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Nyheder2018juni30

 

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Can humans reach even older age? We haven't maxed out yet, some scientists say

On the day that one becomes an octogenarian, nature bestows a mathematical birthday gift: a gradual reprieve from the relentlessly increasing likelihood that he or she will die in the coming year.

3h

Photos From the Nationwide “Families Belong Together” Marches

Across the country yesterday, hundreds of thousands of people took to the streets in small towns and big cities to march and voice their opposition to the Trump administration’s immigration policies. Demonstrators in more than 700 locations called for the swift reunification of immigrant families separated by border agencies, and an end to the policies that cause so many separations. Collected he

4h

Data fra død rumsonde tyder på liv nær Saturn

Nye analyser viser tegn på liv under iskold måne-overflade.

9h

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LATEST

Arvid Carlsson, Who Discovered a Treatment for Parkinson’s, Dies at 95

Dr. Carlsson determined the critical role of the brain chemical dopamine, leading to drugs for Parkinson’s disease and a Nobel Prize.

20min

Discovery unlocks secrets behind cancer drug resistance

New research provides insights into an underlying mechanism that could explain why new cancer therapies to help treat metastatic melanoma do not always work on patients, paving the way for predicting which patients will benefit from certain drugs.

31min

Infographic: Resurrecting Ancient Proteins

Learn the basic steps researchers take when reconstructing proteins from the past and how these biomolecules can inform engineering projects.

39min

The War Against the Loneliness Epidemic

submitted by /u/thedabarry [link] [comments]

1h

Eyewire Cup Quarterfinals

The Quarterfinals are upon us and 8 spectacular teams have earned their spot to compete! Congratulations to the advancing countries: Antarctica United States Hungary Madagascar Poland Switzerland Egypt Canada You have some important choices to make now, so take a moment before you make your next move. Joining a team for the Quarterfinals opens Monday at noon. The Four Quarterfinal Matches: #1 Ant

1h

I Regret to Inform You: Kilauea Rumors Aren't At All True

Here's your one-stop Kilauea BS detector — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

1h

DBS treatment may slow the progression of Parkinson's tremor in early-stage patients

Deep brain stimulation (DBS) may slow the progression of tremor for early-stage Parkinson's disease patients, according to a new study.

2h

New technology enables man to hold his granddaughter again

In the first known study of how amputees use advanced sensory-enabled prostheses outside the lab, subjects used a mechanical hand more regularly and for longer periods of time compared to traditional prostheses — and also reported a greater sense of psychosocial well-being.

2h

The Grandeur of Great Protest Music

A few months ago, the fearsome music critic Greil Marcus came across an old song he’d never heard before. Though the radio, against doo-wop harmonies and wandering guitar arpeggios, a woman crooned, “It isn’t nice to block the doorway / It isn’t nice to go to jail / There are nicer ways to do it, but the nice ways always fail.” “The thing just sucked me in,” Marcus said Friday during a panel abou

2h

Is Empathy the Essence of Soul Music?

One of the saxophonist Kirk Whalum’s earliest memories is of hearing beautiful music in the black Baptist church where his father pastored, and detesting it. “I love the Lord, he heard my cries,” the congregants had sung, with each syllable landing upon a different note. The hymn “reminded me of my grandmother,” Whalum said in a session about “The Genius of Soul” at the Aspen Ideas Festival, whic

3h

Readers Respond to Jordan Peterson in Aspen

My article “ Jordan Peterson Comes to Aspen ” generated a lot of correspondence. Most of it defied the conventional wisdom that the University of Toronto professor turned celebrity intellectual is either uncritically loved or hated. Some Dr. Peterson fans disagree with parts of his oeuvre; some critics see merit in his project; and lots of folks are earnestly wrestling with his ideas. By the time

3h

Balancing Rocks and Philae's Wave

Stunning images from the final archive of the Rosetta comet mission — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

4h

Why Democratic socialists are surging in support

Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez’s surprising win over an establishment politician underscores the rising passion of the far left. Read More

4h

27 tricks to level up your video gaming

DIY Ready, player one? Do you play video games on PlayStation, Xbox, or Switch? Whichever console you prefer, we have tricks for you to get more out of your gaming.

4h

Grafik: Tiltrotor-fly kan erstatte det amerikanske forsvars ikoniske Black Hawks

De amerikanske UH-60 Black Hawks står over for ophugning. Det amerikanske forsvar har indsnævret to alternativer til den konventionelle helikopter.

5h

Sinking Carbon

With samples taken from the crust of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge, researchers have discovered where some of the oceans’ dissolved organic carbon winds up.

5h

"Foul Treachery" of Trotsky and Lenin in 1918; Phineas Gage's Brain in 1868

Innovation and discovery as chronicled in Scientific American — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

5h

Megamergers I'd Like to See

12 ideas for new companies that probably won't exist—but should — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

5h

Weather-Smart Electric Grids Are Needed for Wind and Solar Power to Surge

Renewable energy will rule only when weather data drive the design of a new electric grid — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

5h

Buzz Kill: Our Best Weapons against Mosquitoes

As mosquito-borne diseases spread, scientists are fighting back with new poisons, traps and genetic engineering techniques — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

5h

In Case You Missed It

Top news from around the world — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

5h

The Real Paleo Diet

Microscopic wear patterns on fossil teeth reveal what our ancestors ate—and provide insights into how climate change shaped human evolution — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

5h

How to Overcome Antiscientific Thinking

Convincing people who doubt the validity of climate change and evolution to change their beliefs requires overcoming a set of ingrained cognitive biases — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

5h

Engineered Microbe Shakes Up the Tree of Life

Scientists have created a life-form that combines features of bacteria and archaea — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

5h

Will Science Ever Solve the Mysteries of Consciousness, Free Will and God?

Are consciousness, free will and God insoluble mysteries? — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

5h

Relaxing Vehicle-Efficiency Standards Is a Truly Dangerous Idea

The current EPA rules are better for our wallets and our health — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

5h

The Same Genes May Underlie Different Psychiatric Disorders

A distinct set of genes may underlie several psychiatric conditions — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

5h

Readers Respond to the March 2018 Issue

Letters to the editor from the March 2018 issue of Scientific American — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

5h

Extreme Flu? Weird Encephalitis? It May Be Your Genes

Subtle mutations can undermine our ability to fend off a specific bug — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

5h

How Gene Expression Runs on a Clock–and What It Means for Medical Treatments

How the body's cycles went from folk medicine to modern science — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

5h

Addicts Should Be Able to Shoot Up Legally in Safe-Injection Facilities

To fight the opioid crisis, let users shoot up under medical supervision — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

5h

A Look at the Inner Lives of 13 Species of Animals You Think You Know

Animals' inner lives are stranger than we can imagine — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

5h

Book Recommendations from the Editors of Scientific American

— Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

5h

Reps. Khanna and Ratcliffe: It’s Time to Modernize Government Websites

Opinion: Two Members of Congress argue that government websites must modernize to meet the needs of today's citizens.

5h

McLaren's Senna Hypercar, Uber's New Life in London, and More Car News This Week

Plus: VW climbs a mountain, robo-cars deliver groceries, and more from the molting world of transportation.

5h

Anthony Kennedy Retiring Tops This Week's Internet News Roundup

The Supreme Court justice's announcement last week caused a lot of chatter on social media.

5h

Ten-Minute Sabbatical

Take a break from the bench to puzzle and peruse.

5h

The Working Women of GLOW

Midway through the second season of GLOW , Ruth (Alison Brie) goes for what she thinks is a working dinner with the head of a cable network. The meeting doesn’t end well—the fact that it takes place in a bungalow at the Beverly Hills Hotel might hint at why—but before it falls apart, the TV executive questions Ruth about her career choices. “So, you come out to Hollywood to be the next Ellen Burs

6h

The Scientists Who Explore Human Hormones In 'Aroused'

NPR's Lulu Garcia-Navarro talks with Dr. Randi Hutter Epstein about her new book Aroused, which tells the story of the scientific quest to understand human hormones.

6h

The study of human heredity got its start in insane asylums

‘Genetics in the Madhouse’ reveals how human heredity research began as a statistical science in 19th century insane asylums.

6h

There's No Limit to Longevity, Says Study Reviving Human Lifespan Debate

The findings counter some previous work — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

6h

New Telescope Will Hunt for Asteroids on Collision Course with Earth

By scanning the skies for rogue space rocks, the telescope could keep our planet safe from impacts like the one that slammed into Chelyabinsk, Russia, in 2013.

6h

Cost-effective universal screening for hepatitis C in France

An estimated 75,000 people in France are unaware they are infected by hepatitis C virus. An ANRS-funded study by Sylvie Deuffic-Burban, a research associate at IAME (Inserm – Université Paris Diderot – Université Paris 13), and her team shows that a universal screening strategy applied to hepatitis C is cost-effective and improves life expectancy in those infected, compared with targeted screening

7h

How Do You Measure a Country?

Sarah Lewis, a curator and Harvard professor, was standing in the Museum of the Confederacy when she got a call from the Spoleto Festival in Charleston, South Carolina. Dylann Roof had just killed nine worshippers at the Emanuel AME Church in their city, and the arts organization wanted to commission an artist who could create a piece about “grace in the face of tragedy.” “I knew immediately that

7h

Chernobyl's Radioactive 'Wildlife Preserve' Spawns Growing Wolf Population

Gray wolves from the radioactive forbidden zone around the nuclear disaster site of Chernobyl are now roaming out into the rest of the world, raising the possibility they'll spread mutant genes that they may carry far and wide.

7h

Gadgets for Shooting Movies on Your iPhone: DJI, Rode, Joby, Moment

As directors like Steven Soderbergh and Sean Baker have shown, you can conjure movie magic with an iPhone.

7h

This Mutation Math Shows How Life Keeps on Evolving

New results emerging from graph theory prove that the way a population is organized can guarantee the eventual triumph of natural selection—or permanently thwart it.

7h

Silicon Valley’s Exclusive Salary Database

Unlike popular self-reported salary sites like Glassdoor or Stack Overflow, Option Impact is reserved for elite users—VCs and the executives at the startups they back.

7h

Østrigsk forsøg lagrer vindenergi i beton og bruger loftet som radiator

Ved at pumpe energi ind i etageadskillelser af beton kan variable elpriser udnyttes mere effektivt, viser forsøg udført af den østrigske cementforening.

8h

$20 blood test could help diagnose hepatitis B patients across Africa

A simple $20 blood test could help diagnose thousands of patients with hepatitis B in need of treatment in some of Africa's poorest regions.

8h

How to End the Judicial Confirmation Wars

The regular controversies over Supreme Court appointments serve as a good example of how norms are only as strong, or last only as long, as the institutional arrangement they are supposed to support. The nominating process now is riven by raw power plays, not marked by civility, or buttressed by norms committing the Senate to fair hearings and some measure of deference to the executive. Each side

8h

The Great Russian Disinformation Campaign

When Westerners first began to hear of Vladimir Putin’s troll army—now some five years ago—the project sounded absurd. President Obama in March 2014 had dismissed Russia as merely a weak “regional power.” And Putin’s plan to strike back was to hire himself a bunch of internet commenters? Seriously? In a recent talk in Washington, the historian Timothy Snyder observed that Russia’s annual budget f

8h

Kig indenfor i salonerne på kongeskibet Dannebrog

Det danske kongeskib er en sejlende udstilling af det bedste, der kan ydes i dansk skibsbyggeri, industri og kunstindustri. Ingeniøren kom om bord i 1963 og beskrev detaljeret skibets konstruktion og udrustning.

10h

Users of home DNA tests 'cherry pick' results based on race biases, study says

Researchers raise concern over white people misunderstanding their minority roots: ‘It has no consequences for them’ People who use home genetic testing kits to unlock the mysteries of their ancestry tend to “cherry pick” the results, relying on preconceived biases to embrace some of the findings while disregarding others, new research suggests. Home genetic testing has become a multibillion-doll

11h

Urban wildlife

Many ostensibly rural creatures are thriving in our towns and cities, while adapting to survive Last week, researchers revealed that bumblebees fare better in urban rather than agricultural environments. City colonies produced more males and reached a larger size, had more food stores and survived longer. They concluded that urban environments provide longer-lived, more varied flowers than intens

12h

What’s in my name: tales that cross continents and generations

Stories behind Sheela Banerjee’s name go from Aryan invaders via sacred black stones to 70s dinner ladies It’s funny the little things that stick in your mind. I was in the back of a cab with my friend Denise, decades ago, when we were both young TV researchers. The driver was having a bit of a flirt, and asked us our names. “Sheela and Denise,” I replied with my London twang. He checked us out a

13h

Sådan bygger du en atombunker til 350 personer

Her er fem ting, du skal vide for at bygge en bunker, der kan modstå atomkrig, solstorme og civilisationens kollaps.

13h

What's a Good Consumer To Do?

In a world beset by climate change, marine pollution, and dwindling natural resources, a member of the mushrooming human population pauses to consider his role.

14h

Identifying Future Victims of Climate Change

Assessments of species vulnerability provide crucial information for conservation efforts. But the science behind them is still evolving.

14h

Hunting Regulations Shape Brown Bears’ Care for Cubs

Scandinavian mother bears gain a survival advantage by weaning their babies later than normal, analysis of a 30-year dataset suggests.

14h

14h

Why Are Modern Humans Relatively Browless?

The function of early hominins’ enlarged brow ridges, and their reduction in size in Homo sapiens, have puzzled paleoanthropologists for decades.

14h

How Live Capture Changed Scientific Views of Killer Whales

Although highly controversial now, keeping orcas in captivity helped transform popular and scientific of the marine mammal from an unfeeling killer to a complex, intelligent animal.

14h

Amazonians Offer Clues to Human Childhood Development

A study of Shuar children in Ecuador provides a window into how the human body responds to infection in the sorts of conditions that shaped our species’ evolution.

14h

How to calculate mutation rate for evolutionary biology

Four ways to study mutation rate, a crucial statistic in studies of evolution

14h

Researchers Look to Sex Pheromones to Trap an Invasive Snake

The brown tree snake has wreaked havoc on the island of Guam, but one solution to the problem could lie in the serpent’s own physiology.

14h

Overcoming the Challenges of Studying Endangered Animals

From the difficulty of tracking rare populations to the danger of poachers exploiting distribution data, the complications of studying endangered species require creative solutions from researchers.

14h

Maiden Voyage, 1872–1876

The Challenger expedition's data on ocean temperatures and currents, seawater chemistry, life in the deep sea, and the geology of the seafloor spurred the rise of modern oceanography.

14h

Oh, Captain

Meet Cindy Van Dover, a deepsea explorer and the first female to pilot Alvin, the submersible that has ferried researchers into some of the ocean's deepest depths.

14h

Nick Pyenson Reconstructs Bygone Whale Populations Using Fossils

The Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History paleobiologist also studies the evolution of echolocation and special sensory structures in modern whales.

14h

Snaking Over

See how the tiny island of Guam became overrun with brown treesnakes, and learn what biologists are doing to try to eradicate the invasive species.

14h

Deep Diver: A Profile of Cindy Van Dover

As the only woman who has piloted the deep-ocean research submersible Alvin, Van Dover is among the few researchers to have explored hydrothermal vents firsthand.

14h

Infographic: How to Predict If a Species Is At Risk

To calculate the likelihood that organisms will be harmed by climate change, researchers estimate their exposure, sensitivity, and ability to adapt to new conditions.

14h

Contributors

Meet some of the people featured in the Jule 2018 issue of The Scientist.

14h

Primer: Acoustics and Physiology of Human Speech

People have a unique anatomy that supports our ability to produce complex language.

14h

July 2018 TS Crossword

Try your hand at a sciency brain teaser.

14h

Climate Change Research Gets Closer to Nature

Researchers devise more-realistic means of forecasting the effects of climate change on complex marine ecosystems.

14h

Ten-Minute Sabbatical

Take a break from the bench to puzzle and peruse.

14h

Infographic: Ocean Mesocosms

How one research team studies the effects of ocean conditions on marine life

14h

Book Excerpt from Orca

In Chapter 15, author Jason Colby describes a scene of captive orca release and early research into the species' behavior and social organization

14h

Infographic: Swimming After Eating

How a meal affects minnows' positions in their schools

14h

Why Human Speech Is Special

Evolutionary changes in both the vocal tract and the brain were necessary for humans’ remarkable gift of gab.

14h

Scientists Bring Ancient Proteins Back to Life

Researchers are resurrecting proteins from millions of years ago to understand evolution and lay the groundwork for bioengineering custom molecules.

14h

Lantern in the Dark

Lanternfish evolution provides unique insights into how deep-sea species might respond to commercial fishing.

14h

Satiated Fish Swim at the Back of the Pack

Digesting a big meal takes energy, forcing some minnows to swim in spots at the rear of a school.

14h

Forests may lose ability to protect against extremes of climate change

A recent study suggests that a warming climate in the Pacific Northwest would lessen the capacity of many forest microclimates to moderate climate extremes in the future.

16h

Complication of 'fat freezing' procedure may be more common than thought

Cryolipolysis is a noninvasive cosmetic procedure that eliminates excess fat by freezing it. But a complication called paradoxical adipose hyperplasia (PAH) — a hardened area of localized fat developing after cryolipolysis — may be more common than previously thought, suggests an article.

16h

Up to half of childhood cancer survivors will develop hormone disorders

The Endocrine Society today issued a Clinical Practice Guideline advising healthcare providers on how to diagnose and treat the endocrine disorders that affect a significant portion of childhood cancer survivors in the United States today.

16h

Simple sampling method eases identification of foot and mouth disease outbreaks

Sampling the environment is an effective way to detect foot and mouth disease, according to a new article.

16h

The novel function of self-renewal factor of spermatogonial stem cells is identified

A research team found a novel function of FGF2 in mammalian testis. Although it has demonstrated that both GDNF and FGF2 are the self-renewal factor for spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs) in vitro, present study revealed that FGF2 acts to facilitate the differentiation of SSCs in vivo. The understanding of molecular mechanism regulating SSCs has potential for future applications for male infertility

17h

Promising therapy' for alcohol abuse

A professor is working to change that, and a new clinical trial is right around the corner.

17h

Mutations in gene TRAF7 are associated with a multisystem disorder

Four mutations of gene TRAF7 have been associated with a multisystem disorder.

17h

Genetic ancestry test users 'cherry-pick' which races to identify with

Genetic ancestry tests are often advertised as a tool to uncover new connections to diverse cultures and ancestries, but new research has found people tend to pick and choose which races they identify with based on preconceived biases.

17h

Obesity + aging linked to Alzheimer's markers in the brain

A new study suggests that when a high-fat, high-sugar diet that leads to obesity is paired with normal aging, it may contribute to the development of Alzheimer's disease. In addition, researchers discovered that certain areas of the brain respond differently to risk factors associated with Alzheimer's.

17h

Newly developed therapeutic shown to combat drug addiction

A new therapeutic may help reverse chemical imbalances made to the brain by habitual drug use and could one day help recovering drug addicts avoid future drug use.

17h

Higher doses of rifampin appear more effective in fighting TB without increasing risk of adverse events

Higher daily doses of rifampin, a cornerstone of tuberculosis treatment, killed more TB bacteria in sputum cultures, and the higher doses did so without increasing the adverse effects of treatment, according to a randomized controlled trial.

17h

New mystery discovered regarding active asteroid phaethon

Based on a new study of how near-Earth asteroid Phaethon reflects light at different angles, astronomers think that its surface may reflect less light than previously thought. This is an exciting mystery for the recently approved DESTINY+ mission to investigate when it flies past Phaethon.

17h

Self-monitoring of type 2 diabetes reduces follow-up costs by more than half

Self-monitoring of type 2 diabetes used in combination with an electronic feedback system results in considerable savings on health care costs especially in sparsely populated areas, a new study shows.

17h

CAR-T immunotherapies may have a new player

Emerging CAR-T immunotherapies leverage modified versions of patient's T-cells to target and kill cancer cells. In a new study, researchers report that similarly modified natural killer (NK) cells derived from human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) also displayed heightened activity against a mouse model of ovarian cancer.

17h

Men and women have different genetic risk factors for developing brain cancer

Researchers have discovered that men and women have different genetic risk factors for developing glioma.

17h

Function of a mysterious component of the inner ear revealed

A new study finds that a mysterious component of the inner ear acts as a pressure-relief valve, formed by a thin barrier of cellular projections that opens and closes to regulate the release of inner ear fluid.

17h

Ancient Moroccan dental remains elucidate history of long-lost African fauna

Long before rhinoceros, giraffes, hippos, and antelopes roamed the African savannah, a group of large and highly specialized mammals known as embrithopods inhabited the continent. The most well known is Arsinoitherium, an animal that looked much like a rhinoceros but was in fact more closely related to elephants, sea cows, and hyraxes. Now, researchers offer a glimpse into this ancient past with t

17h

Open relationships just as satisfying as monogamous ones

Couples in non-monogamous relationships have the same level of relationship satisfaction, psychological well-being and sexual satisfaction as those in monogamous relationships, a new study has found.

17h

Rapid Zika detection test uses smartphone technology

Leveraging nanoparticles and digital health technology, investigators develop rapid, deployable, low-cost diagnostic test for Zika virus.

17h

Magnetic skyrmions: Not the only ones of their class

Tiny magnetic vortex structures, so-called skyrmions, have been researched intensively for some time for future energy-efficient space-saving data storage devices. Scientists have now discovered another class of particle-like magnetic object that could take the development of data storage devices a significant step forward. If skyrmions are used to encode the number "1", then the new objects cou

17h

Strategic classroom intervention can make big difference for autism students

Special training for teachers may mean big results for students with autism spectrum disorder, according to researchers.

17h

“Flying brain” droid straight out of sci-fi launched into space

The new AI droid just sent to space by Elon Musk's SpaceX can assist astronauts in many tasks. Read More

17h

Carbon dioxide-to-methanol process improved by catalyst

Dramatic improvements have been made to the process of converting carbon dioxide, a greenhouse gas, to methanol, a fuel and building block for a wide range of everyday materials, according to researchers.

17h

More than half of Amazonian armadillos carry leprosy

The bacteria that causes leprosy, a chronic disease that can lead to disfigurement and nerve damage, is known to be transmitted to humans from nine-banded armadillos. A new study reports that 62 percent of the armadillos in the western part of Pará state in the Brazilian Amazon are positive for the leprosy bacteria.

17h

Exploring bacterial social interactions to manipulate bacterial pathogens

A new study proposes new strategies to induce the collapse of bacterial populations. A research team has identified novel ways to promote so-called "cheating behavior" in bacterial communities that can lead to the collapse of the bacterial population, simply by manipulating the chemical composition of the environment.

17h

New promise in search for simple, early test for Alzheimer's disease

Researchers have found early evidence that tiny snippets of genetic material called microRNA may help with early detection of conditions such as Alzheimer's disease.

17h

Computational models provide novel genetic insights into atherosclerosis

Researchers have identified a new gene-activation pathway caused by lipids associated with coronary artery disease, a finding that could help identify new directions in research and drug development. The researchers used a new computational model of the cells lining blood vessels in the human heart.

17h

Two proteins involved in schistosome epigenetics play key roles in parasite's biology

Two proteins that recognize and translate DNA methylation marks in Schistosoma mansoni are required for growth of adult stem cells in the parasitic flatworm, as well as production of eggs, according to new research.

17h

Team sports have ancient roots

Competitive team games in which men test their mettle against others are universal across the world, and may have deep roots in our evolutionary past. Among hunter-gatherers, these games enable men to hone their physical skills and stamina, assess the commitment of their team members, and see how each performs under pressure.

18h

What is the blood moon prophecy?

As we’ve come to expect, conspiracy theorists and fringe Christian evangelicals are heralding the July 27 blood moon as a sign of the imminent apocalypse. But what is the blood moon prophecy, and why does it appeal to a certain type of believer? Read More

19h

Photographs actually impair your memory of an event, rather than support it

A new study shows that photographing something doesn't help you remember it. Looks like the ol' "Take a picture, it'll last longer" insult doesn't actually hold any water. Read More

19h

The culprit of some GaN defects could be nitrogen

As silicon-based semiconductors reach performance limits, gallium nitride is becoming the next go-to material for several technologies. Holding GaN back, however, is its high numbers of defects. Better understanding how GaN defects form at the atomic level could improve the performance of the devices made using this material. Researchers have taken a significant step by examining and determining s

19h

Connection between genes, response to environmental chemicals

Researchers have pinpointed a genetic difference in zebrafish tied to differing responses to the same environmental chemical. The work could have implications for identifying genetic factors that explain differential chemical sensitivity.

19h

Sintering atomically thin materials with ceramics now possible

For the first time, researchers have created a nanocomposite of ceramics and a two-dimensional material, opening the door for new designs of nanocomposites with such applications as solid-state batteries, thermoelectrics, varistors, catalysts, chemical sensors and much more.

19h

The neuroscience of human vocal pitch

Among primates, humans are uniquely able to consciously control the pitch of their voices, making it possible to hit high notes in singing or stress a word in a sentence to convey meaning. Researchers narrow in on a region of the brain's frontal lobe that controls the "voice box" muscles that are responsible for vocal pitch.

19h

How the flu virus builds a better mousetrap

For the first time, scientists have directly visualized real-time structural changes in the surface protein of the influenza virus that may help the virus fuse with and enter target cells before hijacking them. Single molecules of the protein were found to stretch toward target cells, then refold and try again 5 to 10 times per second. The discovery may help develop more effective vaccines and bet

19h

Stippled COUNTLESS 2D — 2x Downsampling of Sparsely Labeled Images

submitted by /u/omgitzwowzie [link] [comments]

20h

New coatings make natural fabrics waterproof

A new process could provide a nontoxic alternative to conventional waterproof coatings for fabrics.

20h

Family Separation Protests Shift the Narrative

WASHINGTON, D.C. — The pathway of protest is well known to those who choose to walk it. Often starting with gatherings in Lafayette Square, where rallies can rattle the windows of the adjacent White House, people stream onto Pennsylvania Avenue, heading to go make a human wreathe around the Department of Justice and other government buildings. Over the past year, the pathway has become well worn,

20h

Astronomers observe the magnetic field of the remains of supernova 1987A

For the first time, astronomers have directly observed the magnetism in one of astronomy's most studied objects: the remains of Supernova 1987A (SN 1987A), a dying star that appeared in our skies over thirty years ago. In addition to being an impressive observational achievement, the detection provides insight into the early stages of the evolution of supernova remnants and the cosmic magnetism wi

20h

How validating their distorted memories helps people with dementia

What is the best way to help people who have dementia? Here's a careful examination of the positive role of distorted memories in the preservation of self-defining beliefs and identity. Read More

21h

Viruses are found to be the most common cause of meningitis but diagnosis is often delayed

The first major paper looking at the causes and consequences of meningitis in the UK has found that viruses are now the most common cause of meningitis in adults and a cause of substantial long-term ill health. The paper also found that the management of many patients with meningitis is sub-optimal.

21h

Air pollution contributes significantly to diabetes globally

New research links outdoor air pollution — even at levels deemed safe — to an increased risk of diabetes globally, according to a new study. The findings raise the possibility that reducing pollution may lead to a drop in diabetes cases in heavily polluted countries such as India and less polluted ones such as the United States.

21h

Small bee 'pollen thieves' are not effective bumblebee substitutes

As bumblebees decline, what other busy bees could step in? A new study shows that other bees might do more harm than good.

21h

The Lucky Ones

Paulina is one of the lucky ones. The Trump administration’s “zero tolerance” policy separated roughly 2,500 children from their parents in recent weeks, but not all families were split up. In the absence of an official explanation, advocates speculated that border agents left some families intact for lack of detention space, instead releasing them with GPS ankle trackers and a court date. In thi

22h

Great white spotted off Spain in decades first: marine group

A great white shark was spotted in waters off Spain's Balearic Islands this week in what is the first such sighting by scientists in at least 30 years, a marine conservation group said Saturday.

22h

'Dancing' holes in droplets submerged in water-ethanol mixtures

Researchers have observed the formation of holes that move by themselves in droplets of ionic liquids (IL) sitting inside water-ethanol mixtures. This curious, complex phenomenon is driven by an interplay between how ionic liquids dissolve, and how the boundary around the droplet fluctuates. Self-driven motion is a key feature of active matter, materials that use ambient energy to self-propel, wit

22h

Kids Describe the Fear of Separation at the Border

MCALLEN, Texas—At a shelter for migrants just released from detention, 9-year-old Paulina sits in front a volunteer reading The Very Hungry Caterpillar aloud in Spanglish: “On Friday, he ate through five naranjas .” Paulina sat quietly with her books most of the afternoon. Paulina is one of the lucky ones. The Trump administration’s “zero tolerance” policy separated roughly 2,500 children from th

23h

Hear this: Apple said to have new, higher-end AirPods in the works

Since we can never hear enough about the next big thing Apple might have in store, here's something that could be music to your ears.

23h

Stepping into a Three-Torus

How artist Yayoi Kusama showed me the beauty of a favorite mathematical space — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

23h

James Comey Continues to Argue With Himself

In a sustained and challenging interview with Katie Couric on Saturday, James Comey defended his apparent flouting of FBI standards in the lead-up to the election of President Trump, saying that, in the “500-year flood” that was 2016, the only way to save the credibility of the institution was to break with convention. “Norms … produce reliably good results in normal circumstances,” Comey said on

23h

New testing finds synergistic combination leads to toxicity in nanomaterials

A new study finds reason for caution — a clear emergence of toxicity — in nanomaterial product formulations, but it also provides an early testing technique that could help the industry continue to move forward.

1d

The hidden complexity underlying a common cause of autism

Genes located in a large chromosomal aberration associated with autism interact with each other to modulate the variable symptoms of the disease, according to new research.

1d

Breakthrough in perovskite solar cell technology

A new technique has produced the highest performing inverted perovskite solar cell ever recorded.

1d

Drinking changes young adults' metabolite profile

Adolescent drinking is associated with changes in the metabolite profile, a new study shows. The researchers observed metabolite profile changes even in young people who consumed alcohol at a level that is socially acceptable.

1d

The scent of a man: What odors do female blackbuck find enticing in a male?

At Tal Chhapar, a wildlife sanctuary in the heart of the Thar desert, a strange drama is staged twice every year. In the blistering heat of summer from March to April and the post-monsoon months of September and October, up to a hundred blackbuck males stake out territories on the flat land to entice females to mate with them in a unique assemblage called a lek. Female blackbuck who visit the lek

1d

Self-heating, fast-charging battery makes electric vehicles climate-immune

Californians do not purchase electric vehicles because they are cool, they buy EVs because they live in a warm climate. Conventional lithium-ion batteries cannot be rapidly charged at temperatures below 50 degrees Fahrenheit, but now a team of engineers has created a battery that can self-heat, allowing rapid charging regardless of the outside chill.

1d

New photodetector could improve night vision, thermal sensing and medical imaging

Using graphene, one of science's most versatile materials, engineers have invented a new type of photodetector that can work with more types of light than its current state-of-the-art counterparts. The device also has superior sensing and imaging capabilities.

1d

Out of the darkness: A new spider found deep within an Indiana cave

A small cave in southern Indiana turned out to be the one and only home of a new species of spider, now going by the name Islandiana lewisi. The dark, wet, muddy cave near the Ohio River was apparently the perfect match for this previously unknown sheet weaver. The spider measures about 2 mm in size.

1d

Progress toward improved Wilson's disease drug

Researchers report that they have conducted promising preclinical experiments on a compound that could be used to treat Wilson's disease and possibly other disorders — including certain types of cancer — in which levels of copper in the body are elevated, causing or contributing to pathology.

1d

What Did Dinosaur Tongues Look Like?

Despite their diversity in size and shape, most dinosaurs probably had very similar tongues — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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mclaren senna

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Amazon eyes defense against hijacking of delivery drones by 'nefarious individuals'

Amazon is pushing hard to get delivery drones into the sky, but the latest in a series of patents again highlights the potential risk to public safety.

1d

Could Quantum Computing Be the End of Free Will?

Faster, more powerful computing has the potential to revolutionize fields from drug delivery to freight transportation. But some are also worried that the computers of the future could also upend what it means to be human. Quantum computing capitalizes on the quantum-physics principle that a particle may be in two states at once, as long as it does not leave a record of either state. Unlike tradi

1d

A cortical forest by Daniela Gamba for Eyewire

submitted by /u/amyleerobinson [link] [comments]

1d

Søstjerner er på vej tilbage efter mystisk massedød

På få år er nordamerikanske søstjerner blevet resistente overfor en dødelig virus, viser ny undersøgelse.

1d

WIRED's Top Stories in June 2018: An Alternate Theory About 'The Staircase'

Did an owl do it? Plus: The world's biggest crypto scandal and the physicists who watched a clock tick for 14 years.

1d

How to find your way out of the woods without tools—or your phone

DIY Navigate back to civilization. If you get lost off-trail without a phone or a compass, and you literally can’t find north, we have a few tricks to help you navigate back to civilization…

1d

NSA Spy Buildings, Facebook Data, and More Security News This Week

Data leaks, NSA secrets, and more of this week's top security news.

1d

If You Like 'The Thing' You'll Love "The Things"

Sci-fi author Peter Watts' short story is a take on John Carpenter's movie told from the alien's point of view.

1d

Stepping Back in Time with the "Destination Moon" Exhibit

Steeping visitors in the 1960s brings the Apollo 11 mission to life for a new generation — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

1d

Boeing's Hypersonic Vision: A Sleek Passenger Plane That Can Hit Mach 5

Boeing has dreams of a hypersonic passenger plane, and it looks like something straight out of science fiction.

1d

Code Now. Pay Tuition Later.

Last year, Lavell Burton decided he wanted to learn to code. He searched online for coding bootcamps, and was surprised to find that many of them cost several thousand dollars upfront. Burton, then 36, was hoping to move from his maintenance job aboard an American naval ship to a career in software engineering in California, where he grew up. He finally came across a 30-week remote program, Lambd

1d

Why Is Hawaii Banning Sunscreen?

Recent research shows that oxybenzone and octinoxate are detrimental to coral growth and increase the rate of coral bleaching — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

1d

Her er fem bud på sommerlæsning i hængekøjen

Ingeniørens forslag til sommerferielæsning om matematik, astrofysik, bioteknologi og historie.

1d

Jonathan Safran Foer – One Thing We Can All Agree Upon – Think Again – a Big Think Podcast #154

Maybe everything we do is bad. But it’s not all bad to the same extent. Writer Jonathan Safran Foer on factory farming and free-range parenting in 2018. Read More

1d

Hateful Messages Are an Occupational Hazard of Journalism

For journalists, being hated is part of the job. People will hate things you write, and they’ll tell you. They’ll hate the media in general, and they’ll let you know. They may hate you for your race, gender, religion, or sexual orientation; thanks to the visibility that comes with the job, you’ll hear about that, too. In the age of email and social media, it seems like more than ever, hateful mes

1d

Hawaii's Kilauea Volcano Spawned a Giant, Otherworldly 'Lava Ball'

The strange formation split open in the middle of a river of lava, spilling its glowing guts in a dramatic video.

1d

The Best of the Physics arXiv (week ending June 30, 2018)

This week’s most thought-provoking papers from the Physics arXiv.

1d

Meet the "Bad Boy" of Autism Research

Dennis Wall explores radical ideas, including “smart glasses” to help interpret emotions — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

1d

Gaming Gets X-Rated–and Very Profitable

The thriving erotic-gaming industry that originated in Japan is now going global. Time to boot up your XXXbox.

1d

Space Photos of the Week: Scientists Are Seeing Red Over Jupiter’s Spot

We'll get great new views of the iconic spot—if the James Webb Space Telescope ever gets off the ground.

1d

Sonos Beam, IGTV, and Everything Else We Loved This Month

Plus: Our reviews of the Amazon Fire TV Cube, Google Podcasts, and Fujifilm Instax Square SQ6.

1d

Gå med ned i Danmarks hemmelige atombunker

Hvis fjenden indtog Regan Vest, ville Danmark falde. Kom med i bunkeren, hvor regering og kongehus skulle evakueres under atomkrig.

1d

The Family Weekly: When ‘Follow Your Passion’ Isn’t Enough

This Week in Family ‘Follow your passion’ is pretty common professional advice, but, as the authors Elizabeth Wallace and Hana Schank argue, it may not be enough to keep women in the workforce. In interviewing women about their career and family choices, Wallace and Schank noticed that many of the women they spoke with who didn’t need to work to make money were inclined to give up on having a job

1d

Pledging Allegiance to Trump in the Sunshine State

KISSIMMEE, Fla.—Even the Wi-Fi password made reference to President Trump: “bigredwall.” Speaker after speaker at the Florida Republican Party’s Sunshine Summit on Friday focused on the same set of issues, a useful snapshot of what is on the mind of the GOP: how great it is that Donald Trump is president and Hillary Clinton is not. The Supreme Court. The “fake news” liberal media. Representative

1d

What’s Going on With Novak Djokovic?

True loyalty in men’s tennis tends to cut one of two ways: You’re either with Roger Federer, or you’re on the Rafael Nadal bandwagon. Together, the Swiss and the Spaniard have ruled for the better part of the past 15 years, cowing all challengers while making their genial domination something well worth cheering for—those plucky underdogs be damned. Each time Federer and Nadal reach the finals of

1d

McLaren's Senna Ain't Pretty, but It Can Whip a Track

The $958,966 Senna, named for an F1 legend, won't win your heart with its looks. Who cares?

1d

SteelSeries Arctis Gaming Headset Sale (and 10 Other Tech Deals)

Pick up a SteelSeries Arctis headset for cheap, along with tents, 4K TVs, and more this weekend.

1d

GitHub Developers Are Giving Microsoft a Chance

GitHub rivals say more developers are moving projects since Microsoft said it would buy the code-hosting site; but many developers are sticking with GitHub—for now.

1d

Ikonisk koralrev er ikke længere listet som truet

Regeringen i Belize har bandlyst oliejagten i landets caribiske koralrev. Nu siger FN, at revet ikke længere er truet.

1d

The Post-Kennedy Supreme Court Is Already Here

For those who can’t imagine the Supreme Court without Justice Anthony Kennedy, here’s some faintly good news: you don’t have to. Though Kennedy’s resignation doesn’t take effect until July 31, the post-Kennedy court first convened on the first Monday in October 2017. The “Justice Kennedy” who sat at the right hand of the Chief Justice for the last nine months was not the Justice Kennedy who defin

1d

The Trade Deficit Is China’s Problem

The Trump administration last week escalated its trade war upon China. China will retaliate. As in any war, there will be casualties. As Catherine Rampell reported in The Washington Post last week, the price of dishwashers has risen 17 percent since the January 2018 round of tariff increases. Soon, Chinese consumers will pay more for food. Can this mutual self-harm possibly lead to good? Almost c

1d

Shark sighted off Majorca, first great white there in 40 years

The last time a great white shark was spotted near Spain's Balearic Islands was in 1976.

1d

Rocket developed by Japan startup in flames after liftoff

A rocket developed by a Japanese startup company burst into flames seconds after a failed liftoff Saturday in northern Japan.

1d

Thyssenkrupp, Tata sign deal to become Europe's second biggest steelmaker

German industrial giant Thyssenkrupp said Friday it had finally agreed the merger of its steelmaking business with India's Tata, making the merged firm Europe's second biggest steelmaker.

1d

The ancient giants of Yosemite, under a billion stars

The Mariposa Grove of Giant Sequoias, at the heart of California's Yosemite National Park, is home to 500 of the towering trees—many at least 2,000 years old, having sprouted around the time of Jesus Christ.

1d

GM warns Trump tariffs could lead to 'smaller GM'

General Motors warned Friday that it could be forced to cut jobs and raise prices on its cars if the President Donald Trump's confrontational approach on trade spirals into a trade war.

1d

Comcast says most services restored after widespread outage

Comcast said most of its services had been restored following a widespread outage Friday.

1d

Facial recognition was key in identifying US shooting suspect

Facial recognition technology, which has drawn criticism from civil liberties activists in recent years, was used to identify the suspect in Thursday's newsroom shooting which left five dead in Annapolis, Maryland.

1d

Forests may lose ability to protect against extremes of climate change, study finds

Forests, one of the most dominate ecosystems on Earth, harbor significant biodiversity. Scientists have become increasingly interested in how this diversity is enhanced by the sheltering microclimates produced by trees.

1d

Luftens helte: Derfor kan nogle fodboldspillere svæve i luften

Det er ikke kun et spørgsmål om spillernes højde, når fodboldspillere kommer højest og header til bolden. De dygtigste formår øjensynligt at svæve længere.

1d

Spørg Scientariet: Kan en elbil klare sig uden mekaniske bremser?

En læser vil gerne vide, om man kan vende strømmen i en elbil og klare sig uden mekaniske bremser. Det svarer seniorspecialist fra Teknologisk Institut på.

1d

GPS-data og 3D-vejkort kan give bedre brændstoføkonomi

Fremtidens biler skal køre længere på literen. Men der kan også vrides ekstra kilometer ud af de nuværende med bedre ruteplanlægning.

1d

'Dancing' holes in droplets submerged in water-ethanol mixtures

Researchers from Tokyo Metropolitan University have observed the formation of holes that move by themselves in droplets of ionic liquids (IL) sitting inside water-ethanol mixtures. This curious, complex phenomenon is driven by an interplay between how ionic liquids dissolve, and how the boundary around the droplet fluctuates. Self-driven motion is a key feature of active matter, materials that use

1d

Timing is key for bacteria surviving antibiotics

For bacteria facing a dose of antibiotics, timing might be the key to evading destruction. In a series of experiments, researchers found that cells that repaired DNA damaged by antibiotics before resuming growth had a much better chance of surviving treatment.

1d

Computing power used to track the spread of cancer

Researchers have developed a new computational method that increases the ability to track the spread of cancer cells from one part of the body to another. This migration of cells can lead to metastatic disease, which causes about 90 percent of cancer deaths from solid tumors — masses of cells that grow in organs such as the breast, prostate or colon. Understanding the drivers of metastasis could

1d

Lemurs can smell weakness in each other

Some people watch the competition carefully for the slightest signs of weakness. Lemurs, on the other hand, just give them a sniff. These primates from Madagascar can tell that a fellow lemur is weaker just by the natural scents they leave behind, finds a study on ring-tailed lemurs. The study reveals that getting hurt dampens a lemur's natural aroma, and that males act more aggressively toward sc

1d

Solution: ‘The Slippery Math of Causation’

Our latest Insights puzzle attempted to model multifactorial causation with problems that involved three causal factors whose different types of interactions either produced or did not produce an effect. The goal was to challenge the all-too-intuitive picture of a straight arrow going from cause to effect as far too simplistic to describe the real world. In fact, a recent Quanta article by Veroni

1d

Reality Check

It's often said that butterflies are dying out in the UK, but do the statistics back this up?

1d

Friday's Comcast Outage Was Caused by Cut Fiber Cables

Comcast customers across the country experienced outages Friday, thanks to multiple cuts to fiber optic cables.

1d

Judge Strikes Down Kentucky’s Medicaid Work Rules

The federal court ruling may affect other states’ plans to impose work requirements on the poor in exchange for receiving health care.

1d

Francisco J. Ayala, Famed Biologist, Resigns After Sexual Harassment Inquiry

Administrators at the University of California, Irvine, said they would remove Dr. Ayala’s name from campus buildings and academic posts.

1d

Doctor, Your Patient Is Waiting. It’s a Red Panda.

Medical students at Harvard take part in an elective with veterinarians, learning about diseases and treatments between animals and humans.

1d

The Fight Over Medicaid Begins in Kentucky

This hasn’t been a good week for Democrats and progressives in federal courts. President Trump got his travel ban in the Supreme Court, despite his documented intent to make it a Muslim ban . The Court also dealt a serious blow to labor in Janus v. AFSCME , curtailing the ability of unions to raise funds. And then there was the retirement of Justice Anthony Kennedy, whose departure will mean an u

1d

Viruses are found to be the most common cause of meningitis but diagnosis is often delayed

The first major paper looking at the causes and consequences of meningitis in the UK has found that viruses are now the most common cause of meningitis in adults and a cause of substantial long-term ill health. The paper also found that the management of many patients with meningitis is sub-optimal.

1d

The Lancet Infectious Diseases: Study highlights diagnostic delays and inappropriate treatment of meningitis in UK hospitals

Viruses are the most common cause of meningitis in adults aged 16 and older in the UK, according to new research published in The Lancet Infectious Diseases journal. Although generally seen as a benign condition, this new observational study shows that recovery from viral meningitis can be a long haul for patients, with many still experiencing memory and mental health problems months after they ar

1d

Air pollution contributes significantly to diabetes globally

New research links outdoor air pollution — even at levels deemed safe — to an increased risk of diabetes globally, according to a study from Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis and the Veterans Affairs (VA) St. Louis Health Care System. The findings raise the possibility that reducing pollution may lead to a drop in diabetes cases in heavily polluted countries such as India and

1d

The potential for habitability on these exoplanets is tilting in the right direction

Space Life needs a stable climate. Why do we have seasons on Earth? The planet’s axial tilt, of course. But the tilt does more than just push us from spring, to summer, to fall, to winter.

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