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Ingeniøren
200+
Rottestudie: Roundup ændrer tarmfloraen hos nyfødteEt pilotprojekt fra Italien konkluderer, at rotteungers bakterieflora bliver markant ændret af sprøjtemiddel med glyphosat, selv om moderen ikke blev påvirket.
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Science | The Guardian
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Landmark lawsuit claims Monsanto hid cancer danger of weedkiller for decadesIn June, a California groundskeeper will make history by taking company to trial on claims it suppressed harm of Roundup At the age of 46, DeWayne Johnson is not ready to die. But with cancer spread through most of his body, doctors say he probably has just months to live. Now Johnson, a husband and father of three in California, hopes to survive long enough to make Monsanto take the blame for hi
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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Giant invasive flatworms found in France and overseas French territoriesOne of the consequences of globalization is the introduction of invasive species. Giant hammerhead flatworms, or land planarians, up to 40 cm (over 1 foot) in length, are reported from France and overseas French territories by an international team led by Jean-Lou Justine of ISYEB (Muséum National d'Histoire Naturelle, Paris, France). This is the first study of this invasion, reported in an articl
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Facebook chief faces EU grilling over his 'digital monster'Mark Zuckerberg FacebookFacebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg faced tough questions from European Union lawmakers Tuesday over what one of them branded Zuckerberg's "digital monster," and he apologized for the way the social network has been used to produce fake news, interfere in elections and sweep up people's personal data.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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SpaceX rocket blasts off water-tracking satellite duoSpaceX NASA Earth GRACEA SpaceX rocket Tuesday blasted off a duo of sports car-sized satellites built by the US and Germany to reveal changes in sea level rise, ice melt and drought on Earth.
14min
New on MIT Technology Review
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Amazon is selling its face-recognition tech to police departmentsAmazon Rekognition
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Research reveals how order first appears in liquid crystalsLiquid crystals undergo a peculiar type of phase change. At a certain temperature, their cigar-shaped molecules go from a disordered jumble to a more orderly arrangement in which they all point more or less in the same direction. LCD televisions take advantage of that phase change to project different colors in moving images.
20min
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Training compassion 'muscle' may boost brain's resilience to others' sufferingA new study suggests that as little as two weeks of compassion meditation training — intentionally cultivating positive wishes to understand and relieve the suffering of others — may reduce the distress a person feels when witnessing another's suffering. The findings may have implications for professions in which people routinely work with others who are suffering, like doctors, law enforcement
20min
New on MIT Technology Review
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Mark Zuckerberg tells an irate EU Parliament very little it wants to hearMark Zuckerberg Facebook
37min
BBC News – Science & Environment
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Grace mission launches to weigh Earth's waterSpaceX NASA Earth GRACEThe joint US-German Grace satellites go into orbit to monitor Earth's most important resource.
38min
Popular Science
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The biomechanics behind Michael Jackson’s impossible dance movesScience Some neurosurgeon fans decided to investigate. Before reading the rest of this article, please first stand up and try to tilt your whole body forward at a 45 degree angle. You may only bend at the ankle.
39min
Popular Science
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Best known for aliens and Elvis, this remote town is now at the vanguard of a global revolutionNexus Media News How folks in rural Australia are pushing back against climate change. One small town in Australia is making a major leap into the clean energy future.
39min
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Study demonstrates new treatment for severe asthmaResearchers from McMaster University and the Firestone Institute for Respiratory Health at St. Joseph's Healthcare Hamilton, together with colleagues at other partnering institutions, have developed a new method to treat severe asthma. In a study of over 200 participants with severe asthma, the new treatment was shown to have improved asthma symptoms and lung function, while reducing the need for
41min
Live Science
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These Two Angry, Yelling Lynx Are Probably Fighting About SexA viral video shows two lynx yelling at one another along the side of a road in Ontario, Canada. An expert tells Live Science the fight was likely all about sex.
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Scientific American Content: Global
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Earth's Ozone Layer is Under Attack–AgainDespite a long-standing international ban, ozone-destroying chlorofluorocarbons are surging back into Earth’s atmosphere from unknown sources — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Big Think
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FDA approves first drug that prevents migraines. Is the price tag worth it?The FDA has approved the first drug designed to prevent migraines, a move that could help the four million Americans who suffer from at least 15 migraine days per month. Read More
46min
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Researchers build artificial cellular compartments as molecular workshopsHow to install new capabilities in cells without interfering with their metabolic processes? Scientists have altered mammalian cells in such a way that they formed artificial compartments in which sequestered reactions could take place, allowing the detection of cells deep in the tissue and also their manipulation with magnetic fields.
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TED Talks Daily (SD video)
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The shocking danger of mountaintop removal — and why it must end | Michael HendryxResearch investigator Michael Hendryx studies mountaintop removal, an explosive type of surface coal mining used in Appalachia that comes with unexpected health hazards. In this data-packed talk, Hendryx presents his research and tells the story of the pushback he's received from the coal industry, advocating for the ethical obligation scientists have to speak the truth.
55min
The Atlantic
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John McCain’s Greatest FearLet me stipulate at the outset that I am like many journalists in my fondness for Senator John McCain; let me also stipulate that this fondness derives in part from happy memories trailing McCain through Hungary and Germany and Ohio and the Middle East; and I will further note that this fondness also derives from a belief that McCain represents, at his best, something larger than partisanship and
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Research reveals how order first appears in liquid crystalsBrown University chemists have shown a technique that can identify regions in a liquid crystal system where molecular order begins to emerge just before the system fully transitions from disordered to ordered states.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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New tech may make prosthetic hands easier for patients to useResearchers have developed new technology for decoding neuromuscular signals to control powered, prosthetic wrists and hands. The work relies on computer models that closely mimic the behavior of the natural structures in the forearm, wrist and hand. The technology could also be used to develop new computer interface devices for applications such as gaming and computer-aided design.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Ancient mound builders carefully timed their occupation of coastal Louisiana siteA new study of ancient mound builders who lived hundreds of years ago on the Mississippi River Delta near present-day New Orleans offers new insights into how Native peoples selected the landforms that supported their villages and earthen mounds — and why these sites were later abandoned.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Students taught by highly qualified teachers more likely to obtain bachelor's degreeA researcher has found that high school students taught by a string of teachers who majored or minored in a specific teaching subject, instead of a general teaching degree, are more likely to become college graduates.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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The price of chaos: A new model virtually pits new investors against experienced onesVariation in expertise and risk-taking behaviors among investors regularly sends markets on roller-coaster rides. Researchers now describe the intricate dynamics driving a financial markets model. Their model takes aim to simulate asset pricing when mixed groups of investors enter a market. By examining bifurcation conditions, they described transitions between different chaotic dynamical regimes.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Heart surgery: To have or not to have…your left atrial appendage closedEach year in the US, more than 300,000 people have heart surgery. To reduce risk of stroke for their patients, surgeons often will close the left atrial appendage, which is a small sac in the left side of the heart where many blood clots form, during these surgeries. Adding this procedure is likely the right choice for certain patients but not all.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Mechanisms of harmful overhydration and brain swellingWe are all familiar with the drawbacks of dehydration, but we rarely hear about the harmful effects of overhydration. Scientists have now uncovered a key piece to the puzzle of how our brains detect hyponatremia and regulate overhydration. The new study unearths the fundamental mechanism of how hyponatremia is detected in the brain.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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Posttraumatic stress affects academicsPosttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) caused by traumatic military experiences is associated with feelings of anxiety, anger, sadness and/or guilt. New Penn State research is evaluating how PTSD symptoms increase risks for academic difficulties as well.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Study: Guns in Chicago just '2.5 handshakes' awayIn one of the first studies to try to map a gun market using network science, researchers used the novel scientific approach to understand how close offenders are to guns in the city of Chicago. Recreating Chicago's co-offending network of approximately 188,000 people, the researchers used data on firearms recovered by the Chicago Police Department to locate who in the network possessed those guns
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Two-and-a-half-year expedition ends in world's most biodiverse protected areaAfter a two-and-a-half-year expedition through the world's most biodiverse protected area, the Identidad Madidi explorers have concluded their epic quest of completing a massive biological survey of Madidi National Park, uncovering more than 120 potentially new species of plants, butterflies and vertebrates in the process.
1h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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New brain development disorder identified by scientistsResearchers have identified a new inherited neurodevelopmental disease that causes slow growth, seizures and learning difficulties in humans.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Embryonic mammary gland stem cells identifiedScientists have identified the mechanisms that regulate mammary gland development. Using a combination of lineage tracing, molecular profiling, single cell sequencing and functional experiments, they have demonstrated that mammary gland initially develops from multipotent progenitors during the early steps of embryonic mammary gland morphogenesis whereas postnatal mammary gland development is medi
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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People with ASD risk being manipulated because they can't tell when they're being lied toA new study shows that the ability to distinguish truth from lies is diminished in people with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) — putting them at greater risk of being manipulated.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Mice brain structure linked with sex-based differences in anxiety behaviorUsing male individuals has long been a tradition in scientific mice studies. But new research enforces the importance of using a balanced population of male and female mice. Scientists studying the locus coeruleus brain structure in mice unexpectedly found substantial differences in the molecular structures of this part of the brain between male and female mice.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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How coyotes conquered the continentUsing museum specimens and fossil records, researchers have produced a comprehensive (and unprecedented) range history of coyotes that can help reveal the ecology of predation as well as evolution through hybridization.
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Big Think
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Against metrics: how measuring performance by numbers backfiresMore and more companies are in the grip of a new phenomenon: "metric fixation." Here's what's wrong with it. Read More
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The Atlantic
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An Epic Supreme Court Decision on EmploymentFalse dichotomy, meretricious piety, and pay-no-attention-to-that-man-behind-the-curtain misdirection are vital arrows in the quiver of any lawyer or judge, no matter of what persuasion. These tricks were on particularly egregious display in Epic Systems Corp. v. Lewis , a 5-4 decision announced Monday in which the Supreme Court’s conservative majority continued its drive to narrow protection for
1h
The Atlantic
68
The Trump-Kim Summit Will Happen Soon or Later or NeverAhead of Moon Jae In’s meeting with Donald Trump on Tuesday, a South Korean official said his president’s trip to Washington would serve as “a bridge” between the United States and North Korea, so that Trump and Kim Jong Un can conduct successful nuclear negotiations when they meet in Singapore on June 12. This is the charitable view of the visit. The bleak interpretation is that Moon is bringing
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Feed: All Latest
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Mark Zuckerberg Ducks Pointed Questions From the EU ParliamentMark Zuckerberg FacebookJust days before GDPR goes into effect, the Facebook CEO left European regulators wanting for answers about data protection, hate speech, bullying, and partisan bias.
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New on MIT Technology Review
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Weed-killing robots are threatening giant chemical companies’ business models
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Big Think
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Amazon is selling real-time facial recognition technology to police, outraging civil liberties groupsAmazon Rekognition“People should be free to walk down the street without being watched by the government.” — ACLU and a coalition of civil rights groups Read More
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The Atlantic
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A Changing Way of Life for Mongolia’s Dukha Reindeer HerdersIn north central Mongolia, in the taiga along the border with Russia, the Dukha people have lived a nomadic life for generations, roaming with their reindeer herds and hunting to fill in a diet based largely on reindeer milk. Reuters photographer Thomas Peter traveled to Mongolia’s Khovsgol Aimag, near the village of Tsagaannuur, to spend time with several Dukha families, as their traditional cul
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Viden

Zuckerberg glat som en ål: EU-høring endte som en kæmpe fuserEn særdeles spøjs rækkefølge af spørgsmål og svar tog al slagkraften ud af spørgsmålene fra EU-Parlamentets folkevalgte.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Technique doubles conversion of CO2 to plastic componentFossil fuels have long been the precursor to plastic, but new research has detailed a technique for doubling the amount of carbon dioxide that gets converted to ethylene — an essential component of the world's most common plastic.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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From a model of fluids to the birth of a new field in computational physicsIt may sound like the stuff of fairy tales, but in the 1950s two numerical models initially developed as a pet project by physicists led to the birth of an entirely new field of physics: computational statistical mechanics.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Physicists with green fingers estimate tree spanning rate in random networksScientists calculate the total number of spanning trees in randomly expanding networks. This method can be applied to modelling scale-free network models, which, as it turns out, are characterized by small-world properties.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Could we predict the next Ebola outbreak by tracking the migratory patterns of bats?The researchers worked with satellite information and parameter sampling techniques to create their Ebola-prediction framework, which integrates data and modeling to predict the conditions linking bats' behavior with the outbreak of Ebola.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Subtle hearing loss while young changes brain functionNew research has found that young people with subtle hearing loss — the kind they aren't even aware of — are putting demands on their brains that typically wouldn't be seen until later in life.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
8
The gypsum gravity chute: A phytoplankton-elevator to the ocean floorTiny gypsum crystals can make phytoplankton so heavy that they rapidly sink, hereby transporting large quantities of carbon to the ocean's depths.
1h
Big Think
5
What animals is A.I. currently smarter than?Can artificial intelligence rival the animal kingdom? We compare the intelligence of four animals to current A.I. capabilities. Read More
1h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

UM researcher: Big data, networks identify cell signaling pathways in lung cancerA team of scientists led by University of Montana cell biologist Mark Grimes has identified networks inside lung cancer cells that will help understand this cancer and fight it with drug treatments.
2h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Decoding digital ownership: Why your e-book might not feel like 'yours'People feel very differently about owning physical books versus e-books, a recent study shows. While stereotypes suggest that younger consumers prefer digital books, that is not actually the case, researchers found.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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First record of large-antlered muntjac in VietnamIn November 2017 — under a biodiversity monitoring and assessment activity supported by the US Agency for International Development — scientists and conservationists captured photographs of one of the rarest and most threatened mammal species of Southeast Asia, the large-antlered muntjac, in Quang Nam province, central Vietnam.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Married couples share risk of developing diabetesResearchers have discovered a connection between the BMI of one spouse and the other spouse's risk of developing type 2 diabetes. The researchers therefore believe that efforts to detect undiagnosed diabetes and so-called prediabetes should not focus exclusively on the individual, but also on couples and households.
2h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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'Spooky action at a distance': Researchers develop module for quantum repeaterPhysicists have succeeded in entangling a single atom with a single photon in the telecom wavelength range. This constitutes a basic building block for transmission of quantum information over long distance with low loss.
2h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Lead exposure found to affect fertility ratesNew research that examined the impact of exposure to lead (in the air and topsoil) on fertility in the United States has found that exposure matters for both women and men. It is the first study to find causal evidence of the relationship between lead exposure and fertility rates in the 1980s and mid-2000s.
2h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Remote control of transport through nanoporesIn our bodies, the transfer of genetic information, viral infections and protein trafficking, as well as the synthesis and degradation of biomolecules are all phenomena that require the transport of molecules through channels. In a new study scientists have shown how to alter external factors such as external voltage to control the transport of a sample molecule through a test nanopore.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Research supports restrictions on opioid-containing cold medicines for childrenPrescription cough and cold medicines containing the opioid hydrocodone were more likely to cause serious side effects in children than those containing codeine, according to a new study. The research supports recent U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) restrictions on prescription hydrocodone- and codeine-containing cough medicines for children and suggests that opioids in general should not b
2h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Bear researcher in 'dream job' attacked by grizzlyA government wildlife worker who recently landed her dream job researching grizzly bears in a Montana mountain range is recovering from a bear attack that left her with a fractured skull and other serious injuries.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Pentagon adopts new cellphone restrictionsAfter months of debate, the Defense Department approved Monday new restrictions for the use of cellphones and some other electronic devices in the Pentagon where classified information is present or discussed. But officials stopped far short of imposing an all-out ban.
2h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Texas A&M, USDA research aimed at nitrite poisoning leads to methane mitigationTwo government researchers and a college graduate student aiming at one issue in the cattle industry are finding they can address two issues—nitrite poisoning and methane emissions—with an animal probiotic they are developing.
2h
Live Science
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Archaeologists Find 'Holy Grail of Shipwrecks' Carrying Stash Worth Up to $17 BillionAfter 310 years at the bottom of the Caribbean Sea, the Spanish San José shipwreck has finally been identified.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Digging into new ethical issues around stem cellsDiscussions concerning the ethical issues related to stem cells have been ongoing for many years, but a special section in the latest issue of Perspectives in Biology and Medicine takes a deep look at some of the newest and most complex issues — including the direct global sales of services and untested and unproven products marketed as stem cells.
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The Atlantic
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Life, Death, and Reincarnation as a DoveWhen filmmaker Xavier Marrades discovered that his distant relative, Ramon, was closely bonded with an unusual animal, Marrades knew he had to meet him. “My mum showed me a picture of them together and it was quite unbelievable,” Marrades told The Atlantic . “A couple of months later, when I had established trust between me and Ramon, I asked him if he would be okay if I shot [a film] with him an
2h
Live Science
9
Archaeologists Just Discovered the Mangled Remains of a Slaughtered Barbarian Tribe in Denmark2,000 years ago, a ragtag group of Germanic tribesmen was slaughtered in battle. How they were buried has archaeologists turning their heads.
2h
Live Science
5
Aliens Could 'Slingshot' Their Way Off Earth-Like Worlds (Well, Maybe)Slingshot your way to space.
2h
New on MIT Technology Review
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Amazon’s HQ2 could price lower-income workers out of its chosen city
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Popular Science
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Getting on a plane? Here's how they're inspected to keep you safeTechnology This is what the FAA demands when it comes to ensuring the safety of commercial aircrafts. A tragic airplane accident has prompted the FAA to crank up the frequency on commercial airline inspections.
2h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Using 3D X-rays to measure particle movement inside lithium ion batteriesLithium ion battery performance can decay over time, may not fully charge after many charge/discharge cycles, and may discharge quickly even when idle. Researchers at the University of Illinois applied a technique using 3D X-ray tomography of an electrode to better understand what is happening on the inside of a lithium ion battery and ultimately build batteries with more storage capacity and long
2h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Malaria-causing parasite manipulates liver cells to surviveBefore invading the bloodstream, the malaria-causing Plasmodium parasite rapidly reproduces inside its host's liver cells. Duke University researchers show that liver-stage Plasmodium relies on a host protein called aquaporin-3 to survive and copy itself. Inhibiting the function of aquaporin-3 may provide a new way to keep Plasmodium from proliferating and prevent malaria before symptoms start.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Brazil's austerity measures could increase avoidable child deaths, researchers findCutbacks to social programs in Brazil could lead to more avoidable childhood hospitalizations and deaths compared to maintaining current funding.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Projected impact on childhood mortality of austerity versus social protections in BrazilCompared with fiscal austerity measures currently being implemented in Brazil, the maintenance of social protection could result in a reduction in childhood mortality by 8.6 percent in 2030, according to simulations published this week in PLOS Medicine by Davide Rasella of the Universidade Federal da Bahia, Brazil, and colleagues.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Unnecessary antibiotic use in asthma exacerbations may increase hospital stay, costsAdministering antibiotics to adults hospitalized with an asthma exacerbation without any documented indication of lung infection appears to lengthen hospital stay, increase cost and result in increased risk for antibiotic-related diarrhea, according to new research presented at the ATS 2018 International Conference.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
3
Hawaii volcano producing toxic lava haze plume called 'laze'The eruption of Kilauea volcano in Hawaii sparked new safety warnings about toxic gas on the Big Island's southern coastline after lava began flowing into the ocean and setting off a chemical reaction.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Malaria-causing parasite manipulates liver cells to surviveWhen the malaria-causing Plasmodium parasite first slips into the human bloodstream, injected by the bite of an infected mosquito, it does not immediately target red blood cells.
2h
Feed: All Latest
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Capturing Humor in a Sea of Red TapeOle Witt’s flash photographs make bureaucracy all too real—particularly India’s, dubbed one of the worst in Asia.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Porsche recalls car model aimed at the very youngLuxury German automaker Porsche on Tuesday ordered a recall of a recent model, citing safety hazards for joyriding operators and offering full refunds.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Fluid dynamics may play key role in evolution of cooperationBelieve it or not—it's in our nature to cooperate with one another, even when cheating may be more profitable. Social cooperation is common in every scale of life, from the simplest bacterial films and multicellular tissues to insect colonies and nation-states, where individuals prioritize the common good over personal gain, even when the two might conflict. Scientists have long wondered how socia
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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How citizen science transforms passive learners into engaged scientistsThird-grader Jessica was quiet in group discussions and did not see herself as a strong science student. But after an eight-week unit in school where she was able to read, write about, collect data on and even draw and photograph ladybugs for a project, she began to see herself as scientist in her own right—explaining the life stages and lifestyles of ladybugs to grownups with conviction.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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Gauging language proficiency through eye movementAn MIT study indicates eye movement can reveal the proficiency of people reading English as a second language.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Science in the palm of your hand: How citizen science transforms passive learnersCitizen science projects can engage even children who previously were not interested in science. This article provides guidance on building these lessons.
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iBiology (uploads) on YouTube

Elaine Ostrander (NIH) 2: Genomics of Dogs disease: Dog Genes Tell Surprising TalesElaine Ostrander provides an overview of canine genetics, and explains how scientists are using genetics to decipher the molecular basis of different traits such as height and cancer risk. https://www.ibiology.org/genetics-and-gene-regulation/canine-genetics Talk Overview: Although all domestic dogs belong to the same species, different breeds display unique morphological traits and different dis
3h
iBiology (uploads) on YouTube

Elaine Ostrander (NIH) 1: Canine Genetics: Dog Genes Tell Surprising TalesElaine Ostrander provides an overview of canine genetics, and explains how scientists are using genetics to decipher the molecular basis of different traits such as height and cancer risk. https://www.ibiology.org/genetics-and-gene-regulation/canine-genetics Talk Overview: Although all domestic dogs belong to the same species, different breeds display unique morphological traits and different dis
3h
Big Think
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Survey: Most Germans distrust Trump’s America, see Russia as reliableGermany has long harbored varying degrees of anti-Americanism, but a new survey suggests those sentiments have grown particularly strong. Read More
3h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Fluid dynamics may play key role in evolution of cooperationIn a new study, physicists at the University of Notre Dame examined how the mechanical properties of an environment may shape the social evolution of microbial populations.
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The Atlantic
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Donald Glover Fans Have Taken Over a Pro-Trump Reddit PageDonald Glover fans have taken control of a popular Trump fan page on Reddit. The subreddit, thedonald , which has about 17,000 subscribers, is not to be confused with Reddit’s much larger and more famous Trump fan page, The_Donald , which has over 600,000 subscribers. The takeover began on Monday when fans began posting photos and memes of the acclaimed actor and recording artist. “The One True D
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The Atlantic
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Arne Duncan Is Serious: Americans Should Boycott SchoolThe former education secretary says it’s time for American families to boycott school to fight for stricter gun laws. Over the weekend, Arne Duncan, who served in the Obama administration, replied approvingly to a radical suggestion from a former colleague. “Maybe it’s time for America’s 50 million school parents to simply pull their kids out of school until we have better gun laws,” tweeted Pete
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
2
Two-and-a-half-year expedition ends in world's most biodiverse protected areaAfter a two-and-a-half-year expedition through the world's most biodiverse protected area, the Identidad Madidi explorers have concluded their epic quest of completing a massive biological survey of Madidi National Park, uncovering more than 120 potentially new species of plants, butterflies and vertebrates in the process, according to WCS (Wildlife Conservation Society).
3h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Pigs that digest their nutrients could reduce pork industry's carbon footprintGiving pigs the ability to digest more nutrients in their grains could help reduce the pork industry's environmental impact, says new research published in eLife.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Decoding digital ownership: Why your e-book might not feel like 'yours'Despite stereotypes that paint millennials as "all technology, all the time," young people may still prefer curling up with a paper book over their e-reader—even more so than their older counterparts—according to a new study from the University of Arizona that explores consumers' psychological perceptions of e-book ownership.
3h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Did human activity really trigger the late Holocene rainforest crisis in Central Africa? [Physical Sciences]In a paper by Garcin et al. in PNAS (1), it is assumed that a sharp increase in settlement activities in the Central African rainforest during the first millennium BC caused widespread deforestation between 2,600 and 2,020 cal y BP (the late Holocene rainforest crisis or LHRC) (2, 3). Archaeology…
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Reply to Clist et al.: Human activity is the most probable trigger of the late Holocene rainforest crisis in Western Central Africa [Physical Sciences]Clist et al. (1) challenge our conclusions (2), criticizing our archaeological synthesis to maintain that the late Holocene rainforest crisis (LHRC) in Western Central Africa (WCA) was not triggered by human activity. Clist et al. (1) claim that the archaeological 14C dates we used were not critically evaluated, as we…
3h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Impact of sampling strategies and reconstruction protocols in nasal airflow simulations in fossil hominins [Biological Sciences]In their study, de Azevedo et al. (1) employ a sample of 12 individuals from Argentina of Chinese, Japanese, and Korean origin [northeastern Asians (NEA)] as representative of cold-adapted populations. However, all previous literature on the subject shows that the craniofacial morphology of these populations does not exhibit features adapted…
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Reply to Evteev and Heuze: How to overcome the problem of modeling respiration departing from bony structures [Biological Sciences]Evteev and Heuzé (1) state that there is no evidence supporting that Chinese, Japanese, and Korean populations exhibit cold-adaptation features. However, several facial traits present in these groups were previously interpreted as cold-climate adaptations (2–9). For instance, a composite sample that included Chinese, Japanese, and Korean individuals showed internal nasal…
3h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Laterally confined growth of cells induces nuclear reprogramming in the absence of exogenous biochemical factors [Applied Physical Sciences]Cells in tissues undergo transdifferentiation programs when stimulated by specific mechanical and biochemical signals. While seminal studies have demonstrated that exogenous biochemical factors can reprogram somatic cells into pluripotent stem cells, the critical roles played by mechanical signals in such reprogramming process have not been well documented. In this paper,…
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Physics of lumen growth [Biophysics and Computational Biology]We model the dynamics of formation of intercellular secretory lumens. Using conservation laws, we quantitatively study the balance between paracellular leaks and the build-up of osmotic pressure in the lumen. Our model predicts a critical pumping threshold to expand stable lumens. Consistently with experimental observations in bile canaliculi, the model…
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Developing a molecular dynamics force field for both folded and disordered protein states [Biophysics and Computational Biology]Molecular dynamics (MD) simulation is a valuable tool for characterizing the structural dynamics of folded proteins and should be similarly applicable to disordered proteins and proteins with both folded and disordered regions. It has been unclear, however, whether any physical model (force field) used in MD simulations accurately describes both…
3h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

IonStar enables high-precision, low-missing-data proteomics quantification in large biological cohorts [Applied Biological Sciences]Reproducible quantification of large biological cohorts is critical for clinical/pharmaceutical proteomics yet remains challenging because most prevalent methods suffer from drastically declined commonly quantified proteins and substantially deteriorated quantitative quality as cohort size expands. MS2-based data-independent acquisition approaches represent tremendous advancements in reproducible
3h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Cisplatin-DNA adduct repair of transcribed genes is controlled by two circadian programs in mouse tissues [Biochemistry]Cisplatin is a major cancer chemotherapeutic drug. It kills cancer cells by damaging their DNA, mainly in the form of Pt-d(GpG) diadducts. However, it also has serious side effects, including nephrotoxicity and hepatotoxicity that limit its usefulness. Chronotherapy is taking circadian time into account during therapy to improve the therapeutic…
3h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Cotranslocational processing of the protein substrate calmodulin by an AAA+ unfoldase occurs via unfolding and refolding intermediates [Biophysics and Computational Biology]Protein remodeling by AAA+ enzymes is central for maintaining proteostasis in a living cell. However, a detailed structural description of how this is accomplished at the level of the substrate molecules that are acted upon is lacking. Here, we combine chemical cross-linking and methyl transverse relaxation-optimized NMR spectroscopy to study,…
3h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Systematic approach for dissecting the molecular mechanisms of transcriptional regulation in bacteria [Biophysics and Computational Biology]Gene regulation is one of the most ubiquitous processes in biology. However, while the catalog of bacterial genomes continues to expand rapidly, we remain ignorant about how almost all of the genes in these genomes are regulated. At present, characterizing the molecular mechanisms by which individual regulatory sequences operate requires…
3h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

STXBP4 regulates APC/C-mediated p63 turnover and drives squamous cell carcinogenesis [Cell Biology]Levels of the N-terminally truncated isoform of p63 (ΔN p63), well documented to play a pivotal role in basal epidermal gene expression and epithelial maintenance, need to be strictly regulated. We demonstrate here that the anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C) complex plays an essential role in the ubiquitin-mediated turnover of ΔNp63α through…
3h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Embryonic regeneration by relocalization of the Spemann organizer during twinning in Xenopus [Developmental Biology]The formation of identical twins from a single egg has fascinated developmental biologists for a very long time. Previous work had shown that Xenopus blastulae bisected along the dorsal–ventral (D-V) midline (i.e., the sagittal plane) could generate twins but at very low frequencies. Here, we have improved this method by…
3h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Strategic investment explains patterns of cooperation and cheating in a microbe [Evolution]Contributing to cooperation is typically costly, while its rewards are often available to all members of a social group. So why should individuals be willing to pay these costs, especially if they could cheat by exploiting the investments of others? Kin selection theory broadly predicts that individuals should invest more…
3h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Suppressor mutation analysis combined with 3D modeling explains cohesin’s capacity to hold and release DNA [Genetics]Cohesin is a fundamental protein complex that holds sister chromatids together. Separase protease cleaves a cohesin subunit Rad21/SCC1, causing the release of cohesin from DNA to allow chromosome segregation. To understand the functional organization of cohesin, we employed next-generation whole-genome sequencing and identified numerous extragenic suppressors that overcome either inactive…
3h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Identification of cytokine-specific sensory neural signals by decoding murine vagus nerve activity [Immunology and Inflammation]The nervous system maintains physiological homeostasis through reflex pathways that modulate organ function. This process begins when changes in the internal milieu (e.g., blood pressure, temperature, or pH) activate visceral sensory neurons that transmit action potentials along the vagus nerve to the brainstem. IL-1β and TNF, inflammatory cytokines produced by…
3h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Osmotic stabilization prevents cochlear synaptopathy after blast trauma [Medical Sciences]Traumatic noise causes hearing loss by damaging sensory hair cells and their auditory synapses. There are no treatments. Here, we investigated mice exposed to a blast wave approximating a roadside bomb. In vivo cochlear imaging revealed an increase in the volume of endolymph, the fluid within scala media, termed endolymphatic…
3h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

PII-like signaling protein SbtB links cAMP sensing with cyanobacterial inorganic carbon response [Microbiology]Cyanobacteria are phototrophic prokaryotes that evolved oxygenic photosynthesis ∼2.7 billion y ago and are presently responsible for ∼10% of total global photosynthetic production. To cope with the evolutionary pressure of dropping ambient CO2 concentrations, they evolved a CO2-concentrating mechanism (CCM) to augment intracellular inorganic carbon (Ci) levels for efficient CO2…
3h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Periplasmic depolymerase provides insight into ABC transporter-dependent secretion of bacterial capsular polysaccharides [Microbiology]Capsules are surface layers of hydrated capsular polysaccharides (CPSs) produced by many bacteria. The human pathogen Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi produces “Vi antigen” CPS, which contributes to virulence. In a conserved strategy used by bacteria with diverse CPS structures, translocation of Vi antigen to the cell surface is driven by…
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
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Specificity and robustness of long-distance connections in weighted, interareal connectomes [Neuroscience]Brain areas’ functional repertoires are shaped by their incoming and outgoing structural connections. In empirically measured networks, most connections are short, reflecting spatial and energetic constraints. Nonetheless, a small number of connections span long distances, consistent with the notion that the functionality of these connections must outweigh their cost. While…
3h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Dopamine receptors mediate strategy abandoning via modulation of a specific prelimbic cortex-nucleus accumbens pathway in mice [Neuroscience]The ability to abandon old strategies and adopt new ones is essential for survival in a constantly changing environment. While previous studies suggest the importance of the prefrontal cortex and some subcortical areas in the generation of strategy-switching flexibility, the fine neural circuitry and receptor mechanisms involved are not fully…
3h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

A selective class of inhibitors for the CLC-Ka chloride ion channel [Pharmacology]CLC proteins are a ubiquitously expressed family of chloride-selective ion channels and transporters. A dearth of pharmacological tools for modulating CLC gating and ion conduction limits investigations aimed at understanding CLC structure/function and physiology. Herein, we describe the design, synthesis, and evaluation of a collection of N-arylated benzimidazole derivatives (BIMs),…
3h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Genomic integration of ERR{gamma}-HNF1{beta} regulates renal bioenergetics and prevents chronic kidney disease [Physiology]Mitochondrial dysfunction is increasingly recognized as a critical determinant of both hereditary and acquired kidney diseases. However, it remains poorly understood how mitochondrial metabolism is regulated to support normal kidney function and how its dysregulation contributes to kidney disease. Here, we show that the nuclear receptor estrogen-related receptor gamma (ERRγ)…
3h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

N-hydroxy-pipecolic acid is a mobile metabolite that induces systemic disease resistance in Arabidopsis [Plant Biology]Systemic acquired resistance (SAR) is a global response in plants induced at the site of infection that leads to long-lasting and broad-spectrum disease resistance at distal, uninfected tissues. Despite the importance of this priming mechanism, the identity and complexity of defense signals that are required to initiate SAR signaling is…
3h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Time-evolving genetic networks reveal a NAC troika that negatively regulates leaf senescence in Arabidopsis [Plant Biology]Senescence is controlled by time-evolving networks that describe the temporal transition of interactions among senescence regulators. Here, we present time-evolving networks for NAM/ATAF/CUC (NAC) transcription factors in Arabidopsis during leaf aging. The most evident characteristic of these time-dependent networks was a shift from positive to negative regulation among NACs at…
3h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Codon usage of highly expressed genes affects proteome-wide translation efficiency [Systems Biology]Although the genetic code is redundant, synonymous codons for the same amino acid are not used with equal frequencies in genomes, a phenomenon termed “codon usage bias.” Previous studies have demonstrated that synonymous changes in a coding sequence can exert significant cis effects on the gene’s expression level. However, whether…
3h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Ion-triggered selectivity in bacterial sodium channels [Biophysics and Computational Biology]Since the availability of the first crystal structure of a bacterial Na+ channel in 2011, understanding selectivity across this family of membrane proteins has been the subject of intense research efforts. Initially, free energy calculations based on molecular dynamics simulations revealed that although sodium ions can easily permeate the channel…
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Polypentagonal ice-like water networks emerge solely in an activity-improved variant of ice-binding protein [Biophysics and Computational Biology]Polypentagonal water networks were recently observed in a protein capable of binding to ice crystals, or ice-binding protein (IBP). To examine such water networks and clarify their role in ice-binding, we determined X-ray crystal structures of a 65-residue defective isoform of a Zoarcidae-derived IBP (wild type, WT) and its five…
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Pan-cancer transcriptional signatures predictive of oncogenic mutations reveal that Fbw7 regulates cancer cell oxidative metabolism [Cell Biology]The Fbw7 (F-box/WD repeat-containing protein 7) ubiquitin ligase targets multiple oncoproteins for degradation and is commonly mutated in cancers. Like other pleiotropic tumor suppressors, Fbw7’s complex biology has impeded our understanding of how Fbw7 mutations promote tumorigenesis and hindered the development of targeted therapies. To address these needs, we employed…
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Defective phagosome motility and degradation in cell nonautonomous RPE pathogenesis of a dominant macular degeneration [Cell Biology]Stargardt macular dystrophy 3 (STGD3) is caused by dominant mutations in the ELOVL4 gene. Like other macular degenerations, pathogenesis within the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) appears to contribute to the loss of photoreceptors from the central retina. However, the RPE does not express ELOVL4, suggesting photoreceptor cell loss in STGD3…
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
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ZNRF3 functions in mammalian sex determination by inhibiting canonical WNT signaling [Developmental Biology]Mammalian sex determination is controlled by the antagonistic interactions of two genetic pathways: The SRY-SOX9-FGF9 network promotes testis determination partly by opposing proovarian pathways, while RSPO1/WNT-β-catenin/FOXL2 signals control ovary development by inhibiting SRY-SOX9-FGF9. The molecular basis of this mutual antagonism is unclear. Here we show that ZNRF3, a WNT signaling…
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Divergent drivers of leaf trait variation within species, among species, and among functional groups [Ecology]Understanding variation in leaf functional traits—including rates of photosynthesis and respiration and concentrations of nitrogen and phosphorus—is a fundamental challenge in plant ecophysiology. When expressed per unit leaf area, these traits typically increase with leaf mass per area (LMA) within species but are roughly independent of LMA across the global…
3h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Recurrent bridgehead effects accelerate global alien ant spread [Ecology]Biological invasions are a major threat to biological diversity, agriculture, and human health. To predict and prevent new invasions, it is crucial to develop a better understanding of the drivers of the invasion process. The analysis of 4,533 border interception events revealed that at least 51 different alien ant species…
3h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Linked genetic variation and not genome structure causes widespread differential expression associated with chromosomal inversions [Evolution]Chromosomal inversions are widely thought to be favored by natural selection because they suppress recombination between alleles that have higher fitness on the same genetic background or in similar environments. Nonetheless, few selected alleles have been characterized at the molecular level. Gene expression profiling provides a powerful way to identify…
3h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Artificial selection reveals sex differences in the genetic basis of sexual attractiveness [Evolution]Mutual mate choice occurs when males and females base mating decisions on shared traits. Despite increased awareness, the extent to which mutual choice drives phenotypic change remains poorly understood. When preferences in both sexes target the same traits, it is unclear how evolution will proceed and whether responses to sexual…
3h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Longevity and transposon defense, the case of termite reproductives [Evolution]Social insects are promising new models in aging research. Within single colonies, longevity differences of several magnitudes exist that can be found elsewhere only between different species. Reproducing queens (and, in termites, also kings) can live for several decades, whereas sterile workers often have a lifespan of a few weeks…
3h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Acquisition of virulence genes by a carrier strain gave rise to the ongoing epidemics of meningococcal disease in West Africa [Evolution]In the African meningitis belt, a region of sub-Saharan Africa comprising 22 countries from Senegal in the west to Ethiopia in the east, large epidemics of serogroup A meningococcal meningitis have occurred periodically. After gradual introduction from 2010 of mass vaccination with a monovalent meningococcal A conjugate vaccine, serogroup A…
3h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Precise detection of de novo single nucleotide variants in human genomes [Genetics]The precise determination of de novo genetic variants has enormous implications across different fields of biology and medicine, particularly personalized medicine. Currently, de novo variations are identified by mapping sample reads from a parent–offspring trio to a reference genome, allowing for a certain degree of differences. While widely used, this…
3h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Reducing resistance allele formation in CRISPR gene drive [Genetics]CRISPR homing gene drives can convert heterozygous cells with one copy of the drive allele into homozygotes, thereby enabling super-Mendelian inheritance. Such a mechanism could be used, for example, to rapidly disseminate a genetic payload in a population, promising effective strategies for the control of vector-borne diseases. However, all CRISPR…
3h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Biochemically altered myelin triggers autoimmune demyelination [Immunology and Inflammation]Although immune attack against central nervous system (CNS) myelin is a central feature of multiple sclerosis (MS), its root cause is unresolved. In this report, we provide direct evidence that subtle biochemical modifications to brain myelin elicit pathological immune responses with radiological and histological properties similar to MS lesions. A…
3h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Modeling combination therapy for breast cancer with BET and immune checkpoint inhibitors [Medical Sciences]CTLA-4 is an immune checkpoint expressed on active anticancer T cells. When it combines with its ligand B7 on dendritic cells, it inhibits the activity of the T cells. The Bromo- and Extra-Terminal (BET) protein family includes proteins that regulate the expression of key oncogenes and antiapoptotic proteins. BET inhibitor…
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Simulated night shift work induces circadian misalignment of the human peripheral blood mononuclear cell transcriptome [Medical Sciences]Misalignment of the endogenous circadian timing system leads to disruption of physiological rhythms and may contribute to the development of the deleterious health effects associated with night shift work. However, the molecular underpinnings remain to be elucidated. Here, we investigated the effect of a 4-day simulated night shift work protocol…
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Deubiquitinating enzyme USP3 controls CHK1 chromatin association and activation [Medical Sciences]Checkpoint kinase 1 (CHK1), a Ser/Thr protein kinase, is modified by the K63-linked ubiquitin chain in response to genotoxic stress, which promotes its nuclear localization, chromatin association, and activation. Interestingly, this bulky modification is linked to a critical residue, K132, at the kinase active site. It is unclear how this…
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
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Activation of intestinal tuft cell-expressed Sucnr1 triggers type 2 immunity in the mouse small intestine [Medical Sciences]The hallmark features of type 2 mucosal immunity include intestinal tuft and goblet cell expansion initiated by tuft cell activation. How infectious agents that induce type 2 mucosal immunity are detected by tuft cells is unknown. Published microarray analysis suggested that succinate receptor 1 (Sucnr1) is specifically expressed in tuft…
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Structural basis for Acinetobacter baumannii biofilm formation [Microbiology]Acinetobacter baumannii—a leading cause of nosocomial infections—has a remarkable capacity to persist in hospital environments and medical devices due to its ability to form biofilms. Biofilm formation is mediated by Csu pili, assembled via the “archaic” chaperone–usher pathway. The X-ray structure of the CsuC-CsuE chaperone–adhesin preassembly complex reveals the basis…
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Staphylococcus aureus clumping factor A is a force-sensitive molecular switch that activates bacterial adhesion [Microbiology]Clumping factor A (ClfA), a cell-wall–anchored protein from Staphylococcus aureus, is a virulence factor in various infections and facilitates the colonization of protein-coated biomaterials. ClfA promotes bacterial adhesion to the blood plasma protein fibrinogen (Fg) via molecular forces that have not been studied so far. A unique, yet poorly understood,…
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Ca2+-activated Cl current predominates in threshold response of mouse olfactory receptor neurons [Neuroscience]In mammalian olfactory transduction, odorants activate a cAMP-mediated signaling pathway that leads to the opening of cyclic nucleotide-gated (CNG), nonselective cation channels and depolarization. The Ca2+ influx through open CNG channels triggers an inward current through Ca2+-activated Cl channels (ANO2), which is expected to produce signal amplification. However, a study…
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

LRRK2 phosphorylation of auxilin mediates synaptic defects in dopaminergic neurons from patients with Parkinson’s disease [Neuroscience]Recently identified Parkinson’s disease (PD) genes involved in synaptic vesicle endocytosis, such as DNAJC6 (auxilin), have further implicated synaptic dysfunction in PD pathogenesis. However, how synaptic dysfunction contributes to the vulnerability of human dopaminergic neurons has not been previously explored. Here, we demonstrate that commonly mutated, PD-linked leucine-rich repeat kinase…
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Transcriptomic context of DRD1 is associated with prefrontal activity and behavior during working memory [Neuroscience]Dopamine D1 receptor (D1R) signaling shapes prefrontal cortex (PFC) activity during working memory (WM). Previous reports found higher WM performance associated with alleles linked to greater expression of the gene coding for D1Rs (DRD1). However, there is no evidence on the relationship between genetic modulation of DRD1 expression in PFC…
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Flight motor networks modulate primary olfactory processing in the moth Manduca sexta [Neuroscience]Nervous systems must distinguish sensory signals derived from an animal’s own movements (reafference) from environmentally derived sources (exafference). To accomplish this, motor networks producing reafference transmit motor information, via a corollary discharge circuit (CDC), to affected sensory networks, modulating sensory function during behavior. While CDCs have been described in most…
3h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Ultrafast glutamate sensors resolve high-frequency release at Schaffer collateral synapses [Neuroscience]Glutamatergic synapses display a rich repertoire of plasticity mechanisms on many different time scales, involving dynamic changes in the efficacy of transmitter release as well as changes in the number and function of postsynaptic glutamate receptors. The genetically encoded glutamate sensor iGluSnFR enables visualization of glutamate release from presynaptic terminals…
3h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Farnesoid X receptor is essential for the survival of renal medullary collecting duct cells under hypertonic stress [Physiology]Hypertonicity in renal medulla is critical for the kidney to produce concentrated urine. Renal medullary cells have to survive high medullary osmolarity during antidiuresis. Previous study reported that farnesoid X receptor (FXR), a nuclear receptor transcription factor activated by endogenous bile acids, increases urine concentrating ability by up-regulating aquaporin 2…
3h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Diurnal down-regulation of ethylene biosynthesis mediates biomass heterosis [Plant Biology]Heterosis is widely applied in agriculture; however, the underlying molecular mechanisms for superior performance are not well understood. Ethylene biosynthesis and signaling genes are shown to be down-regulated in Arabidopsis interspecific hybrids. Ethylene is a plant hormone that promotes fruit ripening and maturation but inhibits hypocotyl elongation. Here we report…
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Rewiring of auxin signaling under persistent shade [Plant Biology]Light cues from neighboring vegetation rapidly initiate plant shade-avoidance responses. Despite our detailed knowledge of the early steps of this response, the molecular events under prolonged shade are largely unclear. Here we show that persistent neighbor cues reinforce growth responses in addition to promoting auxin-responsive gene expression in Arabidopsis and…
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Correction for Ishikawa et al., Ion-beam irradiation, gene identification, and marker-assisted breeding in the development of low-cadmium rice [Correction]AGRICULTURAL SCIENCES Correction for “Ion-beam irradiation, gene identification, and marker-assisted breeding in the development of low-cadmium rice,” by Satoru Ishikawa, Yasuhiro Ishimaru, Masato Igura, Masato Kuramata, Tadashi Abe, Takeshi Senoura, Yoshihiro Hase, Tomohito Arao, Naoko K. Nishizawa, and Hiromi Nakanishi, which was first published November 6, 2012; 10.1073/pnas.1211132109 (Proc Na
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Correction for Xu et al., Drought delays development of the sorghum root microbiome and enriches for monoderm bacteria [Correction]PLANT BIOLOGY Correction for “Drought delays development of the sorghum root microbiome and enriches for monoderm bacteria,” by Ling Xu, Dan Naylor, Zhaobin Dong, Tuesday Simmons, Grady Pierroz, Kim K. Hixson, Young-Mo Kim, Erika M. Zink, Kristin M. Engbrecht, Yi Wang, Cheng Gao, Stephanie DeGraaf, Mary A. Madera, Julie A….
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
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In This Issue [This Week in PNAS]Uncertainty in long-run economic growth Uncertainty in future economic growth can influence climate policy. Image courtesy of iStock/MicroStockHub. Modeling uncertainty in forecasts of long-run economic growth is an essential part of climate change research that the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) has highlighted as a priority. Peter Christensen et…
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
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Stephen Hawking (1942-2018): Toward a complete understanding of the universe [Retrospectives]Stephen Hawking overcame the limitations of a debilitating disease to make major contributions to science. He did this through remarkable persistence, determination, conviction, courage, and will. He was supported in this by his family, his students, and his colleagues. Stephen Hawking. Image courtesy of Alan Fersht (University of Cambridge, Cambridge,…
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Taming unruly chloride channel inhibitors with rational design [Pharmacology]Selective Inhibitors Enable Fundamental Physiological Studies A selective inhibitor is a drug that inhibits the function of one type of protein more than others. This precise block of function can reveal the physiological role of the targeted endogenous protein. In PNAS, Koster et al. (1) describe the design and characterization…
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Uncertainty in long-run forecasts of quantities such as per capita gross domestic product [Economic Sciences]People make predictions about the future all of the time. Often these predictions take the form of single-value best estimates, with no associated statement of uncertainty. Sometimes that is just fine. For example, if you need to know to within a few meters where Venus or the Earth will be…
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

New explanation for the longevity of social insect reproductives: Transposable element activity [Evolution]The increasing frailty that accompanies old age deeply influences our lives and permeates our thoughts. As a result, studies tackling this topic naturally fascinate both specialists and the general public. However, despite a wealth of research, the fundamental mechanisms of aging remain undetermined. Damage to molecules, such as DNA and…
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Early fossil record of Euarthropoda and the Cambrian Explosion [Evolution]Euarthropoda is one of the best-preserved fossil animal groups and has been the most diverse animal phylum for over 500 million years. Fossil Konservat-Lagerstätten, such as Burgess Shale-type deposits (BSTs), show the evolution of the euarthropod stem lineage during the Cambrian from 518 million years ago (Ma). The stem lineage…
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

High mobility group A2 (HMGA2) deficiency in pigs leads to dwarfism, abnormal fetal resource allocation, and cryptorchidism [Agricultural Sciences]Expression of HMGA2 is strongly associated with body size and growth in mice and humans. In mice, inactivation of one or both alleles of Hmga2 results in body-size reductions of 20% and 60%, respectively. In humans, microdeletions involving the HMGA2 locus result in short stature, suggesting the function of the…
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Phase-transition temperature suppression to achieve cubic GeTe and high thermoelectric performance by Bi and Mn codoping [Applied Physical Sciences]Germanium telluride (GeTe)-based materials, which display intriguing functionalities, have been intensively studied from both fundamental and technological perspectives. As a thermoelectric material, though, the phase transition in GeTe from a rhombohedral structure to a cubic structure at ∼700 K is a major obstacle impeding applications for energy harvesting. In this…
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Interferometric imaging of nonlocal electromechanical power transduction in ferroelectric domains [Applied Physical Sciences]The electrical generation and detection of elastic waves are the foundation for acoustoelectronic and acoustooptic systems. For surface acoustic wave devices, microelectromechanical/nanoelectromechanical systems, and phononic crystals, tailoring the spatial variation of material properties such as piezoelectric and elastic tensors may bring significant improvements to the system performance. Due t
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Fully gapped d-wave superconductivity in CeCu2Si2 [Applied Physical Sciences]The nature of the pairing symmetry of the first heavy fermion superconductor CeCu2Si2 has recently become the subject of controversy. While CeCu2Si2 was generally believed to be a d-wave superconductor, recent low-temperature specific heat measurements showed evidence for fully gapped superconductivity, contrary to the nodal behavior inferred from earlier results….
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
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Science and Culture: Artistic endeavors strive to save coral reefs [Biochemistry]The gallery of artist Colleen Flanigan is harder to visit than most. On one clear day in January, Flanigan suited up in scuba gear at the Sand Dollar Sports Dive Shop in Cozumel, Mexico, swam 60 meters out to sea, and dove 4 meters down to her latest installation. Zoe–A…
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Inverted allosteric coupling between activation and inactivation gates in K+ channels [Biochemistry]The selectivity filter and the activation gate in potassium channels are functionally and structurally coupled. An allosteric coupling underlies C-type inactivation coupled to activation gating in this ion-channel family (i.e., opening of the activation gate triggers the collapse of the channel’s selectivity filter). We have identified the second Threonine residue…
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Laboratory evolution of virus-like nucleocapsids from nonviral protein cages [Biochemistry]Viruses are remarkable nanomachines that efficiently hijack cellular functions to replicate and self-assemble their components within a complex biological environment. As all steps of the viral life cycle depend on formation of a protective proteinaceous shell that packages the DNA or RNA genome, bottom-up construction of virus-like nucleocapsids from nonviral…
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Dynamic switching enables efficient bacterial colonization in flow [Biophysics and Computational Biology]Bacteria colonize environments that contain networks of moving fluids, including digestive pathways, blood vasculature in animals, and the xylem and phloem networks in plants. In these flow networks, bacteria form distinct biofilm structures that have an important role in pathogenesis. The physical mechanisms that determine the spatial organization of bacteria…
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Real-time observation of DNA target interrogation and product release by the RNA-guided endonuclease CRISPR Cpf1 (Cas12a) [Biophysics and Computational Biology]CRISPR-Cas9, which imparts adaptive immunity against foreign genomic invaders in certain prokaryotes, has been repurposed for genome-engineering applications. More recently, another RNA-guided CRISPR endonuclease called Cpf1 (also known as Cas12a) was identified and is also being repurposed. Little is known about the kinetics and mechanism of Cpf1 DNA interaction and…
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Molecular dynamics simulations of liquid silica crystallization [Chemistry]Silica is one of the most abundant minerals on Earth and is widely used in many fields. Investigating the crystallization of liquid silica by atomic simulations is of great importance to understand the crystallization mechanism; however, the high crystallization barrier and the tendency of silica to form glasses make such…
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Origin of radiation tolerance in amorphous Ge2Sb2Te5 phase-change random-access memory material [Chemistry]The radiation hardness of amorphous Ge2Sb2Te5 phase-change random-access memory material has been elucidated by ab initio molecular-dynamics simulations. Ionizing radiation events have been modeled to investigate their effect on the atomic and electronic structure of the glass. Investigation of the short- and medium-range order highlights a structural recovery of the…
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Sequentially bridged graphene sheets with high strength, toughness, and electrical conductivity [Chemistry]We here show that infiltrated bridging agents can convert inexpensively fabricated graphene platelet sheets into high-performance materials, thereby avoiding the need for a polymer matrix. Two types of bridging agents were investigated for interconnecting graphene sheets, which attach to sheets by either π–π bonding or covalent bonding. When applied alone,…
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Rapid shift and millennial-scale variations in Holocene North Pacific Intermediate Water ventilation [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]The Pacific hosts the largest oxygen minimum zones (OMZs) in the world ocean, which are thought to intensify and expand under future climate change, with significant consequences for marine ecosystems, biogeochemical cycles, and fisheries. At present, no deep ventilation occurs in the North Pacific due to a persistent halocline, but…
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Critical vaporization of MgSiO3 [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]Inhomogeneous ab initio molecular dynamics simulations show that vaporization of MgSiO3 is incongruent and that the vapor phase is dominated by SiO and O2 molecules. The vapor is strongly depleted in Mg at low temperature and approaches the composition of the liquid near the critical point. We find that the…
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Wireless, intraoral hybrid electronics for real-time quantification of sodium intake toward hypertension management [Engineering]Recent wearable devices offer portable monitoring of biopotentials, heart rate, or physical activity, allowing for active management of human health and wellness. Such systems can be inserted in the oral cavity for measuring food intake in regard to controlling eating behavior, directly related to diseases such as hypertension, diabetes, and…
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Magnetic control of heterogeneous ice nucleation with nanophase magnetite: Biophysical and agricultural implications [Environmental Sciences]In supercooled water, ice nucleation is a stochastic process that requires ∼250–300 molecules to transiently achieve structural ordering before an embryonic seed crystal can nucleate. This happens most easily on crystalline surfaces, in a process termed heterogeneous nucleation; without such surfaces, water droplets will supercool to below −30 °C before…
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Importing food damages domestic environment: Evidence from global soybean trade [Environmental Sciences]Protecting the environment and enhancing food security are among the world’s Sustainable Development Goals and greatest challenges. International food trade is an important mechanism to enhance food security worldwide. Nonetheless, it is widely concluded that in international food trade importing countries gain environmental benefits, while exporting countries suffer environmental problems…
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Inner Workings: Zebrafish assay forges new approach to drug discovery [Pharmacology]Researchers at a University of Washington lab in Seattle are using standard 96-well plates to harbor something other than the usual layer of cultured cells. Instead, newly hatched zebrafish, smaller than a grain of rice, swim in each well. Running from the fish’s head to tail are clumps of hair…
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
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Quantum oscillations in a biaxial pair density wave state [Physics]There has been growing speculation that a pair density wave state is a key component of the phenomenology of the pseudogap phase in the cuprates. Recently, direct evidence for such a state has emerged from an analysis of scanning tunneling microscopy data in halos around the vortex cores. By extrapolation,…
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Anomalous density fluctuations in a strange metal [Physics]A central mystery in high-temperature superconductivity is the origin of the so-called strange metal (i.e., the anomalous conductor from which superconductivity emerges at low temperature). Measuring the dynamic charge response of the copper oxides, χ″(q,ω), would directly reveal the collective properties of the strange metal, but it has never been…
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

The geometric blueprint of perovskites [Physics]Perovskite minerals form an essential component of the Earth’s mantle, and synthetic crystals are ubiquitous in electronics, photonics, and energy technology. The extraordinary chemical diversity of these crystals raises the question of how many and which perovskites are yet to be discovered. Here we show that the “no-rattling” principle postulated…
3h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Flow-induced phase separation of active particles is controlled by boundary conditions [Physics]Active particles, including swimming microorganisms, autophoretic colloids, and droplets, are known to self-organize into ordered structures at fluid–solid boundaries. The entrainment of particles in the attractive parts of their spontaneous flows has been postulated as a possible mechanism underlying this phenomenon. Here, combining experiments, theory, and numerical simulations, we demonstrate..
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Uncertainty in forecasts of long-run economic growth [Sustainability Science]Forecasts of long-run economic growth are critical inputs into policy decisions being made today on the economy and the environment. Despite its importance, there is a sparse literature on long-run forecasts of economic growth and the uncertainty in such forecasts. This study presents comprehensive probabilistic long-run projections of global and…
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Science | The Guardian
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The revolutionising potential of medical AI | LettersReaders respond to news that Theresa May has promised millions towards artificial intelligence that could help fight cancer and other diseases The news that Theresa May has urged the NHS and technology companies to adopt artificial intelligence techniques in order to diagnose diseases such as cancer is extremely positive for both the healthcare community and for patients ( May to promise millions
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Live Science
14
Sally Ride Is Getting Her Own Forever StampPhysicist Sally Ride, the first American woman in space and the first astronaut to come out as having a same-sex partner, will have her likeness on a stamp.
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Live Science
98
Giant Hammerhead Worms Have Been Invading France for DecadesInvasive hammerhead flatworms have been quietly infiltrating French ecosystems since 1999.
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Nyheder – Forskning – Videnskab

Ny forskning: Derfor har folkekirken et godt tag i danskerneDanskerne støtter langt mere op om folkekirken end de nationer, vi normalt sammenligner os med….
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
97
Technique doubles conversion of CO2 to plastic componentFossil fuels have long been the precursor to plastic, but new research from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln and European collaborators could help send that era up in smoke—carbon dioxide, to be exact.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Magnesium magnificent for plasmonic applicationsRice University researchers have synthesized and isolated plasmonic magnesium nanoparticles that show all the promise of their gold, silver and aluminum cousins with none of the drawbacks.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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New brain development disorder identified by scientistsResearchers have identified a new inherited neurodevelopmental disease that causes slow growth, seizures and learning difficulties in humans.
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Science | The Guardian
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The big bangers: grime smashes into the Hadron ColliderThey rapped in its tunnels and played instruments made out of old science equipment. Could this be Cern’s most amazing experiment yet? ‘Anyone attending the performances,” says Jack Jelfs , “will find themselves in a 12-dimensional quantum superposition.” This superposition, adds the artist, will contain three overlaid elements: our mythic past, our scientific present and our unknown future. “So,
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Scientific American Content: Global
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Kilauea's Lava Is Now Spilling into the Ocean–Here's Why That's DangerousA pair of scientists discuss the hazards that Kilauea might pose before it finishes erupting — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Decoding digital ownership: Why your e-book might not feel like 'yours'People feel very differently about owning physical books versus e-books, a recent study shows. While stereotypes suggest that younger consumers prefer digital books, that is not actually the case, researchers found.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Pigs that digest their nutrients could reduce pork industry's carbon footprintGiving pigs the ability to digest more nutrients in their grains could help reduce the pork industry's environmental impact, says new research published in eLife.
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Popular Science
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What are quantum dots, and why are we making them out of tea?Science They're everywhere—and they can also treat cancer. They’re tiny, they reflect and absorb light in useful ways, and they’re increasingly found in our homes: quantum dots.
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The Atlantic
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The Literary Insights of Sylvia Plath’s College ThesisIn June 1953, Sylvia Plath was a 20-year-old summer intern at Mademoiselle , living in New York between her junior and senior years of college. She had won the magazine’s annual contest and was offered a guest editorship, along with 19 other young women. The summer was disillusioning for Plath. On one hand, she faced the expectations for professional excellence typically associated with the New Y
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

New tech may make prosthetic hands easier for patients to useResearchers have developed new technology for decoding neuromuscular signals to control powered, prosthetic wrists and hands. The work relies on computer models that closely mimic the behavior of the natural structures in the forearm, wrist and hand. The technology could also be used to develop new computer interface devices for applications such as gaming and computer-aided design.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Magnesium magnificent for plasmonic applicationsScientists at Rice University and the University of Cambridge synthesize magnesium nanoparticles that show plasmonic properties across the infrared, visible and ultraviolet spectrum.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Fruit flies: 'Living test tubes' to rapidly screen potential disease-causing human geneThis study provides a blueprint of how fruit flies can be used as a rapid screening tool to identify potentially pathogenic human genes.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Downward-facing mouse: stretching reduces tumor growth in mouse model of breast cancerUsing a mouse model of breast cancer and a gentle stretching technique, the team evaluated tumor growth as well as changes in molecular signals of immune response and inflammation resolution. Their results appear in Scientific Reports.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Future doctors take to the streets to address problems at the root of poor healthMedical students seldom learn much about the real-life problems (hunger, joblessness, addiction) their patients face outside the clinic walls. Yet, these problems are at the root of poor health in many low-income communities. An article published today describes a new course which apprentices medical students to community health workers (CHWs) in inner city Philadelphia. CHWs are trusted laypeople
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Closing coal, oil power plants leads to healthier babiesWhile the negative health impacts of pollution from coal- and oil-burning power plants are well-documented, UC Berkeley researchers tested the flip side: do birth outcomes improve following power plant shutdowns. They reviewed state data on preterm births and fertility around eight plants before and after they were retired in California and found 20-25 percent drops in preterm birthrates and an in
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Amazonian 'lookout' birds help other species live in dangerous neighborhoodsUsually, birds of a feather flock together — but in the Amazon, some flocks feature dozens of species of all shapes and colors. A new study by San Francisco State University biologists singles out one reason why these unusually diverse flocks exist: lookout species that call in alarm when they spot dangerous predators.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Temple-led trial demonstrates effectiveness of minimally invasive emphysema treatmentSurgically removing small portions of damaged lung tissue helps some patients with severe emphysema, but is invasive and risky. Now, an effective, but safer option — the Zephyr® Endobronchial Valve (Zephyr® EBV®), an endoscopic lung volume reduction therapy manufactured by Pulmonx Corporation — may provide an alternative. In LIBERATE, a Temple-led clinical trial, implantation of Zephyr® EBV® suc
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Quitting smoking, but not cutting back, linked to better lung healthLong-term light smokers appear to be at greater risk for lung function decline, emphysema and obstructive lung disease than heavy smokers who quit, according to new research presented at the ATS 2018 International Conference.
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Viden
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Minut for minut: Zuckerberg stod skoleret i EU-parlamentetMark Zuckerbergs høring i EU er netop slut – og han slap ganske billigt. Læs alle de kritiske spørgsmål fra politikerne og Zuckerbergs letkøbte svar.
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Scientific American Content: Global
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How the "Carbon Budget" Is Causing ProblemsConfusion over how much CO2 can be emitted could undermine global climate action — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Science | The Guardian
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What would a 19th-century science hero make of today's policy world? | Roland JacksonJohn Tyndall – the man who explained why the sky is blue – would be baffled by the idea of democratic discussion of the direction of research and innovation John Tyndall – the 19th-century Irish scientist ( c. 1822–93), not the 20th-century neo-Nazi – was the man who measured the absorption of heat by gases in the atmosphere, underpinning our modern understanding of climate change, meteorology an
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
2
Amazonian 'lookout' birds help other species live in dangerous neighborhoodsUsually, birds of a feather flock together—but in the Amazon, some flocks feature dozens of species of all shapes and colors. A new study by San Francisco State University biologists singles out one reason why these unusually diverse flocks exist: lookout species that call in alarm when they spot dangerous predators.
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Latest Headlines | Science News
62
Consumer DNA testing promises more than it deliversChances are your DNA doesn’t contain dark secrets. But there may be lots of variety in results from testing company to company.
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Latest Headlines | Science News
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Special report: Genetic testing goes mainstreamConsumer genetic tests may not tell customers that much about themselves. Science News delves into these tests in a multipart series.
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Latest Headlines | Science News
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What genetic tests from 23andMe, Veritas and Genos really told me about my healthA Science News reporter tried out three consumer genetic testing companies to see what people really learn about their health.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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Two-and-a-half-year expedition ends in world's most biodiverse protected areaAfter a two-and-a-half-year expedition through the world's most biodiverse protected area, the Identidad Madidi explorers have concluded their epic quest of completing a massive biological survey of Madidi National Park, uncovering more than 120 potentially new species of plants, butterflies and vertebrates in the process, according to WCS (Wildlife Conservation Society).
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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Technique doubles conversion of CO2 to plastic componentFossil fuels have long been the precursor to plastic, but new research has detailed a technique for doubling the amount of carbon dioxide that gets converted to ethylene — an essential component of the world's most common plastic.
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Science : NPR
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Scientists Take A Ride On The Pacific's 'Shark Highway'Biologists knew the sharks sometimes traveled from waters off Costa Rica south to the Galapagos Islands, but they'd never actually witnessed it. (Image credit: Andy Mann/Waitt Foundation/Pacifico )
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
35
OPERA collaboration presents its final results on neutrino oscillationsThe OPERA experiment, located at the Gran Sasso Laboratory of the Italian National Institute for Nuclear Physics (INFN), was designed to conclusively prove that muon-neutrinos can convert to tau-neutrinos, through a process called neutrino oscillation, whose discovery was awarded the 2015 Nobel Physics Prize. In a paper published today in the journal Physical Review Letters, the OPERA collaboratio
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Live Science
24
Nuclear Detectives Hunt Invisible Particles That Escaped the World's Largest Atom SmasherThe Large Hadron Collider hasn't found any new physics since the Higgs boson. A team of outsider physicists think they know why.
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Live Science
100+
Forgotten Element Could Redefine TimeWhy are scientists trying to make precise clocks even more precise?
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

People with ASD risk being manipulated because they can't tell when they're being lied toA new study shows that the ability to distinguish truth from lies is diminished in people with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) — putting them at greater risk of being manipulated.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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Students taught by highly qualified teachers more likely to obtain bachelor's degreeNow, a researcher at the University of Missouri has found that high school students taught by a string of teachers who majored or minored in a specific teaching subject, instead of a general teaching degree, are more likely to become college graduates.
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Science | The Guardian
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Received pronunciation may be dying out – but its passing is long overdueThe lingua franca of the ‘establishment’ is now only spoken by a tiny fraction of the population – although the RP tinges of my own accent often proved beneficial People often talk about the English language as if it is a thing to keep pretty – a petticoat that might be sullied by the spread of glottal stops, text-speak or slang. The latest to weigh in is the writer and critic Jonathan Meades, in
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
5
Students taught by highly qualified teachers more likely to obtain bachelor's degreePrevious research has shown that teachers play a pivotal role in their students' academic success—or lack thereof. Now, a researcher at the University of Missouri has found that high school students taught by a string of teachers who majored or minored in a specific teaching subject, instead of a general teaching degree, are more likely to become college graduates. The researcher says that schools
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New on MIT Technology Review
55
Americans really don’t trust self-driving cars
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
43
Study: Ancient mound builders carefully timed their occupation of coastal Louisiana siteA study of ancient mound builders who lived hundreds of years ago on the Mississippi River Delta near present-day New Orleans offers new insights into how Native peoples selected the landforms that supported their villages and earthen mounds—and why these sites were later abandoned.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
19
The price of chaos: A new model virtually pits new investors against experienced onesFinancial investing attracts a range of casual neophytes to Wall Street financiers. Variation in expertise and risk-taking behaviors among investors regularly sends markets on roller-coaster rides. Most existing economic theories cannot account for this variability, but new research in chaos theory looks to help us to understand the human factors behind investing.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
2
Faster genome evolution methods to transform yeastScientists have created a new way of speeding up the genome evolution of baker's yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the same yeast we use for bread and beer production.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
86
Giant molecules shaped like Kandinsky circles are toxic to MRSA bacteriaNested structures are commonly found throughout nature and art, whether they be in the form of tree rings, Russian dolls, or Wassily Kandinsky's famous 1913 abstract painting Color Study: Squares with Concentric Circles. Now in a new study, chemists have constructed giant nested supramolecules or "supramolecular Kandinsky circles," some of which are more than 30,000 times heavier than a hydrogen a
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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Study: Ancient mound builders carefully timed their occupation of coastal Louisiana siteA new study of ancient mound builders who lived hundreds of years ago on the Mississippi River Delta near present-day New Orleans offers new insights into how Native peoples selected the landforms that supported their villages and earthen mounds — and why these sites were later abandoned. (Includes link to video.)
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

New network is installed to investigate space weather over South AmericaMagnetometer network identifies magnetic field disturbances that can cause interference in electronic appliances, power grids and satellite navigation systems. Using the data collected by the network, Brazilian researchers work on the development of a specific magnetic K-index for South America.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Study finds popular 'growth mindset' educational interventions aren't very effectiveA new study co-authored by researchers at Michigan State University and Case Western Reserve University found that 'growth mindset interventions,' or programs that teach students they can improve their intelligence with effort — and therefore improve grades and test scores — don't work for students in most circumstances.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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MIT study helps driverless cars change lanes more like humans doAt the International Conference on Robotics and Automation, researchers from MIT's Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (CSAIL) will present a new lane-change algorithm that splits the difference. It allows for more aggressive lane changes than the simple models do but relies only on immediate information about other vehicles' directions and velocities to make decisions.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Surveillance intensity not associated with earlier detection of recurrence or improved survival in cA national retrospective study led by researchers at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center found no association between intensity of post-treatment surveillance and detection of recurrence or overall survival (OS) in patients with stage I, II or III colorectal cancer (CRC). Published in the Journal of the American Medical Association, the study is the largest of surveillance intensity
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Unlocking the secrets of HIV's persistenceA new study by investigators at Brigham and Women's Hospital explores how HIV establishes a 'persistent reservoir' of infected cells, identifying cellular survival programs that become activated in these cells, and providing a potential target for future therapy.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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Mechanisms of harmful overhydration and brain swellingWe are all familiar with the drawbacks of dehydration, but we rarely hear about the harmful effects of overhydration. A team from the Centre for Research in Neuroscience at the Research Institute of the McGill University Health Centre in Montreal uncovered a key piece to the puzzle of how our brains detect hyponatremia and regulate overhydration. The new study featured in Cell Reports unearths the
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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Faster genome evolution methods to transform yeastScientists have created a new way of speeding up the genome evolution of baker's yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the same yeast we use for bread and beer production.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Study finds vitamin D supplement decreases wheezing for black preterm infantsBlack infants born prematurely are at higher risk for recurrent wheezing. This condition can cause discomfort and is a risk factor for developing asthma later in life. There are no widely accepted therapies to prevent prematurity-associated wheezing. In a study published in the Journal of the American Medical Association, a UH Rainbow Babies & Children's Hospital physician researcher found black p
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Does vitamin D reduce likelihood of wheezing in preterm black infants?Black infants born preterm who received sustained vitamin D supplementation had a lower likelihood of recurrent wheezing by age 1.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Studies examine effect of testing frequency after treatment, surgery for colorectal cancerTwo studies and a related editorial examined the effect of more or less frequent follow-up testing after treatment or surgery for colorectal cancer.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
3
How coyotes conquered the continentUsing museum specimens and fossil records, researchers have produced a comprehensive (and unprecedented) range history of coyotes that can help reveal the ecology of predation as well as evolution through hybridization.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Mice brain structure linked with sex-based differences in anxiety behaviorUsing male individuals has long been a tradition in scientific mice studies. But new research enforces the importance of using a balanced population of male and female mice. In a paper published May 22 in the journal Cell Reports, scientists studying the locus coeruleus brain structure in mice unexpectedly found substantial differences in the molecular structures of this part of the brain between
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

To have or not to have…your left atrial appendage closedEach year in the US, more than 300,000 people have heart surgery. To reduce risk of stroke for their patients, surgeons often will close the left atrial appendage, which is a small sac in the left side of the heart where many blood clots form, during these surgeries. Mayo Clinic researchers report today in JAMA that adding this procedure is likely the right choice for certain patients but not all.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

The price of chaos: A new model virtually pits new investors against experienced onesVariation in expertise and risk-taking behaviors among investors regularly sends markets on roller-coaster rides. Researchers describe the intricate dynamics driving a financial markets model in this week's Chaos. Their model takes aim to simulate asset pricing when mixed groups of investors enter a market. By examining bifurcation conditions, they described transitions between different chaotic d
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Quanta Magazine
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How Brain Waves Surf Sound Waves to Process SpeechWhen he talks about where his fields of neuroscience and neuropsychology have taken a wrong turn, David Poeppel of New York University doesn’t mince words. “There’s an orgy of data but very little understanding,” he said to a packed room at the American Association for the Advancement of Science annual meeting in February. He decried the “epistemological sterility” of experiments that do piecewor
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Popular Science
91
The elusive Planet Nine might be responsible for this asteroid’s bizarre orbitSpace Something’s got the Kuiper belt’s rocks off, and there’s a scramble to find it. Scientists found more evidence for Planet Nine’s existence…
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
69
Tech 'Nobel' awarded to Finnish physicist for small smart devicesFinnish materials physicist Tuomo Suntola, who developed a groundbreaking technology to reduce the size of complex devices, on Tuesday won Finland's take on the Nobel science prizes.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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How coyotes conquered the continentCoyotes now live across North America, from Alaska to Panama, California to Maine. But where they came from, and when, has been debated for decades. Using museum specimens and fossil records, researchers from the North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences and North Carolina State University have produced a comprehensive (and unprecedented) range history of the expanding species that can help reveal
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Researchers find invasive seaweed makes fish change their behaviorWhen it comes to finding protection and a safe feeding ground, fish rely on towering blades of seaweed, like kelp, to create a three-dimensional hiding space. Kelp forests have been shown to be one of the most productive systems in the ocean with high biodiversity and ecological function. However, in recent decades, many kelp habitats have been taken over and replaced by lower turf-dominated seawe
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
3
Amazon urged not to sell facial recognition tool to policeAmazon RekognitionThe American Civil Liberties Union and other privacy advocates are asking Amazon to stop marketing a powerful facial recognition tool to police, saying law enforcement agencies could use the technology to "easily build a system to automate the identification and tracking of anyone."
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
40
How a pair of satellites will 'weigh' water on EarthThe reason we know today just how much ice is melting in Greenland and Antarctica is because of a pair of satellites, launched in 2002 by NASA and the German Research Centre for Geosciences (GFZ). Now, they are set to be replaced by a more modern duo.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Copenhagen best, Rome worst for clean, safe roads: studyBike-friendly capitals Copenhagen, Amsterdam and Oslo have Europe's cleanest and safest transport systems while heavily congested Rome has the worst, a Greenpeace study found Tuesday.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Tunable diamond string may hold key to quantum memoryA quantum internet promises completely secure communication. But using quantum bits or qubits to carry information requires a radically new piece of hardware—a quantum memory. This atomic-scale device needs to store quantum information and convert it into light to transmit across the network.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

UNH researchers find invasive seaweed makes fish change their behaviorResearchers at the University of New Hampshire have found that changes in the seascape may impact the behavior of fish and could be leaving them less options for refuge and more vulnerable to predators.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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Tunable diamond string may hold key to quantum memoryResearchers at the Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS) and the University of Cambridge engineered diamond strings that can be tuned to quiet a qubit's environment and improve memory from tens to several hundred nanoseconds, enough time to do many operations on a quantum chip.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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Subtle hearing loss while young changes brain function, study findsNew research from The Ohio State University has found that young people with subtle hearing loss — the kind they aren't even aware of — are putting demands on their brains that typically wouldn't be seen until later in life.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

More frequent checks control MRSA in newborns, but can hospitals afford them?Checking more often on newborns in the NICU provided positive results for preventing MRSA transmission, but hospitals must balance the high costs, a new study found.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Physicists with green fingers estimate tree spanning rate in random networksNetworks are often described as trees with spanning branches. How the tree branches out depends on the logic behind the network's expansion, such as random expansion. However, some aspects of such randomly expanding networks are invariant; in other words, they display the same characteristics, regardless of the network's scale. As a result, the entire network has the same shape as one or more of i
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Futurity.org
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Your spouse’s BMI may predict your diabetes riskNew research links the BMI of one spouse and the other spouse’s risk of developing type 2 diabetes. The researchers say efforts to detect undiagnosed diabetes and so-called pre-diabetes should not focus exclusively on the individual, but rather on couples and households. “We have discovered that you can predict a person’s risk of developing type 2 diabetes based on his or her partner’s BMI. This
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Scientific American Content: Global
15
Maybe We Could "See" a Singularity After AllWhen black holes collide, interactions between their cores might leave an imprint on the resulting gravitational waves — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
5
NASA measures heavy US rainfall from spaceFor close to two weeks the combination of a nearly stationary front and tropical moisture caused almost continuous precipitation over much of the Mid-Atlantic. Using data from a constellation of satellites, NASA calculated the extreme rainfall that occurred in parts of the U.S.
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TED Talks Daily (SD video)
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What it's like to be the child of immigrants | Michael RainMichael Rain is on a mission to tell the stories of first-generation immigrants, who have strong ties both to the countries they grew up in and their countries of origin. In a personal talk, he breaks down the mischaracterizations and limited narratives of immigrants and shares the stories of the worlds they belong to. "We're walking melting pots of culture," Rain says. "If something in that pot s
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Ingeniøren

Lego skal genopfinde sig selv på digitale platformeLego er Danmarks mest attraktive virksomhed blandt de ombejlede ingeniørstuderende. En solid økonomi, plads til innovation og gode karrieremuligheder opvejer aktuelle problemer.
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Ingeniøren

Ekspert: Elcykler og road pricing kan afhjælpe fremtidens trængselHvis det bliver dyrere at køre i bil, og folk cykler til arbejde i stedet, vil det afhjælpe fremtidens trængsel, mener trafikforsker. Men er det muligt at lokke flere danskere op på cyklerne?
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
4
NASA's Aqua satellite observes formation of Tropical Cyclone 02ATropical Cyclone 02A formed about 655 nautical miles south of Masirah Island, Oman. When NASA's Aqua satellite passed over the Arabian Sea, Northern Indian Ocean and captured a visible image of the newly developed storm.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
1
Study finds missing link between blow flies and possible pathogen transmissionDetermining whether blow flies have consumed animal fecal material versus animal tissue has important implications for both human public health and animal conservation. A recent study by researchers in biology and chemistry at the School of Science at IUPUI shows how that determination can be made.
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The Atlantic
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Can Genetic Counselors Keep Up With 23andMe?In hindsight, clicking on the email from 23andMe at 10 p.m., alone, on a particularly cold March night probably wasn’t the best idea. Still, Nancy Wurtzel thought she was prepared for the genetic-testing company to give her the news that she had inherited the gene for late-onset Alzheimer’s disease . Both her parents died from it—her father at 86 and her mother at 92. But when Wurtzel stared at t
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The Atlantic
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Trump’s Business Schemes Warrant Their Own InvestigationRoughly one year ago, Special Counsel Robert Mueller was charged with investigating any links or coordination “between the Russian government and individuals associated with the campaign of President Donald Trump,” as well as any “matters” or “federal crimes” that “may arise directly from the investigation.” That probe now divides the right. Conservatives like David French believe that the facts
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Could we predict the next Ebola outbreak by tracking the migratory patterns of bats?The researchers — Javier Buceta, Paolo Bocchini and Graziano Fiorillo — worked with satellite information and parameter sampling techniques to create their Ebola-prediction framework, which integrates data and modeling to predict the conditions linking bats' behavior with the outbreak of Ebola. They have detailed their work in a paper titled "A Predictive Spatial Distribution Framework for Filov
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
1
The gypsum gravity chute: A phytoplankton-elevator to the ocean floorTiny gypsum crystals can make phytoplankton so heavy that they rapidly sink, hereby transporting large quantities of carbon to the ocean's depths.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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How Australia got plantedA new study has uncovered when and why the native vegetation that today dominates much of Australia first expanded across the continent. The research should help researchers better predict the likely impact of climate change and rising carbon dioxide levels on such plants here and elsewhere.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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NASA's Aqua satellite observes formation of Tropical Cyclone 02ATropical Cyclone 02A formed about 655 nautical miles south of Masirah Island, Oman. When NASA's Aqua satellite passed over the Arabian Sea, Northern Indian Ocean and captured a visible image of the newly developed storm.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

The case for not taxing multinationalsThe habit of taxing Multinational Enterprises (MNEs)' profits is the legacy of a time when "GM had to make cars in Detroit and Hollywood had to make movies in L.A.", but is now inefficient and detrimental to global welfare, a new study by Nicolai Foss, Rodolfo Debenedetti Chair of Entrepreneurship at Bocconi University, and colleagues asserts. The solution would be zeroing corporate tax and replac
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Remote control of transport through nanoporesIn our bodies, the transfer of genetic information, viral infections and protein trafficking, as well as the synthesis and the degradation of biomolecules, are all phenomena that require the transport of molecules through channels. Improving our control of these channels and the capacity of molecules to get across could have many potential applications in the fields of energy, biotechnology and me
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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From a model of fluids to the birth of a new field in computational physicsIt may sound like the stuff of fairy tales, but in the 1950s two numerical models initially developed as a pet project by physicists led to the birth of an entirely new field of physics: computational statistical mechanics. This story has recently appeared in a paper published in EPJ H, authored by Michel Mareschal, an Emeritus Professor of Physics at the Free University of Brussels, Belgium.
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Live Science
80
Here's Why Saturn's Inner Moons Are Shaped Like Ravioli and PotatoesThe odd shapes of the inner moons of Saturn, from ravioli to potatoes, may be due to mergers of tiny moonlets, a new study finds.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Under age 13, suicide rates are roughly double for black children vs. white childrenA new study published in JAMA Pediatrics shows that racial disparities in suicide rates are age-related. Specifically, suicide rates for black children aged 5-12 were roughly two times higher than those of similarly aged white children.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Physicists with green fingers estimate tree spanning rate in random networksIn a new study published in EPJ B, Fei Ma from Northwest Normal University in Lanzhou, Gansu Province, China, and colleagues calculate the total number of spanning trees in randomly expanding networks. This method can be applied to modelling scale-free network models, which, as it turns out, are characterised by small-world properties.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
1
NASA measures heavy US rainfall from spaceFor close to two weeks the combination of a nearly stationary front and tropical moisture caused almost continuous precipitation over much of the Mid-Atlantic. Using data from a constellation of satellites, NASA calculated the extreme rainfall that occurred in parts of the US.
6h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

From a model of fluids to the birth of a new field in computational physicsIt may sound like the stuff of fairy tales, but in the 1950s two numerical models initially developed as a pet project by physicists led to the birth of an entirely new field of physics: computational statistical mechanics. This story has recently appeared in a paper published in EPJ H, authored by Michel Mareschal, an Emeritus Professor of Physics at the Free University of Brussels, Belgium.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Research supports restrictions on opioid-containing cold medicines for childrenPrescription cough and cold medicines containing the opioid hydrocodone were more likely to cause serious side effects in children than those containing codeine, according to a new study from Penn State College of Medicine. The research supports recent U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) restrictions on prescription hydrocodone- and codeine-containing cough medicines for children and suggests
6h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Remote control of transport through nanoporesIn our bodies, the transfer of genetic information, viral infections and protein trafficking, as well as the synthesis and degradation of biomolecules are all phenomena that require the transport of molecules through channels. In a new study published in EPJ E, Manuela Pastoriza-Gallego from the University Paris-Seine, France, and colleagues have shown how to alter external factors such as externa
6h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

New bipartisan legislation highlights better care for us all as we age, AGSThe American Geriatrics Society (AGS) today offered a ringing endorsement of the bipartisan Geriatrics Workforce Improvement Act (S. 2888), a proposal in the US Senate to ensure communities across the US have access to health professionals and other critical supports improving care for us all as we age. Introduced by Sens. Susan Collins (R-Maine) and Bob Casey (D-Pa.), the bill echoes similar bipa
6h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Lead exposure found to affect fertility ratesNew research that examined the impact of exposure to lead (in the air and topsoil) on fertility in the United States has found that exposure matters for both women and men. It is the first study to find causal evidence of the relationship between lead exposure and fertility rates in the 1980s and mid-2000s.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Discovery of the first body in the Solar System with an extrasolar originAsteroid 2015 BZ509 is the very first object in the Solar System shown to have an extrasolar origin. This remarkable discovery was made by CNRS researcher Fathi Namouni and her Brazilian colleague Helena Morais, and is published on May 21, 2018 in MNRAS.
6h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

New material detects the amount of UV radiation and helps monitor radiation doseResearchers at the University of Turku, Finland, have developed a synthetic SensoGlow™ material that detects the quantity and quality of ultraviolet radiation from the Sun or other sources. This material makes it possible to produce an affordable, versatile, and long-lasting UV radiation detector which can be used to monitor the UV radiation dose with a mobile app, for example.
6h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

The prevalence of twin births in pure Spanish horses (PREs)A group of researchers has published the first study to determine the prevalence of twin births and chimerism in a large population of PRE horses, and the results suggest that chimerism is not especially connected to infertility.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

IUPUI study finds missing link between blow flies and possible pathogen transmissionDetermining whether blow flies have consumed animal fecal material versus animal tissue has important implications for both human public health and animal conservation. A recent study by researchers in biology and chemistry at the School of Science at IUPUI shows how that determination can be made.
6h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

In brain stimulation therapy less might be moreTheoretical and experimental results demonstrate a new insight for optimizing rTMS, one of the common non-invasive magnetic brain stimulation therapies used to treat brain disorders such as depression and neuropathic pain.
6h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Annual Report to the NationOverall cancer death rates continue to decline in men, women, and children in the United States in all major racial and ethnic groups. Overall cancer incidence, or rates of new cancers, decreased in men and were stable in women from 1999 to 2014. In a companion study, researchers reported an increase in incidence of late-stage prostate cancer and that prostate cancer mortality has stabilized after
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
3
Seduction: An industry selling men and women shortAn industry training men in the art of seduction—estimated to be worth $100 million USD—encourages its clients to treat women and themselves as commodities in a sexual marketplace, a new study has found.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
1
Mount St. Helens' many ecological lessons captured in new bookWhen Mount St. Helens erupted 38 years ago today, it not only dramatically transformed more than 200 square miles that previously contained vast forests, fast-flowing streams, and sparkling mountain lakes, it also created unprecedented research opportunities for scientists. Nearly four decades later, much of what has been learned at this living laboratory is revealed in a new book that presents ke
6h
BBC News – Science & Environment
500+
Ebola outbreak: Experimental vaccinations begin in DR CongoSome 4,000 vaccines are being used to try to stop an outbreak that has killed at least 26 people.
6h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Scientists find inconsistencies and biases in weather forecasting systemThe tiniest of natural phenomena can have a big impact on our weather, but an international team of researchers have found that the most widely used system to model meteorological conditions doesn't account for environmental microphysics well at all scales.
6h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
1
Researchers build artificial cellular compartments as molecular workshopsHow to install new capabilities in cells without interfering with their metabolic processes? A team from the Technical University of Munich (TUM) and the Helmholtz Zentrum München have altered mammalian cells in such a way that they formed artificial compartments in which sequestered reactions could take place, allowing the detection of cells deep in the tissue and also their manipulation with mag
6h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
1
'Spooky action at a distance': Researchers develop module for quantum repeaterPhysicists at Saarland University in Saarbrücken, Germany, have succeeded in entangling a single atom with a single photon in the telecom wavelength range. This constitutes a basic building block for transmission of quantum information over long distance with low loss. The results have raised great attention in the quantum technology community; now they are published in Nature Communications.
6h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
1
Embryonic mammary gland stem cells identifiedResearch team led by Prof. Cédric Blanpain identified the mechanisms that regulate mammary gland development. Using a combination of lineage tracing, molecular profiling, single cell sequencing and functional experiments, A. Wuidart and colleagues demonstrated that mammary gland initially develops from multipotent progenitors during the early steps of embryonic mammary gland morphogenesis whereas
6h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
1
Married couples share risk of developing diabetesResearchers from the University of Copenhagen and Aarhus University have discovered a connection between the BMI of one spouse and the other spouse's risk of developing type 2 diabetes. The researchers therefore believe that efforts to detect undiagnosed diabetes and so-called prediabetes should not focus exclusively on the individual, but also on couples and households.
6h
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68
Bell Labs' Gadget Communicates Human Emotions Through TouchThanks to some innovations at Bell Labs, you’ll soon be able to express your heart through your sleeve.
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Dagens Medicin

Ny udredningsmetode giver boom i behandling af patienter med blodpropperNy udredningsmetode gør det muligt at behandle flere patienter med blodpropper. Hos Neurologisk Afdeling på Bispebjerg Hospital har det medført en stigning i antallet af patienter på 30 pct. den seneste måned.
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Dagens Medicin

Den rette, men dyre vej til psykisk syges inklusionDet er mere end besynderligt, at Psykiatrifonden ikke forholder sig til den grumme virkelighed: At det er strukturelle forbedringer af de sygeste psykisk syges vilkår, som kunne føre til inklusion
7h
Big Think
63
Doctors who got free lunches from Big Pharma were more likely to prescribe opioidsFree meals turn out to be powerful incentives for prescribing opioids, according to a new letter published in JAMA. Read More
7h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
1
EU lawmakers to press Zuckerberg over data privacyMark Zuckerberg FacebookEuropean Union lawmakers plan to press Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg on Tuesday about data protection standards at the internet giant at a hearing focused on a scandal over the alleged misuse of the personal information of millions of people.
7h
BBC News – Science & Environment
1K
'Rare' birth of live reindeer twins in CairngormsPreviously twins born in the herd in the Cairngorms have been stillborn or died shortly after birth.
7h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
5
Dozens feared killed in Karachi heatwave: charityDozens of people are feared to have died in a heatwave gripping Pakistan's largest city Karachi this week, a charity in the sprawling metropolis said Tuesday, as temperatures hit 42 degrees Celsius (108 degrees Fahrenheit).
7h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
8
Conservationists fight to save animals as mass extinction loomsAnimal and plant species are vanishing at an accelerating pace around the world—sometimes even before we know that they exist—but conservationists are pushing back against the juggernaut of mass extinction.
7h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
2
Facebook boss faces European Parliament over data scandalMark Zuckerberg FacebookFacebook chief Mark Zuckerberg faces tough questions later Tuesday at the European Parliament over the fallout from the Cambridge Analytica data breach scandal.
7h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
2
Arctic coastal powers back 'peaceful' dialogue over disputesThe five nations bordering the Arctic Ocean on Tuesday reaffirmed their commitment made in Greenland a decade ago to "peacefully" settle their differences over the resource-rich region threatened by climate change.
7h
Popular Science
30
The best ways to send files wirelesslyDIY Transfer your data without compromising it. Want to share a file with a friend? You have tons of ways to send it wirelessly to their device. So we picked out the simplest and best options.
7h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

First record of large-antlered muntjac in VietnamIn November 2017 — under a biodiversity monitoring and assessment activity supported by the US Agency for International Development — scientists and conservationists of the Leibniz Institute for Zoo and Wildlife Research and WWF-Vietnam captured photographs of one of the rarest and most threatened mammal species of Southeast Asia, the large-antlered muntjac, in Quang Nam province, central Vietna
7h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Advance genetics study identifies virulent strain of TBLSTM's Dr Maxine Caws is co-lead investigator on an advanced genetics study published in Nature Genetics(link is external), which has shown that a virulent strain of tuberculosis (TB) has adapted to transmit among young adults in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam.
7h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

'Serendipitous' use of antimalarial drug may have improved outcome for cancer patientA cancer patient with advanced ovarian cancer had a 'remarkable' journey to recovery that may be partially attributed to a treatment she received for a completely different disease, according to a case report published in ecancermedicalscience.
7h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

What helps form long-term memory also drives the development of neurodegenerative diseaseScientists have just discovered that a small region of a cellular protein that helps long-term memories form also drives the neurodegeneration seen in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS).
7h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Embryonic gene regulation through mechanical forcesDuring embryonic development genetic cascades control gene activity and cell differentiation. In a new publication of the journal PNAS, the team of Ulrich Technau of the Department of Molecular Evolution and Development at the University of Vienna reported that besides the genetic program, also mechanical cues can contribute to the regulation of gene expression during development. Comparisons with
7h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
1
Designer cells: Artificial enzyme can activate a gene switchComplex reaction cascades can be triggered in artificial molecular systems: Swiss scientists have constructed an enzyme than can penetrate a mammalian cell and accelerate the release of a hormone. This then activates a gene switch that triggers the creation of a fluorescent protein. The findings were reported by researchers from the NCCR Molecular Systems Engineering, led by the University of Base
7h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
1
US, China near deal to save ZTE: reportZTE China US WashingtonThe United States and China have a tentative deal to save embattled Chinese telecom company ZTE, days after the two nations announced a truce in their trade standoff, The Wall Street Journal reported Tuesday.
7h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
5
The right mix of green energyCan we get by on just renewable energy? Can energy from the sun, wind and water cover our electricity needs – even on a windless, overcast day in Scandinavia? Perhaps, but it makes new demands.
7h
Futurity.org
12
Exercise doesn’t slow cognitive declineModerate to high intensity exercise does not slow cognitive (mental) impairment in older people with dementia, according to new research. The research team found that although exercise improved physical fitness, it cannot be recommended as a treatment option for cognitive impairment in dementia. Nearly 47.5 million people worldwide have dementia and the view that exercise might slow cognitive dec
7h
The Atlantic
100+
Saudi Arabia Hits the Brakes on ReformsFor months, Saudi Arabia had been enjoying a public-relations windfall. Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman, or MbS, the kingdom’s charismatic future leader, seduced the world with his vision for a new, modern nation. There have been live concerts, and cinemas are opening, with many more planned. Women can attend soccer games. Last September, MbS announced a bold promise to overturn the country’s ba
7h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
40
Giant invasive flatworms found in France and overseas French territoriesOne of the consequences of globalization is the introduction of invasive species. Giant hammerhead flatworms, or land planarians, up to 40 cm (over 1 foot) in length, are reported from France and overseas French territories by an international team led by Jean-Lou Justine of ISYEB (Muséum National d'Histoire Naturelle, Paris, France). This is the first study of this invasion, reported in an articl
7h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
4
AI slaves—the questionable desire shaping our idea of technological progressFrom high impact Hollywood dystopic accounts such as the infamous Terminator films to public responses to the story of a burger flipping robot being "fired", the stories we tell ourselves about AI are important. These narratives have an impact on our conception and development of the technology, as well as expressing elements of our unconscious understanding of AI. Recognising the shaping effect o
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
1
How wheat can root out the take-all fungusIn the soils of the world's cereal fields, a family tussle between related species of fungi is underway for control of the crops' roots, with food security threatened if the wrong side wins. Beneficial fungi can help plants to protect themselves from cousins eager to overwhelm the roots, but it's a closely fought battle.
7h
Dagens Medicin

Nyt professorat i diabetes hos gravide i OdenseOverlæge Dorte Møller Jensen er udnævnt som klinisk professor. Hun skal forske inden for graviditet, diabetes og fedme.
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Dagens Medicin

Rygproblemet er lægeskabtMilliarder af kroner kan spares og henvisningstiden vil falde dramatisk, hvis de mange patienter med rygproblemer ikke parkeres på venteliste til undersøgelse og behandling, alt imens de bliver sygemeldingsramte.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
26
Michael Jackson's antigravity tilt — Talent, magic, or a bit of both?Three neurosurgeons set out to examine Michael Jackson's antigravity tilt, introduced in the movie video 'Smooth Criminal,' from a neurosurgeon's point of view.
7h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
3
Researchers develop module for quantum repeaterPhysicists at Saarland University in Saarbrücken, Germany, have succeeded in entangling a single atom with a single photon in the telecom wavelength range. This constitutes a basic building block for transmission of quantum information over long distance with low loss. The results have raised interest in the quantum technology community and are now published in Nature Communications.
7h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
54
How bacteria behave differently in humans compared to the labMost of what we know today about deadly bacteria such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa was obtained from studies done in laboratory settings. Research reported May 14 in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences shows that this laboratory-based information may have important limits for predicting how these bugs behave once they've invaded humans.
7h
The Scientist RSS
1
Conservation Biologist Ben Collen Dies of Bone CancerThe University College London researcher investigated how environmental pressures affect animals.
7h
The Scientist RSS

Image of the Day: Jasper the CatResearchers found a previously undiscovered hepadnavirus in an immunocompromised cat.
7h
New Scientist – News
29
Why the UK’s plan to tackle air pollution is mostly hot airA ban on using polluting wet wood isn’t nearly enough to halt the rise in dangerous particulates from trendy wood burners
7h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Building a brain, cell by cell: Researchers make a mini neuron network (of two)Neurological research uses simplified models consisting of artificial collections of neurons. These models are often imprecise, because it is difficult to control how neurons connect to one another. Researchers at The University of Tokyo developed a technique that uses microscopic plates to guide how individual neurons grow, and showed that they can make functional connections between specific neu
7h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Oxytocin mediates subjective duration of social interactionsPsychologists ZHOU Wen, JIANG Yi and their colleagues at the Institute of Psychology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, probed this issue by examining individuals' temporal perception of social interactions and the variation among individuals, noting the gregarious nature of humans, the ubiquity of social interactions in daily life and the pronounced interindividual differences in social proficiency —
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Basin growth strata and its structural control in the region of Zhangjiakou, North Hebei, ChinaThe tectonic setting and deforming kinematics of Yanshan tectonic belt are still matters of controversy. Recognizing syn-tectonic sedimentation and clarifying its relationship with structures are the key points to further reveal timing and kinematics of tectonic deformation in Yanshan belt. Now researchers in CUGB have identified five types of growth strata developed in growth structures, and sugg
7h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

SUTD researchers develop reprocessable thermosets for sustainable 3D printingSUTD researchers have developed 3D printing reprocessable thermosets that allows 3D printed structures to be reshapeable, repairable and recyclable leading to more sustainable 3D printing processes.
7h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
3
Valves for tiny particlesNewly developed nanovalves allow the flow of individual nanoparticles in liquids to be controlled in tiny channels. This is of interest for lab-on-a-chip applications such as in materials science and biomedicine.
7h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
1
Artificial enzyme can activate a gene switchComplex reaction cascades can be triggered in artificial molecular systems: Swiss scientists have constructed an enzyme than can penetrate a mammalian cell and accelerate the release of a hormone. This then activates a gene switch that triggers the creation of a fluorescent protein. The findings were reported by researchers from the NCCR Molecular Systems Engineering, led by the University of Base
7h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
70
Scientists develop 3-D scanner for insectsA scanner developed jointly at TU Darmstadt and Darmstadt University of Applied Sciences enables automated digital archiving of preserved insects—in high-resolution and in 3-D. The scientists have published this new and unique development in the journal "ZooKeys."
7h
Viden

I aften skal Facebook-chef stå skoleret i EUKl. 18.20 skal Mark Zuckerberg svare på kritiske spørgsmål fra Europa-Parlamentets ledere om Facebooks dataindsamlingsmetoder. Du kan følge seancen live på dr.dk.
7h
Scientific American Content: Global
24
Here Come the WavesAfter a clutch of historic detections, gravitational-wave researchers have set their sights on some ambitious scientific quarry — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
7h
Futurity.org
19
Online archive to document African-American soldiers in Civil WarA new project is working to put records of the United States Colored Troops—regiments of African-American soldiers that included large numbers of men who had been slaves at the start of the Civil War—online. Just a few weeks prior to the Battle of Gettysburg, the Union Army officially created the United States Colored Troops (USCT). However, details of these estimated 200,000 men who fought in th
7h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
2
These CRISPR-modified crops don't count as GMOsTo feed the burgeoning human population, it is vital that the world figures out ways to boost food production.
7h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
60
Electric vehicles could save billions on energy storageUsing electric vehicles (EVs) as mobile power storage could eliminate the need to build costly stationary grid storage for energy from renewable sources.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
2
Eating to extinction—urban appetite for bushmeat sparks wildlife crisis in CambodiaFrom baby elephants to sun bears and pangolins, escalating demand for bushmeat in towns and cities is taking an increasingly heavy toll on some of Cambodia's most endangered wildlife.
7h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
5
Lessons from Cape Town's water shortageSouth Africa has always been a country with problems of water scarcity. The ominous Day Zero narrative in Cape Town has brought water security into our daily lives and has made us pay closer attention to issues of water demand and availability. Additional challenges, including pollution, poor management and infrastructure maintenance, wastage and excessive consumption, burden our resources. Schalk
7h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
2
Corporate board directors with island tax haven ties signal greater levels of tax avoidance, study findsU.S. companies with board directors who have connections to well-known island tax havens of the Bahamas, Bermuda and the Cayman Islands exhibit significantly greater tax avoidance than other companies, according to a novel study that includes two University of Kansas School of Business professors and one alumnus.
7h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
6
Tidal range power plants hold potential for electricity generationIn theory, one third of global electricity needs could be provided by the world's tidal range, according to a new comprehensive state-of-the-art review of tidal range power plants.
7h
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100+
'Rogue One' and 6 More Great Sci-Fi Movies Streaming NowIt's time to catch up on the classics. Here's where to start.
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Feed: All Latest
47
The Physics of How a Mirror Creates a Virtual WorldHuman eyes are sort of dumb—but you can trick them into being smart.
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Latest Headlines | Science News
200+
Black kids commit suicide at twice the rate of white childrenThe suicide rates for young black kids are higher than those of their white counterparts, a pattern that flips in older kids, researchers find.
8h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
4
Baby lemur born following rare C-sectionBecause they're endangered, all baby lemurs are special. But some, like Ranomasina, are extraordinary.
8h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
3
Biophysicist works toward bio-inspired solar cellEven the best human-engineered solar cell is essentially a clunky dial-up modem compared to the sleek high-speed efficiency of the humble leaf. After all, plants have had about a billion years to perfect the process of photosynthesis, which uses energy from the sun to convert carbon dioxide and water into glucose (used by the plant as fuel) and oxygen (used by all of us).
8h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
1
Non-plasma high-speed anisotropic diamond etching with nickel in 1000°C water vaporDevelopment of next-generation power devices is needed for energy saving in a low carbon society. Diamond is a potentially important power device material due to its excellent physical and electronic properties. Here we have developed a non-plasma high-speed anisotropic etching process using a thermochemical reaction between nickel and diamond in high-temperature water vapor. This technology is ex
8h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

One-way roads for spin currentsScientists from the Singapore University of Technology and Design, together with collaborators from University Insubria (Italy) and Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (Brazil) have shown that systems with strong interactions can rectify extremely well the flow of spins i.e. a spin current will flow much more in one direction than the other. This discovery could unlock new spintronics application
8h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

How bacteria behave differently in humans compared to the labMost of what we know today about deadly bacteria such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa was obtained from studies done in laboratory settings. Research reported May 14 in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences shows that this laboratory-based information may have important limits for predicting how these bugs behave once they've invaded humans.
8h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
1
Schizophrenics' blood has more genetic material from microbesThe blood of schizophrenia patients features genetic material from more types of microorganisms than that of people without the debilitating mental illness.
8h
Dagens Medicin

Region Nordjylland i vagtlæge-bommert anden pinsedagEt forkert indstillet IT-system betød anden pinsedag, at borgerne i Region Nordjylland blev mødt af lægevagtens telefonsvarer. Regionen beklager, men ifølge vagtlægechef Eddie Nielsen er det ikke første gang, at der byttes om på hverdage og helligdage.
8h
Dagens Medicin

Odense Universitetshospital ansætter ny sygeplejefaglig direktørOversygeplejerske Mathilde Schmidt-Petersen tiltræder 15. juni som ny sygeplejefaglig direktør på Odense Universitetshospital.
8h
The Atlantic
200+
Vegan YouTube Stars Are Held to Impossible StandardsStella Rae looks back at her old YouTube videos and cringes. These are the videos that built her career: At 19, she has hundreds of thousands of subscribers to her main channel, which she has dedicated to promoting veganism for several years. But her approach has changed dramatically. Today, she says, she wants to show people “that you can be vegan and just live your normal life.” But her earlies
8h
Scientific American Content: Global
4
The Ripple Effect— Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Scientific American Content: Global
61
What You See in a 3-D Scan of Yourself Could Be UpsettingThe actual and idealized images may not match up — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
8h
cognitive science
1
London hospitals to replace doctors and nurses with AI for some taskssubmitted by /u/trot-trot [link] [comments]
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
1
New fishing rules aim to protect Gulf of St. Lawrence right whalesNot since the days of whaling had so many North Atlantic right whales died in one year.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
35
Researchers demonstrate a novel approach for measuring brain function connectivityMeasuring optical blood flow in the resting human brain to detect spontaneous activity has for the first time been demonstrated by Wright State University imaging researchers, holding out promise for a better way to study people with autism, Alzheimer's and depression.
8h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
100+
Neutrons by the numbers—New counting technique delivers unprecedented accuracyAfter years of research, scientists at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) have developed and demonstrated a way to count the absolute number of neutrons in a beam that is four times more accurate than their best previous results, and 50 times more accurate than similar measurements anywhere else in the world.
8h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
20
A hidden world of communication, chemical warfare, beneath the soilNew research shows how some of these harmful microbes have to contend not just with a farmer's chemical attacks, but also with their microscopic neighbors — and themselves turn to chemical warfare to ward off threats.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
11
Friends influence middle schoolers' attitudes toward peers of different ethnicities, racesStudies have shown that for young people, simply being around peers from different ethnic and racial backgrounds may not be enough to improve attitudes toward other groups. Instead, children and adolescents also need to value spending time and forming relationships with peers from diverse groups. A new study examined how friends in middle school affect each other's attitudes about interacting with
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
15
Young toddlers may learn more from interactive than noninteractive mediaPreschoolers can learn from educational television, but younger toddlers may learn more from interactive digital media (such as video chats and touchscreen mobile apps) than from TV and videos alone, which don't require them to interact. The article also notes that not all children learn to the same degree from these media.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
15
Giant invasive flatworms found in France and overseas French territoriesOne of the consequences of globalization is the introduction of invasive species. Giant hammerhead flatworms, or land planarians, up to 40 cm (over 1 foot) in length, are reported from France and overseas French territories.
8h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
23
Link between tuberculosis and Parkinson's disease discoveredThe mechanism our immune cells use to clear bacterial infections like tuberculosis (TB) might also be implicated in Parkinson's disease, according to a new study. The findings provide a possible explanation of the cause of Parkinson's disease and suggest that drugs designed to treat Parkinson's might work for TB too.
8h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
10
Kids show adult-like intuition about ownershipChildren as young as age three are able to make judgements about who owns an object based on its location, according to a new study.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
19
Experimental drug eases effects of gluten for celiac patients on gluten-free dietAn investigational new drug offers hope of relief for celiac disease patients who are inadvertently exposed to gluten while on a gluten-free diet. Inadvertent exposure to gluten can be a frequent occurrence for celiac patients that triggers symptoms, such as pain in the gut and diarrhea, due to intestinal damage.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
16
Model estimates lifetime risk of Alzheimer's dementia using biomarkersLifetime risks of developing Alzheimer's disease dementia vary considerably by age, gender and whether any signs or symptoms of dementia are present, according to a new study.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
17
New study sheds light on the opioid epidemic and challenges prevailing views about this public health crisisA new study sheds new light on the sharp rise in fatal drug overdoses in recent years, one of the most severe public health challenges of our time. The study found that the growth in fatal overdoses for non-Hispanic whites (NHWs) aged 22-56 years was sufficiently large to account for the entire growth in mortality rates (MR) and years of potential life lost (YPLL) for this population from 1999 to
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
2
Embryonic gene regulation through mechanical forcesDuring embryonic development, genetic cascades control gene activity and cell differentiation. In a new publication of the journal PNAS, the team of Ulrich Technau of the Department of Molecular Evolution and Development at the University of Vienna reported that besides the genetic program, mechanical cues also contribute to the regulation of gene expression during development. Comparisons with ot
8h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
73
First record of large-antlered muntjac in Quang Nam, Vietnam, in the wildUnder a biodiversity monitoring and assessment activity supported by the US Agency for International Development (USAID), scientists and conservationists of the Leibniz Institute for Zoo and Wildlife Research (Leibniz-IZW) and WWF-Vietnam captured photographs of one of the rarest and most threatened mammal species of Southeast Asia, the large-antlered muntjac (Muntiacus vuquangensis), in Quang Nam
8h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
3
Innovative technologies and policies can make agriculture environmentally sustainableAgriculture faces increasing demands for food, feed, fiber, and fuel from a growing population under the looming threat of climate change. Advances in seed technologies, equipment, and crop management offer considerable promise for increasing agricultural productivity and meeting these demands. But a key challenge for agriculture is to meet growing demands while protecting our natural resources.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
200+
Bonobo females found to protect and support a female giving birthA team of researchers from the University of Pisa and CNRS/Université Claude Bernard Lyon has observed captive female bonobos helping one of their own give birth. In their paper published in the journal Evolution and Human Behavior, Elisa Demuru, Pier Francesco Ferrari and Elisabetta Palagi describe what they witnessed, referring to it as a type of midwifery.
8h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
10
How wheat can root out the take-all fungusIn the soils of the world's cereal fields, a family tussle between related species of fungi is underway for control of the crops' roots, with food security on the line. Beneficial fungi can help plants to protect themselves from cousins eager to overwhelm the roots, but it's a closely fought battle. Working out the right conditions to support those beneficial fungi and identifying the cereal varie
8h
Futurity.org
2
More HPV vaccines could prevent head and neck cancersResearchers are calling for ear, nose, and throat doctors (otolaryngologists) to support a preventative strategy against the human papillomavirus (HPV)—vaccination. HPV has long been known as a cause for cervical cancer, but otolaryngologists are seeing a marked increase in the number of head and neck cancers caused by the virus. From 1984 to 2004, the rate of HPV-positive oropharyngeal squamous
8h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
3
Capillary flow is harnessed for the first timeYou may never have heard of the capillary effect, but it's something you deal with every time you wipe up a spill or put flowers in water. Wouter van der Wijngaart has spent most of his life contemplating this phenomenon, which enables liquid to flow through narrow spaces like the fibres of a cloth, or upwards through the stems of flowers, without help from gravity or other forces.
8h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
100+
New hydrogel developed to remove tape from centuries old drawingA team of researchers from the University of Florence, Consorzio Interuniversitario per lo Sviluppo dei Sistemi a Grande Interfase and Paper Conservator has developed a new type of hydrogel for safely removing pressure tape from paper. In their paper published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the group describes developing the gel and using it to remove a stretch of tape from a
8h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
3
What Facebook isn't telling us about its fight against online abuseFacebook has for the first time made available data on the scale of abusive comments posted to its site. This may have been done under the growing pressure by organisations for social media companies to be more transparent about online abuse, or to gain credibility after the Cambridge Analytica data scandal. Either way, the figures do not make for pleasurable reading.
8h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
9
An expanding universe and distant stars—tips on how to experience cosmology from your backyardFor people like me, light years, the expanding universe and the Big Bang are part of daily language.
8h
Scientific American Content: Global
100+
What Is Consciousness?Scientists are beginning to unravel a mystery that has long vexed philosophers — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
8h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
3
New technique can track drug and gene delivery to cellsWith targeted drug and gene therapies, finding the target cells is only half the battle. Once these agents reach a cell's surface, they still have to get inside and do their job.
8h
Popular Science
81
Exclusive: Watch a new video of lightning strikes seen from spaceSpace NOAA's GOES-17 satellite is ready for action. NOAA's GOES-17 satellite, launched earlier this year is now in action, and its already captured some amazing footage of lightning strikes.
8h
NYT > Science
300+
Is This the World’s Most Diverse National Park?Bringing the numbers to life for the jewel in Bolivia’s conservation crown.
8h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
7
Welfare conditionality is ineffective, authors of major study sayWelfare conditionality within the social security system is largely ineffective and in some cases pushes people into poverty and crime, a major study led by the University of York has found.
8h
Feed: All Latest
93
Math Says Urinals in Planes Could Make Lavatory Lines Shorter for EveryoneAs long as you've got the exact right number of urinals.
8h
Feed: All Latest
58
America's Fastest-Growing Urban Area Has a Water ProblemAs St. George, Utah grows, it will have to cut down on its high water consumption or pay handsomely for it—or both.
8h
Dagens Medicin

Aarhus åbner snart landets største akutafdeling3000 medarbejder får ny arbejdsplads, når Aarhus Universitetshospital om en uge åbner for hospitalets nybyggede akut-blok i Skejby.
9h
The Atlantic
300+
The Problem With Buying Cheap Stuff OnlineThe package came in a small black box, covered in tape. It had no return address. Under layers of packaging, there was a box labeled Smart Watch, with no brand name. Inside the box was the watch itself, which looked nothing like the inexpensive Apple Watch I’d hoped it would be. Instead, the large digital face featured icons for Twitter, Facebook, a pedometer, and a photo-taking app called “Camin
9h
Scientific American Content: Global
200+
Why We Need to Take Pet Loss SeriouslyHow to handle grief after a pet’s death—and why we all need to change our attitudes about it — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
9h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
38
Toward a stem cell model of human nervous system developmentHuman embryonic stem cells can be guided to become the precursor tissue of the central nervous system, research led by the University of Michigan has demonstrated.
9h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
31
Leveraging imperfections to create better-behaved quantum dotsPotentially paving the way toward advanced computers, lasers or optical devices, University of Wisconsin-Madison researchers have revealed new effects in tiny electronic devices called quantum dots.
9h
Scientific American Content: Global
42
Living on the Edge: Wildfires Pose a Growing Risk to Homes Built Near Wilderness AreasBuilding houses at the edge of the wilderness increases the danger of catastrophic blazes — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
9h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
5
GRACE-FO spacecraft ready to launchSpaceX NASA Earth GRACETwin satellites that will monitor Earth's water cycle are scheduled to launch from Vandenberg Air Force Base in Central California on Tuesday, May 22, in a unique rideshare arrangement. The two Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment Follow-On mission (GRACE-FO) spacecraft will join five Iridium NEXT communications satellites as the payload on a SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket.
9h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

How wheat can root out the take-all fungusIn the soils of the world's cereal fields, a family tussle between related species of fungi is underway for control of the crops' roots, with food security on the line. Beneficial fungi can help plants to protect themselves from cousins eager to overwhelm the roots, but it's a closely fought battle. Working out the right conditions to support those beneficial fungi and identifying the cereal varie
9h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Link between tuberculosis and Parkinson's disease discoveredThe mechanism our immune cells use to clear bacterial infections like tuberculosis (TB) might also be implicated in Parkinson's disease, according to a new study. The findings provide a possible explanation of the cause of Parkinson's disease and suggest that drugs designed to treat Parkinson's might work for TB too.
9h
The Atlantic
200+
Planet Nine, Show ThyselfIn 2016, when astronomers made the case for a ninth planet , orbiting far beyond Neptune, that could explain a strange clustering of objects in the outer reaches of our solar system, they were hopeful it would be found in less than five years. The search is more than two years in now. “Planet Nine,” thought to be 10 times the mass of Earth, has yet to show itself, but the planet hunters have just
9h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
5
A seachange needed in fisheries to give dolphins, whales and porpoises a chanceDolphins, whales and porpoises (cetaceans) are fascinating animals that continue to capture the imagination of humans as evidenced by the increasing number of whale watchers taking to the seas in search of a glimpse of these majestic creatures. They are amongst the most intelligent animals on our planet and play a critical role in maintaining marine ecosystem health and therefore human health. Yet
9h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
11
Researchers expand forensic method to identify people using proteins from bonesWhen a team of researchers led by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) developed a new biological identification method that exploits information encoded in proteins, they thought it could have multiple applications.
9h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
9
NASA aids Kilauea disaster responseOn May 3, the Kilauea volcano on Hawaii's Big Island erupted from new fissures and sent lava flowing over streets and neighborhoods. As the disaster response on the ground led by the U.S. Geological Survey kicked into gear, managers from NASA's Earth Science Disasters Program heard from response agencies and sent out a call to NASA's own researchers, data managers, and satellite teams: What can we
9h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
4
NASA sends new research on orbital ATK mission to space stationAstronauts soon will have new experiments to conduct related to emergency navigation, DNA sequencing and ultra-cold atom research when the research arrives at the International Space Station following the 4:44 a.m. EDT (1:44 a.m. PDT) Monday launch of an Orbital ATK Cygnus spacecraft.
9h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
16
Ethnically mixed schools better for social cohesion, says new study of teenagers' attitudesPupils from schools with greater ethnic diversity have more positive feelings towards pupils of different ethnicities, according to a new study of attitudes in English secondary schools from the University of Bristol and the London School of Economics and Political Science.
9h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
22
Study details the history of Saturn's small inner moonsThe small inner moons of Saturn look like giant ravioli and spaetzle. Their spectacular shape has been revealed by the Cassini spacecraft. For the first time, researchers of the University of Bern show how these moons were formed. The peculiar shapes are a natural outcome of merging collisions among similar-sized little moons as computer simulations demonstrate.
9h
Feed: All Latest
78
Batteries Still Suck, But Researchers Are Working on ItTechnologists have devised a variety of ways in which lithium batteries can be tweaked to improve battery density, and maybe more importantly, battery safety.
9h
Feed: All Latest
41
The Political Theater of Controlling Ebola With Border ChecksAt best, thermometer-wielding guards waste resources; at worst they slow aid and supplies. So why do we still build checkpoints?
9h
Feed: All Latest
89
Watch SpaceX Launch NASA's Next Earth-Observing SatellitesAnd five communications satellites from Iridium are piggybacking on the ride.
9h
Latest Headlines | Science News
16
A caterpillar outwits corn defenses by gorging on fattening ‘junk’ foodThe crop plants defend themselves with zombie-maker wasps, but one pest has a desperate work-around.
10h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
66
A new DNA editing toolkit for the alga NannochloropsisEric Poliner and a team of MSU scientists in the Farre and Benning labs have released a new genetic engineering toolkit for the alga Nannochloropsis. The alga is of interest for the production of biofuels and other oil-based chemicals.
10h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
3
Dutch radio antenna launched from Chinese base to position behind the MoonYesterday evening Central European Summer Time, the Netherlands Chinese Low-Frequency Explorer (NCLE) was launched on board the Chinese Queqiao satellite from Xichang in the south of China, to a position behind the Moon. It is the first Dutch scientific instrument ever to travel on a Chinese space mission, and it opens a new chapter in radio astronomy. The launch of the satellite is the starting p
10h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
3
ANU invites citizen scientists to search for exploding starsThe Australian National University (ANU) invites citizen scientists to join the University's search for exploding stars called supernovae, which help astronomers to measure the Universe.
10h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Procedure plus medication is better than standard treatment for heart disease patientsA non-surgical procedure, called percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), along with prescribed medication, is better than medication alone as initial treatment for people who have the most common form of heart disease, suggests an analysis of an international clinical trial co-led by St. Michael's Hospital.
10h
Scientific American Content: Global
85
Comsat Launch Bolsters China's Dreams for Landing on the Moon's Far SideThe Queqiao orbiter will serve as a vital communications relay between the Earth and future lunar landers—and perform some science, too — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
10h
Live Science
57
Why You Say 'Um' Before Certain WordsWhat's that … um … word?
10h
Science | The Guardian
100+
The truth about obesogens: can dust and chemicals make you fat?Researchers suspect that taking your shoes off, getting rid of carpets and dusting can prevent chemicals building up that may affect our hormones – and our waistlines. But is it good science? With 26% of adults classified as obese in the UK in 2016 , the hunt for causes and solutions to expanding waistlines is on. While public health messages have focused largely on the food we eat, some scientis
10h
BBC News – Science & Environment
200+
Fatal confusionDrivers may be confusing autonomous cars with driver assistance technology, with sometimes fatal consequences.
10h
Live Science
55
The 'Best' Sunscreens of 2018: What to Look ForAbout two-thirds of sunscreens available in the U.S. offer subpar protection or contain ingredients that may harm your health, a new report finds.
10h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

A hidden world of communication, chemical warfare, beneath the soilNew research shows how some of these harmful microbes have to contend not just with a farmer's chemical attacks, but also with their microscopic neighbors — and themselves turn to chemical warfare to ward off threats.
10h
The Atlantic
500+
Impeachment Is Not the AnswerThe title and timing of To End a Presidency: The Power of Impeachment might lead the unwary reader to expect a polemic. But no. Inside these covers is a learned, judicious, and surprisingly cautious study of the impeachment power by Laurence Tribe, who ranks high among America’s leading constitutional scholars, and his former student, Joshua Matz. Their message: Impeachment is a very, very danger
10h
Ingeniøren

Rapport: Sundhedssektoren udsat for flere hackerangreb end nogen anden industriSundhedssektoren er den industri, som blev udsat for flest hackerangreb i de første fire måneder af 2018. Det er især den aldrende infrastruktur og de følsomme sundhedsdata, som gør sundhedssektoren til et attraktivt mål.
10h
Ingeniøren
15
Laze rammer Hawaii: Farlige skyer med saltsyre og glaspartiklerNedkøling af lavamateriale i havet giver laze – et drilsk fænomen, de er vidne til på Hawaii i disse timer.
10h
Ingeniøren
9
Direktør: Signalprogrammet er planlagt med for stor optimismeProjektet skulle efter de oprindelige planer gennemføres alt for hurtigt og alt for billigt, fortæller programmets direktør.
10h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
3
Precise analysis of the particulate composition of smogResearchers from several leading Warsaw scientific institutions have collaborated to develop a new, extremely precise method for the chemical analysis of suspended particulate matter comprising smog. The method, easily adaptable in modern laboratories, not only determines the chemical composition of compounds, but even recognizes changes in the spatial distribution of atoms in molecules.
10h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
100
A hidden world of communication, chemical warfare, beneath the soilThe soil supporting a field of crops teems with life. Untold numbers of bacteria and fungi strive for space and food. Most are harmless. Many are vital to creating healthy soil. But farmers worry about a handful of species that cause devastating crop diseases, and they often turn to chemical pesticides to keep those pathogens in check.
10h
Feed: All Latest
100+
WIRED’S Predictions for Bots, Blockchain, Crispr, and MoreYou're not working in VR or watching robotrucks rumble down the highway yet. But the future is coming, and we should be ready.
10h
Feed: All Latest
42
Engineers Don't Totally Dig Elon Musk's LA Tunneling PromisesThe Boring Company CEO makes a lot of promises about advancing tunneling and clearing congestion, but not everyone buys in.
10h
Feed: All Latest
100+
Following a Tuna from Fiji to Brooklyn—on the BlockchainStartups—and big companies like IBM and Walmart—are betting that blockchain technology will change how goods travel around the world.
10h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
3
The chestnut gall wasp—The threat of an invasive species with clonal reproductionA molecular study carried out on the chestnut gall wasp (Dryocosmus kuriphilus), a chestnut tree parasite, has revealed the absence of genetic variability in this invasive species in Europe. This is due to the fact that the wasp's reproduction is strictly parthenogenetic—the females produce more females without fertilization by a male. This is the main conclusion of the research, published in Scie
11h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
100+
Tunable third harmonic generation in graphene paves the way to high-speed optical communications and signal processingGraphene Flagship researchers have shown for the first time gate tunable third harmonic generation in graphene. This research, led by Graphene Flagship Partner University of Cambridge, in Collaboration with Politecnico di Milano and IIT-Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia in Genova and published in Nature Nanotechnology, could enable on-chip broadband optical switches for data transport in optical sys
11h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
3
Why are the elderly increasingly more inclined to live alone?For decades, the elderly in Spain have shown a preference for living at home, either alone or with their partners, instead of sharing a home with relatives of other generations. A study by the University of Granada delves into the reasons for this trend.
11h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
2
Establishing a time scale for 10 million years agoThe timescale is the basis to reconstruct the history of the Earth and biological evolution. A research on a chronostratigraphic sequence of the Chinese Neogene with accurate geological datings was published online in Science China: Earth Sciences.
11h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
1
Novel bioactive steroid biosynthetic pathway in symbiotic fungiA group of researchers from Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences at The University of Tokyo and Institute of Traditional Chinese Medicine and Natural Products at Jinan University, identified the biosynthetic gene cluster for the furanosteroid demethoxyviridin, and deciphered its biosynthetic pathway.
11h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
400+
CRISPR-edited rice plants produce major boost in grain yieldA team of scientists from Purdue University and the Chinese Academy of Sciences has used CRISPR/Cas9 gene-editing technology to develop a variety of rice that produces 25-31 percent more grain and would have been virtually impossible to create through traditional breeding methods.
11h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
3
Children understand plant-animal interdependence by the age of eightWhen do children start to become aware of the relationship between animal and plant life? According to a study by the UPV/EHU, they begin to associate animals and plants with each other spontaneously in their drawings by the age of eight. The UPV/EHU researchers José Domingo Villarroel, Álvaro Antón, Teresa Nuño and Daniel Zuazagoitia are the authors of this work, published in the scientific journ
11h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
2
Framework diversity of carbon nitrides offers rich platform for single atom catalysisThe development and understanding of efficient catalysts based on isolated metal centers stabilized on suitable hosts is a challenging task that has sparked the imagination of researchers worldwide. The major interest in this topic arises for three key reasons: the prospect of improving the utilization of precious metals, the potential to achieve unprecedented functionality thereby enabling landma
11h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
18
Japanese student discovers new crustacean species in deep sea hydrothermal ventA new species of microcrustacean was collected from a submarine hot spring (hydrothermal vent) of a marine volcano (Myojin-sho caldera) in the Pacific Ocean off the coast of Japan. This crustacean group is found only in deep-sea hydrothermal vents and is the first of its kind found in Japanese waters.
11h
Ingeniøren
43
Kystmøller skal hjælpe Energinet med at holde spændingenEnerginet og Vattenfall vil nu dele transformerstation, hvor møllerne sørger for spændingsregulering på elnettet.
11h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
5
Uber taps into Japan with first taxi-hailing pilotUber announced Tuesday it would start its first taxi-hailing pilot programme in Japan this summer, as it bids to break into a tough market in the world's third largest economy.
11h
New Scientist – News
100+
Let’s all heed the health benefits of a month without alcoholDrinkers in particular need to be more aware of mounting evidence of links between alcohol and cancer, and make judgements accordingly
11h
New Scientist – News
100+
How your name shapes what other people think of your personalityIs Hannah nicer than Howard, but worse at her job? People link names with personalities – find out how yours compares and why everybody should be called David
11h
Ingeniøren
3
Midaldrende: Nej tak, lægen skal ikke have mine løbe- og fitnessdataHvor unge borgere gerne vil dele deres sundhedsdata med lægen, hvis det kan hjælpe på deres sundhed, er billedet anderledes hos de midalderende, viser undersøgelse.
11h
Ingeniøren
3
: Nej tak, lægen skal ikke have mine løbe- og fitnessdataHvor unge borgere gerne vil dele deres sundhedsdata med lægen, hvis det kan hjælpe på deres sundhed, er billedet anderledes hos de midalderende, viser undersøgelse.
11h
Ingeniøren

Techtopia #53: Dansk Google-pionér laver ny IoT-start-upPodcast: Lars Bak er den virtuelle maskines mester. Det har han bevist med sit arbejde i maskinrummet på Googles browser Chrome. Nu har han forladt Google for at revolutionere Internet of Things (IoT) med sin nye start-up Toitware.
11h
Science : NPR
99
Nothing Certain In Search For 'Regulatory Certainty' At EPAEnvironmental Protection Agency chief Scott Pruitt often cites the need for "regulatory certainty." But even some supporters of his sweeping rollbacks say they're creating the opposite. (Image credit: Andrew Harnik/AP)
11h
Science : NPR
500+
Routine DNA Screening Moves Into Primary CareThe Pennsylvania-based health care chain Geisinger Health System plans to soon offer DNA sequencing as part of routine care for all patients. Is there a downside? (Image credit: GIPhotoStock/Cultura RF/Getty Images)
11h
The Atlantic
100+
How Iran Can Evade Sanctions This TimeOn paper, the 16 companies registered to the 15th-floor office-tower suite of a building in Hong Kong appeared indistinguishable from the thousands of humdrum firms operating within the glass-and-steel high-rises of the city. But according to the U.S. Treasury Department, all these firms, with names like True Honour Holdings and Alpha Effort Limited, were front companies for the Islamic Republic—
12h
Science | The Guardian
14
Weatherwatch: The magic of May dewPurists only gathered dew on the first while others believed the power persisted for the whole month Folklore maintains that dew gathered in May is special. For one thing, it is supposed to give you a flawless complexion. In 1667, Samuel Pepys’ wife went to Woolwich to collect May dew, “ the only thing in the world to wash her face with ”. While purists only gathered dew on 1 May, others believed
12h

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