&M University used satellite images, on-the-ground measurements and a statistical model to determine how much of the earth is covered by rivers and streams. They found that global river and stream surface area is about 45 percent greater than what was indicated by previous studies.

2h

The problem with solving problems

As demonstrated in a series of new studies, Harvard researchers show that as the prevalence of a problem is reduced, humans are naturally inclined to redefine the problem itself. The result is that as a problem becomes smaller, people's conceptualizations of that problem become larger, which can lead them to miss the fact that they've solved it.

2h

Revolutionizing retinal studies

For decades, scientists hoping to understand how the retina interprets visual input have often had to resort to invasive techniques to dissect the retina from the animal in an effort to record the cells' activity, but a new system developed by Harvard scientists, could make it possible to track the firing patterns of dozens of cells chronically in awake animals.

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Study debunks notion that large chunks of Medicare go to lost causes

Around 25 percent of Medicare spending in the US occurs in the last year of people's lives. This is sometimes discussed as a questionable use of resources: Is society throwing large amounts of medical treatment at some patients in a futile, if noble, effort to extend lives that are bound to end soon? A new study co-authored by an MIT health care economist offers a resounding answer: No.

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The evolution of testes

Molecular vestiges resolve the controversial evolution of the testicular position in mammals.

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Path to zero emissions starts out easy, but gets steep

Carbon dioxide emissions from human activities must approach zero within several decades to avoid risking grave damage from the effects of climate change. This will require creativity and innovation, because some types of industrial sources of atmospheric carbon lack affordable emissions-free substitutes, according to a new paper in Science from team of experts led by University of California Irvi

2h

Atomic movie of melting gold could help design materials for future fusion reactors

Researchers at the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory have recorded the most detailed atomic movie of gold melting after being blasted by laser light. The insights they gained into how metals liquefy have potential to aid the development of fusion power reactors, steel processing plants, spacecraft and other applications where materials have to withstand extreme conditions

2h

New insights bolster Einstein's idea about how heat moves through solids

A discovery by scientists at the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory supports a century-old theory by Albert Einstein that explains how heat moves through everything from travel mugs to engine parts.

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Rivers, streams cover substantially more of Earth's surface than we thought

A new global map of rivers and streams created using satellite data suggests that the global surface area of these bodies of water is about 44 percent higher than previously thought.

2h

It's all relative: How our brains overstate the prevalence and intensity of threats

In a series of experiments, David Levari et al. reveal how people are deceived by their own perceptions, where threatening or harmful stimuli are perceived as remaining abundant even when they are, in fact, decreasing in prevalence.

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Far 'over-the-hill' lies the plateau of human mortality

Above age 105, the rise in risk of death by age slows — and even plateaus — according to a new study, one that provides valuable insight into one of the most fundamental questions of human aging; Is there a fixed maximum lifespan for humans?

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Healthcare spending in late life is not wasteful, predictive model shows

End-of-life health care spending in the United States is not wasteful, a new study says; many recipients of such expenditures aren't, in fact, certain to die, as the thinking goes.

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Heavy-duty emissions must be eliminated to halt climate change, UCI-led review shows

To halt climate change in this century, heavy-duty infrastructure undergirding the world's major economies must be redesigned — starting now — to add no carbon dioxide to the atmosphere. According to a UCI-led review due out June 29 in the journal Science, that includes long-haul shipping, airline travel, cement and steel production, and a smoothly operating power grid.

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More than half of Amazonian armadillos carry leprosy

The bacteria that causes leprosy, a chronic disease that can lead to disfigurement and nerve damage, is known to be transmitted to humans from nine-banded armadillos. A new study in PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases reports that 62 percent of the armadillos in the western part of Pará state in the Brazilian Amazon are positive for the leprosy bacteria.

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Molecular 'fossils' reveal evolutionary history of descending testicles

A new study, publishing 28 June in the open access journal PLOS Biology by Virag Sharma and Michael Hiller of the Max Planck Institute of Molecular Cell Biology and Genetics in Dresden, Germany, and colleagues, shows how 'molecular fossils' can reveal whether the testicles of long-dead mammals descended into the lower abdomen or scrotums, or were retained deep inside the abdomen.

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Is an AI chatbot really better than a human doctor?

AI firm Babylon Health claims its chatbot scores higher on a medical exam than the average human doctor, but it’s not clear this was a fair test

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Age 105? Then you've a better chance of living even longer

Study suggests that death rates level off at this age threshold, but fuels fierce debate whether humans are approaching upper lifespan limit It’s considered an inescapable fact of life: the older you get, the more likely death becomes. But new research suggests that the chances of dying may level off – at least for those who make it to 105 years old. The study found that death rates, which rise e

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Tomorrow's Earth

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News at a glance

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The power of many

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Opening the lab door

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Beyond epigenetics

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Controlled activation

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A brush with friction

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A site for sore eyes

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Snail-snacking snakes

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Structures of the fully assembled Saccharomyces cerevisiae spliceosome before activation

The precatalytic spliceosome (B complex) is preceded by the pre-B complex. Here we report the cryo–electron microscopy structures of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae pre-B and B complexes at average resolutions of 3.3 to 4.6 and 3.9 angstroms, respectively. In the pre-B complex, the duplex between the 5' splice site (5'SS) and U1 small nuclear RNA (snRNA) is recognized by Yhc1, Luc7, and the Sm ring.

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Second Chern number of a quantum-simulated non-Abelian Yang monopole

Topological order is often quantified in terms of Chern numbers, each of which classifies a topological singularity. Here, inspired by concepts from high-energy physics, we use quantum simulation based on the spin degrees of freedom of atomic Bose-Einstein condensates to characterize a singularity present in five-dimensional non-Abelian gauge theories—a Yang monopole. We quantify the monopole in

2h

Multivalent counterions diminish the lubricity of polyelectrolyte brushes

Polyelectrolyte brushes provide wear protection and lubrication in many technical, medical, physiological, and biological applications. Wear resistance and low friction are attributed to counterion osmotic pressure and the hydration layer surrounding the charged polymer segments. However, the presence of multivalent counterions in solution can strongly affect the interchain interactions and struc

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Carbonyl catalysis enables a biomimetic asymmetric Mannich reaction

Chiral amines are widely used as catalysts in asymmetric synthesis to activate carbonyl groups for α-functionalization. Carbonyl catalysis reverses that strategy by using a carbonyl group to activate a primary amine. Inspired by biological carbonyl catalysis, which is exemplified by reactions of pyridoxal-dependent enzymes, we developed an N-quaternized pyridoxal catalyst for the asymmetric Manni

2h

Enhanced photovoltage for inverted planar heterojunction perovskite solar cells

The highest power conversion efficiencies (PCEs) reported for perovskite solar cells (PSCs) with inverted planar structures are still inferior to those of PSCs with regular structures, mainly because of lower open-circuit voltages ( V oc ). Here we report a strategy to reduce nonradiative recombination for the inverted devices, based on a simple solution-processed secondary growth technique. This

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A method for single-neuron chronic recording from the retina in awake mice

The retina, which processes visual information and sends it to the brain, is an excellent model for studying neural circuitry. It has been probed extensively ex vivo but has been refractory to chronic in vivo electrophysiology. We report a nonsurgical method to achieve chronically stable in vivo recordings from single retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) in awake mice. We developed a noncoaxial intravit

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Heterogeneous to homogeneous melting transition visualized with ultrafast electron diffraction

The ultrafast laser excitation of matters leads to nonequilibrium states with complex solid-liquid phase-transition dynamics. We used electron diffraction at mega–electron volt energies to visualize the ultrafast melting of gold on the atomic scale length. For energy densities approaching the irreversible melting regime, we first observed heterogeneous melting on time scales of 100 to 1000 picose

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Two-channel model for ultralow thermal conductivity of crystalline Tl3VSe4

Solids with ultralow thermal conductivity are of great interest as thermal barrier coatings for insulation or thermoelectrics for energy conversion. However, the theoretical limits of lattice thermal conductivity () are unclear. In typical crystals a phonon picture is valid, whereas lowest values occur in highly disordered materials where this picture fails and heat is supposedly carried by rando

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Predictive modeling of U.S. health care spending in late life

That one-quarter of Medicare spending in the United States occurs in the last year of life is commonly interpreted as waste. But this interpretation presumes knowledge of who will die and when. Here we analyze how spending is distributed by predicted mortality, based on a machine-learning model of annual mortality risk built using Medicare claims. Death is highly unpredictable. Less than 5% of sp

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Prevalence-induced concept change in human judgment

Why do some social problems seem so intractable? In a series of experiments, we show that people often respond to decreases in the prevalence of a stimulus by expanding their concept of it. When blue dots became rare, participants began to see purple dots as blue; when threatening faces became rare, participants began to see neutral faces as threatening; and when unethical requests became rare, p

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Postimpact earliest Paleogene warming shown by fish debris oxygen isotopes (El Kef, Tunisia)

Greenhouse warming is a predicted consequence of the Chicxulub impact, but supporting data are sparse. This shortcoming compromises understanding of the impact’s effects, and it has persisted due to an absence of sections that both contain suitable material for traditional carbonate- or organic-based paleothermometry and are complete and expanded enough to resolve changes on short time scales. We

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Sex reversal following deletion of a single distal enhancer of Sox9

Cell fate decisions require appropriate regulation of key genes. Sox9 , a direct target of SRY, is pivotal in mammalian sex determination. In vivo high-throughput chromatin accessibility techniques, transgenic assays, and genome editing revealed several novel gonadal regulatory elements in the 2-megabase gene desert upstream of Sox9 . Although others are redundant, enhancer 13 (Enh13), a 557–base

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New Products

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The cost of a career

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Notch ligand Dll1 mediates cross-talk between mammary stem cells and the macrophageal niche

The stem cell niche is a specialized environment that dictates stem cell function during development and homeostasis. We show that Dll1, a Notch pathway ligand, is enriched in mammary gland stem cells (MaSCs) and mediates critical interactions with stromal macrophages in the surrounding niche in mouse models. Conditional deletion of Dll1 reduced the number of MaSCs and impaired ductal morphogenes

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Ultrafast neuronal imaging of dopamine dynamics with designed genetically encoded sensors

Neuromodulatory systems exert profound influences on brain function. Understanding how these systems modify the operating mode of target circuits requires spatiotemporally precise measurement of neuromodulator release. We developed dLight1, an intensity-based genetically encoded dopamine indicator, to enable optical recording of dopamine dynamics with high spatiotemporal resolution in behaving mi

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The first horse herders and the impact of early Bronze Age steppe expansions into Asia

The Yamnaya expansions from the western steppe into Europe and Asia during the Early Bronze Age (~3000 BCE) are believed to have brought with them Indo-European languages and possibly horse husbandry. We analyzed 74 ancient whole-genome sequences from across Inner Asia and Anatolia and show that the Botai people associated with the earliest horse husbandry derived from a hunter-gatherer populatio

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Net-zero emissions energy systems

Some energy services and industrial processes—such as long-distance freight transport, air travel, highly reliable electricity, and steel and cement manufacturing—are particularly difficult to provide without adding carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) to the atmosphere. Rapidly growing demand for these services, combined with long lead times for technology development and long lifetimes of energy infrastructu

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Matter: How Long Can We Live? The Limit Hasn’t Been Reached, Study Finds

The mortality rate flattens among the oldest of the old, a study of elderly Italians concludes, suggesting that the oldest humans have not yet reached the limits of life span.

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Forced Labor Is the Backbone of the World’s Electronics Industry

KUALA LUMPUR, Malaysia—Malaysia bills itself as “heaven for foreign companies.” Since the 1970s, the Southeast Asian nation has drawn 5,000 foreign firms from more than 40 countries to set up facilities in parts of the country specially set aside for business development. The electronics industry—the country’s largest manufacturing sector, which makes everything from semiconductors to TVs to comp

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A.I. beats humans in teamwork video game

Machine learning has developed awareness of consequences for its actions. Oh, boy. Read More

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Amazon buys online pharmacy PillPack, slashing $12 billion from CVS, Rite-Aid and Walgreens stocksAmazon PillPack Pharmacy

Amazon announced on Thursday it had signed a deal to acquire PillPack, an online pharmacy that organizes prescription medication by the dose and delivers it to customers. Read More

2h

Why some mammal species don’t have descended testicles, but most do

New research studying genetic vestiges suggests that descended testicles are as ancient as the first placental mammal.

2h

Leprosy lurks in armadillos in Brazil’s Amazon

Armadillos in the Brazilian Amazon are often infected with leprosy, which they may pass to people.

2h

Earth’s rivers cover 44 percent more land than we thought

A global survey of rivers and streams based on satellite data suggests that these waterways traverse about 773,000 square kilometers.

2h

New insights bolster Einstein's idea about how heat moves through solids

A discovery by scientists at the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory supports a century-old theory by Albert Einstein that explains how heat moves through everything from travel mugs to engine parts.

2h

Path to zero emissions starts out easy, but gets steep

Carbon dioxide emissions from human activities must approach zero within several decades to avoid risking grave damage from the effects of climate change. This will require creativity and innovation, because some types of industrial sources of atmospheric carbon lack affordable emissions-free substitutes, according to a new paper in Science from team of experts led by University of California Irvi

2h

Atomic movie of melting gold could help design materials for future fusion reactors

Researchers at the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory have recorded the most detailed atomic movie of gold melting after being blasted by laser light. The insights they gained into how metals liquefy have potential to aid the development of fusion power reactors, steel processing plants, spacecraft and other applications where materials have to withstand extreme conditions

2h

Molecular vestiges resolve the controversial evolution of the testicular position in mammals

The loss of anatomical features is a frequent evolutionary event. For example, humans and other great apes have lost their tails and whales have lost their legs. The most convincing evidence comes from the presence of vestiges in fossils. Unfortunately, the fossil record mostly preserves vestiges of hard structures such as bones or teeth. Consequently, resolving the evolution of soft-tissue struct

2h

We still have no idea how to eliminate more than a quarter of energy emissions

Air travel, shipping, and manufacturing are huge sources of carbon that we lack good options for addressing.

2h

Molecular brake on human cell division prevents cancer

Researchers have discovered that the process of copying DNA generates a brake signal that stalls cell division. This molecular brake ensures that the cell has two complete copies of DNA before it divides and thus prevents DNA damage and cancer development.

3h

Light mixer generates 11 colors simultaneously

A multicolor laser pointer you can use to change the color of the laser with a button click — similar to a multicolor ballpoint pen — is one step closer to reality thanks to a new tiny synthetic material.

3h

Dietary supplement increases muscle force by 50% percent in the Duchenne muscular dystrophy mouse model

A dietary supplement derived from glucose increases muscle-force production in the Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) mouse model by 50 percent in ten days, according to a new study. These results pave the way for a clinical study to test the treatment's effectiveness on humans.

3h

To tell the sex of a Galápagos penguin, measure its beak, researchers say

For a Galápagos penguin, beak size is nearly a perfect indicator of whether a bird is male or female, scientists have discovered. Armed with this knowledge, researchers could determine the sex of a bird quickly and accurately in the wild without taking a blood sample — speeding up field studies of this unusual and endangered seabird.

3h

Building bridges with water molecules

Researchers have managed to uncover the mystery behind the structure of water molecules on iron oxide surfaces, and their work has revealed that water molecules can form of complex structures reminiscent of bridges, which play a significant role when it comes to chemical reactions on the surface.

3h

Study investigates the reproductive habits of the fungus that causes athlete's foot

Genomic analysis suggests that asexual reproduction is the rule among individuals of the species Trichophyton rubrum. The authors believe that this factor should be considered in drug development.

3h

More clues that Earth-like exoplanets are indeed Earth-like

Researchers suggest that two Earth-like exoplanets (Kepler-186f and 62f) have very stable axial tilts, much like the Earth, making it likely that each has regular seasons and a stable climate.

3h

Mars valleys traced back to precipitation

Astonishingly similar: The valley networks of Mars bear a strong resemblance to those found in arid landscapes on Earth. Researchers have been able to demonstrate this using the branching angles of river valley confluences. Based on these observations, they infer that Mars once had a primeval climate in which sporadic heavy precipitation eroded valleys.

3h

Open relationships just as satisfying as monogamous ones, U of G study reveals

Couples in non-monogamous relationships have the same level of relationship satisfaction, psychological well-being and sexual satisfaction as those in monogamous relationships, a new University of Guelph study has found.

3h

Learning disabilities: Kids and families struggle beyond the academics

Academic struggles can also create significant stress and anxiety for children and families, a new study finds. Using a 15-question survey in families of children on IEP plans, researchers document actionable levels of distress.

3h

Vacation time recharges US workers, but positive effects vanish within days, new survey finds

Taking time off helps the majority of US workers recover from stress and experience positive effects that improve their well-being and job performance, but for nearly two-thirds of working adults, the benefits of time away dissipate within a few days, according to a new survey.

3h

Celebrate Tau Day with an Extra Slice of Pi

To understand tau, you need to understand pi. Watch how mathematicians from Archimedes on have wrapped their heads around the math of circles. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

3h

Why Women’s Friendships Are So Complicated

When Deborah Tannen, a linguistics professor at Georgetown University, was in grade school, one of her best friends abruptly stopped talking to her. Tannen and the friend, Susan, had done everything together: They had lunch together, made trips to the library together, did afterschool activities in their New York City neighborhood of Greenwich Village together. Then, one day, Susan cut her off. T

3h

How Theoretical Physicists Can Help Find Aliens

To be successful, scientists searching for extraterrestrial beings may need to revisit some fundamental assumptions about the nature of life itself — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

3h

How Theoretical Physicists Can Help Find E.T.

If and when humans discover extraterrestrial intelligence, should we expect to find it in the form of biological brains or artificially intelligent robots?

3h

The Milky Way Is Full of Toxic, Sticky Grease

Space: It's cold, dark — and apparently full of grease.

3h

A Gorgeous 'Blue' Sand Dune Snakes Across Mars in This Awesome NASA Photo

A big sand dune blazes in an electric blue on the Red Planet in a gorgeous photo by NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO).

3h

As asylum requests rise, doctors have important role

With applications for asylum in the United States increasing sharply, a new paper from a team of asylum medicine and law experts is highlighting physicians' important role in evaluating refugees' claims of torture and persecution.

3h

#Hookahlife: Social media posts spread misleading information on hookah use

A new study finds that Instagram users using #hookah or #shisha portray hookah use in an overwhelmingly positive manner, despite its serious health risks. Published in Health Education & Behavior, the study authors examined nearly 300 Instagram posts and found that the portrayal and promotion of hookah smoking on social media can normalize its use and pose public health challenges.

3h

Two proteins involved in schistosome epigenetics play key roles in parasite's biology

Two proteins that recognize and translate DNA methylation marks in Schistosoma mansoni are required for growth of adult stem cells in the parasitic flatworm, as well as production of eggs, according to new research presented in PLOS Pathogens by Kathrin Geyer and colleagues at Aberystwyth University, UK.

3h

I am human, hear me roar: Judging formidability from human vocalizations

Many animals use vocalizations to judge one another's size and physical formidability when in competition for mates or other resources. Now, researchers have found that humans can use nonverbal vocal cues, including aggressive roars, in a similar way.

3h

Chimpanzees start using a new tool-use gesture during an alpha male takeover

Similar to humans, non-human primates combine gestures, facial expressions, and vocalizations in various ways to communicate effectively. Researchers investigated one such signal, the 'leaf clip' gesture, which re-emerged in a wild chimpanzee group during an alpha takeover.

3h

Synthesis of opium alkaloids using electric current

Researchers have mastered a nearly 50-year-old challenge of electrosynthetic chemistry — the electrochemical synthesis of thebaine.

3h

Psychological adjustment: No difference in outcomes for children of same-sex versus different-sex parents

For children of lesbian or gay parents, psychological adjustment is about the same as in children of heterosexual parents, a new study finds.

3h

Tau does not stabilize microtubules in brain, study finds

Though it is widely believed that tau protein stabilizes microtubules in neurons of the brain, new research suggests just the opposite: tau lengthens microtubules and keeps them dynamic.

3h

Biologists show that female seals have consistent personalities

Female seals don't change their spots, according to a new study. In fact, individual differences in boldness remain consistent over time. The study is among the first to examine boldness in wild marine mammals in the burgeoning field of animal personality. Animal personality influences many ecological processes, like how individuals interact with other species or respond to changing environmental

3h

Paleontologists ID two new Miocene mammals in Bolivia

Researchers have discovered the 13-million-year-old fossils of a pair of new species of extinct hoofed mammals known as 'litopterns' from a site in Bolivia.

3h

Genetic structure of painted bunting identified

Biologists have identified the genetic structure of the Painted Bunting, a neotropical migratory songbird, using microsatellite DNA and single nucleotide polymorphisms to develop high-resolution markers to differentiate between individual birds breeding in different Oklahoma populations and across the United States. Through this research, scientists now can differentiate between the eastern and we

3h

Seismologists use massive earthquakes to unlock secrets of the outer core

By applying new data and Princeton's supercomputers to the classic question of what lies beneath our feet, Princeton seismologist Jessica Irving and an international team of colleagues have developed a new model for the Earth's outer core, a liquid iron region deep in the Earth.

3h

This curious animal grew larger over time — but its brain didn't quite keep up

The ancestor of the modern day mountain beaver had a larger relative brain size, offering a rare example of brain size decrease over time.

3h

THz spectroscopy could help explain water's anomalies

Liquid water sustains life on earth, but its physical properties remain mysterious among scientific researchers. Recently, a team of researchers used existing THz spectroscopy techniques to measure liquid water's hydrogen bonding. Future efforts with this technique could one day help explain water's peculiar properties.

3h

The guinea pig at the Last Supper | Brief letters

Animal iconography | Ladybirds’ absence | Measuring space gloop | Nat King Cole’s Route 66 | Morris mushrooms “I’m looking for the wombat in the altarpiece now,” says Heather Dalton, the historian who found a cockatoo in a 16th-century Italian altarpiece created long before Captain Cook washed up in Australia ( Report , 27 June). She might enjoy the 17th-century painting of the Last Supper in Cuzc

3h

Det koldeste sted på Jorden er koldere, end forskere hidtil har troet

Visse steder på Antarktis kan temperaturen nå ned på minus 98 °C – og så har DMI et overraskende bud på, hvor på kloden, der findes flest lyse timer.

3h

Energy giant BP bets on electric car boom

British energy major BP on Thursday bought the nation's largest electric vehicle charging firm, as it bets on booming demand in the coming decades.

3h

Kenya's Lake Turkana put on World Heritage danger list

A UNESCO panel on Thursday added Lake Turkana, a conservation hotspot in Kenya and a candidate site for the birthplace of mankind, to the list of endangered World Heritage Sites.

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3h

Justice Stevens: Roe Will Be Overturned if Kennedy Retires

In a recent interview at the Aspen Ideas Festival, The Atlantic contributing editor Jeffrey Rosen reveals that before Justice Stevens retired, “[Stevens] told me…he thought Roe would be overturned if Justice Kennedy retired.” Rosen, who is the President and CEO of the National Constitution Center as well as a renowned law professor and scholar, goes on to explain that while the immediate effect

3h

New simulations break down potential impact of a major quake by building location and size

With unprecedented resolution, scientists and engineers are simulating precisely how a large-magnitude earthquake along the Hayward Fault would affect different locations and buildings across the San Francisco Bay Area.

3h

Researchers analyze how competitive team sports shaped the physical and psychological skills of early humans

Competitive team games in which men test their mettle against others are universal across the world, and may have deep roots in our evolutionary past. Among hunter-gatherers, these games enable men to hone their physical skills and stamina, assess the commitment of their team members, and see how each performs under pressure. All these activities suggest motivation to practise skills involved in l

3h

Study finds benefits and tradeoffs in feeding rice bran to pigs

Rice is the third most widely grown cereal grain worldwide, and the bran left over from milling white rice is available in large quantities for livestock feed. Rice bran is high in unsaturated fatty acids, but limited information is available about effects of rice bran on growth performance of growing-finishing pigs and impacts on meat and carcass quality. A new study from the University of Illino

3h

Organizing a cell's genetic material from the sidelines

A tremendous amount of genetic material must be packed into the nucleus of every cell—a tiny compartment. One of the biggest challenges in biology is to understand how certain regions of this highly packaged DNA can be called upon so that the genes encoded in them can be "turned on" or expressed and used to manufacture RNA and proteins.

3h

SNMMI 65th Annual Meeting sets the stage for a revolution in precision medicine

More than 5,000 physicians, technologists, scientists and exhibitors gathered for the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging's 65th Annual Meeting, held June 23-26 in Philadelphia. With nuclear medicine playing a growing role in providing precision medicine, theranostics (combining diagnostic imaging and targeted radionuclide therapy) were an important focus throughout the meeting.

3h

Penn study reveals secrets of 'hot' and 'cold' pancreatic cancer tumors

So-called 'hot' tumors filled with T cells are often considered to be more sensitive to immunotherapy compared to 'cold' tumors with fewer T cells, but a clear demonstration of why has eluded cancer biologists — until now. A team has discovered that whether a tumor is hot or cold is determined by information embedded in the cancer cells themselves.

3h

Magnetic skyrmions: Not the only ones of their class

Tiny magnetic vortex structures, so-called skyrmions, have been researched intensively for some time for future energy-efficient space-saving data storage devices. Scientists at Forschungszentrum Jülich have now discovered another class of particle-like magnetic object that could take the development of data storage devices a significant step forward. If skyrmions are used to encode the number "1"

3h

Biodiversity is the 'infrastructure that supports all life'

Dr Cristiana Pașca Palmer, UN assistant secretary general and executive secretary of the convention on biological diversity, discusses Half Earth, a future biodiversity agreement and where to find the money to save life on Earth Dr. Cristiana Pașca Palmer has a big job ahead of her: planning the 2020 UN Biodiversity Convention in Beijing. As the Executive Secretary of the Convention on Biological

4h

Mars dust storm may lead to new weather discoveries

Mars is experiencing an estimated 15.8-million-square-mile dust storm, roughly the size of North and South America. This storm may not be good news for the NASA solar-powered Opportunity rover, but one professor sees this as a chance to learn more about Martian weather.

4h

What's giant panda conservation worth? Billions every year, study shows

In China, the giant panda is clearly a cultural icon. And yet panda conservation, and the panda itself, is often criticized because of the associated cost. But a new analysis shows that panda conservation has great value that extends far beyond protection of pandas themselves.

4h

Spectral cloaking could make objects invisible under realistic conditions

Researchers and engineers have long sought ways to conceal objects by manipulating how light interacts with them. A new study offers the first demonstration of invisibility cloaking based on the manipulation of the frequency (color) of light waves as they pass through an object, a fundamentally new approach that overcomes critical shortcomings of existing cloaking technologies.

4h

Nanoaggregation on command

A combination of natural microtubules and synthetic macrocyclic receptors allows for the light-controlled, reversible aggregation of the microtubules into larger nanostructures. When in a cellular environment these aggregated microtubules can also change cell morphology, causing cell death. Researchers hope to learn more about diseases caused by the improper aggregation of proteins.

4h

Dangerous protected reptiles

Attacks by crocodiles have been rising in South East Asia since they became protected animals, a study finds.

4h

Special-purpose buildings bring together earliest Neolithic communities

The advent of food production took place in the Near East over 10,000 years and sparked profound changes in the ways human societies were organized. A new study demonstrates that specialized buildings regularly featured in the world's earliest agricultural villages and were key to maintaining and enhancing community cohesion.

4h

The US has an anti-drone gun that shoots drones at other drones

A new anti-drone system built by the US can fire interceptor drones from a tube as well as jam the controls of potential incoming attackers

4h

Strategic classroom intervention can make big difference for autism students

Special training for teachers may mean big results for students with autism spectrum disorder, according to Florida State University and Emory University researchers.

4h

Team sports have ancient roots

Competitive team games in which men test their mettle against others are universal across the world, and may have deep roots in our evolutionary past. Among hunter-gatherers, these games enable men to hone their physical skills and stamina, assess the commitment of their team members, and see how each performs under pressure.

4h

Illinois study finds benefits and tradeoffs in feeding rice bran to pigs

Rice is the third most widely grown cereal grain worldwide, and the bran left over from milling white rice is available in large quantities for livestock feed. Rice bran is high in unsaturated fatty acids, but limited information is available about effects of rice bran on growth performance of growing-finishing pigs and impacts on meat and carcass quality. A new study from the University of Illino

4h

Forskere overrasket: Psykiske sygdomme har gener til fælles

Der har længe været spekuleret i, hvordan sygdomme i hjernen hænger sammen. Nu har 500 forskere endelig en del af svaret.

4h

Novel drug therapy partially restores hearing in mice

A small-molecule drug is the first to preserve hearing in a mouse model of an inherited form of progressive human deafness. The study sheds light on the molecular mechanism that underlies a form of deafness (DFNA27), and suggests a new treatment strategy.

4h

Sounds of moving objects change perceptions of body size

Sound and object motion can be used to change perceptions about body size, according to a new study by an international team involving UCL researchers.

4h

A milestone on the path towards efficient solar cells: Singlet fission

Generating more electricity from solar cells and conducting further research into so-called singlet fission. Singlet fission could considerably boost the efficiency of solar cells — and thanks to the latest research it is one step closer to becoming possible.

4h

New oceanographic insight pinpoints marine 'hotspots of risk'

Using a novel, high-resolution 'Lagrangian Coherent Structures' mapping technique, scientists are able to model dynamic features in ocean surface currents. The capacity for improved, near real-time mapping of ocean fronts and eddies may now help alert fishermen and fisheries managers to the increased risk so they can try to avoid those protected species and better target the species they are after

4h

Detection of arboreal feeding signs by Asiatic black bears

Asiatic black bear (Ursus thibetanus) climbs the trees to eat fruits by breaking branches, and arboreal feeding signs (AFS) are formed in trees. We focused on hard mast tree and researched the influence of fruit quantity of individual trees and at regional scale on the detection of AFS to clarify in what case bears climb to eat fruit. Results suggested that bears may maximize their feeding efficie

4h

Kids sneak smoking substitute into school

An easily-concealed device designed to wean smokers off tobacco is turning up in classrooms as kids puff the discreet JUUL device to get a nicotine dose. Scientists surveyed thousands of social media posts to track the trend.

4h

Social Fish Will Brave the Cold to Stay with Their Pals

Social Fish Will Brave the Cold to Stay with Their Pals Individuals will compromise on their own temperature preferences to gain the benefits of group life. SocialFish_topNteaser.jpg Image credits: Evan Baldonado / AquariumKids.com Creature Thursday, June 28, 2018 – 10:30 Brian Owens, Contributor (Inside Science) — You've probably experienced it: Your friends want to sit on a restaurant patio an

4h

2017 Was a Really Bad Year for Tropical Forests

Forest cover losses were the second worst on record, after only 2016, with implications for climate mitigation — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

4h

4h

Study of 800-million tweets finds distinct daily cycles in our thinking patterns

Our mode of thinking changes at different times of the day and follows a 24-hour pattern, according to new findings. Researchers were able to study our thinking behavior by analyzing seven-billion words used in 800-million tweets.

4h

Sandbox craters reveal secrets of planetary splash marks and lost meteorites

Researchers inspired by school science to crack the conundrum of planetary craters.

4h

Physicists set limits on size of neutron stars

How large is a neutron star? Previous estimates varied from eight to sixteen kilometers. Astrophysicists have now succeeded in determining the size of neutron stars to within 1.5 kilometers by using an elaborate statistical approach supported by data from the measurement of gravitational waves.

4h

Molecular brake on human cell division prevents cancer

Researchers at Karolinska Institutet, Sweden, and the University of Sussex, England, have discovered that the process of copying DNA generates a brake signal that stalls cell division. This molecular brake ensures that the cell has two complete copies of DNA before it divides and thus prevents DNA damage and cancer development. The study is published in the scientific journal Molecular Cell.

4h

Some existing anti-cancer drugs may act in part by targeting RNA, study shows

Bolstering the notion that RNA should be considered an important drug-discovery target, scientists at Scripps Research have found that several existing, FDA-approved anti-cancer drugs may work, in part, by binding tightly to RNA, the regulators of the basic activities of life within cells. The research offers another approach for tackling diseases that have been considered "undruggable," including

4h

Sandia light mixer generates 11 colors simultaneously

A multicolor laser pointer you can use to change the color of the laser with a button click — similar to a multicolor ballpoint pen — is one step closer to reality thanks to a new tiny synthetic material made at Sandia National Laboratories. Research on the new light-mixing metamaterial was published in Nature Communications earlier today.

4h

Organizing a cell's genetic material from the sidelines

A tremendous amount of genetic material must be packed into the nucleus of every cell–a tiny compartment. One of the biggest challenges in biology is to understand how certain regions of this highly packaged DNA can be called upon so that the genes encoded in them can be "turned on" and used to manufacture RNA and proteins. New work sheds light on this process with implications for age-related di

4h

Some existing anti-cancer drugs may act in part by targeting RNA, study shows

The research offers another approach for tackling diseases that have been considered 'undruggable,' including amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), muscular dystrophy, cystic fibrosis and certain cancers.

4h

'Breakthrough' algorithm exponentially faster than any previous one

Computer scientists at the Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS) have developed a completely new kind of algorithm, one that exponentially speeds up computation by dramatically reducing the number of parallel steps required to reach a solution.

4h

Molecular brake on human cell division prevents cancer

Researchers at Karolinska Institutet, Sweden, and the University of Sussex, England, have discovered that the process of copying DNA generates a brake signal that stalls cell division. This molecular brake ensures that the cell has two complete copies of DNA before it divides and thus prevents DNA damage and cancer development. The study is published in the scientific journal Molecular Cell.

4h

'German Stonehenge' Yields Grisly Evidence of Sacrificed Women and Children

The broken, battered bones of children, teenagers and women discovered at the newly excavated "German Stonehenge" may be evidence of ancient human sacrifice, a new study finds.

4h

Movie Pirates of the Caribbean: Illegal streaming sites vulnerable to copyright enforcers

Fifty-eight per cent of a new kind of online video piracy is based in just two locations making them more vulnerable to copyright enforcers than previously thought, according to research by Queen Mary University of London.

4h

You can tell how tall or strong a person is by hearing them roar

Both men and women can tell how much taller or stronger another person is by listening to them roar, though men were more sensitive to differences in height

4h

Get Yer Bread and Milk From Kroger's Cute New Delivery RobotKroger Nuro Grocery

Built by Nuro, the little autonomous R1 can carry 12 bags of groceries to your door—but the other logistics are still up in the air.

4h

Chimpanzees start using a new tool-use gesture during an alpha male take over

Similar to humans, non-human primates combine gestures, facial expressions, and vocalizations in various ways to communicate effectively. Researchers of the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology investigated one such signal, the 'leaf clip' gesture, which re-emerged in a wild chimpanzee group during an alpha takeover. Importantly, the gesture was produced only by adult male chimpanzee

4h

Germany’s World Cup Loss, Europe’s Schadenfreude

PARIS—When some countries place out of the World Cup, the news barely registers. When others do, it prompts shock, comparisons to geopolitics, and bad jokes. That’s what happened after Germany’s 2-0 loss on Wednesday to South Korea, which sent the 2014 champions packing and immediately inspired dramatic headlines, comparisons to the state of Chancellor Angela Merkel’s government, and soul-searchi

4h

A Flu Drug May Be Poised to Upend Treatment in U.S.

The medication can reduce the duration of symptoms — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

4h

What the fire near Saddleworth Moor means for wildlife

Experts warn it may take years for the wildlife to fully return to the burnt area near Saddleworth Moor.

4h

Once-Dreaded Poliovirus Could Treat Brain Cancer

This once-feared virus might help treat another deadly illness — brain cancer.

4h

Dietary supplement increases muscle force by 50% percentin the Duchenne muscular dystrophy mouse model

A dietary supplement derived from glucose increases muscle-force production in the Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) mouse model by 50 percent in ten days, according to a study conducted by researchers from Université Laval's Faculty of Medicine and Centre hospitalier universitaire (CHU) de Québec Research Centre-Université Laval. These results pave the way for a clinical study to test the treatme

4h

Study: Tau does not stabilize microtubules, challenges approach to treating Alzheimer's

Though it is widely believed that tau protein stabilizes microtubules in neurons of the brain, new research suggests just the opposite: tau lengthens microtubules and keeps them dynamic.

4h

Low-cost prosthetic foot mimics natural walking

MIT engineers have developed a simple, low-cost, passive prosthetic foot that they can tailor to an individual. Given a user's body weight and size, the researchers can tune the shape and stiffness of the prosthetic foot, such that the user's walk is similar to an able-bodied gait. They estimate that the foot, if manufactured on a wide scale, could cost an order of magnitude less than existing pro

4h

Researchers discover new mechanism to explain the spread of Alzheimer's disease

Scientists have pinpointed minute exosomes as the main vehicle that allow the spread of toxic proteins that trigger the onset of Alzheimer's Disease across a person's brain network. This finding could help to develop better diagnostic and treatment options for this debilitating brain disease that is characterized by dementia, memory loss, mood swings and being disorientated and is ultimately fatal

4h

CMS Policy to reduce hospital-acquired conditions had minimal impact

Hospitals may have avoided financial penalties by billing hospital-associated conditions (HAC) as present at the time of the patient's admission, supporting prior work that showed that a Medicare policy designed to monetarily penalize hospitals for preventable complications had an insignificant impact on reducing healthcare-associated infections. The new research was published today in Infection C

4h

Many survivors of childhood cancer are unconcerned about their future health

New findings suggest that many survivors of childhood cancer may not fully understand or acknowledge their increased risks for later health problems.

4h

Less than a quarter of American youths previously treated for anxiety disorders stay anxiety-free

For the majority of affected youth, anxiety disorders are chronic, even after a successful course of evidence-based treatments, a new study finds.

5h

Correcting the eyesight of microscopes

A newly discovered property of wave propagation may lead to a novel way to improve the resolution of virtually all optical technologies — everything from microscope lenses to telecommunications, laser-based lithography, biological and astronomical imaging.

5h

Fingerprints of molecules in space

Physicists are on the hunt for nitrogen containing molecules in space. Using terahertz spectroscopy, they directly measured two spectral lines for one particular molecule for the first time. The discovered frequencies are characteristic of the amide ion, a negatively charged nitrogen molecule. With the spectral lines now determined, this species can be searched for in space.

5h

Meteorite 'Black Beauty' expands window for when life might have existed on Mars

New evidence for a rapid crystallization and crust formation on Mars has just been published. The study, based on the analysis of the rare Mars meteorite Black Beauty, significantly expands the window for when life might have existed on Mars.

5h

Tricky feat with stand-up molecule

Scientists have achieved a new level of precision working with single molecules. They succeeded in placing an ultrathin molecule in an upright position on a flat layer of silver atoms — and the molecule remained standing instead of reverting to its naturally favored position. The artificial structure illustrates the potential of novel molecular fabrication methods.

5h

Adhering to Paris Agreement climate goal could significantly decrease heat-related summer deaths

As much of the UK and Europe swelters under heatwave conditions, new research has produced compelling evidence that loss of life through increased heat stress during heatwaves can be limited if we stabilize climate at the lower of the Paris Agreement climate goals.

5h

Trump Backs Russia on Election Interference Ahead of NATO Summit

Just weeks before his back-to-back summits with NATO members in Belgium and Russian President Vladimir Putin in Finland, President Trump is legitimizing Russia’s claim that it did not interfere in the 2016 election, contradicting the conclusions of U.S. intelligence agencies. “Russia continues to say they had nothing to do with Meddling in our Election!” Trump tweeted on Thursday morning, before

5h

Baleen Holds Secrets to Whales’ Lives—and Deaths

The most convenient place for a dead whale to wash up is somewhere that can be reached with large construction equipment. But when a 12-year-old right whale died in 2005, gruesomely tangled in fishing rope, she came ashore on a remote part of a barrier island off the Virginia coast. The necropsy team had to take a boat out, then hike to the carcass. They couldn’t carry much back with them for ana

5h

Learning disabilities: Kids and families struggle beyond the academics

Academic struggles can also create significant stress and anxiety for children and families, report researchers led by Boston Children's neuropsychologist Deborah Waber, PhD. Using a 15-question survey in families of children on IEP plans, they document actionable levels of distress.

5h

No Difference in Outcomes for Children of Same-Sex versus Different-Sex Parents

For children of lesbian or gay parents, psychological adjustment is about the same as in children of heterosexual parents, reports a study in the Journal of Developmental & Behavioral Pediatrics, the official journal of the Society for Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics. The journal is published in the Lippincott portfolio by Wolters Kluwer.

5h

Lobachevsky University scientists developed a mathematical model of a social conflict

A team of researchers led by Associate Professor Alexander Petukhov of the Institute of International Relations and World History at Lobachevsky University is developing social conflict models on the basis of nonlinear dynamics.For mathematical modeling, an important feature of social and political processes is that they cannot be strictly defined. They are always subject to small changes and fluc

5h

Spectral cloaking could make objects invisible under realistic conditions

Researchers and engineers have long sought ways to conceal objects by manipulating how light interacts with them. A new study offers the first demonstration of invisibility cloaking based on the manipulation of the frequency (color) of light waves as they pass through an object, a fundamentally new approach that overcomes critical shortcomings of existing cloaking technologies.

5h

Marine protected areas often expensive and misplaced

Many marine protected areas are often unnecessarily expensive and located in the wrong places, an international study has shown. The research found protected areas missed many unique ecosystems, and have a greater impact on fisheries than necessary.

5h

'Lower status' people more likely to share wealth than 'higher status' people

When playing an economic game those that were assigned as 'lower status' were more likely to share their wealth than their 'higher status' counterparts, according to a new study.

5h

Gaming or gambling? Online transactions blur boundaries

In-game purchasing systems, such as 'loot boxes', in popular online games resemble gambling and may pose financial risks for vulnerable players, according to gambling psychology researchers.

5h

Handwashing and house cleaning may protect against chemicals added to furniture

Washing your hands and cleaning your house frequently may help to lower your contact with common flame-retardant chemicals, according to a new study. The study is the first to assess whether house cleaning and handwashing can effectively lower exposure to flame retardants.

5h

Climate change linked to potential population decline in bees

A new study has found that climate change may drive local extinction of mason bees in Arizona and other naturally warm climates.

5h

It's go time for Hawaiian bird conservation, and luckily there's a playbook

A new study presents some of the best guidance to date on the priorities and actions that can be taken to help Hawaii's endemic birds. This article lays out a plan to better guide and empower conservation efforts for Hawaiian birds.

5h

Milky Way is rich in grease-like molecules

Our galaxy is rich in grease-like molecules, according to new research. Astronomers used a laboratory to manufacture material with the same properties as interstellar dust and used their results to estimate the amount of 'space grease' found in the Milky Way.

5h

The Young Milky Way Collided With a Dwarf Galaxy

As the Milky Way was growing, taking shape, and minding its own business around 10 billion years ago, it suffered a massive head-on collision with another, smaller galaxy. That cosmic cataclysm changed the Milky Way’s structure forever, shaping the thick spirals that spin out from the supermassive black hole at the galaxy’s core. Two new studies — one published earlier this month, another still u

5h

Cleaner air could cut infant deaths in sub-Saharan Africa

Even modest improvements in air quality could lead to substantial reductions in infant mortality in developing countries, a new study shows. Exposure to particulate matter in sub-Saharan Africa led to 400,000 otherwise preventable infant deaths in 2015. “Many wealthy countries have recently used legislation to clean up their air,” says coauthor Marshall Burke, assistant professor of earth system

5h

Hobby Lobby's Illegal Antiquities Shed Light On A Lost, Looted Ancient City In Iraq

About 3,800 objects purchased by Hobby Lobby were returned to Iraq in May. Some come from an ancient Sumerian city, Irisagrig, and indicate that life there was "pretty good," an archaeologist says. (Image credit: Win McNamee/Getty Images)

5h

Nanoaggregation on command

A combination of natural microtubules and synthetic macrocyclic receptors allows for the light-controlled, reversible aggregation of the microtubules into larger nanostructures. As Chinese scientists have reported in the journal Angewandte Chemie, when in a cellular environment these aggregated microtubules can also change cell morphology, causing cell death. The researchers hope to learn more abo

5h

Synthesis of opium alkaloids using electric current

Researchers at Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz in Germany have mastered a nearly 50-year-old challenge of electrosynthetic chemistry, namely the electrochemical synthesis of thebaine.

5h

Chimpanzees start using a new tool-use gesture during an alpha male take over

Similar to humans, non-human primates combine gestures, facial expressions, and vocalizations in various ways to communicate effectively. Researchers of the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology investigated one such signal, the 'leaf clip' gesture, which re-emerged in a wild chimpanzee group during an alpha takeover. Importantly, the gesture was produced only by adult male chimpanzee

5h

Crucial new data on the origin of the Dolmens of Antequera, a World Heritage Site

The results obtained indicate the Neolithic chronology of the cave (probably, at least, at the beginning of the 4th millennium BC) and its importance as a place of reference for the Neolithic (and possibly even older) population of the region, which would explain the anomalous orientation of the Menga dolmen.

5h

Territory holders and floaters: Two spatial tactics of male cheetahs

Scientists of the Leibniz Institute for Zoo and Wildlife Research (Leibniz IZW) in Berlin analysed the spatial behaviour of cheetahs. They showed that male cheetahs operate two space use tactics which are associated with different life-history stages. This long-term study on movement data of over 160 free-ranging cheetahs in Namibia has now been published in the scientific journal ECOSPHERE.

5h

Complexity of NMDA receptor drug discovery target revealed

NMDA receptor assemblies containing the GluN2C subunit are predominant in the cerebellum, and have distinct electrochemical properties, Emory scientists found.

5h

How the office org chart in your brain helps to organize your actions

Salk scientists discover how learned behaviors are organized and controlled by different brain cell types, offering insight into Parkinson's, OCD.

5h

Mutations in gene TRAF7 are associated with a multisystem disorder

Four mutations of gene TRAF7 have been associated with a multisystem disorder.

5h

Is cataract surgery associated with reduced risk of a serious traffic accident?

Cataract surgery was associated with a modest decrease in the risk of being involved in a serious traffic crash.

5h

Cheating on cheaters

A new study, to be published in Current Biology on June 28, proposes new strategies to induce the collapse of bacterial populations. A research team led by Karina Xavier, from Instituto Gulbenkian de Ciência (IGC, Portugal), identified novel ways to promote so-called "cheating behavior" in bacterial communities that can lead to the collapse of the bacterial population, simply by manipulating the c

5h

Visual impairment associated with a decline in cognitive function

Worsening vision and declining cognitive function are common conditions among older people. Understanding the association between them could help reduce age-related cognitive changes. A study of more than 2,500 adults aged 65 and older found rate of worsening vision was associated with rate of declining cognitive function.

5h

Genetic biomarker linked to improved survival for patients with certain brain tumors

It wasn't the first wedding anniversary present that Lori Mines was hoping for. After seeking treatment for a debilitating migraine, Lori was diagnosed with advanced stage brain cancer. The prognosis for the disease is usually poor, but researchers are giving some patients with malignant brain tumors new hope for a longer life through research to help predict tumor aggressiveness and survival base

5h

'Music of speech' linked to brain area unique to humans

New research by UC San Francisco scientists reveals what area of the human brain controls the vocal folds of the larynx, or voice box, to let us control the pitch of our speech. Insights into pitch control could pave the way for advanced brain prosthetics that could allow people who can't speak to express themselves in a naturalistic way.

5h

How the flu virus builds a better mousetrap

For the first time, scientists have directly visualized real-time structural changes in the surface protein of the influenza virus that may help the virus fuse with and enter target cells before hijacking them. Single molecules of the protein were found to stretch toward target cells, then refold and try again 5 to 10 times per second. The discovery may help develop more effective vaccines and bet

5h

Researchers identify mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) in human arteries

Mount Sinai researchers identified, in situ and in vivo, adventitial CD90+ (a protein used as a marker for a variety of stem cells) and mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) in human arteries for the first time.

5h

New insights into the epigenetic control of hematopoiesis

Wistar scientists have characterized a novel function for the INTS13 protein that is part of a large protein complex regulating gene transcription, called Integrator. According to study results, INTS13 is required for monocytic maturation, promoting expression of lineage-specific genes.

5h

Novel drug therapy partially restores hearing in mice

A small-molecule drug is the first to preserve hearing in a mouse model of an inherited form of progressive human deafness, report investigators at the University of Iowa, Iowa City, and the National Institutes of Health's National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders (NIDCD). The study, which appears online in Cell, sheds light on the molecular mechanism that underlies a form o

5h

The neuroscience of human vocal pitch

Among primates, humans are uniquely able to consciously control the pitch of their voices, making it possible to hit high notes in singing or stress a word in a sentence to convey meaning. On June 28 in the journal Cell, researchers at the University of California, San Francisco narrow in on a region of the brain's frontal lobe that controls the "voice box" muscles that are responsible for vocal p

5h

I am human, hear me roar: Judging formidability from human vocalizations

Many animals use vocalizations to judge one another's size and physical formidability when in competition for mates or other resources. Now, researchers reporting in the journal iScience have found that humans can use nonverbal vocal cues, including aggressive roars, in a similar way. The new evidence shows from a vocalization alone, human listeners can estimate whether another person is stronger

5h

Ancient Moroccan dental remains elucidate history of long-lost African fauna

Long before rhinoceros, giraffes, hippos, and antelopes roamed the African savannah, a group of large and highly specialized mammals known as embrithopods inhabited the continent. The most well known is Arsinoitherium, an animal that looked much like a rhinoceros but was in fact more closely related to elephants, sea cows, and hyraxes. Now, researchers reporting in Current Biology offer a glimpse

5h

What's giant panda conservation worth? Billions every year, study shows

In China, the giant panda is clearly a cultural icon. And yet panda conservation, and the panda itself, is often criticized because of the associated cost. But an analysis reported in Current Biology on June 28 shows that panda conservation has great value that extends far beyond protection of pandas themselves.

5h

Immigrant children in U.S. detention camps could face yet another health hazard: contaminated water

Health Toxic chemicals common on military bases are especially dangerous for children. And as the Department of Defense begins housing detainees on military bases, the children could face yet another health risk: contaminated drinking water.

5h

Norge køber Sundhedsplatformen: »Det fungerer godt vældig mange steder«

Epics eneste EPJ-konkurrent i Norge har trukket sig, og nu er vores naboer på vej til også at købe Sundhedsplatformen.

5h

Will global warming change the summer rainfall patterns over Eastern China?

Global warming is changing the Earth's climate. Heat waves, heavy rainfall, droughts and floods occur frequently in different parts of the world. Under these circumstances, how regional rainfall changes is of great concern.

5h

Winners of the 2018 National Geographic Travel Photographer of the Year Contest

The winning images have been selected from this year’s edition of the National Geographic Travel Photographer of the Year competition, with the grand prize being awarded to Reiko Takahashi for her image of a humpback whale calf swimming near Japan’s Kumejima Island. National Geographic was kind enough to share some of the winning entries with us here, gathered from three categories: Nature, Citie

5h

The Yankees–Red Sox Rivalry Is Back in Full Force

This Sunday will mark the 14th anniversary of one of the most thrilling regular-season baseball games in recent history. On July 1, 2004, the Red Sox and Yankees delivered a 13-inning epic still remembered for Manny Ramirez’s two home runs, Alex Rodriguez’s brilliant double play , John Flaherty’s walk-off hit and, most of all, Derek Jeter’s legendary dive into the Yankee Stadium stands . At that

5h

A tiny version of this physics toy is revealing quantum secrets

Scientists created a quantum Newton’s cradle to study thermal equilibrium.

5h

One Sentence With 7 Meanings Unlocks a Mystery of Human Speech

Neuroscientists turned to an internet-famous phrase to identify the region of the brain that controls pitch and emphasis in human speech.

5h

Most Republicans Think Tech Companies Support Liberal Views

A survey by the Pew Research Center finds most Americans think social media platforms censor political viewpoints, and Republicans think they have it worse.

5h

I am human, hear me roar: Judging formidability from human vocalizations

Many animals—including sea lions, red deer, and dogs—use vocalizations to judge one another's size and physical formidability when in competition for mates or other resources. Now, researchers reporting in the journal iScience on June 28 have found that humans can use nonverbal vocal cues, including aggressive roars, in a similar way. The new evidence is the first to show that, from a vocalization

5h

New insights into the epigenetic control of hematopoiesis

Scientists at The Wistar Institute have characterized a novel function for the INTS13 protein that is part of a large protein complex regulating gene transcription, called Integrator. According to study results, published online in Molecular Cell, INTS13 is required for monocytic maturation, promoting expression of lineage-specific genes.

5h

How the flu virus builds a better mousetrap

For the first time, scientists have directly visualized in real-time structural changes in the surface protein of the influenza virus that may help the virus to fuse with and enter target cells before hijacking their functions. Researchers at Tufts University School of Medicine found that single molecules of the protein hemagglutinin (HA) that reside on the surface of the virus unfold to stretch t

5h

What's giant panda conservation worth? Billions every year, study shows

In China, the giant panda is clearly a cultural icon. And yet panda conservation, and the panda itself, is often criticized because of the associated cost. But an analysis reported in Current Biology on June 28 shows that panda conservation has great value that extends far beyond protection of pandas themselves.

5h

Ancient Moroccan dental remains elucidate history of long-lost African fauna

Long before rhinoceros, giraffes, hippos, and antelopes roamed the African savannah, a group of large and highly specialized mammals known as embrithopods inhabited the continent. The most well known is Arsinoitherium, an animal that looked much like a rhinoceros but was in fact more closely related to elephants, sea cows, and hyraxes. Now, researchers reporting in Current Biology on June 28 offer

5h

Cheating on cheaters—exploring bacterial social interactions to manipulate bacterial pathogens

A new study, to be published in Current Biology on 28 June, proposes new strategies to induce the collapse of bacterial populations by manipulating social interactions in the human pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a bacterium that causes chronic lung infections.

5h

The agony of opioid withdrawal — and what doctors should tell patients about it | Travis Rieder

The United States accounts for five percent of the world's population but consumes almost 70 percent of the total global opioid supply, creating an epidemic that has resulted in tens of thousands of deaths each year. How did we get here, and what can we do about it? In this personal talk, Travis Rieder recounts the painful, often-hidden struggle of opioid withdrawal and reveals how doctors who are

5h

Perspectives of immune suppression in the tumor microenvironment promoting oral malignancy

In this review, the complexity of immune-suppressive mechanisms in the tumor milieu of cancers, including oral malignancy is discussed in relation to immune check point inhibitors, regulatory T cells (Treg), myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) and cancer associated fibroblasts (CAFs).

5h

People undergoing voluntary and involuntary ECT treatment have similar outcomes

People who have involuntary electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) for depression have similar outcomes to those who have voluntary treatment, according to a ground-breaking new study conducted by researchers from Trinity College Dublin.

5h

Smartphones used to track migrations caused by climate change

Spanish researchers have developed a system that tracks human displacement caused by climate change using the tracks of mobile phones. With this model, which was tested during a severe drought in Colombia in 2014, it was determined that the portion of the population that migrated due to this event was 10 percent during the six months of the study.

5h

Physicists come in 3 types, say mathematicians

As of 2013, there were 7.8 million researchers globally, according to UNESCO. This means that 0.1 percent of the people in the world professionally do science. Their work is largely financed by governments, yet public officials are not themselves researchers.To help governments make sense of the scientific community, Russian mathematicians have devised a researcher typology. The authors initially

5h

Is it heuristics in use or 'ritualistic and instrumentalist' in purpose?

The primary task this article embarks upon is on determining whether the researches using KAPS (Knowledge, Attitude and Practice Surveys) has any heuristic purpose or is it just fulfilling some self-centered ritualistic and instrumentalist objective.

5h

New telescope will scan the skies for asteroids on collision course with Earth

Around sunrise on Feb. 15, 2013, an extremely bright and otherworldly object was seen streaking through the skies over Russia before it exploded about 97,000 feet above the Earth's surface. The resulting blast damaged thousands of buildings and injured almost 1,500 people in Chelyabinsk and the surrounding areas. While this sounds like the first scene of a science fiction movie, this invader wasn'

6h

Rumsonde besøger asteroide 300 millioner kilometer væk

Den japanske Hayabusa2-sonde er efter 42 måneders rejse nået frem til sit mål, den diamantformede asteroide Ryugu.

6h

Telia: Vi er klar med Narrowband IoT-netværk inden udgangen af året

Et nyt mobilnetværk fra teleselskabet Telia skal understøtte Internet of Things.

6h

Less than a quarter of American youths previously treated for anxiety disorders stay anxiety-free

For the majority of affected youth, anxiety disorders are chronic, even after a successful course of evidence-based treatments, reports a study published in the July 2018 issue of the Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry (JAACAP).

6h

Scientists fine-tune carbon nanotubes for flexible, fingertip-wearable terahertz imagers

Researchers at Tokyo Institute of Technology have developed flexible terahertz imagers based on chemically 'tunable' carbon nanotube materials. The findings expand the scope of terahertz applications to include wrap-around, wearable technologies as well as large-area photonic devices.

6h

Movie Pirates of the Caribbean: Illegal streaming sites vulnerable to copyright enforcers

Fifty-eight percent of a new kind of online video piracy is based in just two locations making them more vulnerable to copyright enforcers than previously thought, according to research by Queen Mary University of London.

6h

Off the scale: Can forensics save the world's most-trafficked mammal?

A pioneering new project trials fingerprinting techniques to battle pangolin poaching.

6h

Hunting and fishing activities cause dietary changes in South American fur seals and sea lions

Researchers of the Faculty of Biology and the Biodiversity Research Institute (IRBio) of the University of Barcelona reconstructed the dietary habits of South American sea lions and seals in the area of Rio de la Plata (Uruguay) over the last 7,000 years. The results show that these species' diets were different until late 20th century, when they started coinciding without overlapping each other.

6h

Are we alone? The question is worthy of serious scientific study

Are we alone? Unfortunately, neither of the answers feel satisfactory. To be alone in this vast universe is a lonely prospect. On the other hand, if we are not alone and there is someone or something more powerful out there, that too is terrifying.

6h

This Japanese fungus can dry-age a steak in 48 hours. Here's how.

DIY This barbecue season, try cooking with koji. For the past two years, the Japanese culinary fungus koji has been colonizing the menus of America's top foodie establishments. Here's how you can use it to create a…

6h

Crop insurance is good for farmers, but not always for the environment

Congress is currently debating the 2018 Farm Bill, a massive piece of legislation enacted about every five years. One of its key elements is crop insurance, which helps protect farmer income in times of volatile production – for example, when crops are damaged by droughts or floods.

6h

Secrets of the Big Bang and dark matter

At the Japanese Research Center for Particle Physics KEK, the new particle accelerator experiment Belle II started operation after eight years of construction. Scientists from all over the world eagerly waited for news on the first collisions. 20 researchers of Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) are involved in the experiment. Based on the Belle II data, they want to study the events after th

6h

Psychiatrists Call for Rollback of Policy Banning Discussion of Public Figures' Mental Health

Famed Goldwater Rule adopted by the American Psychiatric Association is said to deprive the public of expert analysis about the mental health of elected leaders — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

6h

This music is designed for extraterrestrials. Listen carefully.

To help dramatize the need for us to open our minds about the potential nature of extraterrestrial life, experiment philosopher Jonathon Keats has built instrument and composed music for aliens. Read More

6h

Map identifies 1,700 public memorials to the Confederacy

Three years after the Charleston massacre, the 'Lost Cause' is still honoured throughout the South – and beyond Read More

6h

One-third of American children take alternative medicine. This is a problem.

Despite little clinical evidence of efficacy, a growing number of parents are giving their children supplements that could prove dangerous. Read More

6h

What killed the patient? Determining causes of tree death during droughts and heatwaves

Researchers are using advanced imaging technologies similar to those used in hospitals to determine how vulnerable our trees are to drought and heatwaves. A new scientific review published In Nature outlines progress towards understanding the likely risks from droughts and heatwaves that combine to kill millions of trees around the world with spectacular effects on the environment.

6h

The fingerprints of molecules in space

Physicists at the University of Innsbruck are on the hunt for nitrogen-containing molecules in space. Using terahertz spectroscopy, they directly measured two spectral lines for one particular molecule for the first time. The discovered frequencies are characteristic of the amide ion, a negatively charged nitrogen molecule. With the spectral lines now determined, researchers can search for this sp

6h

Scientists develop new strategies to discover life beyond earth

Scientists now think we may be able to detect signs of life on planets beyond our solar system in the next few decades, but to do so new tools and techniques will be required. Researchers from around the world just produced a roadmap to develop the techniques that may finally answer the question of whether we are alone in the Universe. This work was published this month in five papers in the journ

6h

Security gaps identified in LTE mobile telephony standard

By abusing security weaknesses in the LTE mobile telephony standard, attackers are able to identify which web pages a user visits and to reroute him to a scam website. This is the result of a study carried out by security experts from Horst Görtz Institute at Ruhr-Universität Bochum. All devices using LTE, also referred to as 4G, are affected—i.e. almost all mobile phones and tablets, as well as c

6h

'Leaders,' 'successors,' and 'toilers': Mathematicians classify physicists and other scientists

As of 2013, there were 7.8 million researchers globally, according to UNESCO. This means that 0.1 percent of the people in the world professionally do science. Their work is largely financed by governments, yet public officials are not themselves researchers. To help governments make sense of the scientific community, mathematicians from the Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology and Trapeznik

6h

Image: Asteroid 162173 Ryugu

After a 42-month journey, Japan's Hayabusa2 spacecraft arrived at asteroid 162173 Ryugu, 300 million km from Earth, on 27 June at 02:35 CEST (00:35 GMT).

6h

Where Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez Parts Ways With Bernie Sanders

Here are a few things I have noticed about Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez’s exceptionally disciplined congressional campaign, which will surely make her a folk hero on the left. First, my impression is that she had strikingly little to say about Russian interference in the 2016 election, nor did she spend her time litigating the question of whether James Comey’s blundering interventions cost Hillary Cl

6h

The Coming Battle to Overturn Roe v. Wade

This has been a heady week for the pro-life movement. First, the Supreme Court handed down a favorable decision in NIFLA v. Becerra, agreeing that pro-life crisis-pregnancy centers shouldn’t have to post information about abortion. Then, Justice Anthony Kennedy, the Court’s long-time conservative swing vote, announced his retirement. This has opened the way to what will inevitably be an intense b

6h

Building bridges with water molecules

A team based at TU Wien has now managed to uncover the mystery behind the structure of water molecules on iron oxide surfaces, and their work has revealed that water molecules can form of complex structures reminiscent of bridges, which play a significant role when it comes to chemical reactions on the surface.

6h

The meteorite 'Black Beauty' expands the window for when life might have existed on Mars

New evidence for a rapid crystallization and crust formation on Mars has just been published in a study from the Centre for Star and Planet Formation at the Natural History Museum of Denmark, University of Copenhagen. The study, based on the analysis of the rare Mars meteorite Black Beauty, significantly expands the window for when life might have existed on Mars.

6h

Flamingo Spotted in Texas, 13 Years After Escaping Kansas Zoo

It's incredibly rare to catch a glimpse of an African flamingo on the Texas coast, but if you do, it's Flamingo No. 492.

6h

Marine protected areas often expensive and misplaced

Many marine protected areas are often unnecessarily expensive and located in the wrong places, an international study has shown.

6h

Researchers study the spatial behaviour of male cheetahs

Scientists of the Leibniz Institute for Zoo and Wildlife Research (Leibniz IZW) in Berlin analysed the spatial behaviour of cheetahs. They showed that male cheetahs operate two space use tactics which are associated with different life-history stages. This long-term study on movement data of over 160 free-ranging cheetahs in Namibia has now been published in the scientific journal Ecosphere.

6h

Crows make the right tool by remembering the last one they saw

New Caledonian crows made bespoke food vouchers from memory with their beaks and claws, ripping pieces of card into exactly the right size to get a reward

6h

Blockchain-based property registries may help lift poor people out of poverty

Many developing countries don't have a working system of tracking property rights, and what they do have can be fragile and incomplete. In Haiti, for instance, a large earthquake in 2010 destroyed all the municipal buildings that stored documents confirming many small farmers' ownership of the land they worked. Even years later, many farmers didn't have proof that they were landowners. People are

6h

Filling gaps in scientific knowledge of the Gulf Coast's interconnected natural and human system

Improved understanding of the coupled natural-human coastal system will help promote resilience of coastal communities and ecosystems under rapidly changing environmental conditions and support informed decision-making, says a new report from the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine.

6h

How to protect your dog from deadly blue-green algae

Blue-green algae poses a deadly risk to humans as well as animals. Karyn Bischoff, toxicologist at the Cornell University College of Veterinary Medicine, explains the dangers and advises livestock and pet owners to be vigilant in avoiding contaminated areas. Bischoff worked with New York Sea Grant to create a free guide for pet owners on how to spot contaminated waters, how to report blooms to of

6h

An App for Ejecting the Homeless

Ted S. Warren / AP Surrounded by the vibrant, emerald trees that give the city its nickname, Seattle’s Ravenna Woods seem like the perfect place for homeless people to build shelter without disrupting metropolitan life. If not for a large, homemade banner at the entrance of the encampment that read, “ Do Homeless Lives Matter ?” you might not even have noticed they were there. But someone did not

6h

Leave No Trace Is a Shattering, Essential Drama

Early on in Leave No Trace, Will (Ben Foster) and Tom (Thomasin McKenzie) have moved into a modest, charming home in Oregon’s countryside, with assistance from the state and from a local farmer who took pity on their situation. Will and Tom were homeless, and the first act of the film focuses on their life camping in a large nature preserve outside of Portland before they’re arrested and taken in

6h

Trilobites: Can Crows Make Mental Pictures of Tools?

New Caledonian crows were trained to seek rewards by tearing paper of a certain size, demonstrating what researchers say is quite advanced toolmaking.

6h

Marijuana Farms Are Driving This Adorable Forest Creature to Extinction

California wants to protect the Humboldt marten, an adorable-but-ferocious cat-size carnivore and a member of the weasel family. The state's declaration would apply only within state lines and wouldn't offer federal protections.

6h

Pulse wave analysis provides reliable information on heart health in young people

Arterial stiffness is one of the early signs of cardiovascular disease, and arterial stiffening has been observed in children. A recent study suggests that an easy-to-use, non-invasive method can produce reproducible estimates of arterial stiffness in adolescents aged 16-19 years. The results of the study, conducted at the University of Jyväskylä, were published in the journal Clinical Physiology

6h

Synthesis of opium alkaloids using electric current

Researchers at Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU) have mastered a nearly 50-year-old challenge of electrosynthetic chemistry, namely the electrochemical synthesis of thebaine. The chemists had set themselves this difficult task within the framework of a collaboration with the University of Münster.

6h

Big data analytics for dummies

Big Data is still very much an elite thing: only the most IT-savvy and wealthy businesses have a shot at scratching the surface of its potential. All this could be about to change thanks to a Big Data analytics platform developed under the TOREADOR project, which will automatically handle all major problems related to on-demand data preparation.

6h

Still a mystery: How does the brain make the mind?

How do molecules, cells, neurotransmitters, and other brain “stuff” create the abstract experience of self-awareness? Despite massive breakthroughs in the field of neuroscience over the last century, this question continues to baffle both scientists and philosophers. In his new book, The Consciousness Instinct: Unraveling the Mystery of How the Brain Makes the Mind (Farrar, Strauss, and Giroux, 2

7h

Natural language processing facilitates collaborative decisions

The Decision Science, AI and Natural Language Processing team at IBM Research-Ireland recently presented a conference paper called "Decision Conversations Decoded" at the 16th Annual Conference of the North American Chapter of the Association for Computational Linguistics: Human Language Technologies (NAACL HLT). The team also presented a demo of our virtual assistant prototype, which analyses col

7h

Amazon moves to disrupt pharmacy sector with new acquisitionAmazon PillPack Pharmacy

Amazon set its sights on the pharmacy market Thursday with the acquisition of tech-focused retailer PillPack, sending shock waves through the sector over prospects of disruption by the US online colossus.

7h

These apps give you the best features of iOS 12 before the update rolls out

DIY Don't wait until September. Apple's next-generation mobile operating system, iOS 12, won't roll out to everyone until the fall. But you can already access a lot of its features right now.

7h

John Kerry’s Advice to Democrats

On Wednesday, former Secretary of State John Kerry savaged President Trump, arguing that he is undermining U.S. leadership in the world with catastrophic consequences for human rights, global stability, and American power—and that he risks a needless war by withdrawing from the Iran deal. “If your house is burning down, do you say to the fire department, ‘Don’t put the fire out, because it may bu

7h

The fingerprints of molecules in space

Physicists at the University of Innsbruck are on the hunt for nitrogen containing molecules in space. Using terahertz spectroscopy, they directly measured two spectral lines for one particular molecule for the first time. The discovered frequencies are characteristic of the amide ion, a negatively charged nitrogen molecule. With the spectral lines now determined, this species can be searched for i

7h

Will global warming change the summer rainfall patterns over Eastern China?

Researchers from the Institute of Atmospheric Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, and the UK Met Office Hadley Centre find big difference in the responses of rainfall modes to increased CO2 forcing at different timescales.

7h

Correcting the eyesight of microscopes

Researchers have discovered that, if light passes through asymmetric apertures, astigmatism arises and can degrade image resolution. Having identified this previously-unsuspected problem, the researchers showed how to remedy it.

7h

Lego box and smartphone sniff out nerve gas

A new a way to sense dangerous chemicals uses not much more than a smartphone and a box made from Lego bricks. It could help first responders in the field identify deadly and difficult-to-detect nerve gas such as VX and sarin. The methodology combines a chemical sensor with photography to detect and identify different nerve agents—odorless, tasteless chemical weapons that can cause severe illness

7h

Why we're sequencing the genomes of Canada's iconic species

Last year, to commemorate Canada's 150th birthday —and to lay a foundation for Canadian research excellence for the next 150 years—a group of scientists in our country embarked upon the Canada 150 Sequencing Initiative (CanSeq150).

7h

A 'social' virtual assistant for migrants

Migrants have been very high on the EU political agenda for the past few years. But far from the political debate, there are cases where technological innovation can truly make a difference. The KRISTINA project has been developing such technologies with a focus on overcoming language barriers.

7h

Enhancing the competitiveness of the railway sector

Enhancing the competitiveness and attractiveness of the railway sector – the core ambition of the Shift2Rail joint undertaking – requires other projects to clear the way. The ROLL2RAIL project played this role by focusing on novel rolling stock technologies and methodologies.

7h

How microscopic marine algae cope with changing ocean conditions

Human activities are changing the ocean on a global scale, with seawater in some regions becoming warmer, more acidic, and less well mixed. One possible result of reduced ocean mixing is that nutrients, which act like fertilizer for marine algae, could become less available near the sea surface.

7h

Warming climate could make wildfire-prone homes uninsurable

On October 9, 2017, the Tubbs Fire ripped through Sonoma County, California, destroying nearly 5,000 homes and killing 22 people. It was the most destructive wildfire in California's history and the largest urban conflagration in the United States since the 1906 San Francisco earthquake fires. And it was only one of approximately 250 wildfires that sparked that same night in Northern California, c

7h

Einstein's theory of gravity holds – even in extreme conditions

Drop a marble and a cannon ball off the Leaning Tower of Pisa at the same time and they will hit the ground at the same time. That fact is explained by Albert Einstein's theory of gravity—general relativity—which predicts that all objects fall in the same way, regardless of their mass or composition.

7h

Sound waves in lipid films can annihilate each other upon collision

Shamit Shrivastava, a post-doctoral researcher in the Department of Engineering Science, writes about a recent finding that has far-reaching consequences for the fundamental understanding of the physics of the brain. The research was conducted in partnership with Professor Matthias F Schneider at the Technical University in Dortmund, Germany.

7h

Building bridges with water molecules

A team at TU Wien now has the proof behind the speculations that water molecules can form complex bridge-like structures when they accumulate on mineral surfaces.

7h

Life situation affects need for digital help more than age

According to research, one's situation in life strongly affects the amount of digital help received from outside the home. Somewhat surprisingly, single-parent families require more external digital help than older people in using and updating the computer and digital television.

7h

Correcting the eyesight of microscopes

Scientists have discovered a new property of wave propagation that leads to a new way to improve the resolution of virtually all optical technologies, including microscope lenses, telecommunications, laser-based lithography, biological and astronomical imaging. All these systems transmit information and energy through wave propagation. Researchers at the Institute for Basic Science have discovered

7h

Diverse geography of Britain's 82 largest islands revealed

A University of Sheffield academic has worked with Ordnance Survey to showcase the diverse geography and unique characteristics of Britain's largest islands.

7h

Study suggests branching networks on surface of Mars due to heavy rainfall

A trio of researchers with ETH Zurich and the University of Chicago has found evidence that suggests narrow channel networks seen on the surface of Mars are due to heavy rainfall runoff. In their paper published on the open access site Science Advances, Hansjoerg Seybold, Edwin Kite and James Kirchner describe their study of the channel networks and comparisons they made with similar formations fo

7h

Living longer in poor neighborhoods, tied to higher risk of not gaining healthy pregnancy weight

The length of time a woman spends in poorer neighborhoods was found to be negatively tied to gaining a healthy amount of pregnancy weight, which is important for newborn health.

7h

Security gaps identified in LTE mobile telephony standard

By abusing security weaknesses in the LTE mobile telephony standard, attackers are able to identify which web pages a user visits and to reroute him to a scam website. The weaknesses are impossible to close; and they are also still present in the upcoming mobile telephony standard 5G, the standardization of which is currently pending. Still, the problem may be stemmed with the aid of other securit

7h

Major study reveals Great Barrier Reef's 30,000-year fight for survival

A landmark international study, recently published in Nature Geoscience, shows that the Great Barrier Reef has suffered 5 death events in the last 30,000 years. The groundbreaking study of the world's largest reef system, involving the participation of Juan Carlos Braga Alarcón, a Full Professor at the UGR's Department of Stratigraphy and Palaeontology, reveals that these events were driven mostly

7h

Empathetic police are less effective in the face of public criticism, study says

Police officers who endorse an empathetic approach to criminal justice do not perform as well when they sense they are underappreciated, according to new research from The University of Texas at Austin.

7h

For some bladder cancer patients, simple test could reduce over-treatment, ease high cost

Georgetown-led investigators have found that a fairly simple test significantly improves the identification of bladder tumors that will likely become invasive.

7h

Marine protected areas often expensive and misplaced

Many marine protected areas are often unnecessarily expensive and located in the wrong places, an international study has shown.The University of Queensland was part of research which found protected areas missed many unique ecosystems, and have a greater impact on fisheries than necessary.A collaboration with the University of Hamburg, Wildlife Conservation Society and The Nature Conservancy asse

7h

To tell the sex of a Galápagos penguin, measure its beak, researchers say

Scientists at the University of Washington have announced that, for a Galápagos penguin, beak size is nearly a perfect indicator of whether a bird is male or female.

7h

Obstetric trauma rates for forceps deliveries have increased in Canada

Trauma to both mother and baby during vaginal deliveries, especially forceps deliveries, has increased in Canada in recent years, according to a large study published in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal).

7h

New photodetector could improve night vision, thermal sensing and medical imaging

Using graphene, one of science's most versatile materials, engineers from the UCLA Samueli School of Engineering have invented a new type of photodetector that can work with more types of light than its current state-of-the-art counterparts. The device also has superior sensing and imaging capabilities.

7h

Researchers report first nanostructured material for broad mixing of light waves

A multicolor laser pointer you can use to change the color of the laser with a button click—similar to a multicolor ballpoint pen—is one step closer to reality thanks to a new tiny synthetic material made at Sandia National Laboratories.

7h

Even a microchipped pet can be lost if your data is out of date

From July 1st 2018, every state and territory of Australia (excluding the Northern Territory) will have laws making microchipping cats and dogs compulsory.

7h

Flights disrupted as Bali volcano shoots towering ash column

The Mount Agung volcano on Bali shot ash 2,000 meters (6,600 feet) into the atmosphere Thursday, disrupting the travel plans of thousands as several airlines canceled flights from the Indonesian tourist island.

7h

Gabon's unique 'orange crocodiles' intrigue scientists

The West African state of Gabon is famous for its biodiversity but in a galaxy of spectacular finds, one stands out: orange crocodiles.

7h

Cuba has a hidden internet system based on trading USB sticks

In Cuba millions of people use El Paquete to get their weekly internet fix – a new study has uncovered how it is bought and spread throughout the country

7h

Morgenthaler: Jeg fatter ikke, at politikere virker ligeglade med klimaet

Men jeg tror på, at vi kan råbe dem op, hvis vi er mange, der hæver stemmen, inden det går helt galt, siger Anders Morgenthaler, der nu sender sit sidste klimaprogram på P1.

7h

Sådan kan el-forbrugerne skubbe til konkurrencen

Det kræver øget tryghed og hurtighed, hvis elforbrugerne skal blive blive mere tilbøjelige til at skifte elselskab. Det er i både forbrugernes og branchens interesse at skabe et mere fleksibelt elmarked.

7h

Professor: Alt for mange datadrevne projekter er ren idioti

Legetiden er forbi. Nu skal der værdi ud af data-projekterne, siger CBS-professor Thomas Ritter.

7h

Soldiers deployed to help fight wildfire in England

A hundred soldiers and a military helicopter on Thursday joined firefighters battling a rare wildfire in northern England that could burn for weeks amid sustained hot weather, officials said.

7h

Zensational! Japan firm launches Buddhist sermon service

Feeling uncertain about life? Need a bit of guidance? A Japanese firm is launching a new service allowing you to talk to a smart speaker and receive a sermon from Buddhist monks.

7h

Kroger to test grocery deliveries with driverless carsKroger Nuro Grocery

Kroger Co. is about to test whether it can steer supermarket customers away from crowded grocery aisles with a fleet of diminutive driverless cars designed to lower delivery costs.

7h

Why Is There a ‘Gaming Disorder’ But No ‘Smartphone Disorder?’

The international health community has decided that if you play video games like Fortnite or World of Warcraft a lot, you might suffer from a mental-health issue: Gaming Disorder. It’s a behavioral condition that the World Health Organization has added to the proposed 11th revision of its International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems, or ICD-11, the first update

7h

Empathetic police are less effective in the face of public criticism, study says

Police officers who endorse an empathetic approach to criminal justice do not perform as well when they sense they are underappreciated, according to new research from The University of Texas at Austin.

7h

Tales of Parker | Gold Rush: The Ballad of Parker and Todd

The youngest mine boss tells us about his unique childhood in Alaska and tries to recall time spent doing anything other than gold mining. Stream Every Episode of Gold Rush: https://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/gold-rush/ Download the Discovery GO app now! Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Discovery Follow us on Twitter: https://t

7h

Treating the cause of crime more effective than only addressing the crime itself

Researchers from The University of Western Australia's Law School have been studying the feasibility of a justice model that has the potential to improve the effectiveness of crime prevention in Western Australia.

8h

Pulsed electric field technology offers new potential for food processing

University of Otago researchers are demonstrating the potential of a new technology which could see New Zealand production of a popular food – the French fry – become healthier, and less costly and wasteful.

8h

Critic’s Notebook: Coney Island’s Newest Wonder: Sharks!

A New York Aquarium pavilion, with 115 marine species, finally opens this weekend, and the overall effect makes it more of a visible, welcoming presence and neighbor.

8h

Efter utætte fjernvarmelagre: Rådgiver svarer på læsernes spørgsmål

Planenergis rådgiver Per Alex Sørensen svarer på, hvorfor fjernvarmelagre er konstrueret med flydende isoleringslåg af plast, der kan risikere at suge vand.

8h

New tool to help police identify victims of coercive control

Merseyside Police is piloting a new learning tool developed by University of Liverpool that should help officers provide an improved service for victims of the complex new coercive control law.

8h

Skull tower and skull rack offer evidence of Aztec human sacrifice in early Mexico City

A team of researchers has uncovered what they describe as a skull rack—a basketball court length wall of skulls with poles passed through them—in Mexico City. Lizzie Wade, with ScienceMag, outlines the work being done by a team from Mexico's National Institute of Anthropology and History.

8h

Dramatic shift to Atlantic climate in Arctic warming hotspot

The Arctic is about to shrink, shows a new study, as an important part of the Arctic Ocean shifts over to an Atlantic climate regime. The rapid climate shift occurs in the northern Barents Sea—the Arctic warming hotspot where the surface warming and loss of winter sea ice is largest in the entire Arctic.

8h

Labeling GMOs might not actually make them seem scarier

Science Vermonters seem less averse to bioengineered food once it's identified. America has never had GMO labels, and so all experts could do was make educated guesses based on polling data. But now we finally have some hints—thanks to the good…

8h

How the weird scoring system in tennis gives underdogs a boost

A mathematical analysis reveals exactly how much of an advantage the odd scoring system of tennis gives to the underdog

8h

How Roboticists Are Copying Nature to Make Fantastical Machines

Nature knows what it’s doing, and roboticists are more than happy to steal evolution’s ideas to make a plethora of curious and clever machines.

8h

More Devoted to Order Than to Justice

American politics is today a brutal boxing match of harassing confrontations. The disagreements renew two enduring questions: one philosophical, one historical. Is political harassment civil? And do the ugly political confrontations signal a sharp departure, or have they always existed in the United States of America? Moderates in both major political parties have long argued no on both fronts. T

8h

Never mind the Brexiteurs: why it’s time to learn French | Phil Daoust

Soon more English students will study Spanish than the tongue of Molière and MC Solaar. We lazy Britons think it’s easier Putain de bordel de merde. Ces rosbifs sont cons comme des bites . Pardon my French, but we must make the most of the obscenities while we can. English children are increasingly unwilling to learn the language of Molière and MC Solaar, according to the British Council, which re

8h

Kilner Fermentation Set Review: A Great and Easy Way to Get Started

This inexpensive and easy-to-use kit is the nudge you need to start making your own fermented foods.

8h

Fourth of July Party Picks: Yeti, Weber, Biolite, Hydro Flask

Happy Fourth of July! Let us upgrade your Independence Day bash with premium coolers, stomping rockets, and 12 other great products.

8h

Vitamin D and the relationship to colon cancer

Colorectal cancer is common. A new study examines the relationship with vitamin D levels.

8h

Computational intelligence-inspired clustering in multi-access vehicular networks

There is an increasing demand for distributing large amounts of digital information to vehicles on the move. However, the current widely used cellular networks are not sufficient due to limited bandwidth in dense vehicle environments. Recently, vehicular ad hoc networks (VANETs) have attracted great interest for improving communications between vehicles using infrastructure-less wireless technolog

9h

Plastic-free campaigns don't have to shock or shame. Shoppers are already on board

With Coles and Woolworths supermarkets phasing out single-use plastic bags at their checkout counters, and Queensland and Western Australia bringing in bans on single-use plastic bags for all retailers from July 1, a long overdue step is being taken towards reducing Australia's plastic waste.

9h

Could electricity-producing bacteria help power future space missions?

Humans aren't the only ones who have harnessed the power of electricity. Some bacteria do this, too, by producing structures that extend from their surface like wires to transfer electrons over distances. Now, scientists at NASA's Ames Research Center in California's Silicon Valley are exploring this phenomenon to see if they can make use of these special microbes to perform essential functions on

9h

Researchers report phase-stable inorganic halide perovskite

CsSnI3 is a prototype inorganic halide perovskite that has recently been proposed as a strong candidate for photovoltaic applications because of its unique properties as a semiconductor.

9h

New photodetector could improve night vision, thermal sensing and medical imaging

Using graphene, one of science's most versatile materials, engineers from the UCLA Samueli School of Engineering have invented a new type of photodetector that can work with more types of light than its current state-of-the-art counterparts. The device also has superior sensing and imaging capabilities.

9h

This Andean Volcano Is Restless. But Should We Expect an Explosive Eruption?

Can an ancient shoreline help geologists predict when and how major eruptions can happen?

9h

Udflyttede styrelser tager medarbejderflugt roligt

Miljøstyrelsen får god hjælp til rekruttering af de fynske kommuner. Men IDA er ikke imponeret over indsatsen over for medarbejderne.

9h

Nuclear Fusion Power Could Be Here By 2030, One Company Says

This is a major advance on the way to achieving fusion energy.

9h

Why Does a Mother's Body Keep Some of Her Baby's Cells After Birth?

Having a child changes a woman. It turns her into a mother … but also into a kind of chimera.

9h

Discovery of Rare Viking Dragon Pin Solves 130-Year-Old Mystery

More than 130 years ago, a Swedish farmer discovered a black dragon — a Viking carving of one, that is. Now, archaeologists have found a metal dragon made from a mold much like this one.

9h

Technology for visualizing flow of blood to aid neurosurgery in the human brain

Neurosurgeons conduct vascular recanalization for treatment of cerebrovascular diseases. Successful surgery necessitates surgery the minimization of flow disturbances due to blood during surgical intervention. However, monitoring the flow of blood under surgery is difficult due to a lack of imaging tools for visualizing microcirculation in the brain.

9h

Using light for next-generation data storage

Tiny, nano-sized crystals of salt encoded with data using light from a laser could be the next data storage technology of choice, following research by Australian scientists.

9h

Controlling photons with a photon

Photons are considered to be ideal information carriers and expected to play important roles in quantum communication and information processing, where quantum mechanics allows for absolutely secure cryptographic key distribution as well as computation much faster than conventional computers. In order to take full advantage of quantum information carried by photons, it is important to make them di

9h

Photos: Vikings Accessorized with Tiny Metal Dragons

A newly discovered Viking dragonhead pin nearly matches a dragonhead mold found more than 130 years ago.

9h

Optimized pixel isolation technology enhances light sensitivity and color fidelity

Samsung Electronics, a world leader in advanced semiconductor technology, today introduced its new 'ISOCELL Plus' technology, which allows CMOS image sensors to capture more light, significantly increasing light sensitivity and color fidelity. Smartphone consumers can now expect even more accurate and clearer photos in challenging light environments.

9h

To find the sex of a Galápagos penguin, measure its beak, researchers say

It turns out that to tell the sex of a Galápagos penguin, all you need is a ruler.

9h

Controlling photon energy density in opaque materials

Just like merry people at a party, photons perform random walks through white paint; but their density remained out of control. Recently, scientists at the University of Twente in the Netherlands have managed to control the photon energy density inside opaque materials such as white paint.

9h

Measuring ion concentration in solutions for clinical and environmental research

Okayama University researchers describe in the journal Optics Express the use of Terahertz (THz) chemical microscopy to measure the pH of water-based solutions with a volume as small as 16 nL. The findings are important to be able to measure pH concentrations in small-volume solutions for clinical and environmental analyses.

9h

New manufacturing process creates super-small channels to repel water and improve medical, electronic devices

A new manufacturing process developed by Purdue University researchers may improve the water repellency for some common products, ranging from medical equipment and sensors to vehicle engines and windshields.

9h

Light-controlled reversible aggregation of microtubules mediated by paclitaxel-modified cyclodextrin

A combination of natural microtubules and synthetic macrocyclic receptors allows for the light-controlled, reversible aggregation of the microtubules into larger nanostructures. As Chinese scientists have reported in the journal Angewandte Chemie, when in a cellular environment these aggregated microtubules can also change cell morphology, causing cell death. The researchers hope to learn more abo

9h

Bacteria have even evolved to live in the venom glands of snakes

The venom glands of snakes, scorpions and spiders are home to thriving communities of microorganisms that have adapted to the toxic surroundings

9h

Female velvet ants are so scary no other animal dares eat them

Most insects live in constant fear of predators—but not the velvet ant. New research suggests that these gaudy, fuzzy insects are essentially invincible.

9h

Boeing’s Proposed Hypersonic, Mach 5 Plane Is Really, Really Fast

Supersonic planes are always almost here, but maybe the way to fly is to go faster. Much, much faster.

9h

50 years ago, a Japanese scientist dreamed up a rocket-propelled train

50 years ago, a Japanese engineer tried rocket boosters on a train. Today, high-speed trains propelled by superconducting magnets are being tested.

9h

Inside the effort to print lungs and breathe life into them with stem cells

Martine Rothblatt wants to end transplant shortages with 3-D-printed lungs.

9h

6 Ways to Be an Environmental Hero at the Beach

Some ocean-friendly products and practices for the summer and beyond — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

9h

How trees secretly talk to each other

Plants share resources using an underground network called the "Wood Wide Web".

10h

"Traveling" Brain Waves May Be Critical for Cognition

Physical motion of neural signals may play a more important role in brain function than previously thought — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

10h

DF i håndbremsevending om bilafgifter: Nu bliver små biler dyrere og store billigere

Først trak DF støtten til regeringens forslag om at kompensere bilejerne for stigninger i bilafgifterne, men nu er partiet vendt 180 grader.

10h

Virksomheder undervurderer prisen ved strømsvigt

De forretningsmæssige konsekvenser ved strømsvigt er langt større end de fleste virksomheder forestiller sig. Server- og teknikrum i udsatte kældre er med til at gøre danske virksomheder sårbare.

10h

Spe­cial-pur­pose build­ings in the world's ear­li­est Ne­olithic vil­lages helped bring to­gether com­mu­ni­ties

The advent of agriculture took place in the Near East over 10,000 years, and sparked profound changes in the ways human societies were organized. A new study, published in the journal PloS One by Prof. Cheryl Makarewicz of Kiel University and Prof. Bill Finlayson of the University of Reading, demonstrates that specialized buildings regularly featured in the world's earliest agricultural villages,

10h

A milestone on the path towards efficient solar cells

Scientists at Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg (FAU) are currently working on a joint research project to generate more electricity from solar cells and conduct further research into so-called singlet fission with Argonne-Northwestern Solar Energy Research (ANSER) Center, U.S. Singlet fission could considerably boost the efficiency of solar cells, and thanks to the latest research

10h

Dangerous reptiles

The southeast Asian island state of East Timor has a problem with crocodiles. Between 2007 and 2014, there was a sharp increase in attacks on humans. Many of these attacks were fatal. Sebastian Brackhane, a research assistant in the Department of Remote Sensing and Landscape Information Systems of the University of Freiburg, has analyzed data on crocodile attacks in relation to a rise in the popul

10h

Scientists identify geographic sectors controlling the Hadley circulation

A Chinese-French team has pinpointed the zonal diversity of regional meridional circulations (RMC) in the tropics and distinctive roles in the interannual variability of Hadley circulation strength and its edges in boreal winter.

10h

Researchers present new strategy for extending ductility in a single-phase alloy

Simultaneous high strength and large ductility are always desirable for metallic materials. However, while the strength of metals and alloys can be easily increased by five to 15 times through simple plastic deformation or grain refinement down to the nano-scale, the gain in strength is usually accompanied by a drastic loss of uniform ductility. Ductility depends strongly on the work hardening abi

10h

Australian shrub contains new class of organic compound

The botanical world can be an exciting place for chemists. Plant species produce a beautiful array of organic molecules with complex structures, often of great practical use. Indeed, this is a realm where new discoveries are still being made. Recently, a Japanese-led research team discovered an entirely new structural class in compounds from a jungle-dwelling shrub.

10h

Japan’s Hayabusa 2 spacecraft has arrived at asteroid Ryugu

A Japanese spacecraft has arrived at the tiny asteroid Ryugu, where it will drop off landers and explosively take samples of dust to analyse back on Earth

10h

Protest Isn’t Civil

Lexington, Virginia, is a city where history radiates like hot air shimmering over blacktop. Nestled in the Shenandoah Valley, the town’s namesake is the site where Massachusetts patriots first gave their blood in battle against the British. The area’s institutional heart, Washington and Lee University, is named after Virginia’s two best-known sons, one who created the Union, and the other who fo

10h

Donald Trump’s Poverty Denial

Let the Trump administration tell it, and there are virtually no people living in extreme poverty in the United States. In a recent rebuke to a United Nations report on American poverty, U.N. Ambassador Nikki Haley’s office stated that a recent study of Americans making less than $4 a day “implies that there are only approximately 250,000 persons in ‘extreme poverty’ circumstances.” Their estimat

10h

When the Supreme Court Locks Arms With Republicans

This term, the five Republican-appointed Supreme Court justices locked arms with their GOP counterparts in the White House and Congress against the unstinting forces of demographic change. In muscling through a series of 5–4 decisions on voting rights , redistricting , and President Trump’s travel ban over the unified objections of the Court’s Democratic-appointed justices, the Republican majorit

10h

The States That Exercise Least

The federal government recommends that every week we all do “muscle-strengthening” activities at least twice, along with 150 minutes of “moderate intensity” aerobic physical activity. However, only about 23 percent of U.S. adults actually manage to work out this much during their leisure hours, according to a new CDC report released Thursday. And, the CDC found, the percentage of people who get e

10h

The Delicate Art of Creating New Emoji

Emoji's consortium of gatekeepers serve as one example of how online communication might be supervised with rigor, generosity, and imagination.

10h

SpaceX Is About to Launch Its Final Block 4 Falcon

RIP to the moderately reusable Falcon 9.

10h

How the Startup Mentality Failed Kids in San Francisco

Huge contributions from tech titans, a STEM-packed curriculum, gadgets everywhere: Willie Brown Middle School was supposed to set the bar. Then it opened.

10h

Nærhedsfinansiering – et vindue for byttehandler?

Sundhedsvæsenet får halvanden mia. kr., hvis det kan reducere antallet af indlæggelser og indføre mere telemedicin. Det giver en ny og unik mulighed for at gentænke opgavefordelingen mellem kommuner og regioner, skriver professor i sundhedsøkonomi, Jakob Kjellberg fra VIVE.

11h

Siemens: Nyt kølemiddel gør store varmepumper klar til fjernvarmen

Ifølge nye beregninger fra Siemens vil varmepumper fra 20 MW og derover være en god forretning for knap halvdelen af danske fjernvarmeværker og kunne spare Danmark for udledning af 2,6 mio. ton CO2 årligt.

11h

Nestlé Offered Permit To Continue Taking Water From California Stream

The company's U.S. bottled water unit had been found to be operating under a long-expired permit, taking tens of millions of gallons a year from a watershed in the San Bernardino National Forest. (Image credit: Damian Dovarganes/AP)

11h

Oxide sintering by air pressure control

Professor Hiromi Nakano of the Toyohashi University of Technology has collaborated with a company to develop a small, lightweight air-pressure control atmosphere furnace that can rapidly and uniformly synthesize periodical structures of Li2O-Nb2O5-TiO2 (LNT) solid solution materials at 3x ordinary pressure. The underlying mechanism was discovered using detailed composition/structure analysis. As t

11h

Solar activities can affect the East Asian winter monsoon at the multidecadal time scale

Solar irradiation provides light, heat and energy for driving atmospheric motion on Earth, and is directly affected by solar activities. The Fifth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) indicated that solar activities have significant effects on the climate system, but large uncertainties also exist. The related mechanisms, especially how solar activities affect

11h

Nyt patientregister presser regioner: »Det er så kritisk, som det kan blive uden at knække«

Nye versioner af både Sundhedsplatformen og Landspatientregisteret går i luften samtidig. Det presser regionerne, der skal lave nye arbejdsgange til et system, som ikke er færdigudviklet endnu.

11h

Forsinket hangar forlænger F-16-flyenes tjeneste

Forsinkelser af hangarer til F-35 kampfly betyder, at F-16 må anvendes længere end planlagt.

12h

Gaming or gambling? Online transactions blur boundaries

In-game purchasing systems, such as 'loot boxes', in popular online games resemble gambling and may pose financial risks for vulnerable players, according to gambling psychology researchers at the University of Adelaide.

12h

Microtransactions can move popular online games closer to online gambling

An editorial published today by Addiction argues that some online games use in-game purchasing systems that disguise or withhold the long-term cost of microtransactions until the player is already financially and psychologically committed. Such purchasing systems push free-to-play online gaming closer to gambling and may present financial risks for vulnerable players.

12h

Kom med ind i tophemmelig alarmcentral: Telenors ‘dommedagsrum’ fra den kolde krig

Vagten troede ikke sine egne øjne, da han opdagede det mystiske rum i en kælder med i et lejlighedskompleks i bydelen Torshov i Oslo. Han havde fundet en skjult alarmcentral, som Telenor byggede under Cuba-krisen i 1960’erne – i tilfælde af atomkrig.

12h

Betingelser for liv opstod tidligere på Mars end på Jorden

Forskere på Københavns Universitet viser i ny artikel, at Mars på rekordtid blev et fast legeme. Liv kan derfor i princippet være opstået tidligere på Mars end på Jorden.

12h

Supercomputers help design mutant enzyme that eats plastic bottles

A dump truck's worth of plastic empties into the ocean every minute. Worldwide, humankind produces over 300 million tons of plastic each year, much of which is predicted to last centuries to millennia and pollutes both aquatic and terrestrial environments. PET plastic, short for polyethylene terephthalate, is the fourth most-produced plastic and is used to make things like beverage bottles and car

12h

Apple and Samsung settle lengthy iPhone patent battle

Apple and Samsung have ended a years-long patent battle over copied iPhone design with an undisclosed settlement, according to a US court filing Wednesday.

13h

The world's wine industry is adapting to climate change

When an Oregon valley famed for its wine heats up under the afternoon sun, Pacific Ocean winds rush through a dip in the mountains, cooling the grapes in Jeff Havlin's vineyards.

13h

Move over UPS truck: Amazon delivery vans to hit the street

Your Amazon packages, which usually show up in a UPS truck, an unmarked vehicle or in the hands of a mail carrier, may soon be delivered from an Amazon van.

13h

Pursuing poachers, and tourism, to boost Mozambique's conservation

The dam at Massingir in southwestern Mozambique is like a bridge between two worlds, one a deadly threat to the wildlife in the other.

13h

Voters in Google's hometown to decide employee 'head tax'

Voters in Google's Silicon Valley hometown will decide whether the search engine leader and other tech companies should help pay for the traffic congestion and other headaches resulting from mushrooming workforces.

13h

Migrating birds create flu bonanza for scientists to study

Huge flocks of famished birds scour the sands of Delaware Bay for the tiny greenish eggs an army of horseshoe crabs lays every spring.

13h

Out of the darkness: A new spider found deep within an Indiana cave

Spiders are ubiquitous within our forests, fields, and backyards. Although you may be used to seeing the beautiful yellow and black spiders of the genus Argiope in your garden, large ground-scurrying wolf spiders in your yard, or spindly cellar spiders in your basement, this new sheet-web-building spider is probably one you haven't seen before. The reason is that it's known from a single cave in t

13h

'Lower status' people more likely to share wealth than 'higher status' people

When playing an economic game those that were assigned as 'lower status' were more likely to share their wealth than their 'higher status' counterparts, according to a new study at Queen Mary University of London.

13h

Climate change linked to potential population decline in bees

A new study from Northwestern University and the Chicago Botanic Garden has found that climate change may drive local extinction of mason bees in Arizona and other naturally warm climates.

14h

The beauty of crab blood parasites: Winner of 2018 Research as Art awards announced

Seventeen stunning images, and the fascinating stories behind them—such as analysing owls' daily diet, a dream about getting the blame unfairly, and how to tell which fish are the most devious—have today been revealed as the winners of the 2018 Research as Art Awards.

14h

Laser-made aircraft parts a breakthrough for industry

Researchers are developing laser technology to manufacture and repair steel and titanium parts in what could be a game-changing application for industry.

14h

Maybe you shouldn't eat that: Novel app switches you to healthier options

Drop that yogurt. Instead, try this one with less sugar, fat and fewer unpronounceable additives.

14h

Millioner til forskning i ældres sundhed og livskvalitet

Flere danskere skal bevare høj livskvalitet og vitalitet igennem hele livet. Det perspektiv er…

14h

How smart technology gadgets can avoid speed limits

Speed limits apply not only to traffic. There are limitations on the control of light as well, in optical switches for internet traffic, for example. Physicists at Chalmers University of Technology now understand why it is not possible to increase the speed beyond a certain limit—and know the circumstances in which it is best to opt for a different route.

14h

Pædagoger får høreskader af børns råb

Pædagoger udsættes for voldsom støj og "råbekultur". Det giver træthed, stress og opmærksomhedstab, siger forsker.

14h

Building the future, one RoboBoat at a time

Last week, teams of students from 13 schools—representing six countries—tested their engineering skills by developing autonomous boats during the 11th annual International RoboBoat Competition, held June 18-24 in Daytona Beach, Florida.

14h

End of the line for ASIMO, Japan's famed robot?Honda Asimo HR-V Pilot

It has played football with former US president Barack Obama and danced for German leader Angela Merkel, but Honda's ASIMO robot may have reached the end of the line.

14h

Climate change linked to potential population decline in bees

A new study from Northwestern University and the Chicago Botanic Garden has found that climate change may drive local extinction of mason bees in Arizona and other naturally warm climates.

14h

Meet Benedict Allen, the explorer rescued by the Daily Mail against his will

Last year’s expedition in Papua New Guinea ended in him falling ill, being rescued by the newspaper and facing accusations of imperialism. What drives him to seek out yet more adventures? Benedict Allen arrives dressed like an explorer: all in green, multi-pocketed jacket, sturdy trousers, a bag that could carry accessories in the Amazon. It is a somewhat anachronistic get-up for a meeting in cent

14h

Spil computer og find din rigtige rolle på jobbet

Et aarhusiansk computerspil kan hjælpe skoler og arbejdspladser med at sammensætte blandede og bedre arbejdsgrupper.

15h

Archaeologists stumble on Neolithic ritual site in Suffolk

Diggers laying groundwork for a new windfarm discover previously unknown site of international significance As diggers began to strip the daisies and buttercups and carve down through the parched clay of a field near Woodbridge in Suffolk that sloped down to a riverbank, with archaeologists watching over the pretty but apparently featureless site, something extraordinary began to emerge. Clear sp

15h

IDSA/ASM lab diagnosis guide helps health care providers

Advances in rapid molecular testing mean infectious diseases can be accurately diagnosed in minutes or hours rather than days or weeks and patients can receive appropriate treatment sooner. A guide released by the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA) and American Society for Microbiology (ASM) helps health care providers keep up with the latest technology and know what tests to order and

15h

Video clips, spicy soap operas, games slash STD rates in gay young men

A novel online HIV prevention program with spicy soap operas and interactive games — like a rising thermometer of sexual risk — reduced sexually transmitted infections in gay young men by 40 percent.

15h

UK is not on track to meet its own climate targets, says report

The UK is not on course to meet its own targets for cutting greenhouse gas emissions in the 2020s and 2030s, says the UK’s Climate Change Committee

15h

AI and radar technologies could help diabetics manage their disease

People with diabetes could be able to monitor their blood sugar without drawing blood using a system now being developed at the University of Waterloo.

16h

Out of the darkness: A new spider found deep within an Indiana cave

A small cave in southern Indiana turned out to be the one and only home of a new species of spider, now going by the name Islandiana lewisi. The dark, wet, muddy cave near the Ohio River was apparently the perfect match for this previously unknown sheet weaver. The spider, which measures about 2 mm in size, is described by Marc Milne and Elizabeth Wells, University of Indianapolis, in the open acc

16h

How smart technology gadgets can avoid speed limits

Speed limits apply not only to traffic. There are limitations on the control of light as well, in optical switches for internet traffic, for example. Physicists at Chalmers University of Technology now understand why it is not possible to increase the speed beyond a certain limit – and know the circumstances in which it is best to opt for a different route.

16h

Handwashing and house cleaning may protect against unhealthy chemicals

Washing your hands and cleaning your house frequently may help to lower your contact with common flame-retardant chemicals, according to a new study by researchers at the Columbia Center for Children's Environmental Health (CCCEH) at Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health. The study is the first to assess whether house cleaning and handwashing can effectively lower exposure to flame

16h

'Lower status' people more likely to share wealth than 'higher status' people

When playing an economic game those that were assigned as 'lower status' were more likely to share their wealth than their 'higher status' counterparts, according to a new study at Queen Mary University of London.

16h

Educational interventions decrease sunburns among heavy equipment operators

Implementation of educational interventions among operating engineers (heavy equipment operators) in Michigan significantly increased the use of sunscreen and decreased the number of reported sunburns.

16h

Fingerprint tech could help catch pangolin poachers

British scientists discover a way of taking human fingerprints off seized pangolin scales.

17h

Fault at Lucas Heights nuclear reactor halts production of medical isotope

Spokesman says no safety risk but there are fears patients could face delays in cancer diagnosis Patients in hospitals around Australia may face delays in cancer diagnosis after production of the most commonly used isotope in nuclear medicine was halted at the Lucas Heights nuclear reactor in Sydney’s south. The Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (Ansto) usually produces about

17h

A Victory for Coral: Unesco Removes Belize Reef From Its Endangered List

The Belize Barrier Reef has been removed from the United Nations list of threatened world heritage sites because it no longer faces immediate danger from development.

20h

The GOP’s Bill to Stop Family Separations Looks Dead for Now

Less than 24 hours after House Republican leaders planned to file a standalone bill addressing the family-separation crisis, multiple GOP sources conceded on Wednesday that the issue was likely dead for the week. Three House Republican sources, who spoke on the condition of anonymity to discuss internal talks, confirmed that waffling on the part of the White House likely means that no legislation

20h

Another Shocking Delay for NASA’s Next Big Telescope

In February, a watchdog government agency warned NASA that its next big space telescope was dangerously close to running over schedule and over budget. Most of the James Webb Space Telescope, such as its gold-plated mirrors and scientific instruments, were ready. But there were too many problems with other elements of the spacecraft—specifically, the parts that NASA had hired an outside contracto

20h

Tropical Forests Suffered 2nd-Worst Loss Of Trees On Record Last Year

In 2017, 39 million acres of tree cover disappeared, an area as big as Bangladesh. "The report is telling a bleak picture," researcher Mikaela Weisse said. "What we are doing right now isn't enough." (Image credit: Chaideer Mahyuddin/AFP/Getty Images)

20h

What makes dogs man's best friend?

Working with ancient dog DNA and DNA from village dogs, University of Michigan researchers find new genetic sites linked to common domestication traits–genes that are also responsible for rare genetic syndromes in humans.

20h

Young will pick up climate change bill, advisers warn

Without action on climate change, the coming generation will pay much more to curb emissions, a UK report says.

20h

What makes dogs man's best friend?

From pugs to labradoodles to huskies, dogs are our faithful companions. They live with us, play with us and even sleep with us. But how did a once nocturnal, fearsome wolf-like animal evolve over tens of thousands of years to become beloved members of our family? And what can dogs tell us about human health? Through the power of genomics, scientists have been comparing dog and wolf DNA to try and

20h

Study reveals two hormones that may decrease religiosity

A study finds a link between sex hormones and level of religiosity. Read More

21h

A new tactic for starving tumors

Scientists have found a metabolic particularity in tumor cells that are low on oxygen. The discovery might point to new drugs to target the most difficult-to-treat spots within a tumor.

21h

First malaria-human contact mapped with Nobel Prize-winning technology

Scientists have taken a significant step toward developing a new vaccine for malaria, revealing for the first time an 'atomic-scale' blueprint of how the parasite invades human cells. Using the Nobel Prize-winning technology cryo-EM (cryo-electron microscopy), the researchers mapped the previously hidden first contact between Plasmodium vivax malaria parasites and young red blood cells they invade

21h

'Ring around bathtub' at giant volcano field shows movement of subterranean magma

A new study is tracing the geologic changes in the Maule volcanoes, located in a region in Chile that has seen enormous eruptions during the last million years.

21h

Study yields a new scale of earthquake understanding

Nanoscale knowledge of the relationships between water, friction and mineral chemistry could lead to a better understanding of earthquake dynamics, researchers said in a new study. Engineers used microscopic friction measurements to confirm that, under the right conditions, some rocks can dissolve and may cause faults to slip.

21h

70K opioid-related deaths in U.S. may have gone unreported

Several states are likely dramatically underestimating the effect of opioid-related deaths because of incomplete death certificate reporting, experts say. A new study finds that potentially 70,000 opioid-related overdose deaths were not included in national opioid-related mortality estimates since 1999 because coroners and medical examiners did not specify the drug that contributed to the cause o

21h

Barley could replace barium for scanning the throat

When hit with a common laser beam, a roasted version of barley may be an ideal and safe contrast agent for diagnosing swallowing disorders, a new study shows. “Because we’ve been eating or drinking these products, we know they’re safe for most people.” Before landing on barley, researchers tried out more than 200 types of tea, chocolate, herbs, and other foodstuffs. The discovery could improve th

21h

Financial incentives help to drive down unnecessary antibiotic prescriptions from GPs

Offering financial incentives to NHS commissioners reduces the amount of antibiotics in the community, and could help to curb drug-resistant infections.

21h

Rescue rover deals with rough terrain like a beaver

To help autonomous robots overcome uneven terrain and other obstacles, researchers have turned to beavers, termites, and other animals that build structures in response to simple environmental cues, as opposed to following predetermined plans. “When a beaver builds a dam, it’s not following a blueprint. Instead, it’s reacting to moving water. It’s trying to stop the water from flowing,” says Nils

21h

The FDA Approved its First Cannabis Drug. What Next?

The approval of epilepsy drug Epidiolex is poised to permanently change the way we talk about cannabis in the US.

21h

Heroin users’ brains hint at a new treatment for narcolepsy

Heroin users make too much of a “wakefulness” chemical in their brains. The finding hints that milder opiates may offer a new way to treat narcolepsy

21h

Launch of NASA’s James Webb Space Telescope delayed another year

NASA's James Webb Space Telescope has been plagued by delays and cost overruns, and now it has been delayed another year for a planned launch date in 2021

21h

Justice Kennedy’s Retirement Could Reshape the Environment

The retirement of Justice Anthony Kennedy, announced Wednesday in a letter hand-delivered to President Trump, could bring about sweeping changes to U.S. environmental law, endangering the federal government’s authority to fight climate change and care for the natural world. With Kennedy gone, a more conservative Supreme Court could overhaul key aspects of the Clean Air Act, the Clean Water Act, a

21h

The Justice Who Believed in America

Like everyone who follows the Supreme Court, I’ve been trying to read Justice Anthony Kennedy’s mind for more than 30 years. I was an intern for Joe Biden on the Senate Judiciary Committee the summer that Robert Bork’s nomination to the Supreme Court was defeated in 1987, and watched Senator Biden turn from an opponent of Bork to a supporter of Kennedy because of Kennedy’s belief that Americans h

21h

Scientists use hydrophone to listen in on methane seeps in ocean

A research team has successfully recorded the sound of methane bubbles from the seafloor off the Oregon coast, opening the door to using acoustics to identify — and perhaps quantify — this important greenhouse gas in the ocean.

21h

Personalized 'deep learning' equips robots for autism therapy

Researchers have now developed a type of personalized machine learning that helps robots estimate the engagement and interest of each child during these interactions, using data that are unique to that child. Armed with this personalized 'deep learning' network, the robots' perception of the children's responses agreed with assessments by human experts, with a correlation score of 60 percent.

21h

Orangutan: How 70,000 years of human interaction have shaped an icon of wild nature

The evolution of the orangutan has been more heavily influenced by humans than was previously thought, new research reveals. Scientists have shed new light on the development of the critically endangered species.

21h

Yosemite granite 'tells a different story' story about Earth's geologic history

A team of scientists revealed that granites from Yosemite National Park contain minerals that crystalized at much lower temperatures than previously thought possible. This finding upends scientific understanding of how granites form and what they can teach us about our planet's geologic history.

21h

Insight into the physics of the Higgs particle

Physicists have succeeded in putting a superconducting gas into an exotic state. Their experiments allow new insights into the properties of the Higgs particle, but also into fundamental characteristics of superconductors.

21h

System lets public cameras send you messages

A new technology lets public cameras send personalized messages to people without compromising their privacy. “Our technology enables public cameras to send customized messages to targets without any prior registration,” says He Wang, an assistant professor in the Purdue University computer science department, who created the technology along with PhD student Siyuan Cao. “Our system serves as a b

22h

Scientists find evidence of complex organic molecules from Enceladus

Using mass spectrometry data from NASA's Cassini spacecraft, scientists found that large, carbon-rich organic molecules are ejected from cracks in the icy surface of Saturn's moon Enceladus. Scientists think chemical reactions between the moon's rocky core and warm water from its subsurface ocean are linked to these complex molecules.

22h

Rough terrain? No problem for beaver-inspired autonomous robot

Researchers are using stigmergy, a biological phenomenon that has been used to explain everything from the behavior of termites and beavers to the popularity of Wikipedia, to build new problem-solving autonomous robots.

22h

Why bacteria survive in space

Earth germs could be contaminating other planets. Despite extreme decontamination efforts, bacteria from Earth still manages to find its way into outer space aboard spacecraft. Biologist are working to better understand how and why some spores elude decontamination.

22h

`Oumuamua gets a boost

`Oumuamua, the first interstellar object discovered in the Solar System, is moving away from the Sun faster than expected. This anomalous behavior was detected by a worldwide astronomical collaboration. The new results suggest that `Oumuamua is most likely an interstellar comet and not an asteroid.

22h

Providing care based on need not ability to pay is the NHS's greatest achievement

'Providing care based on need and free at the point of delivery' has been voted the NHS's greatest achievement in its 70 years by readers of The BMJ.

22h

Recorded penicillin allergy linked to increased risk of 'superbug' infections

Patients who have a penicillin allergy recorded in their medical records are at an increased risk of developing the drug resistant 'superbug' infection MRSA and healthcare-associated infection C difficile, finds a study published by The BMJ today.

22h

Patients believed allergic to penicillin have increased risks of MRSA and C. difficile

Analysis of outpatient records of large number of British patients reveals that those believed to be allergic to penicillin have significantly increased risks of contracting the dangerous infections MRSA and C. difficile.

22h

What Kennedy's Absence Means for Civil Rights

During his tenure on the nation’s highest court, Justice Anthony Kennedy was certainly nothing close to liberal. Even his fabled credentials as a “swing” justice have been burnished a bit beyond his actual court work. In every 5-4 decision this term that saw liberal Justices Sotomayor, Ginsburg, Breyer, and Kagan united in dissent, Kennedy has provided the deciding vote for conservatives each tim

22h

NASA's James Webb Space Telescope Plagued by Delays, Rising Costs

The project will come in at least an extra 18 months behind schedule and $800 million over budget.

22h

Anthony Kennedy’s Retirement May Have Huge Consequences for Privacy

Kennedy’s record is mixed, but he was a thoughtful voice on how to interpret constitutional rights for the internet era.

22h

The Atlantic Daily: The Question Is How

What We’re Following Justice Departing: Anthony Kennedy, the conservative Supreme Court Justice, announced his retirement. His swing vote helped decide the landmark cases of Citizens United v. Federal Election Commission , which protected the speech of corporations, and Obergefell v. Hodges , which established the right of same-sex couples to marry. Without Kennedy, the court will likely become m

22h

The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: Just(ice) in Time for the Midterms

-Written by Lena Felton ( @lenakfelton ) and Taylor Hosking ( @Taylor__Hosking ) Today in 5 Lines Supreme Court Justice Anthony Kennedy announced his retirement, giving President Trump another slot to fill on the bench. Kennedy frequently sided with the Court’s more liberal justices on issues like abortion, gay rights, and affirmative action. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell said his chambe

22h

Spider Eggs Look Like Rock Candy (But Don't Eat Them)

Spider eggs are so colorful that they look like candy (but please don't eat them).

22h

The Truth About 'Meat Sweats,' According To Science

You don't have to be a competitive eater to get the meat sweats (but it helps).

22h

Lego blocks could be the key to detecting nerve gases in the field

Science The worst toys to step on may yet be redeemed. Lego blocks destroy the feet of parents around the world, but as a new study demonstrates, these mutable children’s toys can also be used for good.

22h

4 landmark decisions from Supreme Court Justice Anthony Kennedy, who retires in July

Supreme Court Associate Justice Anthony M. Kennedy, 81, announced on Wednesday his upcoming resignation, marking the end of a three-decade tenure on the high court. Read More

22h

MIT scientists discover fundamental rule of brain plasticity

Our brains are famously flexible, or “plastic,” because neurons can do new things by forging new or stronger connections with other neurons. But how, exactly, does it do that? Read More

22h

Iran’s People Keep Getting Poorer

A perfect storm of a currency in free fall, soaring prices, economic mismanagement and corruption, and impending U.S. sanctions have sent Tehran’s shop owners to the streets in perhaps the largest anti-government demonstrations in the Iranian capital in recent years. Businesses in Tehran’s Grand Bazaar were closed Monday and Tuesday, as traders protested outside parliament against the decline of

23h

What caused the mass extinction of Earth's first animals?

Fossil records tell us that the first macroscopic animals appeared on Earth about 575 million years ago. Twenty-four million years later, the diversity of animals began to mysteriously decline, leading to Earth's first know mass extinction event. A research team is helping to unravel this mystery and understand why this extinction event happened, what it can tell us about our origins, and how the

23h

Granite crystallizes at temperature 200 degrees lower than previously thought

Evidence from rocks in Yosemite National Park suggests that granite stored in the Earth's crust is partially molten at 500 degrees Celsius, nearly 200 degrees lower than had previously been believed.

23h

Men with aggressive prostate cancer may get new powerful drug option

A double-blind, randomized phase III trial shows a drug currently used to treat men with metastatic, advanced prostate cancer significantly lowered the risk of metastasis or death when used in men with non-metastatic castrate-resistant prostate cancer and a rising PSA level.

23h

You say you hate Instagram's changes, but your eyeballs say otherwise

Technology It's 2018 and UX designers know us better than we know ourselves. Using Instagram feels increasingly terrible. But the numbers suggest the app is performing better than ever. What gives?

23h

160 Years of the American Idea

In May 1857, a coterie of literary New Englanders met for the first time to lay out the foundational vision for The Atlantic : a magazine adamantly opposed to slavery, belonging to “no party or clique,” which would work to publish literary articles “of an abstract and permanent value.” Six months later, in November 1857, the first issue of the magazine was printed. The Atlantic has spent the last

23h

Photos: The 8 Coldest Places on Earth

Locales with record-breaking cold.

23h

Genealogists Turn to Cousins’ DNA and Family Trees to Crack Five More Cold Cases

Police arrested a D.J. in Pennsylvania and a nurse in Washington State this week, the latest examples of the use of an open-source ancestry site since the break in the Golden State killer case.

1d

Against Big Philanthropy

The world’s tech titans are amassing some of the biggest fortunes ever created. Some, like Mark Zuckerberg and Bill Gates, are giving most of it away . While there have been some dissenters , the general reaction to this kind of philanthropy has been positive. Bill Gates has the highest net favorability of any major political figure not named Colin Powell; he’s seen as warm and competent . But St

1d

The Last of the Small-Town Lawyers

Justice Anthony Kennedy, who announced his retirement from the Supreme Court on Wednesday, will almost certainly be the last justice to come from a legal world that has now all but vanished—the decorous, Atticus Finch-style 20th-century life of the small-town, general-practice lawyer, who saw life from many legal angles and formed a bulwark of American communities in all 50 states. That backgroun

1d

One of the best pocket cameras just got better

Gadgets Sony’s new RX100 VI helps keep high-end compact cameras alive. This month Sony announced an updated model to the compact RX line. The VI brings familiar features and form factor, but changes it up in a major way when it comes to the…

1d

Can video games help boost cruise bookings?

For travel companies with anemic cruise bookings, video games might be the cure, according to a new study.

1d

Lyft value jumps to $15.1 billion in new funding round

Smartphone-summoned ride service Lyft on Tuesday announced it is raising $600 million in a funding round that values the Uber competitor at $15.1 billion.

1d

Summer dead zones in Chesapeake Bay breaking up earlier

A new study shows that dead zones in the lower Chesapeake Bay are beginning to break up earlier in the fall, which may be an indication that efforts to reduce nutrient pollution to the Bay are beginning to make an impact. Scientists from the University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science examined 30 years of data on dead zones and nutrient levels in the Chesapeake Bay. They found that dea

1d

Jordan Peterson Comes to Aspen

In Aspen, Colorado, up a narrow switchback road, high above the picturesque valley, where a house unburdened by close neighbors opens onto a furnished open-air patio, I found Jordan Peterson, arguably the most influential, most controversial, and most improbable intellectual star in North America, earnestly holding forth to several of the very successful locals who were eager to meet him and to a

1d

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