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Nyheder2018juni29

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Biggest study of vaginas shows there’s no such thing as ‘normal’

A study measuring labia and clitoris size in hundreds of women has found they vary widely, potentially helping to curb rising cosmetic surgery rates

8h

Quantum gas reveals first signs of path-bending monopole

Magnets, whether in the form of a bar, horseshoe or electromagnet, always have two poles. If you break a magnet in half, you'll end up with two new magnets, each with its own magnetic north and south.

9h

FM-senderne overlever det nye medieforlig

Efter kritik har regeringen og DF indgået et medieforlig, hvor planen om at sætte årstal på lukningen af FM-senderne, er droppet.

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LATEST

The Atlantic Daily: Visceral Impact

What We’re Following The Capital Gazette: In the wake of the shooting that killed five local newspaper employees, Emma Green reported on the scene in Annapolis, Maryland, where residents are struggling to make sense of an attack that struck at the heart of their community. Police identified the suspected shooter using facial-recognition technology, comparing an image of his face to those in a dat

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The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: A Community Grieves

Today in 5 Lines Authorities identified the five people killed in Thursday’s attack at the Capital Gazette newsroom in Annapolis, Maryland. The suspect, identified as 38-year-old Jarrod Ramos, has been charged with five counts of first-degree murder. President Trump addressed the shooting during an event at the White House, saying, “Journalists, like all Americans, should be free from the fear of

39min

This self-driving grocery delivery car will sacrifice itself to save pedestrians

Technology The vehicles will take part in a pilot program with Kroger in the fall. In the fall, little robot cars will take part in a pilot program with Kroger to deliver groceries autonomously.

46min

Photos: Fruits of the Sonoran Desert

The fruits of the cardon and saguaro cacti of the Sonoran Desert are an amazing story of interdependence and survival. Here's a look at the gorgeous blooms of two giant cacti.

47min

Readers ponder geothermal power and more

Readers respond to stories from the May 26, 2018 issue of Science News.

1h

Medical breakthroughs come with a human cost

Editor in Chief Nancy Shute muses on the risks many medical advances pose in their infancy.

1h

Less biased facial recognition? Microsoft touts improvement, IBM offering help

If a picture paints a thousand words, facial recognition paints two: It's biased.

1h

Can Sacrificing Privacy Stomp Out Disinformation Online?

It’s one thing to note that tech companies seem to be immune to the bad press that comes from data breaches and intentionally misleading content propagating on their platforms. It’s an altogether scarier prospect that those platforms and disinformation actors might sometimes be working toward similar goals. According to Dipayan Piku Ghosh, a digital-privacy expert at Harvard’s Kennedy School of G

1h

Treating AFib with ablation reduces mortality and stroke

Using catheter-based ablation instead of medications alone reduces the risks of death and stroke in patients with the common form of heart arrhythmia known as atrial fibrillation, or AFib, new research from UC Davis physicians shows.

1h

Complication of 'fat freezing' procedure may be more common than thought

Cryolipolysis is a noninvasive cosmetic procedure that eliminates excess fat by freezing it. But a complication called paradoxical adipose hyperplasia (PAH) — a hardened area of localized fat developing after cryolipolysis — may be more common than previously thought, suggests a paper in the July issue of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery®, the official medical journal of the American Society o

1h

DBS treatment may slow the progression of Parkinson's tremor in early-stage patients

Deep brain stimulation (DBS) may slow the progression of tremor for early-stage Parkinson's disease patients, according to a Vanderbilt University Medical Center study released in the June 29 online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

1h

New Caledonian Crows Build Tools From Mental Images, Not Lessons

When it comes to tool making, the birds learn differently than humans.

2h

Woman's Odd Weight Gain Turned Out to Be a 50-Pound Ovarian Tumor

A woman in Alabama who couldn't seem to lose weight turned out to have a massive tumor on her ovary, according to news reports.

2h

UM study: Forests may lose ability to protect against extremes of climate change

A recent University of Montana study suggests that a warming climate in the Pacific Northwest would lessen the capacity of many forest microclimates to moderate climate extremes in the future.

2h

Why psychiatrists are calling on the APA to end its controversial ‘Goldwater Rule’

Some psychiatrists want the American Psychiatric Association to end its controversial Goldwater Rule, which prohibits members from airing opinions on the mental health of public figures. Read More

2h

Scientists treat anxiety by implanting false memories

A new study suggests that it’s possible to replace anxiety-producing unpleasant memories with new ones implanted under hypnosis. Read More

2h

Most teens with gynecomastia don't need hormone lab tests

Routine assessment by an endocrinologist and laboratory tests to measure hormone levels aren't necessary in most adolescent boys with gynecomastia (male breast enlargement), concludes a study in the July issue of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery®, the official medical journal of the American Society of Plastic Surgeons (ASPS).

2h

How to tell an asteroid from a comet, even when its from outside our solar system

Space An ‘Oumuamua by any other name would still be as fascinating. Wait, what’s the difference between a comet and an asteroid?

2h

How evolution builds the most efficient airfoils

Swimming and flying animals are optimally adapted for cruising through their environments, producing thrust via propulsors—wings for birds and caudal fins for fish. Over millions of years, the morphology of these animals evolved for maximally efficient cruising, and about 30 years ago, researchers proposed that most swimmers cruise within a narrow range of Strouhal numbers—these are dimensionless

2h

Mini machines can evade friction by taking quantum shortcuts

Special maneuvers allow researchers to create tiny machines that are as efficient as possible.

2h

Bacterial Infections Can Cause Powerful Odor, As Happened to Plane Passenger

A man who smelled so bad his plane had to be rerouted has died of a flesh-eating bacterial infection.

2h

Comcast deals with widespread outage

Comcast is dealing with a widespread outage of some of its services.

2h

Polish stork vanishes from GPS but delivers huge phone bill

A Polish environmental group that was using a mobile-phone transmitter to track migratory movements of a stork has received a phone bill of 10,000 zlotys ($2,650) after the bird went missing in Sudan and someone started using the chip to make calls.

2h

NASA infrared data reveals Tropical Storm Emilia is strengthening

Infrared NASA satellite imagery provided cloud top temperatures of thunderstorms that make up Tropical Storm Emilia. Comparing those NASA temperature readings with another satellite's data obtained the following day, forecasters determined that Emilia had strengthened.

2h

NASA's GPM finds heavy rainfall on Tropical Storm Prapiroon's southwestern side

When the Global Precipitation Measurement mission or GPM core satellite passed over the Northwestern Pacific Ocean, it saw very heavy rainfall occurring in one part of Tropical Storm Prapiroon.

2h

Simple logic for nanofluidic computing simulated

Invigorating the idea of computers based on fluids instead of silicon, researchers have shown how computational logic operations could be performed in a liquid medium by simulating the trapping of ions (charged atoms) in graphene (a sheet of carbon atoms) floating in saline solution. The scheme might also be used in applications such as water filtration, energy storage or sensor technology.

2h

The 'Decapitated' Pompeii Man Wasn't Decapitated After All

His skull did eventually separate from his body, but not until a tunnel collapse about 1,600 years after he died.

3h

Photos of the Week: Wild Horses, Scarlet Sails, Sun God

A firearms course for teachers in Colorado, Saudi Arabia lifts its ban on women drivers, immigration-policy protests in Washington, D.C., and Los Angeles, the World's Ugliest Dog Competition in California, a spider hunts along a Russian river, Fashion Week in Dakar, Banksy surfaces in Paris, a dramatic moonrise above a burning moorland in England, and much more.

3h

Study: 35,000 Papers May Have Retraction-Worthy Image Duplication

The authors of a preprint recommend that journals implement better image screening procedures before publishing articles.

3h

NASA's GPM finds heavy rainfall on Tropical Storm Prapiroon's southwestern side

When the Global Precipitation Measurement mission or GPM core satellite passed over the Northwestern Pacific Ocean, it saw very heavy rainfall occurring in one part of Tropical Storm Prapiroon.

3h

Can your smartphone stop you from getting hit by a car?

Technology Scientists say, probably not. Distracted walking might not seem as dangerous as distracted driving, but could be a factor in the surge of pedestrian deaths and injuries seen over the last four…

3h

The Way Police Identified the Capital Gazette Shooter Was Totally Normal

A mass-shooting in Annapolis, Maryland, at the Capital Gazette yesterday killed five journalists, making it the most deadly domestic attack on the press since 9/11 . Local police say a suspect in custody, Jarrod Ramos, appears to have acted alone and been motivated by retribution for a failed defamation lawsuit against the paper. As accounts of the shooting and its aftermath arrived, one detail s

3h

NASA infrared data reveals Tropical Storm Emilia is strengthening

Infrared NASA satellite imagery provided cloud top temperatures of thunderstorms that make up Tropical Storm Emilia. Comparing those NASA temperature readings with another satellite's data obtained the following day, forecasters determined that Emilia had strengthened.

3h

Up to half of childhood cancer survivors will develop hormone disorders

The Endocrine Society today issued a Clinical Practice Guideline advising healthcare providers on how to diagnose and treat the endocrine disorders that affect a significant portion of childhood cancer survivors in the United States today.

3h

Kids today are waiting longer than ever in the classic marshmallow test

Preschoolers wait longer for extra treats than they used to. What does it mean?

3h

Chocolate was used as money in the ancient Maya civilization

Have you ever eaten a chocolate bar that was worth its weight in gold? If you lived in ancient Mesoamerica, you might have done it every day. Read More

4h

Puerto Rico introduces bill to become 51st U.S. state by 2021

“No longer do we want ambiguity. No longer do we want this kicked down the road,” said Puerto Rico Governor Ricardo Rosselló. Read More

4h

9 Absolutely Evil Medical Experiments

From intentional STD infection to Nazi war crimes, science isn't always so ethical.

4h

New study: Seeing the same doctor for years means lower death rates

One study showed the death rate cut in half for people who kept the same doctor. Wow. Read More

4h

Two-by-fours are not actually 2-by-4—here’s why

Technology We measure wood in a weird way. Turns out, numbers actually do lie. Two-by-fours are actually 1.5-by-3.5s.

4h

How Trump Could Sell Out Syria to Putin

Russia is in search of the ultimate deal with Syria. At present, Washington is pressing Moscow to halt Syrian President Bashar al-Assad’s military offensive into southwestern Syria; Moscow, meanwhile, wants Washington to abandon the areas in Syria’s northeast that it has liberated from the Islamic State. With a summit between Presidents Donald Trump and Vladimir Putin looming, Russia may try to l

4h

The Entire History of 'World of Warcraft' in One (Long) Video

The game’s designers talk through every expansion in the history of the legendary MMORPG.

4h

Trilobites: The Evolutionary Origin of Descending Testicles

Descending testicles were likely present in the earliest mammals, then subsequently disappeared in elephants, manatees and their relatives, according to a new study.

4h

Q&A: A Galaxy Far, Far Away

NASA has identified something 13.4 billion light-years away, as the farthest thing observed in space.

4h

Trilobites: He Died at Pompeii, but His Head Wasn’t Crushed by a Block

The skull of the “unluckiest man” at Mt. Vesuvius’ eruption was found by archaeologists, intact and with a mouth full of teeth.

4h

Foxconn reaches agreement to open Green Bay office

Foxconn Technology Group announced Friday that it plans to open an office in Green Bay that will bring at least 200 high-tech jobs, a chance for the company to spread benefits and goodwill more widely amid doubts that the company's massive southeastern Wisconsin campus will boost the economy statewide.

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NYC drivers for Uber, other apps to get vision care coverage

Drivers for car services and ride-hailing apps like Uber and Lyft are usually on their own when it comes to buying health insurance, but starting Sunday in New York they will now be able to get coverage for vision care as well as phone or video appointments with doctors, industry representatives announced.

4h

Climate predictions should include impacts of CO2 on life

Climate change predictions are not taking account of the full range of possible effects of rising carbon dioxide levels, researchers say.

4h

Simple sampling method eases identification of foot and mouth disease outbreaks

Sampling the environment is an effective way to detect foot and mouth disease, according to a paper published in Applied and Environmental Microbiology, a journal of the American Society for Microbiology.

4h

Five rad and random games to play this Fourth of July

Gadgets The end-of-week dispatch from PopSci's commerce editor. Vol. 49. My job is to find cool stuff. Throughout the week I spend hours scouring the web for things that are ingenious or clever or ridiculously cheap.

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The Mysterious Microbes in the Sky

It’s well known that the human gut is a thriving bacterial ecosystem—not to mention the skin, lungs, and various other parts of the body. But the breadth and depth of microbes’ participation in many systems on the planet are still not widely understood. For instance, there is evidence that there are microbes in the clouds, hitching thousand-mile rides through the atmosphere and helping to cause r

5h

End May Be in Sight for Ebola Outbreak in Central Africa

No new cases have been reported since June 2, the World Health Organizations reports.

5h

At Asteroid Ryugu, Japan's Hayabusa2 Spacecraft Preps for Exploration

The probe will map the surface, deploy rovers and collect pristine samples that could contain clues about the origins of life on Earth — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

5h

Cell Signaling and Metabolism: Bridging a Gap in Cancer Therapies

The Scientist is bringing together a panel of experts to discuss their research into an exciting and recently acknowledged hallmark of cancer.

5h

Varmt vand i Barentshavet truer dyrene i Arktis

Nord for Norge er et dramatisk klimaskifte i gang. Derfor er flere dyrearter truet på deres levevilkår og Arktis krymper, siger forsker.

5h

Genetically humanized mice could boost fight against aggressive hepatitis

In research that could lead to treatments for an aggressive type of liver disease, scientists describe a genetically humanized mouse that can be persistently infected with hepatitis delta virus.

5h

Map of Javan leopard distribution provides guidance for conservation efforts

The first robust estimate of the distribution of the Javan leopard offers reliable information on where conservation efforts must be prioritized to safeguard the Indonesian island's last remaining large carnivore.

5h

Break it down: Understanding the formation of chemical byproducts during water treatment

To improve water treatment, researchers use modeling to understand how chemical byproducts form during the advanced oxidation process.

5h

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Southern California's cliffs are on losing end of rising sea

It's not just beaches and sand that are disappearing as the ocean pushes inland. Sea level rise is also eating away at California's coastal cliffs.

5h

Climate predictions should include impacts of CO2 on life

Climate change predictions are not taking account of the full range of possible effects of rising carbon dioxide levels, researchers say.

5h

Administering hormones affects DNA

In pigs, endocrine disruptors can alter gene expression in a way that also affects the next generation. The study findings could potentially apply to humans, too.

5h

Novel hybrid catalyst to split water discovered

Researchers have reported an inexpensive hybrid catalyst capable of splitting water to produce hydrogen, suitable for large-scale commercialization.

5h

Pulse wave analysis provides reliable information on heart health in young people

Arterial stiffness is one of the early signs of cardiovascular disease, and arterial stiffening has been observed in children. A recent study suggests that an easy-to-use, non-invasive method can produce reproducible estimates of arterial stiffness in adolescents aged 16-19 years.

5h

AI and radar technologies could help diabetics manage their disease

People with diabetes could be able to monitor their blood sugar without drawing blood using a system now being developed.

5h

Gas Industry Grapples with Culpability

Executives address methane leaks and public trust — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

5h

A Web Tool That Lets People Choose Their Own ‘Sources of Truth’

In a world where the most famous dorm-room-born internet company has developed a reputation as a matrix of fake users and misleading posts , Ash Bhat and Rohan Phadte are hoping that the answer to online disinformation could come out of their own college apartment. Bhat and Phadte, both 21, are the founders of Robhat Labs, which they launched while previously students at the UC Berkeley. Last yea

6h

June's Stunning Space Pictures

June's Stunning Space Pictures This month we appreciate how images can take us on a journey to better understand the universe. 5_crop_nrao18cb07_artistimpression.jpg Three young planets around a newborn star. Image credits: S. Dagnello/NRAO/AUI/NSF Space Friday, June 29, 2018 – 12:00 Abigail Malate, Staff Illustrator (Inside Science) — This month, we feature images that expand our understanding

6h

‘Spying on Whales’ dives into the story of true leviathans

"Spying on Whales" retraces the evolution of cetaceans, explaining how they came to be some of Earth’s largest creatures.

6h

Climate predictions should include impacts of CO2 on life

Climate change predictions are not taking account of the full range of possible effects of rising carbon dioxide levels, researchers say.

6h

'Kiss Me First' and 'Reverie': Virtual Reality Is Back in Pop Culture—As a Warning

Two new shows make clear that Hollywood sees VR as the perfect symbol of near-future dystopia.

6h

It’s alien life, Jim, but not as we know it | Letters

Roger Oliver and Jef Pirie on the prospect of finding other life in the galaxy Professor Jim Al-Khalili ( Opinion , 27 June) says: “There are some who argue that life on Earth appeared pretty quickly after the right conditions emerged almost 4bn years ago, which was when our planet had cooled sufficiently for liquid water to exist. Doesn’t that mean it could easily appear elsewhere too? Actually,

6h

Newly developed therapeutic shown to combat drug addiction

A new therapeutic may help reverse chemical imbalances made to the brain by habitual drug use and could one day help recovering drug addicts avoid future drug use.

6h

Human Sacrifices Surround Ancient Mesopotamian Tomb

About 5,000 years ago, the Mesopotamians buried two 12-year-olds — a boy and a girl — and surrounded their slender bodies with hundreds of bronze spearheads and what appears to be eight human sacrifices, a new study finds.

6h

The World Bargain on Asylum Is Unraveling

In one sense, the Trump administration’s actions against migrants fleeing violence and deprivation in Central America have made the United States a glaring global outlier. “The U.S. is the only country I know of that has experimented on any kind of serious scale with deliberately detaining children as a deterrent to their parents,” said David FitzGerald of the Center for Comparative Immigration S

6h

Terry Crews and the Discomfort of Masculine Anxiety

On Tuesday, Brooklyn Nine-Nine star and former NFL linebacker Terry Crews testified in front of the Senate Judiciary Committee to advocate for H.R. 5578 , the bill often referred to as the Sexual Assault Survivors’ Bill of Rights. In a stirring, vulnerable account, Crews detailed the profound impact of the sexual assault he first alleged last October in a series of tweets . “The assault lasted on

6h

Timing is key for bacteria surviving antibiotics

For bacteria facing a dose of antibiotics, timing might be the key to evading destruction. In a series of experiments, Princeton researchers found that cells that repaired DNA damaged by antibiotics before resuming growth had a much better chance of surviving treatment.

6h

Sintering atomically thin materials with ceramics now possible

For the first time, researchers have created a nanocomposite of ceramics and a two-dimensional material, opening the door for new designs of nanocomposites with such applications as solid-state batteries, thermoelectrics, varistors, catalysts, chemical sensors and much more.

6h

Sintering atomically thin materials with ceramics now possible

For the first time, researchers have created a nanocomposite of ceramics and a two-dimensional material, opening the door for new designs of nanocomposites with such applications as solid-state batteries, thermoelectrics, varistors, catalysts, chemical sensors and much more.

6h

Researchers apply computing power to track the spread of cancer

Princeton researchers have developed a new computational method that increases the ability to track the spread of cancer cells from one part of the body to another. This migration of cells can lead to metastatic disease, which causes about 90 percent of cancer deaths from solid tumors — masses of cells that grow in organs such as the breast, prostate or colon. Understanding the drivers of metasta

6h

Screening for postpartum depression in the emergency department

Lenore Jarvis, M.D., M.Ed.: Postpartum depression is the most common complication of childbirth, occurring in up to 20 percent of mothers and having significant implications for the mother, her baby and the entire family.

6h

Timing is key for bacteria surviving antibiotics

For bacteria facing a dose of antibiotics, timing might be the key to evading destruction. In a series of experiments, Princeton researchers found that cells that repaired DNA damaged by antibiotics before resuming growth had a much better chance of surviving treatment.

6h

Researchers find connection between genes, response to environmental chemicals

Researchers have pinpointed a genetic difference in zebrafish tied to differing responses to the same environmental chemical. The work could have implications for identifying genetic factors that explain differential chemical sensitivity.

6h

Is risk for endocrine disease higher in survivors of cancer in adolescence, young adulthood?

An increased risk of endocrine diseases, such as thyroid disease, testicular dysfunction and diabetes, was associated with people who survived cancer as adolescents and young adults.

6h

If we don’t want to run out of water, we should look to the sun

Nexus Media News Next generation solar technology could drive down the cost of scrubbing salt from seawater. New solar thermal desalination techniques are making it a whole lot cheaper to scrub the salt from seawater.

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»Det er stadigvæk skatteborgerne, der skal betale for udbygningen«

Med den nye energiaftale holder staten stadig hånden under markedet for vedvarende energi, mens energislugere som datacentre ikke bidrager tilstrækkeligt, vurderer energiprofessor.

6h

Elsevier are corrupting open science in Europe

Elsevier – one of the largest and most notorious scholarly publishers – are monitoring Open Science in the EU on behalf of the European Commission. Jon Tennant argues that they cannot be trusted. Open Science is all about making science work better so that it can address the world’s challenges. It has been at the top of the EU’s agenda for some time. The European Commission has the ambitious targ

6h

The culprit of some GaN defects could be nitrogen

As silicon-based semiconductors reach their performance limits, gallium nitride (GaN) is becoming the next go-to material to advance light-emitting diode (LED) technologies, high-frequency transistors and photovoltaic devices. Holding GaN back, however, is its high numbers of defects.

7h

Researchers simulate simple logic for nanofluidic computing

Invigorating the idea of computers based on fluids instead of silicon, researchers at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) have shown how computational logic operations could be performed in a liquid medium by simulating the trapping of ions (charged atoms) in graphene (a sheet of carbon atoms) floating in saline solution. The scheme might also be used in applications such as

7h

New way to give cheddar the right color ditches waste

Food scientists have found a waste-free way to give cheddar cheese its consumer-pleasing orange color. The new method creates no waste when squeezing out the watery whey, while preserving whey’s natural color for other commercial uses, according to a paper in the journal ACS Applied Materials and Interface . “Observing cheddar cheese in the grocers’ dairy cases, you see different hues of orange a

7h

Mars valleys traced back to precipitation

The valley networks of Mars bear a strong resemblance to those found in arid landscapes on Earth. Researchers have been able to demonstrate this using the branching angles of river valley confluences. Based on these observations, they infer that Mars once had a primeval climate in which sporadic heavy precipitation eroded valleys.

7h

More clues that Earth-like exoplanets are indeed Earth-like

Researchers suggest that two Earth-like exoplanets (Kepler-186f and 62f) have very stable axial tilts, much like the Earth, making it likely that each has regular seasons and a stable climate.

7h

How autonomous flying taxis could change the way you travel | Rodin Lyasoff

Flight is about to get a lot more personal, says aviation entrepreneur Rodin Lyasoff. In this visionary talk, he imagines a new golden age of air travel in which small, autonomous air taxis allow us to bypass traffic jams and fundamentally transform how we get around our cities and towns. "In the past century, flight connected our planet," Lyasoff says. "In the next, it will reconnect our local co

7h

For the Love of the Local Newspaper

A fatal single-engine plane crash in a corn field was the first story I ever covered for a local newspaper, the Kalamazoo Gazette. Life and death. That’s the bread and butter of local newspapers. The obituaries are among their most-read sections. What journalists don’t expect is to find their own colleagues in those pages, gunned down in the place where they work, the way five members of the staf

7h

The UN’s Migration Body Rejects Trump’s Pick to Be Its Leader

Updated at 12:40 p.m. ET Since President Trump took office in January 2017, the U.S. has withdrawn from the Paris climate agreement and the non-binding Global Compact on Migration. The president himself has criticized refugees, blamed migration for Europe’s ills, instituted a travel ban that targets the citizens of five predominantly Muslim countries, and adopted a tough policy on migrants along

7h

Cimon the robot blasts off to the International Space StationCIMON ISS IBM Airbus

A second-hand SpaceX rocket has just launched a spherical robot to the International Space Station, where it will assist astronauts in a variety of tasks

7h

A race against time to save bats living in the walls of this north Texas city

In this downtown of old, empty buildings, the Bat World Sanctuary has been racing against time.

7h

Empathetic cops struggle more with public criticism

Police officers who endorse an empathetic approach to criminal justice do not perform as well when they sense they are underappreciated, research shows. In the study, which appears in Administrative Science Quarterly , officers’ ideology—liberal or conservative—determined how well they weathered perceived animosity and lack of appreciation from the public, says author Shefali V. Patil, assistant

7h

Energispareindsatsen mister en milliard kroner

Ifølge den hidtidige aftale bruger energiselskaberne omkring 1,5 mia. kr. årligt på at realisere energibesparelser. I det nye energiforlig er der kun afsat 500 mio. kr. årligt. Beskæringen møder kritik.

7h

Sådan skal Kattegatforbindelse undersøges

Transportministeren har bedt Vejdirektoratet udvide den igangværende undersøgelse af en eventuel forbindelse over Kattegat, så der også regnes på en løsning med både biler og tog.

7h

Energiforlig: Her er reaktionerne i branchen

Dansk Energi roser de lavere elafgifter, gasbranchen glæder sig over den langsigtede aftale, og Dansk Vindmølleforening kalder aftalen for et flot kompromis.

7h

Not all diversity is equally beneficial

Experts from the Higher School of Economics have determined that cultural diversity is beneficial for team performance in eSports, while language and experience diversity negatively affect performance. These results might be of interest to companies of similar industries aiming to maximize profits. The study, entitled 'Is Diversity Good or Bad? Evidence from eSports Teams Analysis,' was published

7h

The culprit of some GaN defects could be nitrogen

As silicon-based semiconductors reach performance limits, gallium nitride is becoming the next go-to material for several technologies. Holding GaN back, however, is its high numbers of defects. Better understanding how GaN defects form at the atomic level could improve the performance of the devices made using this material. Researchers have taken a significant step by examining and determining s

7h

Administering hormones affects DNA

In pigs, endocrine disruptors can alter gene expression in a way that also affects the next generation. This has been shown by a team of researchers from ETH Zurich and the Technical University of Munich. The study findings could potentially apply to humans, too.

7h

7h

NIST researchers simulate simple logic for nanofluidic computing

Invigorating the idea of computers based on fluids instead of silicon, researchers at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) have shown how computational logic operations could be performed in a liquid medium by simulating the trapping of ions (charged atoms) in graphene (a sheet of carbon atoms) floating in saline solution. The scheme might also be used in applications such as

7h

The scent of a man: What odors do female blackbuck find enticing in a male?

Jyothi Nair, a student from Uma Ramakrishnan's group at the National Centre for Biological Sciences (NCBS), Bangalore, collaborated with Shannon Olsson's team, also from NCBS, to develop a pipeline for investigating odors in a quick, efficient way. In a publication in the journal, Ecology and Evolution, the researchers document their evaluation of different odor collection, identification, and ana

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Minus 98 grader: Koldeste temperatur nogensinde målt på Antarktis

Ny forskning viser, at det Østantarktiske plateau er koldere end hidtil troet. Temperaturen er blevet målt til minus 98 grader mere end 100 steder.

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New filter removes run-off chemicals

Surface water run-off in urban areas is often highly contaminated. It is therefore important to make it as clean as possible before it pollutes the natural environment.

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Microbial Magic Could Help Slash Your Dinner's Carbon Footprint

In one year, fertilizer production in the U.S. emitted as much carbon dioxide as two million cars. What if we could help plants make their own nitrogen so they wouldn't need man-made chemicals? (Image credit: Sam Scharffenberger)

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How One Number Could Change the Lives of People With a Rare Disorder

To most people, Q93.51 would seem like an arbitrary collection of letters and numbers. But for Terry Jo Bichell, it represents an important victory, and the hope of something better for her son Lou. Lou, 19, is the youngest of five siblings, and the only one born with Angelman syndrome —a genetic condition characterized by a happy, excitable demeanor, but also by absent or minimal speech, delayed

8h

Wikimedia v. NSA Highlights the ACLU's Challenges in Fighting Mass Surveillance

The ACLU has been trying to challenge the NSA's bulk surveillance for years. A hearing in *Wikimedia v. NSA* Friday could mark a breakthrough.

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New chip designed to power kids' smartwatches

Qualcomm is launching a chip tailored for children's smartwatches, a growing niche in the wearable technology market, particularly in China.

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A new feature turns Apple AirPods into impromptu hearing aids. We tried it

You almost certainly bought Apple's wireless Bluetooth $159 AirPods to listen to music or podcasts, and not because you planned to use them as a sort of hearing aid substitute.

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Drinking changes young adults' metabolite profile

Adolescent drinking is associated with changes in the metabolite profile, a new study from the University of Eastern Finland and Kuopio University Hospital shows. The researchers observed metabolite profile changes even in young people who consumed alcohol at a level that is socially acceptable.

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The novel function of self-renewal factor of spermatogonial stem cells is identified

A research team found a novel function of FGF2 in mammalian testis. Although it has demonstrated that both GDNF and FGF2 are the self-renewal factor for spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs) in vitro, present study revealed that FGF2 acts to facilitate the differentiation of SSCs in vivo. The understanding of molecular mechanism regulating SSCs has potential for future applications for male infertility

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HKUST scientists discover autophagy inhibitory peptides from giant ankyrins

Recently, a research team led by structural biologist Prof. Mingjie Zhang from HKUST has discovered potent and specific inhibitory peptides to target the Atg8 family proteins (including LC3s and GABARAPs), central components in the autophagy pathway. These genetically encodable autophagy inhibitory peptides can be used to occlude autophagy spatiotemporally in living animals, which leads to many si

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Want to live 110? Make it to 105

Want to be a supercentenarian? The chances of reaching the ripe old age of 110 are within reach—if you survive the perilous 90s and make it to 105 when death rates level out, according to a new study. Researchers tracked the death trajectories of nearly 4,000 residents of Italy who were 105 and older between 2009 and 2015 and found that the chances of survival for these longevity warriors plateau

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Breezes Could Help Power Landers on Mars

Wind turbines could produce significant amounts of electricity for robots exploring the Red Planet’s surface — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Why are Democratic voters more approving of compromise than Republicans?

At a time when political division is heightened and the parties in Washington are deeply polarized, it is worth asking whether there is any payoff for politicians to work together.

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Regional Earth system modeling: Review and future directions

The regional climate modeling community is actively engaged in the development of regional earth system models (RESMs), applicable in different regional contexts. In a paper published in Atmospheric and Oceanic Science Letters, Prof. Filippo Giorgi from the Abdus Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics in Italy, and Xuejie Gao from the Institute of Atmospheric Physics, Chinese Academy o

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Source of E. Coli in Deadly Romaine Lettuce Outbreak Finally Found

The bacteria turned up in the waters of an irrigation canal in Yuma, Arizona.

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Australia is launching a space agency, but what will it do?

The Australian Space Agency, which officially launches this week, has a modest budget but hopes to encourage start-ups to get in on the space gold rush

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Uncle Drew: A Solid Piece of Branded Content

In decades past, when the NBA offseason arrived in June, it meant no more basketball for a while, a break from (in this reviewer’s humble opinion) the world’s greatest professional sport until the fall, when the new season tipped off again. But ours is an age of media saturation, of total brand dominance in every sphere, of 24/7 coverage. So NBA fans now get to exult in the draft, in the drama of

8h

The Rise of College ‘Grade Forgiveness’

Over the course of the past three decades, the A has become the most common grade given out on American college campuses. In 2015, 42 percent of grades were top marks, compared to 31 percent in 1988. This trend of grade inflation—the gradual increase in average GPAs over the past few decades—is often considered a product of a consumer era in higher education, in which students are treated like cu

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The Paradox of Trump's Populism

Throughout the 2016 presidential election, there persisted among his opponents a Millenarian faith in the silver bullet that would end Donald Trump’s presidential hopes. There were multiple failed prophets and prophecies of this faith : Trump’s comments about Senator John McCain not being a war hero were going to take down his campaign. Then his feud with Megyn Kelly. Then his kid-glove treatment

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Ingen afgiftslettelser på elbiler i energiforlig

Folketingets nye energiaftale byder på 500 millioner til grøn transport. Men det er problematisk, at aftalen ikke indeholder en løsning på de omdiskuterede elbil-afgifter, siger energiprofessor.

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Regional Earth system modeling: Review and future directions

The regional climate modeling community is actively engaged in the development of regional Earth system models (RESMs), applicable in different regional contexts. An international team reviewed recent progress in, and future directions for, the field of regional Earth system modeling.

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Enzyme may get key role in drug design for breast cancer and brain condition

In recent years, researchers have focused on the enzyme TLK2 suspecting it of playing a main role in several diseases. A new study conducted at the University of Copenhagen now reveals that the enzyme displays lower levels of activity in intellectual disability and that it is possible to inhibit it in breast cancer, where it is overactive. The study thus suggests that the enzyme may be a target fo

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Self-monitoring of type 2 diabetes reduces follow-up costs by more than half

Self-monitoring of type 2 diabetes used in combination with an electronic feedback system results in considerable savings on health care costs especially in sparsely populated areas, a new study from the University of Eastern Finland shows.

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New mystery discovered regarding active asteroid Phaethon

Based on a new study of how near-Earth asteroid Phaethon reflects light at different angles, astronomers think that its surface may reflect less light than previously thought. This is an exciting mystery for the recently approved DESTINY+ mission to investigate when it flies past Phaethon.

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For dialysis patients with AFib, a newer blood thinner may provide a safer option

A new study finds a newer blood thinner may be a safer choice for reducing stroke risk in those who have both end-stage kidney disease and atrial fibrillation.

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Research shows benefit of giant panda conservation far exceeds cost

To determine the value of panda conservation, a research team led by Prof. WEI Fuwen from the Institute of Zoology, together with colleagues from other research organizations, cooperated to assess the value of ecosystem services from giant panda reserves for the first time. They found that the value provided by the giant pandas and forested habitat within nature reserves is about 10-27 times the c

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New app offers interactive experiences for Disney guests

With the opening of Toy Story Land at Hollywood Studies, Walt Disney World is also offering guests a new mobile app called Play Disney Parks.

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First EPR nuclear reactor goes on stream in China

A third generation EPR nuclear reactor in China started providing power to the grid on Friday, a first for the new-generation technology, joint venture partners CGN and EDF said.

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New website amplifies refugee voices amid immigration crackdowns

To humanize the growing refugee crisis, researchers at UC Berkeley and UC Davis have launched an interactive website that maps the perilous ordeals of thousands of displaced people from the Middle East, Africa and Asia through their own personal stories and social media posts.

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New testing finds synergistic combination leads to toxicity in nanomaterials

A new study finds reason for caution—a clear emergence of toxicity—in nanomaterial product formulations, but it also provides an early testing technique that could help the industry continue to move forward.

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At This Lab, 'Mad Scientists' Are Making Outlandish Tech a Reality

X, The Moonshot Factory tackles global problems with solutions so outlandish that they just might work.

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MicroRNA snippets may warn of Alzheimer’s down the road

Tiny snippets of genetic material called microRNA may offer a way to detect conditions such as Alzheimer’s disease earlier, according to a new study. Researchers have discovered that changes in microRNA are detectable in mice long before they start to show symptoms from neurodegeneration. The changes may represent an early warning sign, or “biomarker,” for the condition. “Identifying biomarkers e

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Team makes breakthrough in perovskite solar cell technology

The University of Surrey has helped to create a technique that has produced the highest performing inverted perovskite solar cell ever recorded.

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Small bee 'pollen thieves' are not effective bumblebee substitutes, study shows

Bumblebee populations are declining in the United States for a range of reasons—loss of habitat, pesticide use, climate change, competition from non-native species, and non-native parasites. As major plant pollinators, bumblebees are important to plant reproduction and the overall health of ecosystems. As the abundance of these large hairy bees has dropped in recent decades, scientists have held o

8h

Let it rain! New coatings make natural fabrics waterproof

Fabrics that resist water are essential for everything from rainwear to military tents, but conventional water-repellent coatings have been shown to persist in the environment and accumulate in our bodies, and so are likely to be phased out for safety reasons. That leaves a big gap to be filled if researchers can find safe substitutes.

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For the closest shave, get naked—doctor's orders

DIY Dermatologists say to shave in the shower. Want to get a good shave without hurting your skin? We asked dermatologists for their tips.

8h

Continental microbes helped seed ancient seas with nitrogen

Like our oceans, today's continents are brimming with life. Yet billions of years ago, before the advent of plants, continents would have appeared barren. These apparently vacant land forms were believed to play no role in the early biochemical clockwork known as the nitrogen cycle, which most living things depend on for survival.

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A satellite with a harpoon, net and drag sail to capture space junk is in orbit and will be tested soon

After almost 70 years of spaceflight, space debris has become a rather serious problem. This junk, which floats around in low Earth orbit (LEO), consists of the spent first rocket stages and non-functioning satellites and poses a major threat to long-term missions like the International Space Station and future space launches. And according to numbers released by the Space Debris Office at the Eur

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New sensor technology enables super-sensitive live monitoring of human biomolecules

The human body is an extremely complex molecular machine, the details of which can be followed through certain substances; so-called biomarkers. Unfortunately, it is not yet possible to monitor biomarkers live in patients when these are present in minuscule concentrations. Researchers at Eindhoven University of Technology have now developed a new technique that can become the plain and simple solu

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Is Colonizing Mars the Most Important Project in Human History?

The Earth and Mars are a bit like fraternal twins that slowly grew apart. Four billion years ago, both planets were warm , sheathed by protective atmospheres, and carved with rivers and pools of liquid water. But today, Mars is an irradiated desert enveloped by a thick miasma of carbon dioxide, while its twin is a sensationally fertile orb and, for all we know, the universe’s cosmic jackpot of li

8h

Math explains why your bus route seems so unreliable

Have you ever waited for your bus at a bus stop for a very long time – only to be greeted by two or more buses arriving together?

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Novel design and luggage solutions to cut air travel times

Shrinkable aircraft seats and door-to-door baggage delivery will help create seamless passenger flow, thanks to an EU-backed initiative.

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An island of hope for the yellow-naped parrot

Ometepe, an island rising out of Lake Nicaragua, is home to one of the largest remaining populations of the yellow-naped parrot. These beautiful birds play an important role in their ecosystem as seed dispersers, meaning they are crucial to the health of the tropical forests in which they live.

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New research reveals two-thirds of second-hand memory cards contain personal data from previous owners

University of Hertfordshire research finds people aren't sufficiently erasing data before selling old memory cards from mobile phones, tablets and other connected devices.

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Veterinarian warns animal owners to take precautions as excess heat warnings continue

With excessive heat warnings for many parts of the region through Saturday, Tom Schwartz, director of the Veterinary Health Center at Kansas State University, says pet owners need to take precautions.

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Microchips can permanently link patients with clinical samples

You watched the blood flow from your arm into a vial. The technician capped the vial and secured with a rubber band the scrap of paper containing your name and patient information. When you call to get the results of the test, you learn that it wasn't done because the paper had slipped off the vial, and no one knew who the blood belonged to. Or worse, you receive someone else's results because you

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The unbearable sensation of being

submitted by /u/thedabarry [link] [comments]

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Surrey makes breakthrough in perovskite solar cell technology

The University of Surrey has helped to create a technique that has produced the highest performing inverted perovskite solar cell ever recorded.

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Otago researchers' discovery unlocks secrets behind cancer drug resistance

University of Otago research provides insights into an underlying mechanism that could explain why new cancer therapies to help treat metastatic melanoma do not always work on patients, paving the way for predicting which patients will benefit from certain drugs.

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Small bee 'pollen thieves' are not effective bumblebee substitutes, study shows

As bumblebees decline, what other busy bees could step in? A new study shows that other bees might do more harm than good.

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New coatings make natural fabrics waterproof

A new process invented at MIT could provide a nontoxic alternative to conventional waterproof coatings for fabrics.

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New testing finds synergistic combination leads to toxicity in nanomaterials

A new study finds reason for caution — a clear emergence of toxicity — in nanomaterial product formulations, but it also provides an early testing technique that could help the industry continue to move forward.

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Continental microbes helped seed ancient seas with nitrogen

ASU researcher Ferran Garcia-Pichel, along with Christophe Thomazo, from the Laboratoire Biogéosciences in Dijon, France, and Estelle Couradeau, a former Marie Curie postdoc in both labs, show that biological soil crusts — colonies of microorganisms that today colonize arid, desert environments — may have played a significant role in the Earth's nitrogen cycle, helping to fertilize early oceans

8h

Why retailers want you to know about their green credentials

Australian supermarkets phasing out single-use plastic bags is just one example of how retailers are fiercely engaged in a race to be "green". Other examples are dumping plastic straws, buying back used products and reducing unnecessary packaging.

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Habitable water world exoplanets

There are currently about fifty known exoplanets whose diameters range from Mars-sized to several times the Earth's and which also reside within their stars' habitable zone – the orbital distance within which their surface temperatures permit liquid water. These exoplanets are currently our best candidates for hosting life.

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2000-year-old mummy found near Russian reservoir

A team of researchers from St Petersburg's Institute of History of Material Culture has found the naturalized remains of a mummy in an ancient gravesite near the Sayano-Shushenskaya Dam in Russia. In speaking with the press, the researchers reported that the remains were those of a mummified young girl lying in a stone gravesite and that they believe she lived almost 2000 years ago.

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More rehab doesn’t mean better outcomes after hip fracture

More care may not translate into better long-term health after a hip fracture hospitalization, according to a new study. The study of more than 300,000 Medicare patients who completed rehabilitation therapy after hip fractures shows that patients covered under Medicare’s fee-for-service plan spent an average of 31 days in nursing homes following hip fracture hospitalization. In contrast, those co

8h

How E-waste encourages competitors to collaborate

Most of the time, when we're done using the things we buy, it's our responsibility to dispose of them properly.

8h

How climate change is increasing the risk of wildfires

The army has been called in to help firefighters deal with a huge wildfire on Saddleworth Moor, Greater Manchester, where residents have been forced to evacuate. Wildfires are also blazing across Northern California while the issue of bushfires in Australia calls for constant vigilance from the emergency services there. These fires are becoming more common and one of the reasons for this is climat

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Tellurium is detected in one of its places of origin

An international team led by a Ph.D. student from the Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias (IAC) and the University of La Laguna (ULL) has identified the emission of tellurium in the infrared spectra of two planetary nebulae and bromine in one of them.

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Wave fronts and ant trails

Ludwig Maximilian University of Munich physicists investigating spontaneous pattern formation in a model system that includes motile proteins have discovered hitherto unobserved phenomena. Their findings afford new insights into biological processes.

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Unlocking the promise of approximate computing for on-chip AI acceleration

Recent advances in deep learning and exponential growth in the use of machine learning across application domains have made AI acceleration critically important. IBM Research has been building a pipeline of AI hardware accelerators to meet this need. At the 2018 VLSI Circuits Symposium, we presented a multi-TeraOPS accelerator core building block that can be scaled across a broad range of AI hardw

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Image: Australian crater

For Asteroid Day, the Copernicus Sentinel-2A satellite takes us over the Gosses Bluff crater in the Northern Territory of Australia. The crater is visible in the left centre of the image and it is about 22 km in diameter. It was most likely formed 140 million years ago by the impact of a large comet or meteorite slamming into the surface of Earth.

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The Physics of a Spinning Spacecraft in *The Expanse*

For the most part, this show gets *a lot* right.

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How to show consumers the benefits of genetically modified foods

Genetically modified (GM) foods for human consumption have long been a subject of intense public debate, as well as academic research.

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Share bikes don't get cars off the road, but they have other benefits

Many remedies have been put in place to cope with population increase – one of which is encouraging more people to commute using bicycles. After the operator of bike-sharing scheme oBike recently made the call to leave Melbourne, Fairfax columnist Matt Holden wrote: "It's a shame really. Our roads are jammed with single-occupant cars and our public transport system is bursting at the seams: Melbou

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There are some single-use plastics we truly need. The rest we can live without

A Senate report this week recommended a ban on single-use plastics such as takeaway food containers and plastic-lined coffee cups by 2023.

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The good and bad of location tracking

Two recent news stories about cellphone location services recently caught my eye. One was a positive development and the other quite negative, until it was at least partially fixed.

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Heavy-duty emissions must be eliminated to halt climate change, review shows

To halt climate change in this century, heavy-duty infrastructure undergirding the world's major economies must be redesigned – starting now – to ensure no increase of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere. According to a UCI-led review due out Friday in the journal Science, that includes long-haul shipping, airline travel, cement and steel production, and a smoothly operating power grid.

9h

Tallinn University researchers helped develop three serious games

When we talk about learning, the most fun way to do it seems to be through games. However, learning by playing tends to get confused with plain entertainment. The border between playing for entertainment and playing as a learning process can be drawn at serious games. Junior researcher Triinu Jesmin and project expert Kadri-Liis Kusmin talk about three serious games developed at Tallinn University

9h

How China Is Trying to Invent the Future as a Science Superpower

In its quest for scientific achievement, China’s research and development spending has grown rapidly over the past two decades, making it second only to the United States — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Tales of Todd | Gold Rush: The Ballad of Parker and Todd

The one who started it all. Todd recounts growing up in Portland, his unexpected venture into music, and how he's become the man he is today. Stream Every Episode of Gold Rush: https://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/gold-rush/ Download the Discovery GO app now! Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Discovery Follow us on Twitter: https:

9h

Addressing the safety of combined exposures to multiple chemicals for people and the environment

Every day we are exposed to low levels of hundreds of different manmade chemicals present for example in our food, consumer products and the air we breathe.

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Descended testicles: DNA study drops new hints on secrets of low hanging glands

The scrotum is a mystery. Why do most male mammals have their reproductive glands so vulnerably located in a sack of skin and muscle outside the body? According to new research, the answer might be found in those unusual mammals that have testicles located inside the abdomen. These includes elephants, aardvarks and others from a group that originated in Africa, known as the Afrotheria.

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Freak accident created a massive army of super-fertile clones

A new species of bigger and super-fertile all-female crayfish originated almost instantaneously because of a genetic accident

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Energiforlig: Alle partier enige om nye havvindmølleparker og 55 pct. VE i 2030

Samtlige Folketingets partier står bag et forlig på energiområdet, der netop er indgået. Her er hovedpunkterne.

9h

New mystery discovered regarding active asteroid Phaethon

Based on a new study of how near-Earth asteroid Phaethon reflects light at different angles, astronomers think that its surface may reflect less light than previously thought. This is an exciting mystery for the recently approved DESTINY+ mission to investigate when it flies past Phaethon.

9h

Right whales could be extinct in less than 30 years

North Atlantic right whales now number fewer than 500. If things don’t change, the highly-endangered species could face extinction in less than 30 years, according to a new study. Making matters worse, climate-mediated shifts are pushing their prey out of the whales’ usual feeding grounds, rendering traditional habitat-focused protection policies less than optimal. This reality was starkly appare

9h

Administering hormones affects DNA

In pigs, endocrine disruptors can alter gene expression in a way that also affects the next generation. This has been shown by a team of researchers from ETH Zurich and the Technical University of Munich. The study findings could potentially apply to humans, too.

9h

Study explores what makes strong science teachers

A new study shows that eighth-grade science teachers without an educational background in science are less likely to practice inquiry-oriented science instruction, a pedagogical approach that develops students' understanding of scientific concepts and engages students in hands-on science projects. This research offers new evidence for why U.S. middle-grades students may lag behind their global pee

9h

Exploring an undisturbed rainforest hidden on top of an African mountain

Atop Mount Lico in northern Mozambique is a site that few have had the pleasure of seeing – a hidden rainforest, protected by a steep circle of rock. Though the mountain was known to locals, the forest itself remained a secret until six years ago, when Professor Julian Bayliss spotted it on satellite imagery. It wasn't until last year, however, that he revealed his discovery, at the Oxford Nature

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ORNL produces rare ruthenium isotope for atom smashing experiment

A tiny vial of gray powder produced at the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory is the backbone of a new experiment to study the intense magnetic fields created in nuclear collisions.

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New staph virulence factor

Staphylococcus aureus (staph) is a leading cause of hospital-acquired infections and an increasing threat to public health. Enzymes called serine hydrolases modulate host-pathogen interactions, but little is known about this enzyme family in staph.

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Satellites map fire on Saddleworth Moor

The U.K. Space Agency has worked with partners to activate the Copernicus Emergency Management Service to provide satellite mapping to aid the response to fires burning on Saddleworth Moor, Greater Manchester.

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Japan quake battered most powerful microscopes

Two of the world's most powerful microscopes suffered severe damage from a deadly earthquake that hit the western Japanese city of Osaka, causing delays in cutting-edge cell and atomic-level research, a scientist said Friday.

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Adidas warns US customers of possible data breach

German sportswear maker Adidas has warned some Americans who shopped with the company online that their data may have been stolen.

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UK lawmakers slam Facebook's evasive answers

The head of the U.K. Parliament's media committee has criticized Facebook for what it describes as evasive behavior in answering questions on fake news.

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SpaceX launches AI robot, strong coffee for station crew

A SpaceX rocket that flew just two months ago with a NASA satellite roared back into action Friday, launching the first orbiting robot with artificial intelligence and other station supplies.

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Astronomers observe the magnetic field of the remains of supernova 1987A

For the first time, astronomers have directly observed the magnetism in one of astronomy's most studied objects: the remains of Supernova 1987A (SN 1987A), a dying star that appeared in our skies over thirty years ago. In addition to being an impressive observational achievement, the detection provides insight into the early stages of the evolution of supernova remnants and the cosmic magnetism wi

9h

A newly discovered reef offers important lessons in resilience

The bay of Cartagena might be the last place you'd expect to find a coral reef. The skyscrapers and hotels of resort-heavy Bocagrande hug the nearby beach. Cruise ships and freighters ply the busy harbor. The vibrant, historic city itself is both Colombia's leading tourist destination and one of its major ports.

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NASA uses Earth as laboratory to study distant worlds

The study of exoplanets—planets that lie outside our solar system—could help scientists answer big questions about our place in the universe, and whether life exists beyond Earth. But, these distant worlds are extremely faint and difficult to image directly. A new study uses Earth as a stand-in for an exoplanet, and shows that even with very little light—as little as one pixel—it is still possible

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Four other things ECOSTRESS can see

NASA's Ecosystem Spaceborne Thermal Radiometer Experiment on Space Station (ECOSTRESS) is designed to study how plants respond to heat and water stress by measuring the temperature of Earth's vegetation at all times of day with an accuracy of a few tenths of a degree.

9h

These charts reveal America's complicated relationship with exercise

Health New data shows just how few of us are meeting the recommended guidelines. We all already know that America, as a country, is pretty inactive. Not nearly enough of us exercise nearly as often as we should.

10h

The Self-Defeating Ways Americans Talk About Feminism

Here are some of the complaints that have been made about the #MeToo movement as it has expanded and become a subject of debate: It is irrational. It is overly angry. It is insufficiently orderly, insufficiently tidy, insufficiently complacent. It takes up too much space. It does not know its place. In short, many of the criticisms of #MeToo—and many of the demands critics have made of the moveme

10h

When a Local Tragedy Becomes National News

ANNAPOLIS, Md.—Wendi Winters was assigned to report on Davis’ Pub on Friday. The owner, Kevin Colbeck, told me she had pitched them an interview about life at a beloved local hangout; the bar is like “the Cheers of Annapolis,” one bartender told me. These kinds of stories were a regular part of Winters’s beat. The 65-year-old veteran reporter most enjoyed writing her column on the “teen of the we

10h

Player-only villages on college campuses could hinder student development

"If you build it, they will come" seems to be the mantra of top football programs around the country that have invested in the creation of exclusive player-only villages. Coaches are behind the concept of the "Athletic Village," believing it will enhance the togetherness of their team. However, researchers are raising caution to the exclusivity of these compounds – which may support the further se

10h

Amazon Echo Dot Kids Edition: Cute But Unnecessary

Anything Alexa can do, Mom and Dad can do better.

10h

Astronomers observe the magnetic field of the remains of supernova 1987A

For the first time, astronomers have directly observed the magnetism in one of astronomy's most studied objects: the remains of Supernova 1987A (SN 1987A), a dying star that appeared in our skies over thirty years ago.

10h

Rise of the Miscellany of Medical Malarkey…Again

More deaths in the European measles outbreak. Experts call for a national registry of sleep-related deaths in infants. Raw milk puts several Tennessee children in the intensive care unit. Oh, and medicinal dog urine. It must be time for another miscellany of medical malarkey.

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Image of the Day: Protector

A newly described parasitic wasp is named after Daenerys Targaryen from the book series A Song of Ice and Fire and TV show Game of Thrones.

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Don't Gamble Our Planet's Future on Unproved Technologies

Pulling excess carbon out of the air isn’t very effective—and might never be — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

10h

Video: What is a near-Earth asteroid?

We often hear from astronomers and other scientists about 'near-earth asteroids' – lumps of rock and metal that orbit through our Solar System, and pass close enough to our planet to pose an impact risk.

10h

Superstrong Al alloys may change manufacturing processes for automobiles, aerospace devices

Purdue University researchers have developed a superstrong material that may change some manufacturing processes for the aerospace and automobile industries.

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Eradicating cancer with immune cells armed with nanorings

Can we use nanotechnology to transform our own immune cells into cancer serial killers?

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Polycystic ovary syndrome linked to mother’s health in pregnancy

Women who are overweight or smoke during pregnancy are more likely to have daughters who develop polycystic ovary syndrome, a nationwide study has found.

10h

New form of gold is shinier and much golder than normal gold

Gold never loses its lustre because it is so chemically unreactive, and now microscopic gold crystals have been made that are even less reactive

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From that dress to Yanny and Laurel: what tribal memes tell us about our fantasy-land politics

With smartphone cameras and digital message trails, ‘what actually happened’ is more available to us than it has ever been. So why is public life saturated in both illusion and delusion? When Melania Trump recently visited the detention centres at America’s southern border while wearing a jacket printed with the words “I really don’t care do u?”, the responses of Washington pundits were sharply d

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Unge på lyn-elcykler skal have knallertkørekort

Politikerne når lige at få en rettelse ind i speed pedelec-forsøgsordningen, der træder i kraft på søndag. Hvis du er under 18, skal du have knallertkørekort. Samtidig er de også blevet enige om at lave en evaluering af forsøgsordningen inden maj 2019.

10h

This invasive tick can clone itself and suck livestock dry

The newly invasive longhorned tick, now found in four continental U.S. states, spreads human diseases in its native Asia. Here, it’s mostly a threat to livestock — so far.

11h

Why Tech Employees Are Rebelling Against Their Bosses

The revolts at Amazon, Google, Microsoft, and Salesforce are part of a growing political awakening over contracts with government agencies.

11h

Mission Bicycle's Light-Up Fork Will Never Leave You in the Dark

A new bike design has two LED strips built into the front fork, offering some guiding light on rides at night.

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Crash-Happy RC Cars Make Self-Driving Tech Smarter

Short on time, money, and space, Georgia Tech researchers created a 1:5 scale platform that lets them test autonomous tech without fear of crashing.

11h

What's the Evidence for Einstein's Theory of Relativity?

As good skeptics, we shouldn't immediately believe general relativity's tangle of mathematics at first blush. Instead, we need evidence. Good evidence.

11h

Avoiding the "Bobblehead Effect": Strength Training Could Help Soccer Players

Strong muscles help protect the body from damage caused by headers and other injuries — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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WWI POW's Romantic Engraving Discovered 100 Years Later

More than 100 years ago, a Russian soldier held captive in a prisoner-of-war camp engraved a beautiful scene on an aluminum canteen showing two people, deeply in love, snuggling together.

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Hottest Night in Recorded History Just Logged in Oman

Quriyat, Oman, just blasted past a 24-hour minimum-temperature record, beating the previous "highest low," which was also set in Oman.

11h

Teen Dies from Toxic Shock Syndrome. Why Is It Linked to Tampons?

A Canadian teenager who died on a school field trip was found to have toxic shock syndrome that appears to have stemmed from tampon use.

11h

Historic Shift Means An Arctic Ocean Region Could Become Part of the Atlantic

A region in the Arctic Ocean is undergoing a historic identity crisis.

11h

Bank: Ticketmaster holdt datalækage hemmelig i flere måneder

Den digitale bank Monzo underrettede ifølge eget udsagn Ticketmaster om en datalækage helt tilbage i april.

11h

Meteoroid explodes over Russia without warning

A meteoroid exploded over the city of Lipetsk in western Russia last week without warning, lighting up the summer sky with a bright flash. While some enjoyed the light show, others are worried that we didn't see it coming.

12h

5G technology brings 3-D views to inter-vehicle communication

The safety of road users can be increased through new solutions and services enabled by the 5G technology. VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, in cooperation with businesses, has developed new solutions related to road weather services, road maintenance, automated driving, and real-time inter-vehicle transmission of 3-D views.

12h

Smartphones used to track migrations caused by climate change

Spanish researchers have developed a system that tracks human displacement caused by climate change using the tracks of mobile phones. With this model, which was tested during a severe drought in Colombia in 2014, it was determined that the portion of the population that migrated due to this event was 10 percent during the six months of the study.

12h

Fine-tuning chemistry by doping with transition metals produced stability in bismuth oxide

ANSTO has contributed to research led by the University of Sydney, involving doping transition metals in a polymorph of bismuth oxide in a search for more structural stability.

12h

Ingeniørens mediestøtte bliver halveret

Regeringen ønsker at flytte ressourcerne bedre rundt mellem danske medier. Det går ud over DR og Radio 24syv, men Ingeniøren er også ramt. Efter medieforliget er offentliggjort fredag morgen, ser det ud til, at halvdelen af husets mediestøtte vil forsvinde.

12h

Scientists develop a mathematical model of a social conflict

A team of researchers led by Associate Professor Alexander Petukhov of the Institute of International Relations and World History at Lobachevsky University is developing social conflict models on the basis of nonlinear dynamics.

12h

Crucial new data on the origin of the Dolmens of Antequera, a World Heritage Site

The ATLAS research group from the University of Seville has conducted a high-resolution analysis of one of the most important sections of the Peña de los Enamorados, a natural formation included in the Antequera Dolmens Site, declared a World Heritage Site by the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organisation (UNESCO).

12h

Plant fossils provide new insight into the uplift history of SE Tibet

The Tibetan Plateau, the highest and largest plateau in the world, is well known as 'The Third Pole'. Tibet has also been called 'Asia's water tower' because so many of Asia's major rivers such as the Ganges, Indus, Tsangpo/Brahmaputra, Mekong, Yellow and Yangse rivers originate there. Despite its importance, the uplift history of the plateau and the mechanisms underpinning its evolution are still

12h

Researchers observe unique chiral magnetic phenomenon

Tiny magnetic vortex structures, so-called skyrmions, have been researched intensively for some time for future energy-efficient space-saving data storage devices. Scientists at Forschungszentrum Jülich have now discovered another class of particle-like magnetic object that could take the development of data storage devices a significant step forward. The newly discovered magnetic particles make i

12h

Scientists fine-tune carbon nanotubes for flexible, fingertip-wearable terahertz imagers

Researchers at Tokyo Institute of Technology have developed flexible terahertz imagers based on chemically tunable carbon nanotube materials. The findings expand the scope of terahertz applications to include wrap-around, wearable technologies as well as large-area photonic devices.

12h

Researchers report novel hybrid catalyst to split water

Researchers from the University of Houston and the California Institute of Technology have reported an inexpensive hybrid catalyst capable of splitting water to produce hydrogen, suitable for large-scale commercialization.

12h

New technology enables man to hold his granddaughter again

In the first known study of how amputees use advanced sensory-enabled prostheses outside the lab, subjects used a mechanical hand more regularly and for longer periods of time compared to traditional prostheses–and also reported a greater sense of psychosocial well-being. The study also asserts that sensory feedback fundamentally changed how the study participants used their mechanical attachment

12h

The hidden complexity underlying a common cause of autism

Genes located in a large chromosomal aberration associated with autism interact with each other to modulate the variable symptoms of the disease, according to new research.

12h

ClinGen Panel evaluates validity of genes reported to be associated with Brugada Syndrome

Clinical laboratories often rely on medical articles and public information on gene disease associations in determining genes to include on genetic testing panels for specific conditions or results to return to patients. For Brugada Syndrome, a serious genetic condition causing a disruption of the heart's normal rhythm and predisposing a patient to sudden arrhythmic death, many clinical laboratori

12h

Lemurs can smell weakness in each other

Some people watch the competition carefully for the slightest signs of weakness. Lemurs, on the other hand, just give them a sniff. These primates from Madagascar can tell that a fellow lemur is weaker just by the natural scents they leave behind, finds a study on ring-tailed lemurs led by Duke University researchers. The study reveals that getting hurt dampens a lemur's natural aroma, and that ma

12h

People who keep seeing the same doctor have lower death rates

An analysis of 22 different studies has found that seeing the same family doctor, GP, or specialist over time is associated with better health outcomes

12h

Born in a zoo, released into the San Gabriels, a rare Los Angeles frog bounces back

The venue: a remote creek in the San Gabriel Mountains.

12h

Senators are concerned about competition should T-Mobile's deal for Sprint go throughT-Mobile Galaxy S7

T-Mobile's proposed purchase of wireless rival Sprint came under scrutiny Wednesday by U.S. senators who acknowledged possible benefits –– like next-generation service but also emphasized the need for competition among mobile phone-service providers.

13h

Lemurs can smell weakness in each other

Some people watch the competition carefully for the slightest signs of weakness. Lemurs, on the other hand, just give them a sniff.

13h

Researchers report novel hybrid catalyst to split water

Researchers from the University of Houston and the California Institute of Technology have reported an inexpensive hybrid catalyst capable of splitting water to produce hydrogen, suitable for large-scale commercialization.

13h

Novartis plans spinoff of Alcon, $5 bn share buy-back

Swiss pharmaceutical giant Novartis said Friday it planned to cut loose its Alcon eye care division, and aimed to buy back $5.0 billion of its own shares by the end of 2019.

13h

How your smart fridge might be mining bitcoin for criminals

Is the web browser on your phone slower than usual? It could be mining bitcoin for criminals.

13h

Ung læge advarer om 'skræmmende' fejlramt søgefunktion i Sundhedsplatformen

Man ikke altid kan stole på søgefunktionen i Sundhedsplatformen, lyder det fra ung læge, som nu lægger sjældent indblik i platformens skærmbillede ud til offentligheden.

13h

Skærer, fræser og svejser: Fynsk byggerobot er klar til at tage fat på pladsen

Støbeforme til trapper, vinduesudsparinger og søjler kan produceres hurtigt og billigt med en ny transportabel robot. Virksomheden Odico har rejst 30 mio. kr til at vokse. Målet er at sælge 150 robotter på fire år

13h

Enzym kan få nøglerolle i lægemiddeludvikling mod brystkræft og hjernelidelse

Forskere har de seneste år haft fokus på enzymet ’TLK2’ med en formodning om,…

13h

Bali airport reopens after ash threat stranded thousands

The international airport on the Indonesian resort island of Bali reopened Friday afternoon after a nearly 12-hour closure due to a volcanic ash threat that disrupted travel plans for thousands.

13h

Alternative Flea Control Products

Every natural pet health website has their recommendations for flea treatments that don’t use harsh chemicals. The evidence for their claims is nonexistent. It’s appropriate that they’re talking about parasitic organisms, but I don’t think they see the irony.

15h

Crow vending machine skills 'redefine intelligence'

An experiment with a "vending machine for crows" is revealing insights into how intelligence evolves, scientists say.

15h

Crow vending machine skills 'redefine intelligence'

An experiment with a "vending machine for crows" is revealing insights into how intelligence evolves, scientists say.

15h

Slice of PIE: a linguistic common ancestor – Science Weekly podcast

Nicola Davis explores Proto-Indo-European, the hypothetical common ancestor of modern Indo-European languages and asks, where did it come from? How and why did it spread? And do languages evolve like genes? Subscribe and review on Acast , Apple Podcasts , Soundcloud , Audioboom and Mixcloud . Join the discussion on Facebook and Twitter Swedish, Ukranian, Punjabi, and Italian. To many of us, these

15h

Slice of PIE: a linguistic common ancestor – Science Weekly podcast

Nicola Davis explores Proto-Indo-European, the hypothetical common ancestor of modern Indo-European languages and asks, where did it come from? How and why did it spread? And do languages evolve like genes?

16h

16h

Her er nyhederne i Java 11

Ny HTTP-klient og ud med CORBA er blandt godterne i den kommende udgave af Java.

16h

Her er 3 myter om vin: Er du faldet for dem?

Der er mange myter om vin. DR har kigget nærmere på, hvad der holder, og hvad der bare er røverhistorier.

17h

Plant fossils provide new insight into the uplift history of SE Tibet

Plenty of well-preserved plant fossils with well constrained geological ages were discovered from Markam Basin in SE Tibetan Plateau. Fossils from different layers are different in floristic components and leaf sizes, they evidenced the uplift to present elevation during the Eocene-Oligocene Transition (33.9 Ma). Moreover, these fossils suggest that the modernization of highly diverse Asian biota

17h

Higher doses of rifampin appear more effective in fighting TB without increasing risk of adverse events

Higher daily doses of rifampin, a cornerstone of tuberculosis treatment, killed more TB bacteria in sputum cultures, and the higher doses did so without increasing the adverse effects of treatment, according to a randomized controlled trial published online in the American Thoracic Society's American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine.

17h

Egypt looks to monitor popular social media users

Freedom of expression may shrink further in Egypt where lawmakers have approved the first reading of a bill that would monitor popular social media users in the name of combating "false news".

18h

US trial over Roundup cancer link set to open

A first of its kind trial over whether Monsanto herbicide Roundup caused a groundskeeper's lethal cancer is scheduled to begin here on July 9 with opening remarks by attorneys.

18h

Climate change sinking Arctic archeological treasures

A mad rush is needed to preserve or catalogue thousands of Arctic archeological sites before they are washed away by warming hastening the thaw of permafrost and coastal erosion, a study said Thursday.

18h

S. Korea's LG Group heads for fourth generation succession

South Korea's LG Group on Friday welcomed the heir to its late patriarch as holding company board member, paving the way for yet another family transfer of corporate power in the country.

18h

Harlan Ellison, science fiction master, dies at age 84Harlan Ellison Star Trek

Harlan Ellison, the prolific, pugnacious author of "A Boy and His Dog," and countless other stories that blasted society with their nightmarish, sometimes darkly humorous scenarios, has died at age 84

18h

Bali airport closed as Agung volcano gushes column of ash

The Indonesian tourist island of Bali closed its international airport Friday, stranding thousands of travelers, as the Mount Agung volcano gushed a 2,500-meter (8,200-feet) column of ash and smoke.

18h

Robot with artificial intelligence about to invade spaceCIMON ISS IBM AI Airbus

A robot with true artificial intelligence is about to invade space.

18h

Københavns Kommune får to mio. kr. i erstatning for Den Røde Plads

Erstatningen fra tysk underrådgiver i syns- og skønssagen om den københavnske plads, hvor belægningen var glat og falmede, går dermed nogenlunde lige op med kommunens udgifter til bl.a. advokatbistand i forbindelse med sagen.

18h

Rivers and Streams Compose Much More of Earth’s Surface Than Thought

A new estimate bumps up the area previously estimated to be covered by running water by more than 40 percent.

19h

Risk of Dying Levels Off in Super Old Age: Study

The researchers say that their results are evidence we haven’t yet reached a limit to human lifespan.

19h

19h

10x Genomics Single Cell Mouse Immune Profiling Solution

10x Genomics, a company focused on accelerating discovery, today announced the launch of the Single Cell Mouse Immune Profiling Solution. For the first time, researchers will have the ability to simultaneously and deeply characterize single cell gene expression and paired receptor sequences of T- and B-cells in mouse models of disease.

19h

BAX® System assays now meet new ISO 16140-2 standard for all AFNOR-approved methods

AFNOR, an ISO certification body in France that is a widely recognized European accreditation body of food safety detection methods, has now issued extensions in accordance with the new ISO standard 16140-2 for all 10 BAX® System assays previously certified.

19h

Image of the Day: X-Ray Vision

Using a unique microscope, researchers looked inside a yet-to-be identified pseudoscorpion from Peru.

19h

Opinion: Broken Promises Caused by the Travel Ban

The scientific community must step up to support students and scholars who will undoubtedly face isolation.

19h

Magnetic Microrobots Deliver Cells Into Living Animals

The miniscule carriers successfully transported and released live cells at a particular location within living mice.

19h

Bumblebees Fare Better in the City Than in the Countryside

Urban colonies had more offspring, survived longer, and hosted fewer parasites.

19h

New US-China Tariffs Could Affect Science

The list of imports subject to additional taxes include products used in research, but the effect of the trade dispute is still unclear.

19h

Young Brain Cells Silence Old Ones to Quash Anxiety

In adult mice, neurogenesis increases social confidence by suppressing the activity of mature neurons.

19h

Opinion: Deductive Science Is Needed for Public Health

Big data and empirical approaches to understanding diseases provide a limited picture of pathogenesis.

19h

Image of the Day: Throw the Switch

A computer model of the eye can predict the consequences of altering the neural pathways of vision.

19h

Artificial Intelligence to Boost Liquid Biopsies

Machine-learning algorithms tuned to detecting cancer DNA in the blood could pave the way for personalized cancer care.

19h

Fruit Fly Geneticist Dan Lindsley Dies

A leader in the Drosophila community, the UCSD professor was well known for his so-called Red Book of fruit fly genetics.

19h

Optibrium Introduces StarDrop 6.5

Optibrium™ , a developer of software for drug discovery, today announced the launch of version 6.5 of StarDrop™ that provides a complete platform for small molecule design, optimisation and data analysis. The latest release introducesWhichP450, a new feature in StarDrop’s P450 metabolism module that predicts which human Cytochrome P450 enzymes are the major metabolising isoforms for a novel compou

19h

Poliovirus Therapy May Extend Life of Advanced Brain-Cancer Patients

More than one-fifth of individuals treated with the genetically modified virus survived at least three years.

19h

New England Biolabs® Launches New NEBNext® Single Cell/Low Input RNA Library Prep Kit for Increased Transcript Detection with Ultra-low Input Amounts

New England Biolabs (NEB®) today announced the release of the NEBNext® Single Cell/Low Input RNA Library Prep Kit for Illumina®. This new kit incorporates an optimized template switching protocol— as well as NEB's Ultra™ II FS enzymatic DNA fragmentation technology— to produce full-length transcript sequence-ready libraries from single cells and ultra-low input RNA

19h

19h

Image of the Day: Hide and Seek

Neurons of the embryonic subplate don’t die as scientists had thought.

19h

Genes Tied to Intelligence and Neurotic Behavior Identified

Researchers found several hundred genes expressed in the human brain are tied to cognition or neuroses.

19h

FDA Approves First Marijuana-Derived Drug

As the CBD-based medication enters the market, the agency promises a crackdown on producers of cannabidiol products that make unproven claims.

19h

Seven Researchers Guilty of Misconduct in Macchiarini Case

The Karolinska Institute’s latest decision includes a guilty verdict for one of the whistleblowers who contributed to the investigation.

19h

Opinion: Rise of the Robot Radiologists

The first wave of AI-driven job loss among doctors will be in the field of radiology and is poised to force a paradigm shift in medical imaging.

19h

Image of the Day: Remodeled

Researchers use CRISPR-Cas9 to create transgenic Hydractinia symbiolongicarpus, a cnidarian, for the first time.

19h

Trump Admin Restricts Federal Scientists Talking with Reporters

USGS researchers must get approval from the Department of the Interior before speaking to the media.

19h

World First: Human Case of Keystone Virus Identified

A Florida teenager is the first person with a confirmed infection by the mosquito-borne virus.

19h

Image of the Day: Ray of Light

The discovery of the world’s first known manta ray nursery will offer a glimpse into the animals’ juvenile stage.

19h

US Scientists’ Letter Calls for Transparency in Animal Research

Nearly 600 signatories, including four Nobel Prize winners, urge openness about animal experiments.

19h

Bones in Ancient Tomb Are of Newly Discovered Ape Genus

The now-extinct gibbon was buried with the grandmother of China’s first emperor and her many pets.

19h

Herpes Viruses Implicated in Alzheimer’s Disease

A new study shows that the brains of Alzheimer’s disease patients have a greater viral load, while another study in mice shows infection leads to amyloid-β build up.

19h

Common Gene Variants Found Among Psychiatric Disorders

In the largest-ever study of its kind, researchers combined genomic data from nearly 900,000 patients and healthy individuals to identify commonalities among 10 mental illnesses.

19h

Koko the Signing Gorilla Dies at 46

The primate was famous for her ability to communicate with humans.

19h

Image of the Day: Performance Anxiety

In the presence of competition, archerfish become more hesitant but accurate shooters.

19h

Two University of Rochester Professors Resign in Protest

Celeste Kidd and Steven Piantadosi had sued the university over its handling of sexual harassment allegations made against colleague Florian Jaeger.

19h

Caffeine-Triggered Cells Help Control Blood Sugar in Diabetic Mice

Scientists engineered human cells to produce a molecule that stimulates insulin secretion in the presence of caffeine.

19h

Dopamine Neuron Implants Ease Parkinson’s Symptoms in Monkeys

The stem cell–derived transplants were stable for 24 months and led to wide-ranging behavioral improvements in the monkeys.

19h

Positive Trial Results for Experimental DMD Gene Therapy

Preliminary data from Sarepta Therapeutics has exceeded expectations, causing a surge in company stock prices this week.

19h

Image of the Day: Snacking on Snails

Five newly identified species of snakes suck the mollusks right out of their shells.

19h

Novel Method Could Accelerate DNA Synthesis

The new technique uses an enzyme found in vertebrate immune systems to attach nucleotides to a growing strand.

19h

New Database Expands Number of Estimated Human Protein-Coding Genes

Some scientists are not yet convinced that the list is accurate.

19h

Deadly Wasting Syndrome Genetically Altered Sea Stars: Study

The surviving animals may have evolved genes that provided an advantage in fighting the disease.

19h

Image of the Day: Multiple Choice

Photosynthesis can happen in more than one way.

19h

Pancreatic Cell Size Negatively Relates to Lifespan in Mammals

Species with larger pancreatic cells tend to have shorter lives, according to a study.

19h

Opinion: Constrain Speculation to Protect the Integrity of Science

What we can know about biology before the last universal common ancestor is limited—and we should be circumspect in filling in the gaps.

19h

Theranos Leaders Indicted For Fraud

Federal prosecutors filed criminal charges that allege the company’s promise to revolutionize blood testing swindled investors out of hundreds of millions of dollars and put patients in danger.

19h

Image of the Day: Landing Blows

The smashing mantis shrimp is strategic in its attack on sea snails.

19h

Senate, House Propose Funding Boosts for US Science Agencies

NASA, NSF, and NIH are expected to receive higher financial backing for the 2019 fiscal year, going above and beyond the President’s proposed budget.

19h

Interior Department’s Screen of Meeting Abstracts Called Censorship

USGS scientists need approval from a political appointee before they can present research at two big geological conferences.

19h

Dartmouth Professor Investigated for Sexual Misconduct Retires

Todd Heatherton had groped students, according to allegations, and was facing termination.

19h

Zika: Predicting the long-term effects of an unrelenting virus

Summer is upon us, and with that comes much-anticipated vacation travel. As you pack your bag with sunblock, clothes that haven’t seen the light of day since your trip last year, and that sci-fi novel that has been sitting on your nightstand since February, don’t forget what might be the most important item: bug spray. […]

20h

Birdbrainy: New Caledonian crows make tools using mental images

Study finds birds have design templates in their minds and may pass them on to future generations New Caledonian crows use mental pictures to twist twigs into hooks and make other tools, according to a provocative study that suggests the notoriously clever birds pass on successful designs to future generations, a hallmark of culture. “We find evidence for a specific type of emulation we call ment

21h

The Floating Robot With an IBM Brain Is Headed to SpaceCIMON ISS IBM AI Airbus

The IBM robot bound for the International Space Station doesn't have a body, but it has cameras for eyes, microphones for ears, and a speaker for a mouth.

21h

First seal pup survey in Thames

The mammals have made a comeback and scientists are counting them to help guard them against threats.

21h

Humans Can Size One Another Up with a Roar

Listeners to a person letting loose with a roar can accurately estimate the size and formidability or the human noise maker. Christopher Intagliata reports. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

21h

NASA's Astro-Mice Will Test What Space Does to Your Gut

A new study will help the space agency understand how to keep its astronauts—and their resident microbes—healthy on future missions to Mars.

22h

Seal baby boom hope for Thames

From biologically dead to a haven for wildlife. How the Thames Estuary has become a sanctuary for seals.

22h

Beak size points to sex of Galápagos penguins

Beak size is nearly a perfect indicator of whether a Galápagos penguin is male or female, new research shows. The discovery means scientists can quickly and accurately determine a bird’s sex in the wild—no blood sample needed. “For Galápagos penguins, we really wanted to understand if there was a simple ‘rule’ we could employ to determine sex—a sign that would be fast and reliable,” says lead aut

22h

Seeing the same doctor is a matter of life and death

The first ever systematic review of the relationship between death rates and continuity of care concludes that seeing the same doctor over time is lined to lower mortality rates.

22h

How old could humans get? We probably haven’t hit the limit yet

The idea that we have reached the maximum possible human lifespan is highly divisive. New evidence adds fuel to a fiery debate, says Tom Kirkwood

22h

Breast cancer studies neglect key social factors

Studies of breast cancer do not take sufficient account of patients’ race, ethnicity, economic status, education level, health insurance coverage, and other social factors, a group of scientists says. The researchers, in a commentary in the journal Cancer Causes and Control , point to evidence that social factors help determine people’s vulnerability to cancer. They argue that these factors shoul

23h

Keeping the same doctor reduces death risk, study finds

New research suggests continuity and bond between patient and doctor not only improves level of care, but can also save lives Seeing the same doctor each time you need medical care might reduce your risk of death, research suggests. Previous studies have revealed that so-called continuity of care is linked to a number of benefits, including patients following medical advice more closely, better u

23h

The Atlantic Daily: Keep Alive the Question

What We’re Following Annapolis Shooting: A gunman killed at least five people and seriously injured several others at the offices of the Capital Gazette newspaper in Annapolis, Maryland. Local authorities say a suspect is in custody. Here is the Baltimore Sun’ s report on what we know so far. Kennedy’s Retirement: The former Supreme Court Justice John Paul Stevens once told the scholar Jeffrey Ro

23h

How smart technology gadgets can avoid speed limits

Speed limits apply not only to traffic. There are limitations on the control of light as well, in optical switches for internet traffic, for example. Physicists now understand why it is not possible to increase the speed beyond a certain limit – and know the circumstances in which it is best to opt for a different route.

23h

Summer dead zones in Chesapeake Bay breaking up earlier

A new study shows that dead zones in the lower Chesapeake Bay are beginning to break up earlier in the fall, which may be an indication that efforts to reduce nutrient pollution to the Bay are beginning to make an impact. Scientists found that dead zones in the lower part of the Chesapeake Bay are getting smaller in the late summer thanks to a late-season replenishment of oxygen, a natural respons

23h

Patients believed allergic to penicillin have increased risks of MRSA and C. difficile

Analysis of outpatient records of large number of British patients reveals that those believed to be allergic to penicillin have significantly increased risks of contracting the dangerous infections MRSA and C. difficile.

23h

New insight into how Autism might develop in human brain

Scientists have revealed a molecular mechanism that may play a role in the development of autism.

23h

Of hearts and giants: Moving a cardiac regulatory protein to the right place

An international research team revealed a nuclear localization role for a conserved short stretch of a cardiac muscle regulator. Mutations within the RSRSP stretch of RBM20 cause the left ventricle to enlarge and weaken, and were shown to interrupt nuclear transport of RBM20, preventing it from controlling a giant spring-like protein of cardiac muscle cells. The findings and animal model developed

23h

Thermal camouflage disguises hot and cold

Hunters don camouflage clothing to blend in with their surroundings. But thermal camouflage – or the appearance of being the same temperature as one's environment – is much more difficult. Now researchers have developed a system that can reconfigure its thermal appearance to blend in with varying temperatures in a matter of seconds.

23h

The ultimate 'smell test': Device sends rotten food warning to smartphones

When it comes to the 'smell test,' the nose isn't always the best judge of food quality. Now scientists report that they have developed a wireless tagging device that can send signals to smartphones warning consumers and food distributors when meat and other perishables have spoiled. They say this new sensor could improve the detection of rotten food so it is tossed before consumers eat it.

23h

Spin dynamics suggest 2 exoplanets really are Earth-ish

Two exoplanets thought to be similar to Earth apparently are, at least when it comes to climate, research into spin dynamics shows. Kepler-186f is the first identified Earth-sized planet outside the solar system orbiting a star in the habitable zone. This means it’s the proper distance from its host star for liquid water to pool on the surface. The study, which appears in the Astronomical Journal

23h

Reddit's Case for Anonymity on the Internet

Reddit, the self-described “front page of the internet,” may have a key tool in its arsenal as Americans begin to question their relationship with social media: anonymity. According to Steve Huffman, the site’s co-founder and CEO, “privacy is built into Reddit.” All that’s required to create an account and post on any of Reddit’s 1.2 million forums is an email address, a username, and a password.

23h

Harvests increase when the uni gets good

Researchers have assessed how the quality of red sea urchin roe—the delicacy called uni—influences fisher behavior. Served as sushi, uni is the reproductive organ of the sea urchin. The red sea urchin, Mesocentrotus franciscanus , is one of the most highly valued coastal fisheries in California, found in the Pacific Ocean from Alaska to Baja California. Processors who buy red sea urchins determin

23h

New study: Indonesia faces a 'double burden' of diseases

Indonesia has made advances in health since 1990, increasing life expectancy by eight years and decreasing rates of health burden from communicable diseases like diarrheal disease and tuberculosis. But the country is facing a growing and expensive wave of health threats from heart disease, diabetes, and other non-communicable diseases, according to a new study.

23h

Largest ever multimorbidity trial in primary care challenge current thinking

In the largest ever trial of an intervention to treat people with multiple long-term conditions (multimorbidity) in primary care, researchers at the Universities of Bristol, Manchester, Dundee and Glasgow found that the patient-centred approach taken improved patients' experience of their care but did not improve their health-related quality of life. This is a challenge to current thinking on whic

23h

Availability of family and friends key factor in deciding organ transplant suitability

The availability of a supportive network of family and friends is a key factor in deciding on a person's suitability for an organ transplant, reveals research published online in the Journal of Medical Ethics.

23h

Global Health: Ebola Outbreak in Central Africa Is ‘Largely Contained’

The first Ebola outbreak fought with a new vaccine is winding down, according to the World Health Organization. The outbreak lasted just seven weeks.

23h

Here’s some rare good news about coral reefs

Environment Belize shows that a little local action can go a long way. Coral reefs are a boon to biodiversity and marine ecology, and their declining health threatens our oceans with a loss of life that’s hardly comprehensible.

23h

California Unanimously Passes Historic Privacy Bill

The law will give Californians more control over the data that companies collect on them than ever before.

1d

The evolution of testes

The fossil record preserves predominantly vestiges of hard structures such as bones or teeth. Consequently, resolving the evolution of soft-tissue structures such as muscle or brain tissue requires analytical methods. Researchers now provide a new approach to resolve the evolution of soft-tissue structures, focusing on the evolution of testes in mammals.

1d

The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: A Shooting in Annapolis

Today in 5 Lines At least five people were killed and several others injured after a gunman opened fire in the Capital Gazette newsroom in Annapolis, Maryland, local authorities said. A suspect is in custody. President Trump said on Twitter that he was briefed on the shooting, adding, “My thoughts and prayers are with the victims and their families.” At a hearing, Republicans on the House Judicia

1d

The Trump-Putin Summit: What the Europeans Fear

French President Emmanuel Macron has done it . German Chancellor Angela Merkel has done it . Yet when it was confirmed Thursday that President Trump would be meeting with Russian President Vladimir Putin, Europeans could be forgiven for not greeting it like a routine get-together. After all, there is a context. Trump is meeting Putin at a time when he remains at odds with his intelligence communi

1d

New Jersey’s ‘Operation Helping Hand’ offers treatment, not stigma, to arrested drug users

A new experimental program in New Jersey offered treatment, not stigma, to low-level drug offenders arrested during one week in June—and the results are encouraging. Read More

1d

Rapid 3D analysis of rockfalls in Yosemite

Yosemite National Park contains some of the world's most iconic landforms, including Half Dome, Yosemite Falls, and El Capitan. Although the cliffs of Yosemite Valley may appear static, rockfalls from these cliffs are common, with a rockfall occurring every four to five days on average. Rockfalls are key to shaping this iconic landscape but also pose risk to the four- to five-million visitors to t

1d

The odds of living to 110-plus level out — once you hit 105

The chances of reaching the ripe old age of 110 are within reach — if you survive the perilous 90s and make it to 105 when death rates level out, according to a study of extremely old Italians.

1d

Using artificial intelligence to understand volcanic eruptions from tiny ash

Scientists have shown that an artificial intelligence program called a Convolutional Neural Network can be trained to categorize volcanic ash particle shapes. Because the shapes of volcanic particles are linked to the type of volcanic eruption, this categorization can help provide information on eruptions and aid volcanic hazard mitigation efforts.

1d

The Meaning of a U.S.-Russia Summit in Helsinki

HELSINKI—In 1975, representatives from the United States, Soviet Union, and 33 other nations gathered in the capital of Finland to help defuse mounting tensions over nuclear weapons, human rights, and military posturing. The summit was the brainchild of Urho Kekkonen, then the president of Finland, who had successfully toed the narrow line between the East and the West. The Helsinki Final Act, th

1d

Power-multiplying exoskeletons are slimming down for use on the battlefield

Military The technology has been long-anticipated by military commanders. A raft of newly developed exoskeletons is starting to meet the slimmed-down, stealth requirements of today’s troop commanders. They see these power-assisting suits as…

1d

Narrowly Escaping the Travel Ban

Life in Somalia was “unthinkable,” remembers Hussein Mohamud in Daniel Klein and Hunter Johnson’s short documentary, You Are My Sunshine . “It was chaos. People killing each other…[leaving] wasn’t a matter of discussion; it was a matter of survival.” In the film, Mohamud and his son tell the story of their grueling escape from Somalia and the subsequent 20 years spent in a dangerous refugee cam

1d

The odds of living to 110-plus level out — once you hit 105

The chances of reaching the ripe old age of 110 are within reach — if you survive the perilous 90s and make it to 105 when death rates level out, according to a study of extremely old Italians led by the University of California, Berkeley, and Sapienza University of Rome.

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Rapid 3-D analysis of rockfalls in Yosemite

Yosemite National Park contains some of the world's most iconic landforms, including Half Dome, Yosemite Falls, and El Capitan. Although the cliffs of Yosemite Valley may appear static, rockfalls from these cliffs are common, with a rockfall occurring every four to five days on average. Rockfalls are key to shaping this iconic landscape but also pose risk to the four- to five-million visitors to t

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Someone Just Killed One of the Last Remaining Jaguars in the US

Yo'oko, a male jaguar (Panthera onca) once known to roam the Huachuca Mountains in southern Arizona, was probably killed by a mountain lion hunter.

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