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Nyheder2018maj28

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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Sweeping gene survey reveals new facets of evolutionWho would have suspected that a handheld genetic test used to unmask sushi bars pawning off tilapia for tuna could deliver deep insights into evolution, including how new species emerge?
10h
Ingeniøren
200+
Holland går all in: Betaler dig for at cykleForholdene for cykler er allerede så gode i Holland, at kun penge kan udgøre en ny fordel.
9h
Scientific American Content: Global
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Muons: The Little-known Particles Helping to Probe the ImpenetrableThe ubiquitous particles are helping to map the innards of pyramids and volcanoes, and spot missing nuclear waste — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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LATEST

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Most popular vitamin and mineral supplements provide no health benefit, study findsThe most commonly consumed vitamin and mineral supplements provide no consistent health benefit or harm, suggests a new study led by researchers at St. Michael's Hospital and the University of Toronto.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Sex hormone levels may affect heart disease risk in post-menopausal womenIn post-menopausal women, having a higher blood level of a male hormone (testosterone) and a higher ratio of the male-type to-female type (estrogen) of hormones is associated with a higher risk of heart disease later in life, according to research published today in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.
3min
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Homeless populations at high risk to develop cardiovascular diseaseAmong homeless individuals cardiovascular disease remains one of the major causes of death due to challenges in predicting initial risk, limited access to health care and difficulties in long-term management, according to a review published today in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.
3min
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Most vitamin, mineral supplements not shown to lower heart disease riskCurrent research does not show enough evidence that vitamin or mineral supplements are beneficial for preventing or treating heart disease, with the exception of folic acid for reducing stroke risk, according to a review article published in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology. Current recommendations to adopt healthy diets that are heavy in plant-based foods from which these vitamin
3min
New Scientist – News
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The Great Barrier Reef has died 5 times in the last 30,000 yearsThe Great Barrier Reef has resurrected itself five times in the last 30,000 years after being wiped out by dramatic environmental shifts.
5min
New Scientist – News
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Bacteria teach us how to make green fuel from carbon dioxideWe’ve found bacteria that turn carbon dioxide into hydrocarbons useful for fuel and plastic, and now we’ve mimicked their enzymes to do it even better
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The Atlantic
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The Measure of Trump’s DevotionMemorial Day is for the living: for those who mourn, for those who remember, for those who carry upon their bodies and souls the scars of war. It is the opportunity for society to express gratitude. That is not only a duty to the past. It’s a commitment to the future—because Memorial Day speaks not only to those who have sacrificed in the past, but to those who may be called on to sacrifice in ye
33min
Popular Science
3
How to handle a koala-chlamydia epidemicAnimals Sex, drugs, and baby koalas. Scientists think young koalas eat their mothers' poop to get their incredible microbiomes. But antibiotic treatment (for koala chlaymdia) harms this practice.
40min
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
1
Amazon, Starbucks pledge $25,000 each to campaign for referendum on Seattle head taxAmazon and Starbucks are among companies that have promised to cut large checks to a campaign collecting signatures for a referendum on Seattle's head tax.
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Science | The Guardian
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The truth about blue light: does it really cause insomnia and increased risk of cancer?The light emitted from our LED screens is blamed for everything from bleary eyes to much more serious health issues. So just how worried should we be? Long attached to visions of clear skies and calm seas, the colour blue historically could not be more welcome, refreshing and natural. Yet, because of the proliferation of blue-emitting LEDs in our artificially lit lives, blue light has come to rep
59min
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
1
Snap Inc. launches accelerator program to invest in media start-upsSnap Inc. will dole out $150,000 investments to various media start-ups this fall as part of an accelerator program it announced Wednesday called Yellow.
1h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
7
A California volcano once obliterated a forest and propelled ash 280 miles. Experts say it offers a warningLassen Peak had been rumbling for days. Glowing hot rocks bounded down the slopes. Lava was welling up into a freshly created crater.
1h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
4
How America will launch more rockets, and fasterIn the 1960s, a rocket launch was big news all over the world. Sixty years later, it's still a big deal. Sure, SpaceX has leaped forward with reusable vehicles, but the ability to make space travel a reliable, everyday event is still a way off.
1h
Scientific American Content: Global
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It Was the 12th Year of Tet ZooThe third and final look back at the TetZooniverse-themed events of 2017… — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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The Atlantic
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The Fading Battlefields of World War IThis year will mark the passing of a full century since the end of World War I—a hundred years since the “War to End All Wars.” In that time, much of the battle-ravaged landscape along the Western Front has been reclaimed by nature, or returned to farmland, and the scars of the war are disappearing. Some zones remain toxic a century later, and others are still littered with unexploded ordnance, c
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Viden

Nasa åbner virtuelt rejsebureau til exoplaneterNasa har åbnet et "rejsebureau", der tilbyder virtuelle ture til exoplaneter uden for vores eget solsystem.
1h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
3
A rare great ape, a 130-foot-tall tree and an extinct marsupial lion make the Top 10 New Species list for 2018The highest branches of a Brazilian forest. The permanent darkness of a cave in China. The deepest place on Earth.
1h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
1
Insider Q&A: Mozilla exec says to demand better internetThe manifesto Mitchell Baker wrote for the free software community Mozilla declared the internet to be a global public resource and privacy a fundamental right that "must not be treated as optional."
1h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
3
Russia asks Apple to help block TelegramRussia's communications watchdog said Monday it had requested Apple help it block the popular messaging app Telegram which has been banned in the country for refusing to give the security services access to private conversations.
1h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
2
Wi-Fi in the road? Kansas City tech start-up is wiring pavement for safety—and funSelf-driving cars have captured the limelight when it comes to how you'll get around in the future, but one Kansas City technology start-up is looking at the road itself.
1h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
1
Spotify vs. Apple Music vs. YouTube Music: Which is best for your hard-earned cash?There are millions of songs available on demand for $10 a month or so from Spotify, Apple Music and rivals, and they're all competing aggressively for your ears and dollars.
1h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
1
'We want to show who they are': How age-enhanced photos of missing children are createdIt happens everyday on Facebook, Instagram and in real life—that moment when you see someone you haven't seen in years. Maybe they've gone gray or gained a few pounds, but there's no doubt you're looking at that friend from high school or the cousin who moved away when you were both 10 years old. You see the boy you once rode bikes with in the face of the man or the girl who taught you how to Fren
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
1
Google village in downtown San Jose would connect local neighborhoods, company vowsGoogle's proposed transit-oriented village would be a catalyst to connect people and nature with an array of experiences, a grand plan that would integrate the game-changing project with numerous adjacent neighborhoods, according to a presentation by the company Wednesday night.
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Science | The Guardian

Peter Morton-Williams obituaryMy husband Peter Morton-Williams, who has died aged 95, was a former pro-vice chancellor of Ulster University and an eminent anthropologist. He worked for many years in Nigeria and Ghana, where he researched and lectured on west African social anthropology and became a leading authority on the history and culture of the Yoruba people of Nigeria. He also wrote many academic papers and some books a
1h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
1
Apple is giving $50 refunds if you paid to replace your iPhone battery last yearApple is refunding $50 to iPhone owners who paid for an out-of-warranty battery replacement for iPhone 6 or newer devices last year.
2h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
7
Getting serious about limiting global warming, the world could save itself more than $20 trillionFighting global warming is starting to sound like a lucrative investment. A new study from Stanford University finds that keeping global warming a half-degree beneath the Paris climate agreement's 2-degree Celsius target could potentially save more than $20 trillion globally.
2h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
4
Dutch govt appeals landmark greenhouse gases rulingThe Dutch government on Monday appealed against a landmark 2015 court ruling which ordered it to slash greenhouse gases by a quarter by 2020.
2h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
3
Air Baltic orders 30 Bombardier C Series jetlinersCanadian aircraft manufacturer Bombardier announced Monday a firm order for 30 C Series jetliners from Latvian carrier Air Baltic, for US$2.9 billion.
2h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Talks to revise the Columbia River Treaty to begin TuesdayTalks are scheduled to begin this week in Washington, D.C., to modernize the document that coordinates flood control and hydropower generation in the United States and Canada along the 1,200-mile (1,930-kilometer) Columbia River.
2h
Big Think
60
You know who else has a problem with police brutality? Russia.Police violence is experienced by a large proportion of Russians. Is America going the way of its geopolitical foe? Read More
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Science | The Guardian
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Invisible scum on sea cuts CO2 exchange with air 'by up to 50%'Scientists say the findings have major implications for predicting our future climate An invisible layer of scum on the sea surface can reduce carbon dioxide exchange between the atmosphere and the oceans by up to 50%, scientists have discovered. Researchers from Heriot-Watt, Newcastle and Exeter universities say the findings, published in the journal Nature Geoscience on Monday, have major impli
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Dagens Medicin

Kronisk nældefeber er allergi mod kroppen selvTyske forskere præsenterede søndag resultater fra et nyt studie, der tyder på, at nældefeber ikke er allergi mod noget uden for kroppen, men en allergi mod kroppen selv.
2h
Dagens Medicin

Overlæge: Molekylær allergologi stormer fremEn ny tilgang inden for allergologien går ud på at diagnosticere patienter ud fra delkomponenter af allergenerne og efterfølgende målrette behandling mod det.
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Dagens Medicin

Skandinaviske lande går sammen om stort studie i intralymfatisk immunterapiForsknings- og behandlingscentre på tværs af skandinaviske lande mødes i disse dage for at planlægge et stort fælles klinisk studie om intralymfatisk immunterapi, der er mindre plagsomt for patienterne og væsentlig billigere end gængs behandling.
2h
Dagens Medicin

Industrien fortrænger forskernes postersessionIndustrien har på årets EAACI-kongres fået markant større område til deres udstillinger. Til gengæld er forskernes postersessions henvist til små telte.
2h
The Atlantic
67
Spitting in Europe’s Face Won’t Help ItalyPARIS—It’s time to retire the famous line by the Italian writer Ennio Flaiano, that in Italian politics, the situation is “always grave but never serious.” Today, it’s fair to say the situation is both grave and serious. The implosion on Sunday of a populist governing coalition—after Italy’s president vetoed the coalition’s choice of a euroskeptical economist as finance minister—has achieved thre
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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New research finds tall and older Amazonian forests more resistant to droughtsA new Columbia Engineering study shows that photosynthesis in tall Amazonian forests–forests above 30m–is 3x less sensitive to precipitation variability than in shorter forests of less than 20m. Taller Amazonian forests were also found to be older, have more biomass and deeper rooting systems that enable them to access deeper soil moisture, making them more resilient to drought. The findings sug
3h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
1
China floods to hit US economy: Climate effects through trade chainsFluvial floods will increase due to human-made climate change, in particular in China. This might raise direct and indirect economic losses along the global supply and trade chains. The US is susceptible to indirect climate-related economic losses due to its negative trade balance with China. Trump's tariffs might further reduce the resilience of the US economy.
3h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Virus genes from city pond rescue bacteriaA key question in evolutionary biology is how new functions arise. New research at Uppsala University shows that bacteriophages (viruses that infect bacteria) can contribute to new functions by revealing hidden potential in their bacterial hosts.
3h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Rise and fall of the Great Barrier ReefStudy is first of its kind to reconstruct evolution of reef over 30,000 years in response to abrupt environmental change.
3h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Genome's dark matter offers clues to major challenge in prostate cancerResearchers at the University of Michigan Rogel Cancer Center identified a novel gene they named ARLNC1 that controls signals from the androgen receptor, a key player in prostate cancer. Knocking down this long non-coding RNA in mice led to cancer cell death, suggesting this may be a key target for future therapies.
3h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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The logic of modesty — why it pays to be humbleWhy do people make anonymous donations, and why does the public perceive this as admirable? A team of scientists, consisting of Christian Hilbe, a postdoc at IST Austria, Moshe Hoffman, and Martin Nowak, both at Harvard University, has developed a novel game theoretic model that captures these behaviors and enables their study. Their new model is the first to include the idea that hidden signals,
3h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Genes, environment and schizophrenia: new study finds the placenta is the missing linkNew research shines a spotlight on the placenta's critical role in the nature versus nurture debate and how it confers risk for schizophrenia and likely other neurodevelopmental disorders including ADHD, autism, and Tourette syndrome. This new scientific frontier, with far-reaching implications for maternal and child health, creates the possibility that scientists can more accurately predict who i
3h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Study identifies processes in the gut that drive fat build-up around the waistResearch by scientists at King's College London into the role the gut plays in processing and distributing fat could pave the way for the development of personalized treatments for obesity and other chronic diseases within the next decade. The research is published in Nature Genetics.
3h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
2
The stick insects that survive being eaten by birdsIt's commonly assumed that when insects are eaten by birds, they and their unborn young have no chance of survival. However, a team of Japanese researchers hypothesized that the eggs within insect bodies can pass through birds undigested. They tested this hypothesis with stick insects, known for their hard eggs, and found that some eggs are excreted unharmed and successfully hatch. Stick insects c
3h
Popular Science
13
What happens if you eat too many Tums?Ask Us Anything If three work, the entire box will probably work even better, right? What if you have like really, really bad heartburn, and you want to just nip it in the bud? Can you just take the whole bottle? While death by Tums overdose is…
3h
New Scientist – News
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We can’t trick people into accepting genetically modified foodsWith new GM foods quietly reaching the shops, we must ensure consumers have the information to make real choices
3h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
20
Landmark international study examines reef's ability to recover from abrupt environmental change over millenniaA landmark international study of the Great Barrier Reef has shown that in the past 30,000 years the world's largest reef system has suffered five death events, largely driven by changes in sea level and associated environmental change.
3h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
17
New research finds tall and older Amazonian forests more resistant to droughtsTropical rainforests play a critical role in regulating the global climate system—they represent the Earth's largest terrestrial CO2 sink. Because of its broad geographical expanse and year-long productivity, the Amazon is key to the global carbon and hydrological cycles. Climate change could threaten the fate of rainforests, but there is great uncertainty about the future ability of rainforests t
3h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
70
China floods to hit U.S. economy—climate effects through trade chainsFluvial floods will increase due to human-made climate change, particularly in China. This might cause direct and indirect economic losses along the global supply and trade chains. The U.S. is susceptible to indirect climate-related economic losses due to its negative trade balance with China. Trump's tariffs might further reduce the resilience of the U.S. economy.
3h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
37
Virus genes from city pond rescue bacteriaA key question in evolutionary biology is how new functions arise. New research at Uppsala University, Sweden, shows that bacteriophages (viruses that infect bacteria) can contribute to new functions by revealing hidden potential in their bacterial hosts.
3h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
94
The logic of modesty—why it pays to be humbleWhy do people make anonymous donations, and why does the public perceive this as admirable? Why do we downplay our interest in a potential partner if we risk missing out on a relationship? A team of scientists, consisting of Christian Hilbe, a postdoc at the Institute Science and Technology Austria (IST Austria), Moshe Hoffman, and Martin Nowak, both at Harvard University, has developed a novel ga
3h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
3
Stick insects expand territory after being eaten by birdsIt's commonly assumed that when insects are eaten by birds, they and their unborn young have no chance of survival. However, a team of Japanese researchers hypothesized that the eggs within insect bodies can pass through birds undigested. They tested this hypothesis with stick insects, known for their hard eggs, and found that some eggs are excreted unharmed and successfully hatch. Stick insects c
3h
Feed: All Latest
57
'Westworld' Recap, Season 2 Episode 6: Back to LifeWestworld Phase SpaceAfter a run of lackluster episodes, HBO's series regained its footing with its most recent installment.
3h
Scientific American Content: Global
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Emily Riehl's Favorite TheoremThe Johns Hopkins University mathematician tells us why doing category theory is like playing the viola — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
3h
Scientific American Content: Global
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The Placenta Is Now a Suspect in Heightening Schizophrenia RiskGenes and pregnancy problems combine to increase significantly the likelihood of developing schizophrenia — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
3h
The Atlantic
500+
America Is Fumbling Its Most Important RelationshipChina is an increasing problem for the United States. But the latest reactions and assumptions about China among America’s political-media leadership class hold every prospect of making China-related problems much worse. How can this be? It involves the familiar tension between short-term political shrewdness and longer-term strategic wisdom. Here’s the pattern I see: Back in the 1980s, when Japa
3h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Novel method to fabricate nanoribbons from speeding nano dropletsAn international team of researchers has discovered a novel method for the synthesis of ultrathin semiconductors.
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Science-Based Medicine
4
CEASE therapy for autism: Homeopathic quackery and “self regulation” by naturopathic boardsNaturopathy is quackery. If you doubt this, consider that you can't have naturopathy without homeopathy. What's even worse is when naturopaths subject autistic children to quackery like CEASE therapy. Expecting any naturopathic regulatory board to investigate quackery in naturopathy is the proverbial fox guarding the henhouse.
4h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
2
HQ2 sweepstakes: Amazon's business much more than e-commerceThere's the part of Amazon that sells and ships books, shoes, electronics, toys and even groceries.
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Dagens Medicin

Kommuner: Opgavepakker er en gratis omgang for PLO og regionernePLO og Danske Regioners fælles udspil om en opgavepakkeløsning mellem kommunerne og praktiserende læger får en lunken modtagelse af KL. »Mærkeligt at vi ikke har været inddraget i det,« lyder det fra KL.
4h
Dagens Medicin

Helen Bernt Andersen valgt som formand for Kræftens BekæmpelseTidligere sygeplejedirektør og sundhedsfaglig direktionskonsulent Helen Bernt Andersen er valgt som ny formand for Kræftens Bekæmpelse.
4h
Popular Science
5
Last week in tech: Have you updated your privacy policy?Technology GDPR happened, Alexa had a butt dial scandal, and enter the Twitter time machine. Avoid eye contact with your family at the Memorial Day barbecue and catch up on last week's big tech stories.
4h
Ingeniøren
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Professor om vandmiljøets fremtid: Vi skal have ådalene tilbageDer er ingen vej udenom at braklægge mindst ti procent af de danske marker og lade en del af dem oversvømme fra tid til anden. Ellers får vi aldrig mindsket udvaskningen af kvælstof tilstrækkeligt til at sikre fjordene mod iltsvind.
4h
Ingeniøren
3
VIDEO: Vandmiljøet bliver værre trods miljøplaner og landbrugspakkeSelv om tre vandmiljøplaner og årtiers indsats forbedrede det danske vandmiljø i fjorde og langs kyster, er forbedringen nu vendt til en forværring.
4h
The Atlantic
18
Westworld: From Cradle to GraveEvery week for the second season of Westworld , three Atlantic staffers will discuss new episodes of HBO’s cerebral sci-fi drama. Because no more screeners will be made available to critics in advance for the rest of Season 2, we’ll be posting our thoughts in installments. Sophie Gilbert: If you discount the flashback scene in which “Arnold” was revealed to be “Bernard,” and in which “Dolores” wa
4h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
8
Johns Hopkins engineers helping NASA restore links to long-lost 'zombie' satelliteWhen aerospace engineers launch a satellite, they don't expect it to last forever. So when the NASA orbiter known as IMAGE disappeared from view after five years in orbit, few were alarmed.
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Dagens Medicin

Nye biologiske midler vil løfte behandlingen af børneeksemBørn med svær eksem, som ikke har gavn af de eksisterende lægemidler, vil efter alt at dømme kunne få stor gavn af at nye biologiske midler, der er på vej ud på markedet.
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Dagens Medicin

Ny dansk metode finder hurtigere årsager til anafylaksiLæge og ph.d.-studerende Morten Junker Christensen har udviklet en metode til at stille diagnosen hvedeafhængigt anstrengelsesudløst anafylaksi. Hans håb er, at metoden kan sætte tal på, hvor mange, der bokser med denne sjældne form for anafylaksi.
4h
Dagens Medicin

Igen er der påbud til to af Region Sjællands sygehuseArbejdstilsynet har udstedt påbud til Radiologisk afdeling på Næstved Sygehus og akutafdelingen på Nykøbing F. Sygehus grundet en meget presset hverdag.
4h
Live Science
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Bad Vibes? Heavy Marijuana Users Hold On to Negative FeelingsMany people tend to look back on the past with "rose-colored glasses," remembering the good times and the good feelings… while forgetting the bad.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
20
Deciphering the language of cells using observation chambersResearchers have developed an innovative label-free method for studying the behavior of single cells continuously and in real time. By placing a cell in a small chamber containing nanosensors and observing it over many hours, it is possible to identify the cell's unique personality and understand how it communicates. This powerful new technology could be used to select the most aggressive cells to
5h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Spanish astronomer discovers new binary star of EW typeSpanish astronomer Salvador Barquin has detected a new binary star system in the Draco constellation. The newly found system, registered by the discoverer in the International Variable Star Index (VSX), is an EW-type eclipsing binary. The finding is reported in a paper published May 16 on arXiv.org.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Akron Zoo turns to a 3-D printer to create its own bands to microchip its birdsThe task seemed simple enough.
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Big Think
53
Afraid of lightning? Go to Antarctica – or EgyptEach year, lightning kills 24,000 people around the world. These maps show which regions get hit more than others. Read More
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
6
Amazon's Alexa won't pass on recordings if you don't set up call featuresIt was every Amazon Echo owner's nightmare. Alexa, the connected speaker, really, truly, was listening in on your conservations, and behind your back, passed on the recording of a private chit-chat to someone on your Echo contact list.
5h
Feed: All Latest
36
We Really Need to Talk About That 'Solo: A Star Wars Story' TwistDid anyone see that coming?
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
8
Sustainability in populist timesFlying is cheaper than driving a car, but a disaster for the environment. Yet few politicians dare to levy excise duty on kerosene. This is only one example from a world where emotions and yelling are burying facts, and in which scientists lose connection with society.
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Dagens Medicin

Syddanmark finder ny chef til friklinikTorsten Wentzer Licht er ansat som chef for Region Syddanmarks Friklinik i Grindsted.
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Dagens Medicin

Nye anbefalinger skal styrke indsats mod livmoderhalskræftSundhedsstyrelsens nye anbefalinger for screening af livmoderhalskræft skal give danske kvinder bedre mulighed for at deltage i screeningen.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
3
Stop and search report leads to policy changePolice Scotland has changed the way it carries out stop and search following a series of recommendations made by researchers at the University of Dundee and Edinburgh Napier University.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
4
Starbucks and the impact of implicit bias trainingOn Tuesday, Starbucks stores in the United States will close for part of the day to deliver "implicit bias training" for all of its employees. Canadian Starbucks employees will get similar training June 11.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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White men's voices still dominate public science. Here's how to change thisVisibility in the mass media matters for scientists. It gets funders' attention. It attracts top students. It can be a pathway to policy influence. Media coverage may even boost the number of times a piece of research is cited in scientific literature.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Molecular biologists compared human and yeast FACTA protein complex called facilitates chromatin transcription (FACT) plays a role in DNA packing within a nucleus, as well as in oncogenesis. A team of scientists from MSU, working in cooperation with foreign colleagues, have reported similarities between the work of this complex in humans and yeast. This discovery led to the prediction that a new protein assists the FACT complex in humans. An arti
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
2
Germany gives Daimler deadline to submit fix for diesel vansGerman authorities are giving automaker Daimler until mid-June to submit a plan for how it will fix diesel-powered vans that don't meet emissions requirements.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Detect the undetectable: Newly developed test allows to screen for the presence of drugs based on drug activity"Looks don't matter, it's what you do that counts." This quote from Skipper, from "Penguins of Madagascar" is the general theme throughout the work of Annelies Cannaert, a Ph.D. student at the Laboratory of Toxicology at Ghent University, Belgium. Annelies, who will defend her Ph.D. thesis on May 25th, developed a novel concept to detect so-called 'designer drugs." Rather than being based on a com
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Simultaneous monitoring of surfaces and protein distribution in cellsIn a first proof-of-concept study, researchers at Ruhr-Universität Bochum (RUB) have combined two microscopy methods that render both a cell's surface and the distribution of a protein in the cell visible, at a resolution in the nanometre range. The method can be used for living cells. It might for example help analyse how cancer metastases are formed or assess the efficacy of specific drugs. The
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Study finds big savings in removing dams over repairsA new study by Portland State University researchers finds billions of dollars could be saved if the nation's aging dams are removed rather than repaired, but also suggests that better data and analysis is needed on the factors driving dam-removal efforts.
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The Scientist RSS

Image of the Day: White WeaselIn Poland, researchers are observing fewer white-coated weasels as the snow melts a little earlier every year, leaving the animals exposed to predators.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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All-electric battery-powered ferry to turn sea travel greenA novel fully electrified car and passenger ferry will help efforts to decarbonise maritime transport. It will also overcome limitations in distances for such boats by targeting medium-range connections.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Genetic mutation identified as culprit in rare infectious diseaseAt some point in life, most of us will contract Tropheryma whipplei without even knowing it. For one in a million infected people, however, this bacterium will make itself blatantly known by causing Whipple's disease, an intestinal inflammatory disorder that causes diarrhea, pain, and weight loss.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Selfies—why we love (and hate) themAt some point, when I was writing my new book, 'Selfies, why we love (and hate) them,' I walked around the Katrinebjerg halls at Aarhus University, Denmark, and asked people if they'd play a word association game with me.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Time crystals may hold secret to coherence in quantum computingAn Aalto University study has provided new evidence that time crystals can physically exist – a claim currently under hot debate.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
3
AI software assists design of new material for solar cellsSolar cells will play a key role in shifting to a renewable economy. Organic photovoltaics (OPVs) are a promising class of solar cells, based on a light-absorbing organic molecule combined with a semiconducting polymer.
6h
The Atlantic
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Was Classic Rock a Sound, or a Tribe?What was classic rock? The question sounds confrontational—how rude to put the Rolling Stones in the past tense when Mick Jagger is still honing his workout routine !—but, of course, the very name classic rock has always implied a was . In 1992, Nirvana jockeyed against contemporaries of their day, from Guns N’ Roses to Kris Kross, for airwave space. Today, “Heart-Shaped Box” still glowers on the
6h
The Atlantic
200+
The 60-Year Downfall of Nuclear Power in the U.S. Has Left a Huge MessIt was just another day in the life of the defunct Hanford nuclear site , a remote part of Washington State that made most of the plutonium in America’s Cold War arsenal. On the morning of May 9, 2017 , alarms sounded. Around 2,000 site workers were told to take cover indoors, and aircraft were banned from flying over the site for several hours. The roof of a tunnel had collapsed, exposing railca
6h
Feed: All Latest
58
Maybe DNA Can’t Answer All Our Questions About HeredityCarl Zimmer's new book _She Has Her Mother’s Laugh_ is a book about the question genetics was invented to answer—and perhaps can't.
6h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
3
Discovery of long chain non-coding RNAs activating sex determination genesThe messenger RNA (mRNA) that conveys genetic information has a region that can be translated into protein (translated region). A noncoding area (ncRNA), which has no translated region (TR), has not been thought to be important; however, recent studies revealed that ncRNAs are transcribed from thousands of loci in genomes.
6h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
8
NASA sees Alberto's strongest storms fragmented near FloridaInfrared data provides temperature information. The colder the temperature of a cloud top, the higher into the atmosphere the storm has pushed, and, as such, the stronger the storm.
6h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
100+
New map shows many old-growth forests remain in EuropeThough you might read about deep, dark woods in fairy tales, the prevailing story today is that very little European old-growth forest remains. But now a new study—and map—shows that a surprising number of these primary forests still stand.
6h
Ingeniøren

Ny algoritme skal forhindre sammenstød for selvkørende bilerForskere finder ny smart måde til at optimere et mere end 100 år gammelt matematisk problem, som bl.a. kan bruges til at forhindre selvkørende biler i sammenstød.
6h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
1
New insights into molecular-level processes could help prevent corrosion and improve catalytic conversionEngineers have long known water vapor can accelerate corrosion of metals and alloys, but the exact mechanisms remain elusive and therefore difficult to prevent. Now an international research team has peered into the atomic-level workings of water vapor corrosion. Their work reveals how the involvement of protons speeds the corrosion process.
6h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
2
Isotope effect reveals non-cooperative water dynamics in salt solutionsWater molecules surrounding ions behave in a much less cooperative way than they do in bulk water. This follows from a study on the isotope-dependent dielectric response of salt solutions, which has just been published in Physical Review Letters by researchers from the Amsterdam research institutes HIMS and AMOLF. Their results lead to an update of Nobel-laureate Onsager's 40-year old theory for t
6h
Scientific American Content: Global
25
How Perceptive Are You? Not Everyone Is the SameThe ability to quickly tally a number of items can predict performance on other visual tasks — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
6h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
17
Restoring culturally relevant food systems to Native American and immigrant populationsThe Karuk Tribe once lived on more than a million acres in remote Northern California. Legally, their ancestral land along the middle section of the Klamath River in Siskiyou County was in the public domain, as the Karuk did not have a reservation. But on May 6, 1905, when President Theodore Roosevelt created the Klamath Forest Reserve, the tribe lost any claim to its aboriginal territory.
7h
The Atlantic
100+
Rival Candidates Try an Unusual Election Message: Vote for Both of UsThe joint press conference that Jane Kim and Mark Leno, two Democratic candidates for mayor of San Francisco, held together earlier this month looked like the kind of unity event that happens the day after a competitive-but-cordial primary election. Surrounded by their respective supporters, they stood side-by-side before a gaggle of microphones and cameras in front of City Hall and looked poised
7h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
10
Broccoli in space—how probiotics could help grow veggies in microgravityAstronauts at the International Space Station are spending more time away from Earth, but they still need their daily serving of vegetables. In the quest to find a viable way for crew to grow their own veggies while orbiting—and possibly one day on the moon or Mars—student researchers are sending broccoli seeds coated with a healthy dose of probiotics to space.
7h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
11
Image: Hubble's galaxy cluster cornucopiaAt first glance, this image is dominated by the vibrant glow of the swirling spiral to the lower left of the frame. However, this galaxy is far from the most interesting spectacle here—behind it sits a galaxy cluster.
7h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
40
Cassowary leaping high caught on film for first timeBy hiding in camouflaged tents for months in the dense rainforest, UNSW Ph.D. student and film-maker Dan Hunter has captured fascinating footage of Australia's "dino-bird" – the elusive flightless cassowary.
7h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
5
Dino-bird dandruff research head and shoulders above restPalaeontologists from University College Cork (UCC) in Ireland have discovered 125 million-year-old dandruff preserved amongst the plumage of feathered dinosaurs and early birds, revealing the first evidence of how dinosaurs shed their skin.
7h
Feed: All Latest
94
How WIRED Lost $100,000 in BitcoinWe mined roughly 13 bitcoins and then ripped up our private key. We were stupid—but not alone.
7h
Feed: All Latest
68
Facebook, Snapchat and the Dawn of the Post-Truth EraSocial media is destroying our notion of an agreed-upon Truth, taking us back to the oral tradition of pre-literate days.
7h
Feed: All Latest
29
Forget Robo-Cars and Hit the Water on an Autonomous BoatRather than worrying about robo-taxis, researchers at places like MIT are making ships self-piloting to save fuel and prevent accidents.
7h
Feed: All Latest
45
These Spinning Disks of Gas and Dust Reveal How Planets Get MadeDetailed images of disks swirling around young stars show the details of how solar systems come to be.
7h
Feed: All Latest
40
For the Best and Smartest Audio, Stick With Apple or GoogleAlexa’s fine, but if you want superior audio with your AI, try one of these chatty speakers.
7h
New on MIT Technology Review
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NASA’s building new tools to manage water, as climate dangers growAfter years of measuring California’s Sierra snowpack from the air, the agency is now developing similar systems for space.
7h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
100+
Physicists invent flux capacitor, break time-reversal symmetryIn the popular movie franchise "Back to the Future", an eccentric scientist creates a time machine that runs on a flux capacitor.
7h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
10
Simulations for Mars Insight missionOn 5 May, the NASA "InSight"-lander set off on its journey to Mars. This is the first mission dedicated to investigate the internal structure of the red planet and to answer some key questions such as: Why have Earth and Mars developed so differently although their original structure and chemical composition seem so similar? How large, thick and dense are the core, mantle and crust? What is their
7h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
2
Researchers develop new combinatorial protein libraryCombinatorial libraries are a key component of the chemist's toolkit for ligand screening. Dynamic combinatorial libraries add a new dimension by interlinking synthesis and screening. Now, British scientists have developed a dynamic combinatorial library for the screening of supramolecular ligand structures that recognize protein surfaces and could interfere with protein–protein interaction. The s
7h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
1
Triplex-signal chemosensor for naked eye and spectrometric lead detectionEnvironmental lead exposure is one of the most significant public health threats worldwide. Consequently, reliable, quick, inexpensive, and easy-to-handle lead assays are urgently needed. Scientists have now presented a novel chemosensor for lead in the European Journal of Inorganic Chemistry. It offers a triplex signal upon binding of lead ions: a significant change in the solution color that ena
7h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
1
New study investigates dolphin liberation in KoreaAn international team of researchers affiliated with South Korea's Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology (UNIST) has carried out a scientific investigation on dolphin liberation in South Korea.
7h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
100+
Team introduces novel method to grow elastic diamondsDiamond is the strongest naturally occurring material on Earth. It is also renowned for its high stiffness, exceptional thermal conductivity, high chemical resistance, and high optical transparency. Although these remarkable properties make diamond highly desirable for scientific and technological applications, progress has been slow due to its brittleness.
7h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
4
Combination of light and temperature naturally regulate algal abundanceA two-year study by University of Queensland researchers has found the amount of algae on a coral reef is influenced by interaction between light and temperature, as well as by human impacts.
7h
Science | The Guardian
25
Why does light travel at the speed it does?The long-running series in which readers answer other readers’ questions on subjects ranging from trivial flights of fancy to profound scientific concepts Why does light travel at the speed it does? Is it related to the age, dimensions or oscillation of the universe? Do we know if this speed has been constant since the big bang? Peter Lowe, Newcastle upon Tyne Continue reading…
7h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
2
Cell chat: Attacking disease by learning the language of cellsBreakthrough miniature biosensor offers unprecedented insights into how individual cells behave, allowing scientists to isolate single cells, analyze them in real time and observe their complex signalling behavior without disturbing their environment.
8h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
2
Deciphering the language of cells using observation chambersEPFL researchers have developed an innovative label-free method for studying the behavior of single cells continuously and in real time. By placing a cell in a small chamber containing nanosensors and observing it over many hours, it is possible to identify the cell's unique personality and understand how it communicates. This powerful new technology could be used to select the most aggressive cel
8h
Ingeniøren

Google: Ny rapport om "retten til at blive glemt"Google har modtaget over 600.000 anmodninger om at få fjernet over 2,5 mia. hjemmeside referencer. De efterkommes ud fra en vurdering af indhold og samfundsmæssig relevans.
8h
Ingeniøren
1
Skolers brug af apps og nettjenester kan blive strafbart med GDPRDet har i mange år haltet med fokus på overholdelse af persondatareglerne. Med GDPR skal der dog strammet op, hvilket kan betyde at mange tjenester bliver ulovlige at bruge.
8h
Ingeniøren
28
CO2-udledning fra energiproduktion stiger for første gang i 4 årDen ekstra udledning svarer til 170 millioner biler.
8h
Ingeniøren

Techtopia #54: Hack din krop!Podcast: En fedtsugning med laser var blot et af tilbuddene på Biohacker Summit i Stockholm, hvor man hacker sin krop til at yde mere eller til helbredelse.
8h
NYT > Science
93
Pursuits: Colliders, Sundials and Wonder: When Science Is Your DestinationAt CERN in Switzerland and Fermilab in Illinois, there is always a sense of discovery—about the past, present and future.
8h
NYT > Science
500+
The New Health Care: It Saves Lives. It Can Save Money. So Why Aren’t We Spending More on Public Health?Funding for health campaigns is surprisingly low when you consider they’re often so valuable that they pay for themselves.
8h
The Atlantic
100+
Killing Eve and the Riddle of Why Women KillThis article contains spoilers through the Season 1 finale of Killing Eve. The eponymous blood-spatter expert of Showtime’s Dexter refers to himself as a “very neat monster” in the show’s pilot. A serial killer who exclusively targeted the guilty, Dexter (Michael C. Hall) lured viewers into his web through a grotesque but well-reasoned veneer of moral relativism. Barry ’s titular character (Bill
8h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
100+
Cell chat: Attacking disease by learning the language of cellsBreakthrough lab-on-a-chip technology that reveals how human cells communicate could lead to new treatments for cancer and autoimmune disorders.
8h
Ingeniøren

Blockchain skal hjælpe virksomheder med at finde partnereAmerikanske forskere foreslår at etablere et blockchain-baseret netværk, som kan hjælpe små og mellemstore fremstillingsvirksomheder med at dele dokumentation og data med kunderne.
8h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
8
Microsatellite swarms could paint clearer picture of our planetTiny, low-cost satellites that can work together to boost their output and a technology that reduces the loss of satellite data are two of the latest innovations to hit the Earth observation market – and the results promise to reveal a more detailed image of our planet.
8h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
6
Solar Impulse 'Efficient Solution' label for profitable start-ups to boost clean energy investmentThe pioneering solar flight foundation Solar Impulse has launched an 'Efficient Solution' label for clean energy start-ups and innovations that can demonstrate their profitability, in a bid to boost investment in the sector.
8h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
2
Researchers achieve almost instant magnetization of matter by lightThe production of devices to store or transmit information is one of the most frequent technological applications of magnetism. An experimental and theoretical study conducted at the University of São Paulo's Physics Institute (IF-USP) in Brazil has discovered an ultrafast way of magnetizing matter with minimal energy consumption.
8h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
1
New platform for analyzing global trade in the last two centuriesA new web platform called the Federico-Tena World Trade Historical Database contains information about imports and exports from 140 countries from every continent from 1800 to 1938. This new data considerably improves previous studies and enables accurate historical continuity to current United Nations estimates, which contain data from 1948 to the present day.
8h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
2
How scientists analyze cell membranesExchange of material and information at the level of individual cells requires transport and signaling at the level of the plasma membrane enclosing the cell. Studying mechanisms at such tiny dimensions presents researchers with enormous challenges. Recently, researchers wanted to determine the function and distribution of cholesterol, an important component of the membrane. So far, cholesterol ca
8h
Dagens Medicin

Hjerteforeningen får ny hjertelæge som formandHjerteforeningens bestyrelse har valgt kardiologisk overlæge og professor Christian Hassager som foreningens nye formand.
8h
HumanBrainProject (uploads) on YouTube

The Human Brain ProjectShort talks presented by the panellists at an event to discuss the latest in brain knowledge and related technologies, held in Geneva on 3 May 2018. Organised by the Swiss Swedish Chamber of Commerce and the Human Brain Project. From: HumanBrainProject
9h
Science : NPR
3K
Great White Sharks Have A Secret 'Cafe,' And They Led Scientists Right To ItThese sharks have a hidden life that's becoming a lot less hidden, thanks to a scientific expedition that was years in the making. (Image credit: Courtesy Stanford University — Block Lab Hopkins Marine Station)
9h
Latest Headlines | Science News
100+
Dark matter particles elude scientists in the biggest search of its kindThe XENON1T experiment saw no signs of hypothetical dark matter particles called WIMPs.
9h
HumanBrainProject (uploads) on YouTube

The Human Brain ProjectThe Human Brain Project should lay the technical foundations for a new model of ICT-based brain research, driving integration between data and knowledge from different disciplines, and catalysing a community effort to achieve a new understanding of the brain, new treatments for brain disease and new brain-like computing technologies. From: HumanBrainProject
9h
Science | The Guardian
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The Galileo space row shows the mess of Brexit in microcosm | Philip BallWe cannot leave the EU and retain all the rights we had as members, as the tussle over this vital satellite system shows A row over the UK’s access to the Galileo project , the European satellite global-positioning system used both for civil and military purposes, is the latest tussle about what Brexit would mean for British science and technology. For all the familiar, rhetorical huffing and puff
9h
NYT > Science
47
Kilauea Volcano’s Lava Fields Offer Scientists a Portal to MarsScientists are studying the Hawaiian volcano as part of a NASA-led project to answer questions like how life on Mars could have developed — if it ever did.
9h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
13
Britain's supply of electric cars at risk from Brexit: think-tankBritain risks a shortage of electric cars after Brexit as carmakers will lose an incentive to sell low-emission vehicles there, a Brussels-based think-tank warned.
10h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
2
Europe's largest wooden building awaits salvation off IstanbulLooking up at the giant wooden edifice looming over him, Erol Baytas shakes his head.
10h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
6
Earthquake shakes northeast China, but no apparent damageA moderate earthquake shook northeastern China early Monday, but no damage or injuries have been reported.
10h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
4
New Zealand to kill 150,000 cows to end bacterial diseaseNew Zealand plans to slaughter about 150,000 cows as it tries to eradicate a strain of disease-causing bacteria from the national herd.
10h
NYT > Science
55
ScienceTake: Breathe Deep: How the Antarctic Sea Spider Gets OxygenThey don’t have lungs or gills, and they are encased in hard exoskeletons. But somehow these marine creepers are getting oxygen from the water.
11h
NYT > Science
27
No Lungs, No Gills: How Do Sea Spiders Breathe?Antarctic sea spiders have no lungs or gills, so how do they get oxygen into their bodies? The answer is in their pores.
11h
Ingeniøren
30
Efsa: Hverken dyr eller mennesker tager skade af glyphosat-rester i madenI en ny rapport konkluderer EU’s fødevareagentur, Efsa, at glyphosat-rester i foderet ikke truer dyrs helbred, og at grænseværdierne for kost til mennesker også hænger fint sammen. Greenpeace savner en ny tilgang fra myndighederne.
13h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
3
Novel method to fabricate nanoribbons from speeding nano dropletsAn international team of researchers, affiliated with South Korea's Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology (UNIST) has discovered a novel method for the synthesis of ultrathin semiconductors.
14h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
2
No link between HPV vaccination and risk of autoimmune disorders: Study in CMAJA new study in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal) found no increased risk of autoimmune disorders in girls who received quadrivalent human papillomavirus (HPV4) vaccination, adding to the body of evidence for the safety of the vaccine.
14h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
2
Paramedic-run health sessions in low-income apartments reduced number of 911 calls, improved healthA community-based health promotion program developed by McMaster University that was offered by paramedics in low-income apartment buildings significantly reduced the number of 911 calls and improved quality of life for seniors, found a randomized controlled trial published in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal).
14h
Ingeniøren

KMD mistede 82.000 filer fra Roskilde: Indisk leverandør forsømte it-vedligeholdKMD har beklaget det nedbrud, der resulterede i tabet af mere end 82.000 filer fra Roskilde Kommune. Men ifølge Version2s oplysninger skyldes det fejl hos en indisk underleverandør.
14h
Ingeniøren

Greenwashing: Forbrugere vildledes om fossilt indhold i bioposerProducenten bag Københavns bioposer fremhæver produktet for at være plantebaseret. Det trækker tråde til Coca-Colas Plantbottle, der i 2013 fik kritik for vildledende markedsføring.
15h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
25
Shape of DNA can be changed with a range of triggers including copper and oxygenThe structure of DNA is widely accepted to exist as a double helix, but different DNA structures also exist. New research points to a range of triggers that can manipulate its shape.
18h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
30
Time spent sitting at a screen matters less if you are fit and strongThe impact of screen time on cardiovascular disease, cancer incidence and mortality may be greatest in people who have lower levels of grip-strength, fitness and physical activity, according to a new study.
18h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
7
New type of vertigo identifiedNeurologists have identified a new type of vertigo with no known cause, according to a new study.
18h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
14
Researchers devise more effective location awareness for the Internet-of-(many)-ThingsAnticipating a critical strain on the ability of fifth generation (5G) networks to keep track of a rapidly growing number of mobile devices, engineers have come up with an improved algorithm for localizing and tracking these products that distributes the task among the devices themselves. It is a scalable solution that could meet the demands of a projected 50 billion connected products in the Inte
18h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
31
Fee-base form of nicotine in electronic cigarettesResearchers have developed methods for measuring levels of free-base nicotine in electronic cigarette (e-cigarette) liquids and vapor, the levels of which are associated with harshness upon inhalation of e-cigarette vapors and tobacco smoke.
18h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
30
Tiny particles could help fight brain cancerResearchers have now devised a new drug-delivering nanoparticle that could offer a better way to treat glioblastoma.
18h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
30
African-Americans and Latinos are more likely to be at risk for depression than whitesA new study shows that African-Americans and Latinos are significantly more likely to experience serious depression than whites, but chronic stress does not seem to explain these differences.
18h
BBC News – Science & Environment
44
Are captive dolphins 'happy'?Scientists have tried to measure how dolphins at a French marine park feel about their environment.
18h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
38
By 2035 over 4 million adults will be morbidly obese across England, Wales, and ScotlandAcross England, Wales, and Scotland, morbid obesity (BMI of 40kg/m² or over) rates in adults are expected to soar over the next 17 years, with the number of morbidly obese adults likely to exceed 4 million by 2035 — more than double the 1.9 million in 2015, according to new research.
18h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
22
Dolphin liberation in KoreaBiologists have carried out a scientific investigation on dolphin liberation in South Korea.
18h
BBC News – Science & Environment
500+
Dolphin 'happiness' measured by scientists in FranceAnimal welfare researchers measure how captive dolphins feel about their environment.
18h
cognitive science
1
Why motor neuron diseases causes the motor neuron to diesubmitted by /u/davyeminy [link] [comments]
18h
Futurity.org
3
These birds recognize neighbors of a different speciesBirds of a different feather can flock together when members of one species come to recognize individuals from another, research shows. The study, which offers the first experimental evidence of recognition across non-primate species, took place in an arid region of southern Australia where both variegated and splendid fairy-wrens live. Researchers recorded the songs of both species from fairy-wr
19h
Futurity.org
2
Certain tests better flag fetuses with brain disorder riskFetuses with a specific, rare chromosomal aberration have a 20 percent risk of developmental or other brain disorder, new research shows. The work could lead to personalized diagnostics and counseling for pregnant women. Fetuses with this new balanced chromosomal aberration have a higher risk of developing brain disorders such as autism and mental retardation than previously anticipated, accordin
19h
Futurity.org
4
New details suggest how cardio could treat addictionNew research clarifies how aerobic exercise could affect the brain in ways that may support treatment—and even prevention strategies—for addiction. Also known as “cardio,” aerobic exercise is brisk exercise that increases heart rate, breathing, and circulation of oxygen through the blood, and is linked to a decrease in a variety of health problems, including diabetes, heart disease, and arthritis
19h

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