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Nyheder2018maj29

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Ingeniøren
400+
Professorer: Esben Lunde talte usandt på samråd om analysefejlForskere afviser, at 50 af Danmarks 119 vandområder var på vej mod god økologisk tilstand, sådan som den afgåede miljøminister hævdede på samråd i april.
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Popular Science
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Why deep-sounding personality tests often provide shallow answersScience Two experts weigh in on all those BuzzFeed quizzes you've been taking. People love turning to these kinds of personality quizzes and tests on the hunt for deep insights into themselves. People tend to believe they have a “true” and…
2h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Graphene layered with magnetic materials could drive ultrathin spintronicsResearchers working at the Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) coupled graphene, a monolayer form of carbon, with thin layers of magnetic materials like cobalt and nickel to produce exotic behavior in electrons that could be useful for next-generation computing applications.
8h

LATEST

Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

Prehistoric teeth dating back two million years reveal details on Africa's paleoclimateNew research shows that the climate of the interior of southern Africa almost two million years ago was much wetter than the modern environment. This first extensive paleoenvironmental sequence for the interior of southern Africa suggests that human ancestors were living in environments other than open, arid grasslands known from East African research of the same time period.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

Invisible barrier on ocean surface can reduce carbon uptakeAn invisible layer of biological compounds on the sea surface reduces the rate at which carbon dioxide gas moves between the atmosphere and the oceans, scientists have reported.
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The Scientist RSS

Wolf-like Animal Baffles Montana ScientistsSpecialists from the state's Department of Fish, Wildlife and Parks are working to determine what creature a rancher shot and killed.
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Viden

Ekspert: Almindelig mad opbygger muskler lige så godt som proteinpulverVed at spise den rette kost, kan man opnå lige så stor effekt uden proteintilskud, siger ekspert i idræt og ernæring.
2min
New on MIT Technology Review
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Intel is under investigation for being ageist
10min
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Having an emotional group feeling boosts multiday sports events, study saysSponsors and organizers of large multiday events, take note: Pulling fans into an emotionally connected group atmosphere can enhance brand recall and may secure repeat attendance.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Having an emotional group feeling boosts multiday sports events, study saysPulling fans into an emotionally connected group atmosphere can enhance brand recall and may secure repeat attendance. That's the key message of a University of Oregon study that analyzed the feelings of fans at a six-day, biannual international track-and-field event.
16min
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

First time guidance on treating red diaper syndrome in otherwise healthy breastfed infantsA case study and subsequent literature review has concluded that absent signs of clinical infection, breastfeeding should continue normally when mother and baby are diagnosed with Red Diaper Syndrome (pink-colored breast milk and pink-colored soiled diapers) caused by Serratia marcescens, an opportunistic bacteria.
16min
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Making sense of the situation in Cape TownScientists at the Joint Research Centre, the European Commission's Science and Knowledge service, analyze Southern African weather patterns, helping policymakers plan actions to minimize the impact of water shortages.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

NASA and NOAA satellites track Alberto in the US southOn Tuesday, May 29, 2018, the National Hurricane Center issued the last public advisory on Alberto. NASA and NOAA satellites continued to provide imagery that showed the extent and strength of the storm in the southern USAlberto has weakened to a subtropical depression.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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Wake Forest researchers create advanced brain organoid to model strokes, screen drugsWake Forest Institute for Regenerative Medicine scientists have developed a 3D brain organoid that could have potential applications in drug discovery and disease modeling.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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New model explains what we see when a massive black hole devours a starA star that wanders too close to the supermassive black hole in the center of its galaxy will be torn apart by the black hole's gravity in a violent cataclysm called a tidal disruption event (TDE), producing a bright flare of radiation. A new study led by theoretical astrophysicists at the University of Copenhagen's Niels Bohr Institute and UC Santa Cruz provides a unified model that explains rece
16min
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

WIC participation better among vulnerable, US citizen children whose mothers are eligible for DACAResults of a study of nearly 2,000 US citizen children and their mothers add to growing evidence of the multigenerational, beneficial effects of the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) immigration policy on children who are citizens, illustrating increased participation in the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants and Children (WIC) among citizen children whose mother
16min
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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France to beef up emergency alert system on social mediaFrance's Interior Ministry announced plans on Tuesday to beef up its emergency alert system to the public across social media.
20min
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Natural phenomenon of Manhattanhenge expected to draw crowdsThanks to a natural phenomenon, it's not all about the plays and celebrity sightings in New York City. When the sun lines up with the Manhattan street grid before setting, the city gets bathed in radiance.
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Science | The Guardian
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Brain cancer vaccine could extend lives of patients by yearsTrial on people with form of disease that killed Tessa Jowell ‘remarkably promising’ A vaccine could add years to the lives of people with the aggressive form of brain cancer that killed the former Labour cabinet minister Tessa Jowell , trials suggest. The treatment for people with glioblastoma works by using the immune cells of patients to target their tumour. Early findings from an 11-year stud
23min
Live Science
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Japanese Whalers Murdered 122 Pregnant Whales and 114 Babies Last SummerThe country remains unapologetic for its "scientific research" program in the South Ocean.
34min
Popular Science
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iOS 11.4 finally cleans up text conversations with Messages in iCloudGadgets Text message slobs rejoice. Deleting a message on your iPhone will now finally delete it across the rest of your devices.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Surgical outcomes equivalent whether physician anesthesiologist assisted by nurse anesthetist or AAPatients who undergo inpatient surgery experience no difference in death rates, hospital length of stay or costs between admission or discharge whether their physician anesthesiologist is assisted by a nurse anesthetist or an anesthesiologist assistant, according to a new study published in the Online First edition of Anesthesiology, the peer-reviewed medical journal of the American Society of Ane
37min
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

How blackcurrants could help end bad (for the planet) hair daysNatural dyes extracted from blackcurrant waste created during Ribena fruit cordial manufacture have for the first time been used in an effective new hair dyeing technology, developed at the University of Leeds.
37min
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Virtual brain could aid surgical planningResearchers have simulated neural activity based on the unique structural architecture of individual brain tumor patients using a platform called The Virtual Brain. The findings, reported in eNeuro, are a first step toward creating personalized brain models that could be used to predict the effects of tumors and consequent surgery on brain function.
37min
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

'Second brain' neurons keep colon movingMillions of neurons in the gastrointestinal tract coordinate their activity to generate the muscle contractions that propel waste through the last leg of the digestive system, according to a study of isolated mouse colons published in the Journal of Neuroscience. The newly identified neuronal firing pattern may represent an early feature preserved through the evolution of nervous systems.
37min
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

E. coli infection induces delirium in aging ratsActivation of the immune system by an infection may temporarily disrupt formation of long-term memories in healthy, aging rats by reducing levels of a protein required for brain cells to make new connections, suggests new research published in eNeuro.
37min
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Flow in the asthenosphere drags tectonic plates alongNew simulations of Earth's asthenosphere find that convective cycling and pressure-driven flow can sometimes cause the planet's most fluid layer of mantle to move even faster than the tectonic plates that ride atop it.
38min
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
3
Minimising the impacts of palm oil plantationsWith palm oil production exploding around the world, a new study of a leading producer has found ways to make the process easier on the environment.
38min
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
3
Researchers predict materials to stabilize record-high capacity lithium-ion batteryA Northwestern University research team has found ways to stabilize a new battery with a record-high charge capacity. Based on a lithium-manganese-oxide cathode, the breakthrough could enable smart phones and battery-powered automobiles to last more than twice as long between charges.
38min
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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'Will this be on the test?' Even if it isn't, students might remember itA new study by the University of British Columbia shows that teachers don't have to test everything they want their students to remember—as long as the knowledge they want to convey fits together well, and the test questions are well-chosen.
44min
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
3
A photosynthetic engine for artificial cellsIn the quest to build an artificial cell, there are two approaches: The first, reengineers the genomic software of a living cell. The second, focuses on cellular hardware, building simple, cell-like structures from the ground up that mimic the function of living cells. One of the biggest challenges in this second approach is mimicking the intricate chemical and biological reactions required for ce
44min
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Canada govt steps in to buy controversial pipelineCanada's government stepped in Tuesday to take over a controversial pipeline expansion project to ensure that it gets built in the face of stiff opposition from environmental activists and a regional government.
44min
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Researchers identify how eye loss occurs in blind cavefishLoss of eye tissue in blind cavefish (Astyanax mexicanus), which occurs within a few days of their development, happens through epigenetic silencing of eye-related genes, according to a study led by the National Institutes of Health. Epigenetic regulation is a process where genes are turned off or on, typically in a reversible or temporary manner. This mechanism differs from genetic mutations, whi
44min
Popular Science
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How to start composting at homeEnvironment Organic waste doesn’t belong in a landfill. Use this kit to turn it into mulch your plants will devour. Leftover salad and the pear you forgot about in the back of the fridge don't belong in a landfill. Use this kit to turn it into mulch your plants will devour.
49min
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Engineers invent a noninvasive technique to correct visionNearsightedness, or myopia, is an increasing problem around the world. There are now twice as many people in the US and Europe with this condition as there were 50 years ago. In East Asia, 70 to 90 percent of teenagers and young adults are nearsighted. By some estimates, about 2.5 billion of people across the globe may be affected by myopia by 2020.
50min
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Bayer says wins conditional US approval for Monsanto takeoverGerman chemicals firm Bayer said on Tuesday it had won conditional approval from the US Justice Department for its proposed $62.5 billion takeover of US seeds and pesticide maker Monsanto.
50min
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Bayer selling $9B in ag business ahead of Monsanto mergerGerman pharmaceutical giant Bayer AG has agreed to the U.S. government's demand that it sell about $9 billion in agriculture businesses as condition for acquiring Monsanto Co., a U.S. seed and weed-killer maker.
50min
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Starbucks shuts 8,000 US stores for racial bias trainingStarbucks is closing more than 8,000 stores across the United States Tuesday to conduct employee training on racial bias, a closely watched exercise that spotlights lingering problems of discrimination nationwide.
50min
New on MIT Technology Review
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A stem-cell transplant in the womb appears to have saved a baby girl’s life
53min
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Novel power meter opens the door for in-situ, real-time monitoring of high-power lasersHigh-power lasers are now widely used in additive manufacturing and laser welding systems to precisely cut and weld metal, making all kinds of metal parts for medical devices, aerospace applications, automotive industries, and more. With the rise in industrial use of high-power laser processing, manufacturers increasingly seek high-accuracy, point-of-use laser power meters that can quickly report
56min
Feed: All Latest
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WIRED's Top Stories in May: I Saw Black and Blue, but I Heard YannyPlus: Robert Mueller continues to captivate, and people clearly have unlimited interest in Moviepass Unlimited.
57min
Feed: All Latest
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Loop Earplugs Review: Hearing Protection That Looks Like JewelryYou've never seen an earplug look this good.
57min
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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Flow in the asthenosphere drags tectonic plates alongNew simulations of the asthenosphere find that convective cycling and pressure-driven flow can sometimes cause Earth's most fluid layer of mantle to move even faster than the tectonic plates that ride atop it.
59min
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

UK Primary Immunodeficiency Registry will help doctors diagnose patients & offer best careOn the tenth anniversary of the United Kingdom Primary Immunodeficiency Registry, the publication of their Primary Immunodeficiency (PID) report offers the most comprehensive view to date of this small but significant group of UK patients. This report, published in Clinical & Experimental Immunology, provides valuable information on PID in the UK, especially regarding delays to diagnosis.
59min
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Novel power meter opens the door for in-situ, real-time monitoring of high-power lasersA group of researchers from National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) have developed a smaller, faster and more sensitive laser power meter in the form of a folding mirror they call a 'smart mirror.'
59min
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Early-life seizures prematurely wake up brain networks tied to autismEarly-life seizures prematurely switch on key synapses in the brain that may contribute to further neurodevelopmental delay in children with autism and other intellectual disabilities, suggests a new study from researchers at Penn Medicine.
59min
Scientific American Content: Global
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Will Starbucks' Anti-Bias Training Be Effective?It's a well-intentioned effort, but it probably won't work — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
59min
The Atlantic
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With Solo, Has Star Wars Fatigue Set In?From 1977 to 2005, there were six Star Wars films released in theaters. For better or worse, each was an event; all but one was the highest-grossing movie the year it came out ( Attack of the Clones was 2002’s third-highest). Since Disney bought Lucasfilm and acquired the rights to George Lucas’s storied, moneymaking franchise, it has put out four Star Wars movies in four years. The first three—
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Viden

Kæmpe elregninger og madsvineri: Superheltene redder verden – men de smadrer miljøetSuperhelte som Batman og Spider-Man redder gang på gang dagen fra onde superskurke, men på vejen mod retfærdighed sætter de undervejs et ordentlig aftryk på klimaet.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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It takes a village—How researchers built their own microscope to decipher 'superbugs'A hand-made super-microscope—capable of seeing the actual building blocks of a bacterial cell wall—has helped Monash researchers decipher how bacteria are able to literally build a wall against the immune system, leading to often deadly disease.
1h
Big Think
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When your brain keeps time with rhythms in speechA new study attempts to figure out why the motor cortex sometimes synchronizes to speech as the auditory cortex does. Read More
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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'Smart' material enables novel applications in autonomous driving and roboticsResearch led by scientists from the University of Luxembourg has shown the potential of liquid crystal shells as enabling material for a vast array of future applications, ranging from autonomous driving to anti-counterfeiting technology and a new class of sensors.
1h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Caseload volume in gynecologic surgery important consideration for womenExperts at the GW, led by Gaby Moawad, M.D., assistant professor of obstetrics and gynecology at the GW School of Medicine and Health Sciences, outlined some of the concerns and proposed solutions for choosing a surgeon in an article recently published in the Journal of Minimally Invasive Gynecology.
1h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Researchers predict materials to stabilize record-high capacity lithium-ion batteryA Northwestern University research team has found ways to stabilize a new battery with a record-high charge capacity. By adding chromium or vanadium to the lithium-manganese-oxide cathode, the battery could enable smart phones and battery-powered automobiles to last more than twice as long between charges.
1h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

CDC interventions targeting diabetes in pregnancy could improve maternal and infant healthDiabetes in pregnant women can have serious health consequences for both mother and baby, and the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has identified four target areas in which increased surveillance, screening, and preventive care can improve maternal and infant health.
1h
New on MIT Technology Review
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HoloLens can now guide the blind through complicated buildingsThe headset’s ability to map a space and talk people through it may prove more important than the mixing-imagery-with-reality stuff.
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NYT > Science
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They’re Out of Prison. Can They Stay Out of the Hospital?Community health workers who used to be locked up themselves help recently released inmates get care for mental illness, addiction and other health problems.
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Science | The Guardian
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Teenagers’ brains not ready for GCSEs, says neuroscientistSarah-Jayne Blakemore opposes timing of exams in a period of major cognitive change Teenagers are being damaged by the British school system because of early start times and exams at 16 when their brains are going through enormous change, a leading neuroscientist has said. Sarah-Jayne Blakemore said it was only in recent years that the full scale of the changes that take place in the adolescent b
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The Atlantic
69
The Radical Supreme Court Decision That America ForgotAmericans like to imagine the civil-rights era as a single, sustained burst of progress, surging forth in 1954 with Brown v. Board of Education and building to a crescendo before terminating, somewhat hazily, in the late 1960s. But the real narrative of civil rights refuses to yield to this familiar arc. Nothing illustrates this more than the strange stop-and-start of American school desegregatio
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

UMN study demonstrates link between social stress and shortened lifespan in miceA new study from University of Minnesota Medical School researchers has demonstrated that psychosocial stress can shorten the lifespan in mice. For years, stress and socio-economic status has been connected to morbidity and mortality in humans, but until now, it has not been mechanically understood or explored in animal models.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Penn-led trial shows AZEDRA can be effective, safe for treatment of rare neuroendocrine tumorsA radiotherapy drug that treats the rare neuroendocrine cancers pheochromocytoma and paraganglioma can be both effective and safe for patients, according to the findings of a multi-center trial led by researchers in the Abramson Cancer Center of the University of Pennsylvania.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

How to code a functional molecular machine?An international team has developed a model that simulates protein evolution. Starting from stiff, unfunctional proteins, the computer model shows how evolving protein components can work together to give rise to dynamic and efficient molecular machines.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Columbia engineers invent a noninvasive technique to correct visionColumbia engineers have developed a noninvasive approach to permanently correct vision that shows great promise in preclinical models. The method uses a femtosecond oscillator for selective and localized alteration of the biochemical and biomechanical properties of corneal tissue. The technique, which changes the tissue's macroscopic geometry, is non-surgical and has fewer side effects and limitat
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

A photosynthetic engine for artificial cellsInternational team of researchers from Harvard University and Sogang University in Seoul have engineered a cell-like structure that harnesses photosynthesis to perform metabolic reactions, including energy harvesting, carbon fixation and cytoskeleton formation.
1h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

NIH researchers identify how eye loss occurs in blind cavefishLoss of eye tissue in blind cavefish (Astyanax mexicanus), which occurs within a few days of their development, happens through epigenetic silencing of eye-related genes, according to a study led by the National Institutes of Health. Epigenetic regulation is a process where genes are turned off or on, typically in a reversible or temporary manner. This mechanism differs from genetic mutations, whi
1h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Scientists show how brain circuit generates anxietyNeuroscientists at Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory (CSHL) have identified a neural circuit in the amygdala, the brain's seat of emotion processing, that gives rise to anxiety. Their insight has revealed the critical role of a molecule called dynorphin, which could serve as a target for treatment of anxiety-related disorders including post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD).
1h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Minimising the impacts of palm oil plantationsWith palm oil production exploding around the world, a new study of a leading producer has found ways to make the process easier on the environment.
1h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

What do animals want?Researchers apply machine learning to understand how potential food rewards guide the movements of nematodes, finding that the subjects combine multiple sensations into strategic behaviors that uses the minimal amount of energy.
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Dagens Medicin

Forskere: EAACI og andre kongresser bringer færre reelle nyhederVidenskabelige tidsskrifters krav om overholdelse af embargo er nu så skrappe, at forskere ikke længere tør lufte deres upublicerede data på kongresser som EAACI.
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Dagens Medicin

Stor uenighed om forebyggelse af allergi i tidlig barndomIngen grund til at ændre på anbefalinger om brug hypoallergen modermælkserstatning, mener danske forskere, selvom EAACI-session satte spørgsmålstegn ved konklusionerne.
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Dagens Medicin

Banebrydende ny form for vaccination mod katteallergi på vejMedicinalfirmaet Regeneron Pharmaceuticals har en helt ny form for vaccine i pipelinen, der rummer de antistoffer kroppen har brug for til at kunne takle allergenet. Forskere kalder princippet for ‘passiv vaccination’, og vaccinen er den første af sin art.
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Science : NPR
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Official Death Toll From Maria In Puerto Rico Is Way Off, Researchers SayA new Harvard study suggests that the death toll in Puerto Rico from last year's hurricane is many times higher than originally believed — closer to 5,000 than the official count of 64.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

New drugs could also be deployed against lung and pancreatic cancersA new anti-cancer drug may be effective against a wider range of cancers than previously thought. Using a mouse model and samples taken from cancer patients, a team from the Technical University of Munich (TUM) has shown that a new class of drugs known as SHP2 inhibitors is also effective against aggressive, hard-to-treat tumors such as lung and pancreatic cancers. Clinical trials currently underw
1h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Hormesis and paradoxical effects in plants upon exposure to formaldehyde are common phenomenaFor the first time, hormesis and paradoxical effects have been shown to occur commonly in plants upon exposure to formaldehyde, which is a widespread pollutant.To assess the level of chemical pollution of the environment, different indicators of plant status are widely used as bioindicators, since plants have an attached lifestyle and are unable to avoid exposure to unfavorable factors.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

A new analysis system is able to identify pollutants from cosmetics in seawaterA University of Cordoba study, in partnership with the University of the Balearic Islands, uses carbon-coated titanium dioxide nanotubes to analyze samples affected by parabens from lotions and shampoos.
1h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Nokia had to weed out a culture of fear to embrace a future without smartphonesThe radical strategic move demanded a sea change in Nokia's management style. Interviews carried out about the events between 2007 and 2013 show how the new board appointed in 2012 got Nokia's top management to express their previously suppressed opinions and to dare to make an about turn in the company's business.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Surrey develops hepatitis C model that could help improve treatmentThe University of Surrey has created a new mathematical model that details how the hepatitis C (HCV) infection develops and behaves more accurately than previous models. This new model has the potential to improve treatment for the infection that affects 215,000 people in the United Kingdom.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Combination pack battles cancerFor efficient cancer therapy with few side effects, the active drug should selectively attain high concentration in the tumor. In the journal Angewandte Chemie, scientists have introduced a new approach, in which two synergistic drug components are combined into a dimer. This dimer can be incorporated into polymeric nanotransporters at exceptionally high concentration. The components are activated
1h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

'Will this be on the test?' Even if it isn't, students might remember itA new study by the University of British Columbia shows that teachers don't have to test everything they want their students to remember — as long as the knowledge they want to convey fits together well, and the test questions are well-chosen. The finding, based on an experiment with UBC pharmacy students, builds on a proven phenomenon known as 'retrieval-enhanced learning' — that the very act o
1h
Scientific American Content: Global
5
Big Art For Our Biggest Conservation ProblemsAn ambitious new project is under way to pepper the migratory routes of endangered monarch butterflies with eye-catching murals — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Latest Headlines | Science News
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Astronomers scrutinized last year’s eclipse. Here’s what they’ve learnedAstronomers observed the 2017 total solar eclipse from the ground and the air, and found some never-before-seen features of the sun’s atmosphere.
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Scientific American Content: Global
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Amid Ice Melt, New Shipping Lanes Are Drawn Up off AlaskaSpecial protections have also been granted for wildlife and coastal communities potentially threatened by oil spills — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Out in the cold or one of the gang: Initial contacts set the sceneOstracism within a group is not always a disciplining tool. Rather, it can be an unintentional side effect of people joining up with individuals they have previously had good experiences with, researchers have found.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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A key switch in biological clocksAn international team of researchers found that CK1 is the priming kinase that 'switches on' a key control point which plays an important role in regulating our biological clock.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Time crystals may hold secret to coherence in quantum computingTime crystals may hold secret to coherence in quantum computing. New experimental evidence also lays groundwork for new ways of studying time.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
23
We could reverse aging by removing wrinkles inside our cells, study suggestsA new discovery about the effects of aging in our cells could allow doctors to cure or prevent diabetes, fatty liver disease and other metabolic diseases — and possibly even turn back the clock on aging itself.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Social pursuits linked with increased life satisfactionIf you want to give a little boost to your life satisfaction a year from now, you may want to try socially-focused strategies over strategies that involve nonsocial pursuits.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Climate change forced zombie ant fungi to adaptZombie ants clamp on to aerial vegetation and hang for months spewing the spores of their parasitic fungi, but researchers noticed that they do not always clamp on to the same part of the plant. Now the researchers know that the choice of leaves or twigs is related to climate and that climate change forced the fungi to adapt to local conditions.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Construction delays make new nuclear power plants costlier than everThe cost of building new nuclear power plants is nearly 20 percent higher than expected due to delays, a new analysis has found.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Turning entanglement upside downA new approach to measure quantum entanglement in multiparticle systems. This is the key outcome of a study conducted by SISSA — Scuola Internazionale Superiore di Studi Avanzati, ICTP — International Center for Theoretical Physics and IQOQI-Innsbruck recently published in Nature Physics.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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Tree species vital to restoring disturbed tropical forestsA family of trees with high drought tolerance could be crucial in restoring the world's deforested and degraded tropical lands, according to new research involving the University of Stirling.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Research enhances enzyme that degrades plasticBrazilians participate in international project to boost capacity of PETase of breaking down polyethylene terephthalate (PET), used in bottles and responsible for producing millions of tons of waste.
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Dagens Medicin

Russiske læger går ind i kampen mod mastocytosePå en session om mastocytose på årets EAACI dukkede der navne op på behandlingscentre i bl.a. Rusland, som lederen af det danske mastocytosecenter aldrig har hørt om. Han tilbød straks sin hjælp til novicerne.
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Dagens Medicin

EAACI er støbeske for danske prestigekurser for specialisterEt stort internationalt møde i fødevareallergi samt et minisymposium for speciallæger og – sygeplejersker er ved at tage form på EAACI. Danske forskere svinger dirrigentstokken.
2h
cognitive science
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Being a Couch Potato May Change Your Personality – The largest study of its kind suggests long-term physical inactivity & character traits may be linkedsubmitted by /u/symonsymone [link] [comments]
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
3
Out in the cold or one of the gang: Initial contacts set the sceneOstracism or social exclusion within a group serves to discipline disagreeable, awkward, or free-loading members and thus promote cooperation—at least this was the assumption of previous research in this field. However, ostracism also develops in situations in which there is no need to discipline the behaviors of others, and the victims often seem to have been selected randomly. When asked, the os
2h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Archaeologists discover a 1,000-year-old mummy in PeruArchaeologists have completed a significant excavation in Pachacamac, Peru, where they have discovered an intact mummy in especially good condition. Pachacamac's status as a Pre-Colombian pilgrimage site under the Inca empire. is confirmed by further evidence.
2h
Ingeniøren

Privat eftersøgning af MH370 slutter resultatløstTrods brug af avancerede autonome undervandsdroner, der kunne kortlægge havbunden helt ned i få centimeters opløsning, er eftersøgningen endt uden nyt om passagerflyet.
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Ingeniøren

Nye køreledninger falder ned: Banedanmark stopper eltog til EsbjergTo gange er køreledninger, som Siemens lige har sat op for at give adgang til at køre med eltog i Danmark, faldet ned. Nu har Banedanmark lukket strækningen til Esbjerg for eltog, indtil alle de hjul, som køreledningerne kører hen over, er udskiftet.
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Quanta Magazine
5
Cores From Coral Reefs Hold Secrets of the Seas’ Past and FutureAs the sun dims over the Pacific’s glassy Solomon Sea, Guillaume Iwankow dons his diving gear and descends from the research schooner Tara into a motorized dinghy. His goal is to bring back a core, an arm’s-length sample of a coral colony that chronicles decades of its lifetime. About 10 minutes after the dinghy leaves Tara , its motor slows. It’s so shallow here that reef fish dart about just in
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Olfactory receptor as therapeutic target in bladder cancerResearchers from Bochum have detected an olfactory receptor in the human bladder that might prove useful for bladder cancer therapy and diagnosis. Using cell culture studies, the team headed by Professor Dr. Hanns Hatt and Dr. Lea Weber demonstrated that the receptor occurs more frequently in bladder cancer tissue than in healthy bladder tissue. Accordingly, significant higher amounts of the recep
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Scientists discover key mechanism behind the formation of spider silkA group of scientists led by researchers from the RIKEN Center for Sustainable Resource Science (CSRS) have examined the soluble precursor of spider silk and found that a previously undiscovered structural element is key to how the proteins form into the beta-sheet conformation that gives the silk its exceptional strength.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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Understanding the origin of Alzheimer's, looking for a cureResearchers look at the promising role played by the BMI1 gene, which could someday help mitigate or even reverse the disease.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Brain scientists identify 'cross talk' between neurons that control touch in miceScientists report they have uncovered a previously overlooked connection between neurons in two distinct areas of the mammalian brain. The neurons, they say, control the sense of touch, and their experiments in mice offer insights into mapping brain circuitry that is responsible for normal and abnormal perception and movements linked to touch.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Stronger alcohol policies help reduce alcohol-related crash deaths in USStronger alcohol policies, including those targeting both excessive drinking and driving while impaired by alcohol, reduce the likelihood of alcohol-related motor vehicle crash deaths.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

It takes a villageA handmade super-microscope — capable of seeing the actual building blocks of a bacterial cell wall — has helped Monash researchers decipher how bacteria are able to literally build a wall against the immune system, leading to often deadly disease. This will provide researchers with key knowledge to disarm 'superbug' resistance to the immune system.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Single injection alleviates chemotherapy pain for months in miceUC San Diego School of Medicine researchers found that treating mice with a single spinal injection of a protein called AIBP — and thus switching 'off' TLR4, a pro-inflammatory molecule — prevented and reversed inflammation and cellular events associated with pain processing. As reported May 29 by Cell Reports, the treatment alleviated chemotherapy pain in mice for two months with no side effect
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Studies examine vitamin D supplementation in pregnancy, for infants, childrenVitamin D supplementation in pregnancy and for infants and children is the focus of two studies, an editorial and a patient page.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Impaired energy production may explain why brain is susceptible to age-related diseasesBy studying neurons generated directly from skin cells, Salk researchers showed the impact of aged mitochondria on brain cells.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Blame the mother's gene: Discovery for a blinding canine eye diseaseA new gene for canine congenital eye disease has been identified by a collaborative research led by Professor Hannes Lohi's research group in the University of Helsinki. Defective RBP4 leads to vitamin A deficiency and abnormal eye development during pregnancy. The study defines a novel recessive mode of maternal inheritance, which may underlie other types of birth defects.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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Black holes from an exacomputerWhat happens when two black holes merge, or when stars collide with a black hole? This has now been simulated by researchers from Goethe University Frankfurt and the Frankfurt Institute for Advanced Studies using a novel numerical method. The simulation code 'ExaHyPE' is designed in such a way that it will be able to calculate gravitational waves on the future generation of 'exascale' supercompute
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Multisensory experiences enhance sales and feeling of comfort in shops and restaurantsThe preliminary results show that sounds of nature that were played in the fruit and vegetable section of a grocery shop had a clear impact on the shop's sales. The sales of fruit and vegetables showed an increase of 20 percent compared to the previous week and 13 percent compared to the week that followed.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Prehistoric teeth dating back 2 million years reveal details on ancient Africa's climateNew research out of South Africa's Wonderwerk Cave led by anthropologists at the University of Toronto (U of T) shows that the climate of the interior of southern Africa almost two million years ago was like no modern African environment—it was much wetter.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Hurricane Maria killed 4,600 in Puerto Rico, 70 times official toll: studyHurricane Maria, which pummeled Puerto Rico in September 2017, is likely responsible for the deaths of more than 4,600 people, some 70 times more than official estimates, US researchers said Tuesday.
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Science | The Guardian
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Cuba calls on US and Canada to investigate 'sonic attack' claimsLuis Velázquez, Cuba’s most senior scientist, says joint inquiry needed to find truth behind alleged attacks on diplomats The most senior scientist in Cuba has called on his opposite numbers in the US and Canada to assess the evidence behind claims that mysterious attacks in Havana left American and Canadian diplomats with inexplicable concussion-like brain injuries. Luis Velázquez, a neurologist
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Futurity.org
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How your brain decides if a reward is worth the effortNew research reveals the mechanics of how the brain calculates whether it’s worth expending effort in exchange for potential rewards. The mind weighs these cost-benefit options all the time, such as deciding to quit hitting the snooze button and get out of bed in the morning to opting to switch off the TV and prepare for sleep at night. “We showed that the brain’s ventromedial prefrontal cortex,
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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From drones to phones, new tech is making gardening easierNew technology is easing the way we garden, store equipment, monitor watering and re-shape landscapes. And some of those tasks can be done remotely, using phones or tablets.
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The Atlantic
100+
Genetic Intelligence Tests Are Next to WorthlessIn 2016, I got my genome sequenced while I was working on a book about heredity. Some scientists kindly pointed out some of the interesting features of my genetic landscape. And then they showed me how to navigate the data on my own. Ever since, I’ve been a genomic wayfarer. Whenever I come across some new insight into the links between our genes and our lives, I check my own DNA. One day I’m ins
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Checking the global pulse for electric vehiclesA team of academic researchers is seeking clarity on predictive plug-in electric vehicle (PEV) models. An examination of more than three dozen studies is providing some meaningful insights.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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Prehistoric teeth dating back 2 million years reveal details on ancient Africa's climateNew research out of South Africa's Wonderwerk Cave led by anthropologists at the University of Toronto shows that the climate of the interior of southern Africa almost two million years ago was much wetter than the modern environment. This first extensive paleoenvironmental sequence for the interior of southern Africa suggests that human ancestors were living in environments other than open, arid
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Researchers identify the electrophysiological sign of cerebral infarctionResearchers from Charité — Universitätsmedizin Berlin have analyzed the underlying electrophysiological indicators of subarachnoid hemorrhage, the second most common type of brain hemorrhage that can lead to ischemic stroke within a matter of days. Their findings, which have been published in the journal Brain, may lay the foundations for new stroke treatments.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

So that Ronaldo and Co. can perform their magicThe official ball for the 2018 FIFA World Cup in Russia has received Empa's 'stamp of approval' after numerous rigorous tests. Some goalkeepers had been critical of its flight characteristics, but the reason for this may lie somewhere else — the rather unconventional appearance of the new ball.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Communication in the cell: important step of signal transmission elucidatedThe effectiveness of new drugs depends crucially on a fundamental understanding of the complex processes within the cells of the body. Scientists from Stanford University in California and the Charité — Universitätsmedizin Berlin have deciphered an important molecular step of cellular signal transmission and published in the journal Nature. Their findings could help the development of specific dr
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TED Talks Daily (SD video)
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This simple test can help kids hear better | Susan EmmettChildren who live in rural areas can have a hard time getting to the doctor — much less to an audiologist's clinic for expensive, complex tests to check their hearing. The result for too many kids is hearing loss caused by ear infections and other curable or preventable problems. That's why ear surgeon and TED Fellow Susan Emmett is working with 15 communities in rural Alaska to create a simple,
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Blog » Languages » English

Time vs. Space: A Multi-Dimensional VSStarting at 11 AM EDT on 5/31 and going for 24 hours, we’re holding a game of “would you rather,” Eyewirers. Would you rather… a) Be able to instantly travel anywhere in the universe, without changing the point of history you’re in? (Aside from the basic effects of relativity, anyway.) or b) Be able to magically travel across the universe’s timeline, without changing the coordinates of the place
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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NASA eyes extremely severe cyclonic mekunu approaching landfallThe Regional Specialized Meteorological Center in New Delhi (RSMC), India noted on May 25 that Mekunu has now been classified as an Extremely Severe Cyclonic Storm. NASA and NOAA satellites provided visible and infrared imagery of the powerful storm as it headed for landfall in Oman. Mekunu was lashing Oman as a Category 3 hurricane.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Landscape evolution intrinsic to ancient mountain settingsNew research helps explain why the structure of some mountains continues to evolve long after the tectonic forces that formed them cease.
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The Atlantic
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Why Egypt Is at the Forefront of Hepatitis C TreatmentJust five years ago, with the best medical therapies available, the odds of curing a person infected with hepatitis C were no better than a coin toss . Eliminating the disease from a whole country was unthinkable. But today, Egypt is wiping the disease from its population at an unprecedented pace. The effort was made possible by revolutionary new drugs—but no country, including the United States,
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The Atlantic
12
Why Europeans Turned Against TrumpWith the Trump administration’s recent withdrawal from the Iran nuclear deal, the already rocky relationship between the United States and its European allies has become even more tenuous. For many Europeans, Trump’s decision to pull the United States out of the Iran accord crystallizes what they dislike about his approach to world affairs: Instead of multilateralism, it’s America First. Across m
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The Atlantic
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Elon Musk Should Know BetterWe might as well begin with the most generous interpretation of Elon Musk’s peculiar behavior. For this, we must go back in time—back before the Reddit-flavored subtweets, before the bizarre earnings-call outbursts, before the supervillain cosplaying. Go back far enough, to another century, to another millennium , where, in the year 1996, you will find Elon Musk, a man in the newspaper business.
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Feed: All Latest
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Apple’s HomePod Speaker Now Supports Stereo Pairing, Multi-Room AudioHomePod AirPlay 2 OS114The smart speaker gets a much-needed update.
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Viden

Google hylder dansk kemiker med quizI 1909 opfandt P.L.S Sørensen pH-skalaen. I dag fejrer Google danskeren, der 13 gange blev indstillet til en nobelpris, på sin forside.
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Futurity.org
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Wildfire smoke is messing with orangutan diet and sleepOrangutans, already critically endangered due to habitat loss from logging and large-scale farming, may face another threat in the form of smoke from natural and human-caused fires, a finds. In 2015, Wendy Erb, a postdoctoral researcher in the anthropology department at Rutgers University–New Brunswick, was studying male orangutans in the forests of Indonesian Borneo when fires started. She and h
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Invisible barrier on ocean surface can reduce carbon uptakeAn invisible layer of biological compounds on the sea surface reduces the rate at which carbon dioxide gas moves between the atmosphere and the oceans, scientists have reported.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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Recreational football an absolute winner for 55- to 70-year-olds with prediabetesTwice-weekly football combined with dietary guidance improves fitness level and cardiovascular health profile in untrained 55- to 70-yr-old women and men with prediabetes. They can also lose weight in a healthier way than with normal dieting.This is the conclusion of the world's first trial involving football and dietary guidance in older prediabetics, carried out in the Faroe Islands by football
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

New insights into the inner clock of the fruit flyBiologists around Professor Ralf Stanewsky (University of Münster, Germany) have now presented new findings on the inner workings of circadian clocks in the fruit fly. The researchers have found evidence that indicates that light and temperature stimuli play a mutual role in their synchronization. They also identified yet unobserved molecular pathways in the photoreceptors which also affect the fr
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Simultaneous monitoring of surfaces and protein distribution in cellsIn a first proof-of-concept study, researchers at Ruhr-Universität Bochum (RUB) have combined two microscopy methods that render both a cell's surface and the distribution of a protein in the cell visible, at a resolution in the nanometer range. The method can be used for living cells. It might for example help analyze how cancer metastases are formed or assess the efficacy of specific drugs.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Out in the cold or one of the gang: Initial contacts set the sceneOstracism within a group is not always a disciplining tool. Rather, it can be an unintentional side effect of people joining up with individuals they have previously had good experiences with, researchers from the Department of Economics of the University of Zurich have found.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Novel NUS-developed hydrogel invented harnesses air moisture for practical applicationsA team of researchers from the National University of Singapore has invented a novel gel-like material that not only effectively dehumidifies ambient air to improve thermal comfort, but it also harnesses the moisture in the air for a wide range of practical applications, such as functioning as a sun or privacy screen, conductive ink and even a battery. These interesting properties are inherent in
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Futurity.org
7
Kids learn language faster when they can self-regulateA child’s ability to self-regulate is a critical element in childhood language and literacy development. The earlier they can hone these skills, the faster language and literacy skills develop, leading to better skills in the long run, according to new research. “Self-regulation is an umbrella term to define children’s abilities to keep information in their working memories, pay attention to task
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New on MIT Technology Review
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GDPR was just the beginning—the next big fight in data protection is “ePrivacy”
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The Atlantic
400+
A Civil-Rights Icon Urges Law Grads to Defend Free SpeechThis month the graduating class at Georgetown Law School marked commencement with a speech by non-voting D.C. Representative Eleanor Holmes Norton, whose résumé is as impressive as any in the House of Representatives. Born in 1937, Norton received a masters in American studies and a law degree at Yale and traveled to the South for the Mississippi Freedom Summer as an organizer for the Student Non
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Scientific American Content: Global
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The Science of EndometriosisEndometriosis spreads like a vine through the bodies of roughly 176 million women worldwide, causing agony and infertility. Science has struggled to understand the condition, but new research is… — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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New on MIT Technology Review
87
Apple wants your iPhone to be able to unlock your front door
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
2
Social pursuits linked with increased life satisfactionIf you want to give a little boost to your life satisfaction a year from now, you may want to try socially-focused strategies over strategies that involve nonsocial pursuits, according to research published in Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
9
We could reverse aging by removing wrinkles inside our cells, study suggestsA new discovery about the effects of aging in our cells could allow doctors to cure or prevent diabetes, fatty liver disease and other metabolic diseases — and possibly even turn back the clock on aging itself.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Ovarian cancer statistics, 2018A new report from the American Cancer Society provides an overview of ovarian cancer occurrence and mortality data.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Exposure of European children to electromagnetic fields is well below the maximum levelsMeasurements from more than 500 children in five countries include different sources such as mobile phones, mobile phone antennas and WiFi.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Positive feedback between East Asian mid-latitude circulation and land surface temperatureA new study shows that a better description of the summer surface condition in the Russian Far East may benefit seasonal forecasts of the East Asian upper-tropospheric westerly jet and, subsequently, East Asian summer climate.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Time crystals may hold secret to coherence in quantum computingTime crystals may hold secret to coherence in quantum computing. New experimental evidence also lays groundwork for new ways of studying time.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

AI software assists design of new material for solar cellsResearchers from Osaka University used machine learning to design new polymers for organic photovoltaics (solar cells). After mining data from previous studies, they input the physical properties of polymers, together with the resulting solar cell efficiencies, into a Random Forest model to statistically predict the effectiveness of new materials. This informatics-based screening, combined with tr
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
2
The mystery of masculinization in Daphnia magna unraveledResearchers at Osaka University discovered lncRNAs to activate the male-determining gene doublesex1 (Dsx1) necessary for sex determination in the crustacean Daphnia magna.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Switched on: a breakthrough for spintronicsResearchers at Tohoku University in Japan have discovered a switch to control the spin current, a mechanism needed for information processing with full spin-based devices.
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Dana Foundation
2
Transforming Ourselves: NYAS Panel Examines Human EnhancementGuest post by science writer Carl Sherman Image: Shutterstock We humans stand poised for transformation. This was the premise of a public symposium at New York Academy of Sciences, sponsored by the Aspen Brain Institute and the Hastings Center. While the prospect demands sound scientific policy, its associated moral, social, and political issues require a broader base of expertise. The symposium
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Futurity.org
3
PTSD can make college tough for student veteransPost-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) resulting from traumatic military experiences is linked to anxiety, anger, and guilt in returning veterans. A new study shows it may also make academics especially difficult. This issue is coming to the forefront as increasing numbers of veterans enroll in colleges and universities, researchers say. “Many of these former service members are experiencing post-
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Dagens Medicin

Læge og nobelprismodtager er dødProfessor emeritus Jens Christian Skou døde 28. maj, 99 år gammel.
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Science | The Guardian
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Revealed: industrial-scale beef farming comes to the UKInvestigation uncovers about a dozen intensive beef units, despite assurances that US-style practices would not happen here Thousands of British cattle reared for supermarket beef are being fattened in industrial-scale units where livestock have little or no access to pasture. Research by the Guardian and the Bureau of Investigative Journalism has established that the UK is now home to a number o
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Inside Science

The Quest for MagmaEarth Drilling directly into magma may help humanity harness a vast new source of clean energy. 05/29/2018 Nala Rogers, Staff Writer https://www.insidescience.org/news/quest-magma
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Inside Science
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The Quest for MagmaThe Quest for Magma Drilling directly into magma may help humanity harness a vast new source of clean energy. MagmaHeart.jpg Image credits: Ralf Lehmann via Shutterstock Earth Tuesday, May 29, 2018 – 09:30 Nala Rogers, Staff Writer (Inside Science) — On a bright day in 1981, John Eichelberger stood on a blackened crust above billions of gallons of lava. Plumes of steam leaked from cracks in the
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Sex hormone levels alter heart disease risk in older womenIn an analysis of data collected from more than 2,800 women after menopause, Johns Hopkins researchers report new evidence that a higher proportion of male to female sex hormones was associated with a significant increased relative cardiovascular disease risk.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Graphene layered with magnetic materials could drive ultrathin spintronicsResearchers working at Berkeley Lab coupled graphene, a monolayer form of carbon, with thin layers of magnetic materials like cobalt and nickel to produce exotic behavior in electrons that could be useful for next-generation computing applications.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Socioeconomic differences in prehospital stroke treatmentNew research indicates that emergency responses to stroke before the patient has reached the hospital differ, depending on the patients' socioeconomic status. For groups of patients with less education and lower income, more time passes before the diagnosis is made, which can affect the efficacy of health care interventions.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Insulator-metal transition at the nanoscaleAn international team of researchers is able to probe the insulator-conductor phase transition of materials at the nanoscale resolution.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

A key switch in biological clocksAn international team of researchers, led by Professor David Virshup from Duke-NUS Medical School, found that CK1 is the priming kinase that 'switches on' a key control point which plays an important role in regulating our biological clock.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Small study suggests a new way to treat fluid buildup in heart failureOne of the key features of heart failure is an accumulation of fluid in the heart and lungs that causes life-threatening symptoms, including shortness of breath, lightheadedness and an elevated heart rate.This fluid buildup has long been considered a symptom of heart failure, but researchers at Duke University Medical School have explored a new theory: it might be a key contributor, and a fairly t
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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A paradigm shift in heart failure treatment?A small, preliminary study could trigger a paradigm shift in the treatment of heart failure. The late-breaking research is published today in Circulation and presented at Heart Failure 2018 and the World Congress on Acute Heart Failure, a European Society of Cardiology congress. The study suggests that heart failure may be caused by inappropriate fluid shifts in some patients rather than an excess
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Ingeniøren

Dansk ingeniør bygger el-trike: Kan køre over 600 km på en opladningLangt hen ad vejen ligner det en trehjulet mooncar, men der er lagt mange tanker og overvejelser i den dansk designede Veloks el-trike, der er udviklet af en dansk ingeniør.
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The Atlantic
95
The GOP’s Public-Education DilemmaPublic-school teachers have long been a vitally important constituency for the Democratic Party, and teachers’ unions are known for backing progressive causes . It must be said, though, that not all public-school teachers are on the left. Some are social conservatives who resent the fact that the mainstream of the Republican Party is, by their lights, so hostile to their interests. For the most p
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The Atlantic
100+
The Mysterious Girls of Picnic at Hanging RockFor his 1975 film Picnic at Hanging Rock , the Australian director Peter Weir wanted an Impressionistic look and feel, a gauzy, painterly aesthetic. He and his cinematographer, Russell Boyd, finally landed on a solution : They bought a variety of wedding veils from a bridal store, using the different fabrics and textures to create scenes in which the characters seemed to glow from within. The det
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Popular Science
25
How to send self-destructing messagesDIY Five apps that leave no trace. Want to send a message that leaves no trace? We collected the best apps and services for sharing text and media that won't stick around. Here’s how to use them.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
3
Measuring the value of 'imaginativeness' in new business successVisionary entrepreneurs fare best with not one but three types of imagination: creative, social and practical.
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Futurity.org
1
See-through fish embryos offer clues to birth defectsZebrafish embryos are transparent and develop outside the mother’s body, which gives scientists a detailed view of early development. Lila Solnica-Krezel, professor and head of the department of developmental biology at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, and her team are revealing new clues to how birth defects develop in the tiniest embryos. Here, Solnica-Krezel explains her
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
5
Blackcurrant dye could make hair coloring safer, more sustainableWhether they're trying to hide some gray or embrace a new or quirky color, people adore hair dyes. But some of these dyes may be harmful to humans and the environment. Now in a study appearing in ACS' Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, scientists report that they have developed a natural, non-toxic hair dye derived from blackcurrant skins that is as durable as conventional dyes and capabl
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
10
Infant mortality rates higher in areas with more Christian fundamentalists, study findsThe odds of an infant dying before their first birthday are higher in counties with greater proportions of conservative Protestants, especially fundamentalists, than in counties with more mainline Protestants and Catholics, according to a new Portland State University study.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
1
NASA eyes extremely severe cyclonic mekunu approaching landfallThe Regional Specialized Meteorological Center in New Delhi (RSMC), India noted on May 25 that Mekunu has now been classified as an Extremely Severe Cyclonic Storm.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Researchers see role of 'imaginativeness' in new business successVisionary entrepreneurs fare best with not one but three types of imagination: creative, social and practical.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
1
Checking the global pulse for electric vehiclesA team of Argonne researchers has reviewed 40 automotive market diffusion models from 16 countries to help determine how many plug-in electric vehicles consumers will buy over the next few decades.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Responding to 'deaths of despair' — call for a national resilience strategyStartling increases in nationwide deaths from drug overdoses, alcohol, and suicides constitute a public health crisis — spurring an urgent call for a National Resilience Strategy to stem these 'deaths of despair.' The proposal is outlined in a special commentary in the Journal of Public Health Management and Practice, published in the Lippincott portfolio by Wolters Kluwer.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
14
Pompeii: New find shows man crushed trying to flee eruptionOfficials at the Pompeii archaeological site have announced a dramatic new discovery, the skeleton of a man crushed by an enormous stone while trying to flee the explosion of Mt. Vesuvius in 79 A.D.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
1
How blackcurrants could help end bad (for the planet) hair daysNatural dyes extracted from blackcurrant waste created during Ribena fruit cordial manufacture have for the first time been used in an effective new hair dyeing technology, developed at the University of Leeds.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
30
New tool for female reproductive geneticsThe fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster is a powerful model organism for studying animal and human development and disease. It is low cost, generates rapidly, and there are many tools to genetically modify its cells. One tool is called the Gal4/UAS two-component activation system. It is a biochemical method used to study the process of turning a gene on (gene expression) and gene function. Although
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
8
Landscape evolution intrinsic to ancient mountain settingsOver the last century, scientists have struggled with a lingering question in geology: Why do the structure and elevation of some mountains continue to evolve long after the tectonic forces that formed them cease?
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Dagens Medicin

Nu er det muligt at få dispensation for seksårsfristenLæger i udvalgte introduktionsforløb til speciallægeuddannelsen kan nu opnå dispensation for seksårsfristen. Det skal øge rekrutteringen i lægedækningstruede områder, forklarer sundhedsministeren. Yngre Læger roser initiativet, men havde gerne set fristen afskaffet helt.
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Futurity.org
8
Hungry mushrooms could clean, build, and make shoesHarnessing the power of fungi could lead to materials that clean up oil spills, offer alternatives to leather, or even build houses. This episode of the podcast Fiat Vox features Sonia Travaglini, a PhD candidate in mechanical engineering at the University of California, Berkeley, who explains the possibilities. Read a written version of the podcast episode below or listen here: ( Podcast transcr
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
5
NASA satellites spot first Atlantic sub-tropical stormThe tropical low pressure area known as System 90L that has been lingering in the western Caribbean Sea for a couple of days has consolidated and strengthened into the Atlantic Ocean basin's first tropical storm. NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite captured an image of the storm that became Tropical Storm Alberto.
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Ingeniøren

»Big Data er et værktøj – ikke et mål i sig selv«Start i det små med konkrete eksempler, der understøtter virksomhedens forretning. Sådan lyder rådet fra Teknologisk Institut til virksomheder med Big Data-ambitioner.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

New tool for female reproductive geneticsThe fruit fly Drosophila is powerful for studying development and disease and there are many tools to genetically modify its cells. One tool, the Gal4/UAS system, has been a mainstay of Drosophila genetics for twenty-five years. But it only functions effectively in non-reproductive cells, not in egg-producing cells. It has not been known why. Carnegie's Steven DeLuca and Allan Spradling discovered
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
1
Better, faster, stronger: Building batteries that don't go boomUnderstanding how lithium reacts to pressure developed from charging and discharging a battery could mean safer, better batteries.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Landscape evolution intrinsic to ancient mountain settingsNew research helps explain why the structure of some mountains continues to evolve long after the tectonic forces that formed them cease.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Answering a medical mystery: Why are vaccines less effective in the developing world?It's a question that has challenged scientists and physicians for years: why do vaccines work better in some parts of the world than in others? A new study, led in part by University of Minnesota Medical School researcher Tim Schacker, M.D., contributes to knowledge about why vaccines given in the developing world often are less effective than in the developed world.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
1
Smartphone app effective for serious mental illness treatmentA smartphone program was just as effective in treating people with serious mental illnesses as a clinical intervention — and it had a significantly better rate of treatment engagement, according to a study published today in the journal Psychiatric Services.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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Zinc oxide-graphene solar cells could provide new opportunitiesThe researchers report on the fabrication and characterization of zinc oxide (ZnO) and zinc oxide-graphene (ZnO-G) composites via a simple chemical route-polyol process, using zinc nitrate hexahydrate, ethylene glycol and reduced graphene oxide (RGO) as the precursors.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
1
NASA satellites spot first Atlantic sub-tropical stormThe tropical low pressure area known as System 90L that has been lingering in the western Caribbean Sea for a couple of days has consolidated and strengthened into the Atlantic Ocean basin's first tropical storm.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

New map shows many old-growth forests remain In EuropeA first-of-its-kind map identifies more than 3.4 million acres of old-growth forests in 34 European countries — considerably more than previously understood.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
1
France vows to outlaw glyphosate weedkillers within 3 yearsThe French government reiterated Tuesday a campaign pledge by President Emmanuel Macron to ban glyphosate-based herbicides by 2021, after senators refused to enshrine the pledge into law.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
12
New research reveals ocean waves play greater role in trapping carbon dioxideFor decades scientists have investigated the influence of the world's oceans in trapping greenhouse gasses.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Chiral superconductor generates electric current when properly deformedScientists around the world are busy looking for chiral superconductors, which are predicted to be ideal for building quantum computers. Until now, it has not been easy to determine whether a material is clearly a chiral superconductor or not. Together with their colleagues in Stockholm, theoretical physicists at Utrecht University have recently discovered that a unique effect occurs in chiral sup
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
10
Tree species vital to restoring disturbed tropical forestsA family of trees with high drought tolerance could be crucial in restoring the world's deforested and degraded tropical lands, according to new research involving the University of Stirling.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
7
Can this bird adapt to a warmer climate? Read the genes to find outMany animals have adaptations that help them cope with specific environments or lifestyles. Antarctic fish produce antifreeze proteins that prevent their blood from freezing in subzero temperatures. Some desert rodents survive without ever drinking a single drop of water. Humans living at high altitudes have special adaptations to cope with the low oxygen concentrations.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
4
New federal policy would hike student spacecraft costs, threatening technology educationThere are only a handful of astronauts, but every year thousands of high school and college students get to visit space vicariously, by launching their own satellites. Students design, build and test each one, and then work with space industry professionals to get them loaded on rockets and launched into orbit. But this opportunity – available to students and educators for more than 30 years – may
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'Solo: A Star Wars Story' Makes the Prequels More Relevant Than EverFlying in the face of fans' expectations, Lucasfilm is using its new movies to make the prequels essential to the saga.
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How to Set Away Messages for Texts and Other AppsGoing on vacation? Set your "out of office" autoreply for your email, then try these hacks to do the same for texts.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
8
We are still evolvingFrom the colour of our eyes to the size of our brain, humans have been adapting to their environment, acquiring new abilities and losing others. We take a look at how evolution is still shaping us.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
5
Eficient cost-effective cooling solution for high performance chipsImec, the world-leading research and innovation hub in nano-electronics and digital technology, today announced that it has demonstrated for the first time a low-cost impingement-based solution for cooling chips at package level. This achievement is an important innovation to tackle the ever-increasing cooling demands of high-performance 3D chips and systems.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
2
The last laugh – How long before the helmeted hornbill falls silent?I'll never forget the first time I heard the maniacal cackle of a helmeted hornbill. I was standing beneath a massive fruiting fig tree in the middle of the Brunei rainforest – not exactly the heart of Borneo, but it was certainly wild enough for me – and craning my neck to catch a glimpse of the gibbons in the canopy. The ripening fruit was a magnet for all manner of other wildlife too, from wild
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
1
Female members European Parliament more likely to be featured on WikipediaResearchers from CWI, the Dutch national research institute for mathematics and computer science, have found that female members of the European Parliament are slightly more likely to be featured on multiple Wikipedia language editions than their male counterparts. However, the variations between language editions are large: while 10 editions over-represent women, 13 editions over-represent men. T
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
5
Cryptocurrency addicts seek treatment at Scottish clinicA Scottish addiction clinic has begun treating people who are hooked on trading cryptocurrencies.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
2
Alibaba shows off automated wine store in Hong KongWith no shop workers or cash tills and payments made using facial recognition, China's largest e-commerce platform Alibaba created a fully automated wine store at Hong Kong's Vinexpo fair Tuesday.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
2
Swiss watch exports tick ahead in AprilExports of Swiss watches ticked ahead nearly 14 percent in April, trade figures showed Tuesday, aided by strong demand from prime market Hong Kong.
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Dagens Medicin

Mens vi venter på planen for det nære og sammenhængende sundhedsvæsenDer er brug for én samlet rettesnor, så alle sundhedsaktørerne trækker i samme retning til gavn for patienterne.
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Dagens Medicin

Kandidatuddannelse i medicin åbner næste år i KøgeFra foråret 2019 kan Region Sjælland slå dørene op i Køge til de første studerende på kandidatuddannelsen i medicin.
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Latest Headlines | Science News
31
The history of heredity makes for a fascinating, and chilling, readFrom eugenics to gene editing, Carl Zimmer’s She Has Her Mother’s Laugh recounts genetics’ biggest discoveries.
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Scientific American Content: Global
500+
Coming to Grips with the Implications of Quantum MechanicsThe question is no longer whether quantum theory is correct, but what it means — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Ingeniøren

IDA: Flere offentlige forskningskroner skal redde verden og vores velfærdStøtte til forskning giver langt bedre afkast end penge i banken og så skaber det vækst og velstand, mener IDA, som opfordrer politikerne til at hæve de offentlige forskningskroner fra 1 procent il 1,5 procent af BNP.
5h
Ingeniøren

Enorm datavask fandt tusindvis af borgere med ikke-eksisterende adresserEfter fem års arbejde er alle danske adresser og vejnavne nu samlet i Danmarks Adresseregister, hvor kvaliteten af de eksisterende adressedata er kvalitetsforbedret efter en grundig datavask, og hvor mere end 100.000 nye adresser er oprettet.
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Viden

LYNTEST NemID-app gør dit liv markant nemmereMange danskere vil kunne få kæmpe glæde af at skifte papkortet ud med den nye nøgleapp. NemID-appen topper med god grund allerede hitlisterne i Apple og Googles butikker.
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The Scientist RSS

Image of the Day: Water FleaA species of water flea in northern Belgium that helps keep algae in check is growing smaller and less abundant in urbanized areas.
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The Scientist RSS

Placental Health Influences Babys Future Schizophrenia Risk, Study SuggestsComplications during pregnancy may act via the placenta to magnify the effects of genetic risk factors.
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Dagens Medicin

Midtjysk læringsfællesskab skal forbedre operationsforløbRegion Midtjyllands fem akuthospitaler skal i fællesskab arbejde for sikrere og mere sammenhængende operationsforløb. Det er et unikt projekt med stort potentiale, mener hospitalsdirektør.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
14
Mountains signalling disappearance of glacier-fed riversA call for policy-makers to begin planning for the inevitable disappearance of glacier-fed rivers is one of the highlights of a no-holds-barred, University of Alberta-led accounting of the health of Canada's mountains.
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Scientific American Content: Global
400+
The Problem with "Learning Styles"There is little scientific support for this fashionable idea—and stronger evidence for other learning strategies — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
13
Why do trees sleep badly?You may think that trees and other plants are stationary and passive organisms that just stand around all day. So long as they get sufficient sun and water, everything is fine.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
2
Viruses can cause global pandemics, but where did the first virus come from?Viruses such as Ebola, influenza and Zika make headlines. They grab our attention with their potential to cause widespread disease and death.
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Popular Science
93
Stop popping your pimplesHealth Dermatologists warn against it, even if it’s super duper satisfying. The only good thing about getting a zit is popping it. You see the bulging spot appear, expand, then evolve into a fully-formed, nasty, white-headed little sucker.
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How the Tech Giants Created What Darpa Couldn’tFacebook and Google's business models and flaws evoke a Darpa project shuttered in 2003. Americans didn’t want the government vacuuming up their data then—so why are we OK with private companies doing it now?
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42
The Wild Logistical Ride of the Ebola Vaccine's High-Tech ThermosThe hardest part of deploying a new Ebola vaccine is teaching people what it’s for. The second hardest part is getting it to them.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Invisible barrier on ocean surface reduces carbon uptake by halfAn invisible layer of biological compounds on the sea surface reduces the rate at which carbon dioxide gas moves between the atmosphere and the oceans, scientists have reported.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
11
How changes in stars' speed gave away the most Earth-like planets ever observedWhen thinking about Earth-like exoplanet discoveries, the Kepler space telescope immediately comes to mind. Yet, it is not only Kepler, but also ground-based information from the HARPS-N spectrograph, that allowed the ETAEARTH consortium to obtain information on these planets with a degree of precision never reached before.
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Scientific American Content: Global
300+
Being a Couch Potato May Change Your PersonalityThe largest study of its kind suggests long-term physical inactivity and character traits may be linked — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
3
Postbiotics and smart toilets—new era of harnessing our microbial chemicals to keep us slim and healthyEver since Alexander Fleming discovered penicillin growing naturally on a petri dish, we have been aware of the power of chemicals produced by microbes. But we have only recently realised their vast potential.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
7
The shape of the DNA helix proves to be as important as its sequenceThe mechanism of DNA binding of the well-studied protein Polycomb, which is vital for cell division and embryogenesis, has finally been deciphered. A remarkable discovery, as it proves that the shape of DNA is at least as important for where the protein binds in the DNA as the DNA sequence. The role of the shape of DNA had not been demonstrated so clearly. Researchers at Radboud University will pu
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Viden

Skarp, nysgerrig og original: 4 forskere mindes nobelprismodtagerJens Christian Skou var en af verdens skarpeste forskere. Her fortæller 4 af hans forskerkolleger om mødet med ham.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Scientists discover key mechanism behind the formation of spider silkA group of scientists led by researchers from the RIKEN Center for Sustainable Resource Science (CSRS) have examined the soluble precursor of spider silk and found that a previously undiscovered structural element is key to how the proteins form into the beta-sheet conformation that gives the silk its exceptional strength.
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The Scientist RSS

USC President Steps Down in Wake of Gynecologist ScandalAn uproar over the university's handling of sexual misconduct accusations led to C.L. Max Nikias's resignation.
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Live Science
30
What Ever Happened to the 'Mission Impossible' Rare-Book Thieves? We Investigated.Three thieves who stole 160 rare books more than a year ago by rappelling down the skylight of a warehouse in London continue to evade police.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
6
A switch to control the spin currentResearchers at Tohoku University in Japan have discovered a switch to control the spin current, a mechanism needed for information processing with full spin-based devices.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
12
First direct dating of Homo antecessorThe Centro Nacional de Investigación sobre la Evolución Humana (CENIEH) has led a new international study published in the journal Quaternary Geochronology, about the direct dating of a fossil tooth of Homo antecessor from the unit TD6 of the archaeological site of Gran Dolina in the Sierra de Atapuerca (Burgos, Spain). In the work, a time range of between 772,000 and 949,000 years was found for t
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Nanoparticles with multifunctional drug precursor for synergistic tumor therapyFor efficient cancer therapy with few side effects, the active drug should selectively attain high concentration in the tumor. In the journal Angewandte Chemie, scientists have introduced a new approach, in which two synergistic drug components are combined into a dimer. This dimer can be incorporated into polymeric nanotransporters at exceptionally high concentration. The components are activated
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
12
Researchers discover one of the most massive neutron starsUsing a pioneering method, researchers from the Astronomy and Astrophysics Group of the UPC and the Canary Islands Institute of Astrophysics (IAC) have found a neutron star of about 2.3 solar masses—one of the most massive ever detected. The study was published on the 23rd of May in the Astrophysical Journal and opens a new path of knowledge in many fields of astrophysics and nuclear physics.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
6
Connecting the sea to the sky in the high ArcticHow important is marine microbiology to clouds in the summertime high Arctic and how important is this connection for climate in the region? This is a key focus of a research expedition on the Swedish icebreaker Oden that will take place in the high Arctic this summer where Stockholm University will take a leading role.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
8
Amazon forests stabilise each other during droughtThe Amazon rainforest stabilises itself, especially during dry periods, reports a new study by Wageningen University & Research, and Utrecht University in the Netherlands, in collaboration with the University of Goettingen in Germany and the Open University in the Netherlands, today in Nature Climate Change.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
10
Black holes from an exacomputerEven after the direct measurement of their gravitational waves, there are still mysteries surrounding black holes. What happens when two black holes merge, or when stars collide with a black hole? This has now been simulated by researchers from Goethe University Frankfurt and the Frankfurt Institute for Advanced Studies (FIAS) using a novel numerical method. The simulation code "ExaHyPE" is design
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
6
First light for SPIRou, exoplanet hunterSPIRou, the new planet-hunting spectropolarimeter developed for the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope (CFHT), has successfully recorded its first starlight. Ten years after it was first designed and following four intensive months of installation at CFHT, this international instrument in which France has played a leading role is on the point of initiating its scientific operations, namely the detecti
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Here is what it looks like when a massive black hole devours a starDr. Jane Lixin Dai, theoretical astrophysicist and assistant professor and Prof. Enrico Ramirez-Ruiz, both from the DARK Cosmology Center at the Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, have recently provided the scientific community with a much-needed computer model. It is necessary for the investigation of Tidal Disruption Events—rare, but extremely forceful events taking place in the cen
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
3
Hold your horses – feral horse fertility control isn't that easyA proposed Kosciuszko Wild Horse Heritage Bill that rules out shooting horses is based on a flawed understanding of fertility control. Unfortunately, by ignoring scientific evidence and expert advice horses will be condemned to slow starvation.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
5
Russian physicists synthesize materials for recycling radioactive wasteExperts from the National Research Nuclear University MEPhI have upgraded a method to synthesize complex oxides. This will result in materials with the best properties to create radioactive waste recycling matrices and heat-resistant ceramic coatings. In addition, the new materials can act as heat-resistant coatings in aircraft engines and turbines.
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Scientific American Content: Global
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Mystery of Earth's Missing Nitrogen SolvedScientists have discovered a previously unknown environmental source of the element — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Ingeniøren
2
Dansk nobelprisvinder er dødJens Christian Skou, som i 1997 modtog Nobelprisen i kemi for sin opdagelse af natriumkaliumpumpen, er død i en alder af 99 år.
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Live Science
500+
Populating a Mars Base Will Be Dangerously UnsexyFor a permanent Mars base to survive, we might have to turn humans into Martians.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
2
Researchers use silicon nanoparticles for bioimaging and drug deliveryAn international research team has studied a new cell visualisation and drug delivery system based on nanoparticles coated with luminescent dye molecules. The particle material and the distance between the dye and the particle's surface affect the intensity of the luminescent signal. Silicon nanoparticles coated with dye molecules are more efficient than similar particles made of gold. Thanks to t
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
5
Scientists develop improved model for study of Zika virusAn international research team has developed a new animal model used to study the pathogenesis of the Zika virus. Scientists were able to induce the disease in mice in a way that is similar to human pathology. The new model reflects the most dangerous manifestation of the Zika virus: infection of the fetus from a pregnant woman, which leads to developmental problems. This was achieved due to a new
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The Atlantic
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How the Midlife Crisis Came to BeThe midlife crisis was invented in London in 1957. That’s when a 40-year-old Canadian named Elliott Jaques stood before a meeting of the British Psycho-Analytical Society and read aloud from a paper he’d written. Addressing about a hundred attendees, Jaques claimed that people in their mid-30s typically experience a depressive period lasting several years. Jaques (pronounced “Jacks”)—a physician
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The Atlantic
40
18 New Shows to Watch This SummerIt’s typical at this point for each new season of television to feature a slate of movie stars making the transition onto the small screen, and this summer is no exception, serving up Kevin Costner, Hugh Grant, Amy Adams, Guy Pearce, and John Krasinski, among others. What does feel noteworthy is the glaring lack of diversity—on multiple fronts—among the freshmen series debuting over the next few
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Dagens Medicin

»Kræft er på mange måder den røde tråd i min karriere«Som formand i Kræftens Bekæmpelse kommer Helen Bernt Andersen ikke anstigende med nye mærkesager. Årene som sygeplejerske har dog lært hende vigtigheden af hele kræftforløbet. Derfor skal fokus på rehabilitering, sektorovergange og den palliative indsats øges.
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Latest Headlines | Science News
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Keeping people within U.S. blood pressure guidelines saves livesBig reductions in heart attacks, strokes and deaths may be possible under 2017 blood pressure guidelines.
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New Scientist – News
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Faulty placenta may explain why some people get schizophreniaA poorly-working placenta may affect brain development in the womb, and this could explain the link between pregnancy complications and schizophrenia
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Self-Driving Cars and the Agony of Knowing What MattersNew details from Uber's self-driving crash highlight the difficulty—and importance—of ignoring what doesn't matter, while recognizing what does.
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Facebook Is Giving Scientists Its Data to Fight MisinformationFor the first time, researchers will be able to access Facebook's data and publish their findings without pre-approval from the company.
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Welcome to Ghetto Gastro’s ‘Black Power Kitchen’ of TomorrowFacebook, Twitter, and Instagram are redefining the underground culinary world, and young chefs are eliminating gatekeepers while they cater to poor communities and celebs alike. Exhibit A: Ghetto Gastro.
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Feed: All Latest
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Pentagon Will Expand AI Project Prompting Protests at GoogleProject Maven, which uses artificial intelligence to identify objects in drone footage, has sparked protests among Google employees.
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Ingeniøren

Datatilsynet kritiserer Skat: Brugte ulovligt indsamlede oplysningerSkat har brugt ulovligt indsamlede oplysninger i en skattesag, selvom både By- og Landsret har afgjort at de var indsamlet ulovligt. Datatilsynet udtaler kritik.
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Scientific American Content: Global
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How Fast Are Glaciers Melting? Just Listen to ThemUnderwater microphones can glean valuable data from the burbles and pops of thawing glaciers and icebergs — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
7h
Live Science
100+
Lab-Grown Human-Chicken Hybrid Embryos Are No 'Frankenfowl'Scientists grafted human stem cells onto chicken embryos, but that doesn't mean the researchers are breeding "frankenfowl."
7h
Live Science
42
The Ethics Behind Using Genealogy Websites to Find Crime SuspectsThe Golden State Killer was caught last April thanks to a genealogy website. NIH bioethicists discuss the ethics behind this controversial use of genetic data.
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Ingeniøren
7
Space Needle beklædes med glas: Garanti for højdeskrækI glastårnet skal selv bænkene være gennemsigtige.
7h
Ingeniøren

Horsens Kommune vil bruge IoT-net til at samle forbrugsdata og spare energiSammen med Insero arbejder Horsens Kommune på, at der i 2019 etableres intelligent energiovervågning i alle kommunens bygninger. En tættere overvågning kan spare 5-10 pct. på vand, el og varmeforbrug.
8h
Ingeniøren

Svensk politi: Vi har meget gavn af dansk politis store dna-registerRigspolitiet i Danmark har knap 130.000 dna-profiler på personer registreret i sit dna-register. Den store volumen kommer også samarbejdspartnere i andre lande til gavn.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
5
Image: BepiColombo unpacked at the spaceportThe three modules of the ESA-JAXA BepiColombo mission to Mercury are pictured here shortly after being unpacked at Europe's Spaceport in Kourou, French Guiana.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
1
Troika of proteins controls leaf old age onsetResearchers at the Center for Plant Aging Research, within the Institute for Basic Science (IBS), have discovered that a three protein hub – dubbed NAC troika—controls the onset of leaf old age. Their systematic study, published on Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America (PNAS), describes protein networks that change during the plant lifespan and play a role
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
96
How to code a functional molecular machineAn international team has developed a model that simulates protein evolution. Starting from stiff, unfunctional proteins, the computer model shows how evolving protein components can work together to give rise to dynamic and efficient molecular machines. Flexibility allows proteins to change their 3D conformation to bind other molecules: this property is crucial to their function. Prof. Tsvi Tlust
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
8
Comparing the chemistry of water isomersWater molecules exist in two different forms with almost identical physical properties. For the first time, researchers have succeeded in separating the two forms to show that they can exhibit different chemical reactivities. These results were reported by researchers from the University of Basel and their colleagues in Hamburg in the scientific journal Nature Communications.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
3
Student Hyperloop motor tested at ESADutch students due to compete in Elon Musk's high-speed 'Hyperloop' challenge this July subjected their motor module to near-vacuum conditions within ESA's technical heart.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
7
Light-emitting particles illuminate understanding of cellular malfunctionsAdvances in cell biology, materials science and imaging are combining to create tools that will allow researchers to track in real time and in super-fine resolution what happens inside a single cell.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Water is not the same as waterWater molecules exist in two different forms with almost identical physical properties. For the first time, researchers have succeeded in separating the two forms to show that they can exhibit different chemical reactivities. These results were reported by researchers from the University of Basel and their colleagues in Hamburg in the scientific journal Nature Communications.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Oxytocin, vasopressin flatten social hierarchy and synchronize behaviorsResearch out of the University of Pennsylvania found that the neuropeptides oxytocin and vasopressin flatten the social hierarchy and synchronize behaviors of rhesus macaques. The work has the potential to lead to new therapies and treatment alternatives for social impairments in disorders like autism and schizophrenia.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Genomic medicine may one day revolutionize cardiovascular careGenomic medicine could enable doctors to make predictions about people's health, from the likelihood of developing heart disease or stroke to the severity of disease, as well as medications for treatment.
8h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

High protein diet associated with small increased heart failure risk in middle-aged menFor middle-aged men, eating higher amounts of protein was associated with a slightly elevated risk for heart failure than those who ate less protein. Proteins from fish and eggs were not associated with heart failure risk in this study.
8h
BBC News – Science & Environment
53
Waterspout emerges from Florida stormStrong winds from Storm Alberto have caused a small waterspout in a swimming pool in Panama City Beach, Florida.
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Ingeniøren
8
Fem tyskstøttede danske solcelleparker er koblet på el-nettetInden for de seneste uger har European Energy nettilsluttet i alt otte solcelleparker med en kapacitet på 70 MW på Lolland, Falster, Læsø, Bornholm, nær Holbæk og ved Hjørring.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
1
Leader of failed MH370 wreckage hunt hopes to search againThe head of a U.S. technology company that scoured the Indian Ocean seabed for more than three months looking for Malaysia Airlines Flight 370 said on Tuesday he was disappointed the hunt failed to find wreckage and hoped to take part in some future search.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
3
Researchers create framework to stop cyber attacks on internet-connected carsA new study by Maanak Gupta, doctoral candidate at The University of Texas at San Antonio, and Ravi Sandhu, Lutcher Brown Endowed Professor of computer science and founding executive director of the UTSA Institute for Cyber Security (ICS), examines the cybersecurity risks for new generations of smart which includes both autonomous and internet connected cars.
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NYT > Science
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Origins of an Epidemic: Purdue Pharma Knew Its Opioids Were Widely AbusedA confidential Justice Department report found the company was aware early on that OxyContin was being crushed and snorted for its powerful narcotic, but continued to promote it as less addictive.
10h
NYT > Science
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How to Decide Whether Ailing Chimps Get Moved to a SanctuaryA new report suggest that federally owned or supported chimps should go to sanctuaries unless the trip is “extremely likely to shorten their lives.”
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Viden
34
Dansk nobelprismodtager er dødFra tømmerhandel i Lemvig til universitet i Aarhus. Biomedicineren Jens Christian Skou er død i en alder af 99 år.
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Science-Based Medicine
58
Mosconi’s Brain Food DietMosconi offers a plan to prevent and treat Alzheimer's and maximize cognitive function in everyone. She claims brain health requires a unique diet, but she fails to make her case. Some of what she says is good standard health advice, but the rest is speculative, not based on good scientific evidence, and sometimes demonstrably wrong.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
14
Hawaii officials order some residents to flee from fast lavaHawaii County officials are knocking on doors on several streets in the Leilani Estates subdivision alerting residents to flee fast-moving lava from Kilauea (kih-luh-WAY'-uh) volcano.
11h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
13
Folkloric and a national symbol: saving the Balkan LynxIn Albania, legend has it that staring into the almond-shaped eyes of the Balkan Lynx renders you blind.
11h
Ingeniøren

Derfor kunne KMD ikke redde Roskildes data: Filudvekslingen var fejlkodetRoskilde bad i 2012 KMD om mulighed for at kunne udveksle data mellem et KMD-system og kommunens ESDH. Den funktion blev kodet forkert, og selvom den aldrig blev brugt, kostede den Store Bededag Roskilde Kommune mere end 82.000 filer.
12h
Science | The Guardian
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Why thousands of AI researchers are boycotting the new Nature journalAcademics share machine-learning research freely. Taxpayers should not have to pay twice to read our findings Budding authors face a minefield when it comes to publishing their work. For a large fee, as much as $3,000 , they can make their work available to anyone who wants to read it. Or they can avoid the fee and have readers pay the publisher instead. Often it is libraries that foot this bill
12h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
2
Report identifies characteristics of microorganisms most likely to cause a global pandemicA potential global catastrophic risk-level pandemic pathogen will most likely have a respiratory mode of transmission; be contagious during the incubation period, prior to symptom development, or when infected individuals show only mild symptoms; and need specific host population factors (e.g., immunologically naïve persons) and additional intrinsic microbial pathogenicity characteristics (e.g., a
13h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Study finds big savings in removing dams over repairsA new study by Portland State University researchers finds billions of dollars could be saved if the nation's aging dams are removed rather than repaired, but also suggests that better data and analysis is needed on the factors driving dam-removal efforts.
13h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

VTCRI scientists identify novel cellular mechanism that can lead to cancer metastasisScientists at the Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute have added a new dimension to the understanding of how cells alter their communication with one another during development, wound healing, and the spread of cancer. The researchers published their results in Molecular Biology of the Cell, a journal published by the American Society for Cell Biology.
13h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
4
UTSA researchers create framework to stop cyber attacks on internet-connected carsA new study by Maanak Gupta, doctoral candidate at The University of Texas at San Antonio, and Ravi Sandhu, Lutcher Brown Endowed Professor of computer science and founding executive director of the UTSA Institute for Cyber Security (ICS), examines the cybersecurity risks for new generations of smart which includes both autonomous and internet connected cars.
13h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Could we work together with our bacteria to stop infection?The benefits of antibiotics to both human and animal health are undisputed. However, as microbes have become increasingly resistant to antimicrobials and other drugs, scientists have become interested in new solutions to the growing superbug crisis, including the use of defensive microbes and fecal transplants. In new research, Oxford University scientists have developed a lab-based approach, crea
13h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Assessment of biomarkers of subconcussive head traumaResearchers evaluated the usefulness of biomarker testing in determining the potential extent of brain trauma suffered from repetitive subconcussive head impacts sustained over the course of a college football season.
13h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
2
Climate change forced zombie ant fungi to adaptZombie ants clamp on to aerial vegetation and hang for months spewing the spores of their parasitic fungi, but researchers noticed that they do not always clamp on to the same part of the plant. Now the researchers know that the choice of leaves or twigs is related to climate and that climate change forced the fungi to adapt to local conditions.
13h
Feed: All Latest
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Climate Change Made Zombie Ants Even More CunningThe parasitic fungus that drives ants to sabotage their own colonies has adapted to zombify their quarry better in different climates.
13h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Could we work together with our bacteria to stop infection?The benefits of antibiotics to both human and animal health are undisputed. However, as microbes have become increasingly resistant to antimicrobials and other drugs, scientists have become interested in new solutions to the growing superbug crisis, including the use of defensive microbes and faecal transplants. In new research, Oxford University scientists have developed a lab-based approach, cre
13h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Climate change forced zombie ant fungi to adaptZombie ants clamp on to aerial vegetation and hang for months spewing the spores of their parasitic fungi, but researchers noticed that they do not always clamp on to the same part of the plant. Now the researchers know that the choice of leaves or twigs is related to climate and that climate change forced the fungi to adapt to local conditions.
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Ingeniøren
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Afsløring af sensor i immunforsvaret kan bane vej for livslange vaccinerForskere fra DTU Bioengineering har påvist en mekanisme, der aktiverer immunforsvaret. Den håber de at kunne udnytte i flere vacciner med livslang immunitet mod f.eks. stivkrampe eller MRSA.
14h
Big Think
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Hot dogs vs. hamburgers: which is the healthier choice?Are hot dogs or hamburgers the healthier option? It’s a question that has plagued many a summer barbeque guest. Read More
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Science : NPR
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The Carpenter Vs. The Gardener: Two Models Of Modern ParentingMany parents think they can shape their child into a particular kind of adult. Psychologist Alison Gopnik says the science suggests otherwise. (Image credit: sturti/Getty Images)
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Science | The Guardian
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Computer learns to detect skin cancer more accurately than doctorsArtificial intelligence machine found 95% of melanomas in study compared to 86.6% for dermatologists A computer was better than human dermatologists at detecting skin cancer in a study that pitted people against machines in the quest for better, faster diagnostics, researchers said on Tuesday. A team from Germany, the United States and France taught an artificial intelligence system to distinguis
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The Atlantic
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Trump’s Right-Hand TrollI t’s late on a Friday afternoon in March, and I’m sitting across from Stephen Miller in his spacious, sunlit West Wing office, trying to figure out whether he’s trolling me. This is no easy task. A provocateur as skilled as Miller doesn’t just announce when he’s saying something outlandish to get a rise out of you—he tries to make you think he means it. So you have to look for the subtle tells.
15h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Scientists discover why heart function is reduced at high altitudeFor over a century, we have known that high altitude reduces the amount of blood the heart pumps around the body with each beat. New research published in The Journal of Physiology has unearthed why this is the case and the findings will be important for people who live, travel and exercise at high altitudes.
16h
NYT > Science
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Manhattanhenge 2018: When and Where to WatchYou might get a chance to take “the best sunset picture of the year” this week in New York.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Amazon's Alexa recorded and shared a conversation without consent, report saysAn Amazon device powered by the Alexa voice software recorded a couple's private conversation in their home and sent it to someone in their contact list without their knowledge, KIRO television reported.
17h
BBC News – Science & Environment
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'Antarctica is my office'Jon Tyler is an Antarctic guide, showing scientists how to survive the extreme environment.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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Man against machine: AI is better than dermatologists at diagnosing skin cancerResearchers have shown for the first time that a form of artificial intelligence or machine learning known as a deep learning convolutional neural network (CNN) is better than experienced dermatologists at detecting skin cancer. The study is published in the leading cancer journal Annals of Oncology.
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The Atlantic
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‘There Is No Real Freedom’At 92, Les Cruise is one of the last surviving D-Day paratroopers. “He is like a celebrity to a lot of people in the military community,” said Michael Ayjian, who, along with Stephen Skeel, co-directed a short documentary about Cruise . In All-American , produced by 7 Wonders Cinema , Cruise recalls the momentous operation at Normandy, during which he watched his close friend die by his side. “It
18h
cognitive science
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Gut bacteria play key role in anti seizure effects of ketogenic dietsubmitted by /u/davyeminy [link] [comments]
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Dino-bird dandruff research head and shoulders above restPalaeontologists have discovered 125 million-year-old dandruff preserved amongst the plumage of feathered dinosaurs and early birds, revealing the first evidence of how dinosaurs shed their skin.
20h
Big Think
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What's the difference between A.I., machine learning, and robotics?There's a lot of confusion as to what AI, machine learning, and robotics do. Sometimes, they can all be used together. Read More
20h
Big Think
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Gamifying reality: How AR and VR will combine to transform experienceIt's the dawn of a new age. AI, VR, and robotics are creating the future that science-fiction writers have dreamed about. Read More
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Most popular vitamin and mineral supplements provide no health benefit, study findsThe most commonly consumed vitamin and mineral supplements provide no consistent health benefit or harm, suggests a new study led by researchers at St. Michael's Hospital and the University of Toronto.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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Is it ethical to use genealogy data to solve crimes?Despite the popularity of online genealogy services, it is unclear whether users understand that their genetic information is available for forensic purposes. Bioethicists from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) suggest a framework for ethical discussions about how and when genealogy data should be used for crime-solving. Their paper is published in Annals of Internal Medicine.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

To scan or not to scan: research shows how to personalize lung cancer screening decisionsA new study shows how to personalize lung cancer CT screening decisions, so doctors can fine-tune their advice to patients based not just on individual lung cancer risk and the potential benefits and harms of screening, but also a likely range of patient attitudes about looking for problems and dealing with the consequences. Two new free online tools based on the research are now available for use
20h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

ACP calls for policies that better support women's healthA new position paper from the American College of Physicians (ACP) examines the unique challenges women face within the US health care system and calls for policies to better support them. The paper addresses a wide range of issues, such as support for paid family and medical leave, recommendations on policies to reduce domestic violence, sexual abuse and harassment, and participation in clinical
20h
Scientific American Content: Global
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Was Wittgenstein a Mystic?The philosopher's greatest work, Tractatus Logico-Philosophicus, only makes sense in the light of mysticism — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Blog » Languages » English

The May Marathon approaches!Happy Monday, Eyewirers! What’s so happy about it? Well, marathon signups are open, for one thing. The forecast for Wednesday is clear skies, balmy temperatures, and a ripe, juicy cell looming on the horizon. Are you ready? Is it record-breaking time? This marathon will kick off at 8 PM EDT on 5/30 . You’ll have 24 hours to grow and complete 1-2 cells! Bonuses for Normal Play Trace 20 cubes – 2,0
20h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Ryanair threatened by summer strikeUnions representing Ryanair cabin crew based in Spain, Portugal, Belgium and Italy said Monday they would go on strike this summer unless the low-cost airline accepts their demands by a June 30 deadline.
21h
The Scientist RSS

Great Barrier Reef Experienced Five Massive Die-Offs in 30,000 YearsThe reef has bounced back from 'death events' in the past, but that doesn't mean it will be resilient over the next few decades.
21h
Big Think
6
Think Facebook can manipulate you? Look out for virtual realityAs Facebook users around the world are coming to understand, some of their favorite technologies can be used against them. It’s not just the scandal over psychological profiling firm Cambridge Analytica getting access to data from tens of millions of Facebook profiles. People’s filter bubbles are … Read More
21h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Amazon's finance ambitions are said to draw attention from FedU.S. banks are keeping a watchful eye on the ambitions of Amazon.com Inc. and other technology giants to break into the world of finance. So is the Federal Reserve.
22h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Most vitamin, mineral supplements not shown to lower heart disease riskCurrent research does not show enough evidence that vitamin or mineral supplements are beneficial for preventing or treating heart disease, with the exception of folic acid for reducing stroke risk, according to a review. Current recommendations to adopt healthy diets that are heavy in plant-based foods from which these vitamins are derived naturally should be reinforced.
22h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
41
China floods to hit US economy: Climate effects through trade chainsFluvial floods will increase due to human-made climate change, in particular in China. This might raise direct and indirect economic losses along the global supply and trade chains. The US is susceptible to indirect climate-related economic losses due to its negative trade balance with China. Trump's tariffs might further reduce the resilience of the US economy.
22h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
18
Genome's dark matter offers clues to major challenge in prostate cancerResearchers identified a novel gene they named ARLNC1 that controls signals from the androgen receptor, a key player in prostate cancer. Knocking down this long non-coding RNA in mice led to cancer cell death, suggesting this may be a key target for future therapies.
22h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Tall and older Amazonian forests more resistant to droughtsA new study shows that photosynthesis in tall Amazonian forests — forests above 30m — is 3x less sensitive to precipitation variability than in shorter forests of less than 20m. Taller Amazonian forests were also found to be older, have more biomass and deeper rooting systems that enable them to access deeper soil moisture, making them more resilient to drought. The findings suggest that forest
22h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Rise and fall of the Great Barrier ReefStudy is first of its kind to reconstruct evolution of reef over 30,000 years in response to abrupt environmental change.
22h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
17
Virus genes from city pond rescue bacteriaA key question in evolutionary biology is how new functions arise. New research shows that bacteriophages (viruses that infect bacteria) can contribute to new functions by revealing hidden potential in their bacterial hosts.
22h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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The logic of modesty — why it pays to be humbleWhy do people make anonymous donations, and why does the public perceive this as admirable? Scientists have developed a novel game theoretic model that captures these behaviors and enables their study. Their new model is the first to include the idea that hidden signals, when discovered, provide additional information about the sender.
22h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
2
Limiting global warming could avoid millions of dengue fever casesLimiting global warming to 1.5°C could avoid around 3.3 million cases of dengue fever per year in Latin America and the Caribbean alone — according to new research from the University of East Anglia (UEA).A new report published today in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS) reveals that limiting warming to the goal of the UN Paris Agreement would also stop dengue spreading to
22h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
1
NIST study shows face recognition experts perform better with AI as partnerScientists from NIST and three universities have tested the accuracy of professional face identifiers, experts who often play a crucial role in criminal cases. The team found that these trained human beings perform best with a computer as a partner, not another person.
22h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
1
Mongooses remember and reward helpful friendsDwarf mongooses remember previous cooperative acts by their groupmates and reward them later, according to new work by University of Bristol researchers, published today in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.
22h
Big Think
40
How MIT's VR environment is saving drones from crashing to deathSales of drones are clocking in around $200 million and doubling each year. Which means there's a lot of testing to be done. Read More
22h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Genes, environment and schizophrenia: New study finds the placenta is the missing linkNew research shines a spotlight on the placenta's critical role in the nature versus nurture debate and how it confers risk for schizophrenia and likely other neurodevelopmental disorders including ADHD, autism, and Tourette syndrome. This new scientific frontier, with far-reaching implications for maternal and child health, creates the possibility that scientists can more accurately predict who i
22h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
300+
Mongooses remember and reward helpful friendsDwarf mongooses remember previous cooperative acts by their groupmates and reward them later, according to new work by University of Bristol researchers, published today in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.
22h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
200+
Limiting global warming could avoid millions of dengue fever casesLimiting global warming to 1.5°C could avoid around 3.3 million cases of dengue fever per year in Latin America and the Caribbean alone—according to new research from the University of East Anglia (UEA).
22h
Scientific American Content: Global
32
Giant Flatworms Invaded France and Ran Amok for 2 Decades before Scientists Realized ItWorms are living the dream of 400 years of medieval English armies — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
22h
Big Think
47
How AI will change astronomy, healthcare, and social justiceAlthough there is much guesswork as to the future of artificial intelligence, today’s AI systems continue to be a boon for science. Read More
23h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Processes in the gut that drive fat build-up around the waistResearch into the role the gut plays in processing and distributing fat could pave the way for the development of personalized treatments for obesity and other chronic diseases within the next decade.
23h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
7
Southern California suppliers learn to adjust to slowdown in satellite ordersSpaceX on Tuesday blasted six small commercial satellites to low-Earth orbit. It was the company's 10th launch this year—but the payload itself may be a sign of what's to come.
23h

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