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NemID er klar som app til smartphonesNemID-papkortet kan nu erstattes med en app, der kan downloades til Android- og Apple-smartphones.
9h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Environmental noise paradoxically preserves the coherence of a quantum systemQuantum computers promise to advance certain areas of complex computing. One of the roadblocks to their development, however, is the fact that quantum phenomena, which take place at the level of atomic particles, can be severely affected by environmental "noise" from their surroundings. In the past, scientists have tried to maintain the coherence of the systems by cooling them to very low temperat
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BBC News – Science & Environment
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Pompeii victim crushed by boulder while fleeing eruptionArchaeologists find a man who, fleeing the initial Vesuvius eruption, was hit by a giant boulder.
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LATEST

Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

No more sweet tooth? Scientists switch off pleasure from food in brains of miceNew research in mice has revealed that the brain's underlying desire for sweet, and its distaste for bitter, can be erased by manipulating neurons in the amygdala, the emotion center of the brain. The research points to new strategies for understanding and treating eating disorders including obesity and anorexia nervosa.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily

Life recovered rapidly at impact site of dino-killing asteroidNew research finds that life rebounded in the crater left by the asteroid that killed the dinosaurs much faster than previously thought. Sea life was present a few years after the impact and a thriving ecosystem within 30,000 years.
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Futurity.org

Rocky clues suggest first Americans arrived via the coastWhen and how did the first people come to the Americas? One dominant theory says that the first Americans took a coastal route along Alaska’s Pacific border to enter the continent. A new geological study provides compelling evidence to support this hypothesis. The conventional story, however, says that the earliest settlers came via Siberia, crossing the now-defunct Bering land bridge on foot and
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Live Science
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You May Have a 'Second Brain' in Your Butt… And It's Smarter Than You ThinkThe neurons in your colon don't need to be told what to do.
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The Atlantic

Killing With Impunity, Every Three Days“We made this film because no one, particularly the US media, seemed to care,” Tom Laffay told The Atlantic . Laffay, a filmmaker and journalist based in Bogotá, is referring to the parlous situation in Colombia, where social leaders and community organizers are routinely assassinated with impunity. “The rate is now at one killing every three days,” Laffay said. “What is unusual isn’t the assassi
11min
NYT > Science
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Roseanne’s ‘Ambien-Tweeting,’ Explained. Sorta.Ambien Roseanne BarrThe drug is infamous for bizarre side effects, but online ranting is not one of them.
13min
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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In ancient boulders, new clues about the story of human migration to the AmericasWhen and how did the first people come to the Americas?
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Getting conservationists and fishers on the same pageHistorically, fisheries and the conservation community have struggled to find common ground. The tension between one's desire to turn a profit and the other's to preserve endangered or protected marine species that can be killed as bycatch has made it difficult to find solutions that satisfy both. Now, a new online tool developed by researchers at San Diego State University in collaboration with t
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Societies may help promote female representation within academic scienceAcademic societies may be able to increase gender equity through supporting female leadership and making an outward commitment of equality, according to a study published May 30, 2018 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Dominique Potvin from University of the Sunshine Coast, Hervey Bay, Australia and colleagues.
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Latest Headlines | Science News
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The first Americans could have taken a coastal route into the New WorldAlaskan glaciers retreated in time for ancient coastal entries of the first Americans.
22min
Scientific American Content: Global
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Hurricane Maria Contributed to Nearly 5,000 Deaths, Researchers SayA new estimate including indirect deaths in Puerto Rico is 72 times higher than the official death toll — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Big Think
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Kim Kardashian meets with Trump to talk prison reformKim Kardashian is meeting with Jared Kushner and President Donald Trump on Wednesday to talk prison reform and the case of Alice Marie Johnson, who's service life for a nonviolent crime. Read More
27min
The Atlantic
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2018 National Geographic Travel Photographer of the Year ContestThe National Geographic Travel Photographer of the Year Contest is under way, with entries being accepted for just one more day—the competition closes at noon, eastern time, on May 31. The grand-prize winner will be awarded $10,000 (USD). National Geographic was once again kind enough to allow me to share some of this year’s entries with you here, gathered from three categories: Nature, Cities, a
29min
Science | The Guardian

Wearing glasses may really mean you're smarter, major study findsIt’s not just a pop culture trope – a University of Edinburgh study has found intelligent people are 30% more likely to have genes related to poor eyesight If you wear glasses I’ve got some good news: you may well be smarter than the average person. A new study published in the journal Nature Communications has found that needing to wear glasses is associated with higher levels of intelligence. B
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Big Think
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Can Ambien make you racist? No, but it can reveal your worst side.The popular sleep drug, when taken recreationally, dredges up what you already have in your brain. Read More
32min
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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The mother of all lizards found in Italian AlpsScientists said Wednesday they had tracked down the oldest known lizard, a tiny creature that lived about 240 million years ago when Earth had a single continent and dinosaurs were brand new.
40min
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Shark fins found in Singapore Airlines shipment to Hong KongEnvironmental campaigners said Wednesday a hidden shipment of shark fins including some from endangered species had been shipped to Hong Kong via Singapore Airlines, despite a ban by the carrier.
40min
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Fox sets shareholder vote on Disney tie-up July 10Media-entertainment giant 21st Century Fox said Wednesday it called a shareholder meeting July 10 to vote on the sale of key television and film operations to Walt Disney Co.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Operator of world's top internet hub sues German spy agencyThe operator of the world's largest internet hub challenged the legality of sweeping telecoms surveillance by Germany's spy agency, a German court heard Wednesday.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Malaysia to build island in waters near SingaporeMalaysian Prime Minister Mahathir Mohamad said Wednesday he wants to develop an island on a cluster of rocks previously disputed with Singapore, a move that could anger its neighbour.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Spanish consumer group to sue Facebook over data sharingFacebook Sheryl SandbergA Spanish consumer group said Wednesday it will sue Facebook over the alleged misuse of the personal data of 26 million users of the social network in Spain.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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US commerce chief warns of disruption from EU privacy rulesUS Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross warned Wednesday that the new EU privacy rules in effect since last week could lead to serious problems for business, medical research and law enforcement on both sides of the Atlantic.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Uber says 'committed' to Turkey after new rules, finesRide-sharing company Uber on Wednesday said it was committed to its business in Turkey despite being hit with tough new regulations there.
46min
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Rare white bison born at Belgrade ZooOne of the world's rarest animals—a white bison—has been born at Belgrade zoo, officials said.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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'Second brain' neurons keep colon movingMillions of neurons in the gastrointestinal tract coordinate their activity to generate the muscle contractions that propel waste through the last leg of the digestive system, according to a study of isolated mouse colons. The newly identified neuronal firing pattern may represent an early feature preserved through the evolution of nervous systems.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Virtual brain could aid surgical planningResearchers have simulated neural activity based on the unique structural architecture of individual brain tumor patients using a platform called The Virtual Brain. The findings are a first step toward creating personalized brain models that could be used to predict the effects of tumors and consequent surgery on brain function.
49min
Big Think
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If you’ve ignored the FBI advice to reboot your router, don’t. It’s a massive problem.Common routers include devices made by Netgear and Linksys; this is a major malware outbreak. Read More
55min
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Even a shark's electrical 'sixth sense' may be tuned to attackImagine having superhuman hearing. You're at a noisy, cocktail party and yet your ears can detect normally inaudible sounds. But, unlike normal hearing, each of these sounds causes your ears to react in the same way. There is no difference between the quietest and loudest movements. According to a study funded by the National Institutes of Health, that may be how a shark's electrosensing organ rea
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Microscopic universe provides insight into life and death of a neutronExperiments on the lifetime of a neutron reveal surprising and unexplained deviations. In order to address this problem of subatomic physics, a team of physicists from Juelich, the UK, and the USA created a simulation of a microscopic universe. They were thus able to calculate a fundamental natural constant of nuclear physics for the first time — a milestone in this field of research. The results
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Scientists use a photonic quantum simulator to make virtual movies of molecules vibratingScientists have shown how an optical chip can simulate the motion of atoms within molecules at the quantum level, which could lead to better ways of creating chemicals for use as pharmaceuticals.
1h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Supercomputers provide new window into the life and death of a neutronA team has enlisted powerful supercomputers to calculate a quantity, known as the 'nucleon axial coupling' or gA, that is central to our understanding of a neutron's lifetime.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Nuclear scientists calculate value of key property that drives neutron decaySupercomputer simulations of neutrons' inner turmoil and a new method that filters out 'noise' yield the highest-ever precision calculation of nucleon axial coupling, a property crucial to predicting neutron lifetime.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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CLL patient treated at Penn goes into remission thanks to single CAR T cellResearchers at the University of Pennsylvania's Abramson Cancer Center say a patient treated for chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) in 2013 went into remission because of a single CAR T cell and the cells it produced as it multiplied, and has stayed cancer free in the five years since, with CAR T cells still present in his immune system.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Supercomputers give scientists key insight into the lifetime of neutronsUsing the largest supercomputers in the country, scientists have reached a milestone decades in the making. The team, which includes a researcher from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, has calculated the axial coupling of the neutron, an important process in nuclear physics that governs nuclear beta decay, or the process by which neutron decays to a proton, an electron, and a neutri
1h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Life recovered rapidly at impact site of dino-killing asteroidNew research led by the University of Texas at Austin finds that life rebounded in the crater left by the asteroid that killed the dinosaurs much faster than previously thought. Sea life was present a few years after the impact and a thriving ecosystem within 30,000 years.
1h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

'Hidden' driver discovered that helps prime the anti-tumor immune responseSt. Jude Children's Research Hospital researchers have used systems biology approaches to reveal key details about regulation of immune function, including T cells that are central to cancer immunotherapy.
1h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

How to build a brain: discovery answers evolutionary mysteryResearchers at King's College London have discovered a fundamental process by which brains are built, which may have profound implications for understanding neurodevelopmental conditions like autism and epilepsy. The study, published in Nature and funded by the Wellcome Trust, also answers an evolutionary mystery about how the delicate balance between different types of brain cells might be mainta
1h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

No more sweet tooth? Scientists switch off pleasure from food in brains of miceNew research in mice has revealed that the brain's underlying desire for sweet, and its distaste for bitter, can be erased by manipulating neurons in the amygdala, the emotion center of the brain. The research points to new strategies for understanding and treating eating disorders including obesity and anorexia nervosa.
1h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
2
Consumer Reports recommends 'buy' for Tesla Model 3A wireless update of antilock braking software improved the stopping distance of Tesla's electric Model 3, prompting Consumer Reports to reverse course and give the car its "Recommended Buy" rating.
1h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Details that look sharp to people may be blurry to their petsCompared with many animals, human eyes aren't particularly adept at distinguishing colors or seeing in dim light. But by one measure at least—something called visual acuity—human eyes can see fine details that most animals can't, Duke University researchers say.
1h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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The smallest biggest theropod dinosaurSpinosaurus is the longest, and among the largest predatory dinosaurs, and possesses many adaptations for a semiaquatic lifestyle. A tiny claw phalanx of the foot, discovered in Cretaceous-aged sandstones of the Sahara, shows a peculiar shape compatible with an early juvenile Spinosaurus. As reported in PeerJ—the Journal of Life & Environmental Sciences, the fossil is from the smallest known indiv
1h
New on MIT Technology Review
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A game-changing carbon-capture power plant just passed its first big test
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Pigs digest fiber efficiently even at high inclusion rates, study findsThe use of high-fiber feed ingredients in swine diets is on the rise due to their wide availability and relatively low cost. However, because pigs lack enzymes needed to digest dietary fiber, the energy available to pigs from these ingredients is less than lower-fiber ingredients. Researchers at the University of Illinois are helping to determine the contribution that high-fiber feed ingredients m
1h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Workplace dress codes present barriers to people living with disabilitiesAccording to the U.S. Census, nearly 20 million people of working age live with a disability. While past research has indicated that people living with disabilities face barriers in workplace participation, researchers from the University of Missouri have now found one hindrance to workplace participation for people with disabilities is the lack of appropriate clothing. This barrier increases thei
1h
The Atlantic
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Why Does Sweetness Taste So Good?The experience of taste is both essential and ephemeral. It’s the reliable bite of your morning coffee, and it’s the charred sweetness of your first campfire marshmallow, so deeply associated with a particular setting that you forget about it until another marshmallow and another campfire shocks it back into your mind. There’s so much tied up in taste that it’s easy to overlook the fact that our
1h
Science | The Guardian

World's oldest lizard fossil forces rethink of reptile family treeDiscovery pushes back the earliest known member of lizard and snake group by 75m years The fossilised remains of a small lizard discovered in rock from the Italian Alps has shaken up the evolutionary family tree of reptiles and shed new light on the survivors of the most devastating mass extinction the world ever faced, researchers say. Thought to have lived in the triassic period , about 240 mil
1h
Science | The Guardian

Desire for sugar eliminated in mice by rewiring brainsResearchers identified two specific regions in the brain which respond to sweet and bitter tastes – and altered those responses From whispering sweet nothings to hoping for sweet dreams, sugariness and pleasure have long been bound together. Now scientists studying the brains of mice have revealed why, unpicking the pathways in the brain which result in sweet foods being perceived as nice and bit
1h
Big Think
25
These 104 countries restrict women's right to workIn most countries around the world, some jobs are by law reserved for men only and forbidden for women. Read More
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Even a shark's electrical 'sixth sense' may be tuned to attackImagine having superhuman hearing. You're at a noisy, cocktail party and yet your ears can detect normally inaudible sounds made by your friends' muscles as they lean in to dish the latest gossip. But, unlike normal hearing, each of these sounds causes your ears to react in the same way. There is no difference between the quietest and loudest movements. To your superhuman ears, they all sound loud
1h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
15
Life recovered rapidly at impact site of dino-killing asteroidAbout 66 million years ago, an asteroid smashed into Earth, triggering a mass extinction that ended the reign of the dinosaurs and snuffed out 75 percent of life.
1h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Nuclear scientists calculate value of key property that drives neutron decayUsing some of the world's most powerful supercomputers, an international team including scientists from several U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) national laboratories has released the highest-precision calculation of a fundamental property of protons and neutrons known as nucleon axial coupling. This quantity determines the strength of the interaction that triggers neutrons to decay into protons—an
1h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Scientists use a photonic quantum simulator to make virtual movies of molecules vibratingScientists have shown how an optical chip can simulate the motion of atoms within molecules at the quantum level, which could lead to better ways of creating chemicals for use as pharmaceuticals.
1h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Free tax services in pediatrics clinics yield high returnsDuring its first two years, StreetCred, a free tax preparation program developed at Boston Medical Center (BMC), helped 753 clients in pediatric clinics receive over $1.6 million in federal tax returns. Results from surveys of clients and staff, published in Pediatrics, showed that StreetCred was associated with a significant improvement in tax filings and a significant increase in client knowledg
1h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Details that look sharp to people may be blurry to their petsBlind as a bat or eagle-eyed? Scientists compared hundreds of species by the sharpness of their sight. They found a 10,000-fold difference between the most sharp-sighted and the most blurry-eyed species, with humans ranking near the top. The researchers also created a series of images showing how different scenes might appear to animals with different acuities. The images reveal patterns that, whi
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Two-pronged antibodies draw immune killers directly to cancer cellsDubbed 'T-cell engaging bi-specific antibodies,' these cancer combatants attack malignant cells but leave healthy cells untouched.
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Scientific American Content: Global
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"Reprogrammed" Stem Cells Approved to Mend Human Hearts in Pilot StudyThree patients in Japan will receive the experimental therapy in the next year — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Popular Science
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These are the actual side effects of AmbienHealth Sleep isn't technically one of them. Though you may find yourself rambling on and on to your friends due to lowered inhibitions and lack of judgement, Ambien has not been known to cause hateful feelings…
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New Scientist – News
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Papua New Guinea bans Facebook for a month in fake news blitzThe country is planning a month-long Facebook shutdown to conduct research on the social media network, weed out fake users and stem "false or misleading” information
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New Scientist – News
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I’m working on a universal language to let us speak to aliensIt's time to find a new way to speak across the stars, says Douglas Vakoch, head of METI, the body dedicated to messaging possible alien civilisations
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BBC News – Science & Environment
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Two different forms of water isolated for first timeScientists have isolated the two different forms of water molecule for the first time.
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BBC News – Science & Environment
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Japanese whale hunters kill 122 pregnant minkeThe team caught 333 minkes, many of which were pregnant females, in its Antarctic "field survey".
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Blog » Languages » English
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Dig Sector 10 is complete!It’s time for another big cellebration on Eyewire: Sector 10 of The Dig is complete as of 5/30/2018! In this sector we uncovered 160 cells, so we’re hosting a 160 minute Happy Hour today starting at 2:00 PM EDT. Regular HH bonuses apply. After that… we’re getting well into Sector 11, and what better way to continue than with the marathon starting tonight? Good luck!!!
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

The smallest biggest theropod dinosaurSpinosaurus is the longest, and among the largest predatory dinosaurs. A tiny claw phalanx of the foot, discovered in Cretaceous-aged sandstones of the Sahara, shows a peculiar shape compatible with an early juvenile Spinosaurus. As reported in PeerJ — the Journal of Life & Environmental Sciences, the fossil is from the smallest known individual of this giant, sail-backed theropod. The findings s
1h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

From Haifa to Tokyo: Medical detectives team up on selenoprotein1/EPT1Ordinary tests couldn't diagnose an Israeli infant's developmental disorder. Until they completed whole-exome sequencing, his doctors were stumped. After finding a homozygous rare allele, they teamed up with Japanese experts on the affected enzyme to describe its hitherto unknown role in myelination.
1h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Workplace dress codes present barriers to people living with disabilitiesAccording to the US Census, nearly 20 million people of working age live with a disability. While past research has indicated that people living with disabilities face barriers in workplace participation, researchers from the University of Missouri have now found one hindrance to workplace participation for people with disabilities is the lack of appropriate clothing. This barrier increases their
1h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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ESA tipsheet for June 2018This is the ESA tipsheet for June 2018.
1h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Queen Mary research forecasting the evolution of cancerResearchers from Queen Mary University of London have developed a computer model that forecasts the changes that occur within tumors as they develop.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Researchers devise new way to discern what microbes eatA new technique devised by researchers from North Carolina State University and the University of Calgary provides a more in-depth look at the metabolism and physiology within microbial communities—the microscopic life such as bacteria, viruses and other tiny forms of life within our bodies and throughout nature. Specifically, the new technique provides a more direct way to determine what food sou
1h
The Atlantic

Colleges Are No Match for American PovertyRussell Lowery-Hart spent a Texas winter weekend sleeping outside, even when a light rain fell and it grew so cold that he forced muddy shoes into his sleeping bag to warm his feet. By day, the 48-year-old became increasingly sunburned crisscrossing the streets of Waco, applying for fast-food jobs and searching for soup kitchens. He arrived at one charity at noon to find that lunch ended at 11:30
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The Atlantic
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LeBron James and the Championship QuestionEarlier this month, when the Cleveland Cavaliers trailed the Boston Celtics two games to none in the Eastern Conference Finals, the ESPN provocateur Stephen A. Smith offered a theory about the inner workings and motivations of LeBron James. “I would never accuse him or insult him by saying that he’s losing on purpose,” Smith said in a tone suggesting he was getting ready to do just that. “I just
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Minimising the impacts of palm oil plantationsWith palm oil production exploding around the world, a new study of a leading producer has found ways to make the process easier on the environment.
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NeuWrite West
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What is freedom?Day A Sweet beat alarm Good energy need cig Okay, dishes laundry interview walk to Mac’s buy pack “celebratory smoke” Exercise too Elaborate plan chump Good impulse See? Drugs are useful Wife disagrees Sure the science is ironclad But greats were ashtrays churchill dylan hitchens Flow Greatness costs Motivated reasoning that b*tch Why live to live long? Short is sweet writing tutor says Mortality
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Ingeniøren

Aftalen, der skal redde ARC, udsættesTillægsaftalen om det skandaleramte Amager Ressourcecenter (ARC, tidligere Amager Forbrænding) er blevet udsat af et samlet Teknik- og Miljøudvalg. Medlemmerne havde et bredt udvalg af uddybende spørgsmål, som de kræver besvaret.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Study examines tax compliance behavior in small business ownersA new Applied Psychology study examines the ethical behaviours of small business owners in terms of tax compliance versus avoidance, and how internalised values and external punishment may come into play.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Alternative inflation rate may offer more accurate economic guidanceConsumer prices may be more volatile than are represented in current inflation indexes, which are used to guide a range of economic decisions, including guidance on interest rates and Social Security cost-of-living adjustments, according to a team of economists.
1h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Flexible and dynamic transport solution for future 5G communications developedA consortium of 20 industry-leading companies and organizations has announced the successful completion of the European research project 5G-Crosshaul, coordinated by Universidad Carlos III de Madrid (UC3M). The three-year effort has delivered what is now the de-facto concept for an integrated 5G transport network, a crucial step towards the real-world implementation of the future 5G communications
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Viden

Træt af at være slap? 6 måder du kan købe dig til superkræfterMåske er du ikke den fødte superhelt. Men med hjælp fra videnskaben kan du blive det – hvis du altså har penge nok. Klik dig igennem "tilbudskataloget" her på siden og se, hvordan videnskaben og teknologien kan hjælpe.
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Scientific American Content: Global
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Computers Go Head-to-Head with Humans on Face RecognitionThe best facial-recognition algorithms are now as good as the best forensic examiners are. But the best results come by combining human and computer skills. Christopher Intagliata reports. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Heat is driving off clouds that dampen California wildfiresSunny California may be getting too sunny. Increasing summer temperatures brought on by a combination of intensifying urbanization and warming climate are driving off once common low-lying morning clouds in many southern coastal areas of the state, leading to increased risk of wildfires, says a new study.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Seismometer readings could offer debris flow early warningFirst came the fire, then the rain—and finally, the devastating mud.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Pigs digest fiber efficiently even at high inclusion rates, study findsThe use of high-fiber feed ingredients in swine diets is on the rise due to their wide availability and relatively low cost. However, because pigs lack enzymes needed to digest dietary fiber, the energy available to pigs from these ingredients is less than lower-fiber ingredients. Researchers at the University of Illinois are helping to determine the contribution that high-fiber feed ingredients m
1h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Having an abortion does not lead to depressionHaving an abortion does not increase a woman's risk for depression, according to a new University of Maryland School of Public Health-led study of nearly 400,000 women. Previous research has found abortion does not harm women's mental health, yet studies claiming that it does have been used to justify state policies that restrict access to abortion in the US. This study's findings, published in JA
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

As colorectal cancer rises in young people, new guidelines recommend screening start at 45Study published today the journal Cancer recommends colorectal cancer screening start at age 45, five years younger than currently recommended for both men and women of all races and ethnicities.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Researchers devise new way to discern what microbes eatA new technique helps researchers determine food eaten by microbes.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Magic in metal could help put excess carbon dioxide to good useA University of Delaware researcher has identified a kind of magic in a metal that may be just what the doctor ordered for Planet Earth. He says the colorful metal, known as bismuth, could help reduce rising carbon dioxide levels in the atmosphere and provide sustainable routes to making fuels.
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Quanta Magazine
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The Slippery Math of CausationYou often hear the admonition “correlation does not imply causation.” But what exactly is causation? Unlike correlation, which has a specific mathematical meaning, causation is a slippery concept that has been debated by philosophers for millennia. It seems to get conflated with our intuitions or preconceived notions about what it means to cause something to happen. One common-sense definition mi
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Ants provide clues to why biodiversity is higher in the tropicsNew global data of invertebrate distributions suggests time holds key to species diversity.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Simultaneous monitoring of surfaces and protein distribution in cellsIn a first proof-of-concept study, researchers have combined two microscopy methods that render both a cell's surface and the distribution of a protein in the cell visible, at a resolution in the nanometer range. The method can be used for living cells. It might for example help analyze how cancer metastases are formed or assess the efficacy of specific drugs.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Electrophysiological sign of cerebral infarction identifiedResearchers have analyzed the underlying electrophysiological indicators of subarachnoid hemorrhage, the second most common type of brain hemorrhage that can lead to ischemic stroke within a matter of days. Their findings may lay the foundations for new stroke treatments.
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NeuWrite West

Can jumping spiders hear with their leg hair?A Phidippus audax jumping spider in Nashville, Tennessee is ready to hear some sounds! Source: Wikimedia Commons. Jumping spiders . If you haven’t been scared away by the thought of spiders jumping, you’re in for a treat of fascinating biology. Jumping spiders have a new entry in their list of terrifying skills, which includes living a vagabond life without a web, pouncing on prey , and dancing t
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Space technologies to help improve environmental and living conditions at banks of the GangesInternational scientists, including researchers from the University of Leicester, are using space sensors to monitor the health of land around the River Ganges in India, home to approximately 500 million people.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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New compound effective against drug-resistant pathogens, could lead to new antibioticsResearchers from North Carolina State University have synthesized an analog of lipoxazolidinone A, a small molecule that is effective against drug-resistant bacteria such as MRSA. This molecule, a new synthetic compound inspired by a natural product, could be a useful chemical tool for studying other Gram-positive infections and may have implications for future drug creation.
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Scientific American Content: Global
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Pioneering NASA Astronaut Don Peterson Dies at 84In 1983, Peterson performed the first spacewalk from a space shuttle — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Kicking the car(bon) habit better for air pollution than technology revolutionChanging our lifestyles and the way we travel could have as big—if not more of an impact on CO2 transport emissions, as electric vehicles and the transport technology revolution, according to new Oxford University research.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Italy's oldest olive oil discovered in peculiar potOlive oil is a staple of Italian cuisine. It's been that way for thousands of years. And new chemical analysis conducted on ancient pottery proves the liquid gold has existed in Italy hundreds of years longer than what anthropologists have previously recorded.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Self-driving cars must reduce traffic fatalities by at least 75 percent to stay on the roadsThe race is on for companies to present their driverless cars to the public, but recent collisions involving autonomous vehicles developed by Uber Technologies Inc. and Tesla Inc. have led consumers to questions whether these vehicles can alleviate traffic issues and increase safety. A new study published in Risk Analysis examined the question "How safe is safe enough for self-driving vehicles (SD
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Building nanomaterials for next-generation computingNanoscientists at Northwestern University have developed a blueprint to fabricate new heterostructures from different types of 2-D materials. 2-D materials are single atom layers that can be stacked together like "nano-interlocking building blocks." Materials scientists and physicists are excited about the properties of 2-D materials and their potential applications. The researchers describe their
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Mixing science and politicsThe inaugural March for Science, held last year in Washington, D.C., and other cities across the world, celebrated science and its role in our everyday lives. In addition, many participants expressed frustration with U.S. President Donald J. Trump's apparent disregard for evidence-based policy-making. An article in Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN), the weekly news magazine of the American Chemic
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Sniffing out real trufflesAt a cost of thousands of dollars per pound, truffles are an expensive food. The fungi are prized for their distinctive aroma, and many foods claim truffles or their aromas as ingredients. But some of these foods may actually contain a much less pricey synthetic truffle compound. To help detect food fraud, researchers report in Analytical Chemistry that they have developed a technique that discrim
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Inside Science
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Bigravity: A Hidden 'Gear' for Gravity?Bigravity: A Hidden 'Gear' for Gravity? Physicists come up with alternate explanation of gravity that may implicate dark energy, which comprises 70 percent of our universe. bigravity.jpg An artist's conception of our universe, where gravity (the green grid) is trying to keep everything together and a mysterious dark energy (the purple grid) is trying to tear everything apart. Image credits: NASA/
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Huddling for survival—monkeys with more social partners can winterWild monkeys which have more social partners form larger huddles in adverse weather and have a better chance of surviving winter, new research has found.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Self-driving cars must reduce traffic fatalities by at least 75 percent to stay on the roadsThe race is on for companies to present their driverless cars to the public, but recent collisions involving autonomous vehicles developed by Uber Technologies Inc. and Tesla Inc. have led consumers to questions whether these vehicles can alleviate traffic issues and increase safety. A new study published in Risk Analysis examined the question 'How safe is safe enough for self-driving vehicles (SD
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With Venues, Oculus and Facebook Push Social VR Into New TerritoryConcerts, sporting events, and movie nights—all live, in three dimensions, and surrounded by hundreds of strangers. What could go wrong?
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Mapbox Uses Your Phone's Camera to Chart a Changing WorldThe mapping company's new software development kit will let its customers tap into data from their users' phone cameras to keep tabs on the streets in real time.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Bees adjust to seasons with nutrients in flowers and 'dirty water'Researchers at Tufts University have discovered that honey bees alter their diet of nutrients according to the season, particularly as winter approaches. A spike in calcium consumption in the fall, and high intake of potassium, help prepare the bees for colder months when they likely need those minerals to generate warmth through rapid muscle contractions. A careful inventory of the bees' nutrient
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Whiskered auklets lack wanderlust, are homebodies insteadA new study from The Auk: Ornithological Advances presents some of the best evidence that Whiskered Auklets are an outlier in the auklet family by not migrating and instead staying close to "home" (their breeding colonies) year-round. Most migratory birds lead two opposite lifestyles in the same year. During the breeding season a bird's location is constrained and their habits are repetitive given
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Study examines tax compliance behavior in small business ownersA new Applied Psychology study examines the ethical behaviors of small business owners in terms of tax compliance versus avoidance, and how internalized values and external punishment may come into play.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Public transit agencies should not have to disclose safety planning records in court, similar to laws for state highway agencies and passenger railroads, says new reportTo enable public transit agencies to engage in more rigorous and effective safety planning, their safety planning records should not be admissible as evidence in civil litigation, says a new report from the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

New study shows evidence that health information exchanges improve care, reduce costsAn updated systematic review of recent studies of health information exchanges found evidence the exchanges reduced both the cost of health care and its use. That contrasts with an assessment published three years ago that found little such evidence.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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New review highlights benefits of plant-based diets for heart healthA new review study published in Progress in Cardiovascular Diseases finds that vegetarian, especially vegan diets, are associated with better cardiovascular health.
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Live Science
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Ötzi the Iceman Was a Heart Attack Waiting to HappenIf a modern heart doctor could give medical advice to the iceman Ötzi — the man who was preserved as a mummy in the Alps — it would be this: Stop eating so much fatty meat and consider taking medications that lower your blood pressure and cholesterol.
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Papua New Guinea Wants to Ban Facebook. It Shouldn'tThe island nation is considering blocking Facebook for one month in order to collect information on fake profiles, pornography, and more. But the impact could be severe.
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The Atlantic
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How Do Aliens Solve Climate Change?The universe does many things. It makes galaxies, comets, black holes, neutron stars, and a whole mess more. We’ve lately discovered that it makes a great deal of planets, but it’s not clear whether it regularly makes energy-hungry civilizations, nor is it clear whether such civilizations inevitably drive their planets into climate change. There’s lots of hope riding on our talk about building a
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Viden

Diabetes spreder sig i familienFamilien skal med til lægen, hvis du er overvægtig. Forsker og forening opfordrer til mere familieorienteret indsats mod diabetes.
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Popular Science
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Pro basketball players' synchronous movements might help us predict the next NBA champScience On court body positioning is far from accidental. Forget highlight reels of 360-degree dunks and half-court shots, these videos of NBA players moving in sync could be the best predictor of who will win the 2018…
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Sniffing out real trufflesAt a cost of thousands of dollars per pound, truffles are an expensive food. The fungi are prized for their distinctive aroma, and many foods claim truffles or their aromas as ingredients. But some of these foods may actually contain a much less pricey synthetic truffle compound. To help detect food fraud, researchers report in Analytical Chemistry that they have developed a technique that discrim
3h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

New compound effective against drug-resistant pathogens, could lead to new antibioticsResearchers have synthesized an analog of lipoxazolidinone A, a small molecule that is effective against drug-resistant bacteria such as MRSA. This molecule, a new synthetic compound inspired by a natural product, could be a useful chemical tool for studying other Gram-positive infections and may have implications for future drug creation.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Building nanomaterials for next-generation computingNanoscientists at Northwestern University have developed a blueprint to fabricate new heterostructures from different types of 2-D materials, single atom layers that can be stacked together like 'nano-interlocking building blocks.' Materials scientists and physicists are excited about the properties of 2-D materials and their potential applications. The researchers describe their blueprint for nan
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Using telemedicine to bring genetic counseling to community cancer careGenetic counseling for cancer patients has become standard of care at academic medical centers, but patients cared for at community-based medical practices across the United States may not have access to these resources. Video and phone sessions can close that gap and bring genetic counseling to patients who would not otherwise have the chance to receive it.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Flexible and dynamic transport solution for future 5G communications developedA consortium of 20 industry-leading companies and organizations has announced the successful completion of the European research project 5G-Crosshaul, coordinated by Universidad Carlos III de Madrid (UC3M). The three-year effort has delivered what is now the de-facto concept for an integrated 5G transport network, a crucial step towards the real-world implementation of the future 5G communications
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Heat is driving off clouds that dampen California wildfiresSunny California may be getting too sunny. Increasing summer temperatures brought on by a combination of intensifying urbanization and warming climate are driving off once common low-lying morning clouds in many southern coastal areas of the state, leading to increased risk of wildfires, says a new study.
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Scientific American Content: Global
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Ebola Outbreak Opens Way to Chaotic Jockeying to Test Experimental DrugsThe final decision about which potential therapies to allow rests with the DRC government — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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The Atlantic
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Why Nicolás Maduro Clings to PowerIt’s difficult to describe the state of Venezuela today without coming across as a little hysterical. Phrases like “zombie movie set” and “post-apocalyptic hellscape” keep turning up in the accounts of recent visitors, who are staggered to see a society reach the levels of decay normally associated with wartime, but without a war. In an engrossing recent account, The Wall Street Journal ’s Anatol
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The Atlantic
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The Man Who Would Be SpeakerT hey began praying without him. It was already 30 minutes past 7 a.m., when Jefferson Parish’s April prayer breakfast was scheduled to begin. More than 100 Louisianans had driven in for the event, filing into the room to a soundtrack of God bless you s and I’m so glad to see you s, women in Easter-egg-colored dresses and men in starched button-downs. The mood was buoyant until it wasn’t. They we
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The Atlantic
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The Roseanne Fantasy Is OverThe Trump-voting Roseanne Conner of the rebooted Roseanne was not deplorable. She griped not about “shithole countries” or the “rapists” from Mexico, but about her mounting bills and healthcare costs. She sternly but lovingly helped out her gender-noncomforming grandkid. Her family members disliked undocumented immigrants only, it was emphasized, because they directly undercut their own job prosp
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NYT > Science
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Pregnant Whales Among Hundreds Killed in Japan Hunt, Report SaysConservationists said the International Whaling Commission data was further evidence that Japan was killing whales for commercial purposes under the guise of scientific research.
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NYT > Science
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Meet Jess Phoenix, the Volcanologist Running for Congress in CaliforniaMs. Phoenix, one of hundreds of scientists seeking public office this year, spoke with The Times about her focus on climate change and her desire to bring evidence-based policymaking to Washington.
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Big Think
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Why working class people are more empathetic (and not prejudiced against migrants)A new study argues that the working class are not prejudiced against immigrants and are more likely to help people. Read More
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Futurity.org
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Zombie ants bite twigs to better ‘rain’ sporesZombie ants clamp onto aerial vegetation and hang on for months spewing the spores of their parasitic fungi, but they don’t always clamp on to the same part of the plant. Now researchers know why. The choice of leaves or twigs is related to climate changes that force the fungi to adapt to local conditions. “In tropical areas, zombie ants bite onto leaves, but in temperate areas, they bite twigs o
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New Scientist – News
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GM golden rice gets approval from food regulators in the USThe genetically modified rice, designed to prevent blindness in undernourished children, was judged safe to eat last week by the US Food and Drug Administration
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Sugarcane pest produces foam to protect itself from heatBrazilian researchers found that the root spittlebug nymph produces bubbles by feeding on sap, to form a thermal insulator foam that maintains an optimal body temperatures during development. Knowledge of the foam's physical and chemical properties can pave the way for research on compounds that could destabilize the bubbles and eliminate the pests' nymphs in the process.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Mixing science and politicsThe inaugural March for Science, held last year in Washington, D.C., and other cities across the world, celebrated science and its role in our everyday lives. In addition, many participants expressed frustration with U.S. President Donald J. Trump's apparent disregard for evidence-based policy-making. An article in Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN), the weekly news magazine of the American Chemic
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Seismometer readings could offer debris flow early warningA debris flow that struck Montecito, Calif., in January was detected by a nearby seismometer.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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Breaking good — Key discovery made for battling opioid epidemicMaking opioids from sugar instead of from field grown opium poppies has the potential to solve many of the problems associated with manufacturing strong pain killers. The breakthrough announced today enables the completion of commercial, non-plant based biosynthetic manufacturing systems for active opioid agents and intermediates. It also opens the door to the creation of new opioid molecules, som
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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High protein diet slightly increases heart failure risk in middle-aged menFor middle-aged men, eating higher amounts of protein was associated with a slightly elevated risk for heart failure than those who ate less protein, according to new research from the University of Eastern Finland. Proteins from fish and eggs were not associated with heart failure risk in this study. The findings were reported in Circulation: Heart Failure.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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Italy's oldest olive oil discovered in peculiar potChemical analysis conducted on ancient pottery discovered from the Early Bronze Age proves Italians started using olive oil 700 years sooner than what's previously been recorded.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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Older men with higher levels of sex hormones could be less religiousThe level of sex hormones such as testosterone in a man's body could influence his religiosity. A new study by Aniruddha Das of McGill University in Canada in Springer's journal Adaptive Human Behavior and Physiology now adds to the growing body of evidence that religiosity is not only influenced by upbringing or psychological makeup, but physiological factors could also play a role.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Kicking the car(bon) habit better for air pollution than technology revolutionChanging our lifestyles and the way we travel could have as big – if not more of an impact on CO2 transport emissions, as electric vehicles and the transport technology revolution, according to new Oxford University research.Published in Energy Efficiency, the study uses Scotland as an example and suggests that, radical lifestyle change can show quicker results than the gradual transition to Elect
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Alternative inflation rate may offer more accurate economic guidanceConsumer prices may be more volatile than are represented in current inflation indexes, which are used to guide a range of economic decisions, including guidance on interest rates and Social Security cost-of-living adjustments.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Prevalence of eating disorders taken from largest sample in the United StatesBiological Psychiatry has published a new study revising the outdated estimates of the prevalence of eating disorders in the United States. The new estimates were based on a nationally representative sample of 36,309 adults — the largest national sample of US adults ever studied. The findings estimate that 0.80 percent of US adults will be affected by anorexia nervosa in their lifetime; 0.28 perc
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The Atlantic
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The Forgotten Girls Who Led the School-Desegregation MovementThere’s an enduring myth that the 1954 Brown v. Board of Education decision was “ the first step ” in the fight to desegregate schools. Rachel Devlin, an associate professor of history at Rutgers University, is looking to upend that myth. A Girl Stands At The Door , her new account of the black girls and teens who laid the groundwork for the historic ruling, draws from interviews and archival res
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The Atlantic
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Dear Therapist: I Don’t Approve of My Daughter-in-Law’s ParentingEditor’s Note: Every Wednesday, Lori Gottlieb answers questions from readers about their problems, big and small. Have a question? Email her at dear.therapist@theatlantic.com . Dear Therapist, I am 65 and have two grandchildren who live nearby. I’m concerned because the 5-year-old is still suckling at night before bed with his mom (even though there is no milk). Problem is, he has been having tro
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Hormone therapy may lead to improved cognitive functionHormones affect just about everything that goes on in a woman's body, from reproductive function and sexual libido to weight gain and overall mood. A new study shows how, in the right dosage and combination, hormones also may slow cognitive decline in postmenopausal women as they age. The study is being published online today in Menopause, the journal of The North American Menopause Society.
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The Atlantic
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When Did TV Watching Peak?With Netflix and Amazon Prime, Facebook Video and YouTube, it’s tempting to imagine that the tech industry destroyed TV. The world is more than 25 years into the web era, after all, more than half of American households have had home Internet for 15 years, and the current smartphone paradigm began more than a decade ago. But no. Americans still watch an absolutely astounding amount of traditional
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Ingeniøren
3
Prisen for Billund-bane stiger til over en milliard kr.Opdateret: Selv hvis en jernbane mellem Billund og Vejle blev gratis at bygge, ville samfundsøkonomien være negativ, viser arbejdsnotat.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Campylobacter — the germ on chicken eggsEggs are a popular food. In fact, Germans consumed almost 20 billion of them in 2016, which equates to a per capita consumption of 235 eggs. It is therefore easy to understand why the detection of chemicals in eggs, such as the insecticide fipronil recently, caused quite a stir, not to say an outrage. What is largely unknown, though, is that the most common bacterial pathogen for food infections i
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Bioanalysis explores novel LC-MS assays impacting CYP and transporter DDI evaluationsBioanalysis, a leading MEDLINE indexed journal for bioanalytical scientists, has published a Special Focus Issue on LC-MS assays impacting CYP and transporter DDI evaluations. The journal is published by Future Science Group.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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After 40 years in limbo: Styrene is probably carcinogenic'Possibly carcinogenic and should be investigated more closely.' For 40 years, this has been the conclusion of researchers who have been unsure of whether there is an increased risk of cancer associated with styrene. But now an impartial working group under WHO, the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC), has upgraded the warning to probably carcinogenic for humans. The decision is lar
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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New guidance on treating diabetes in elderly and frail adultsThe new guidance will advise clinicians on helping elderly people with type 2 diabetes get the most out of treatment options, and for the first time contains guidance on how and when to stop diabetes treatments in particularly frail adults.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

The xB3 platform efficiently delivers antibodies across the BBB at therapeutic dosesBioasis Technologies Inc, a biopharmaceutical company developing its xB3 TM proprietary platform technology for the delivery of therapeutics across the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and the treatment of CNS disorders in areas of high unmet medical-need, including brain cancers and neurodegenerative diseases, today announced the publication of independent research validating the ability of the company'
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Sensory-based food education encourages children to eat vegetables, berries and fruitSensory-based food education given to 3- to 5-year-old children in the kindergarten increases their willingness to choose vegetables, berries and fruit, according to a new study from the University of Eastern Finland. Sensory-based food education offers new tools for promoting healthy dietary habits in early childhood education and care. The findings were published in Public Health Nutrition.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Law firms do not encourage men to take parental leavesThe professional ethos of law firms discourages men from taking parental leave, a new Finnish-Canadian study shows. Carried out by the University of Eastern Finland and TÉLUQ University in Quebec, the study found that the professional culture in law firms rests on traditional masculine ideology, with men regarded as the providers for their families. This view does not encourage men to combine thei
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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New moms' voices get lower after pregnancy, shows a University of Sussex studyThe pitch of new mothers' voices temporarily drops after they have had their first baby.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Growth of Greenlandic children is no longer stuntedPrevious studies of growth of the indigenous Inuit people of Greenland, Canada and Alaska has characterized them as shorter but with the same weight as European or continental US citizens. Yet, this specific growth pattern was no longer found in the new study of growth of Greenlandic children conducted by researchers from University of Southern Denmark, which has just been published in the scienti
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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Song from the distant past, a new fossil pheasant from China preserves a super-elongated windpipeA well preserved, nearly complete skeleton of a new extinct species of pheasant that lived between seven and 11 million years ago adjacent to the northeastern edge of the Tibetan Plateau in China preserves the oldest evidence of a bird having modified and specialized its vocalization sounds (songs or calls).
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

American Cancer Society updates colorectal cancer screening guidelineAn updated American Cancer Society guideline says colorectal cancer screening should begin at age 45 for people at average risk, based in part on data showing rates are increasing in young and middle-aged populations.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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New 3-D printing technique enables faster, better, and cheaper models of patient-specific medical dataWhat if you could hold a physical model of your own brain in your hands, accurate down to its every unique fold? That's just a normal part of life for Steven Keating, Ph.D., who had a baseball-sized tumor removed from his brain at age 26 while he was a graduate student in the MIT Media Lab's Mediated Matter group. Curious to see what his brain actually looked like before the tumor was removed, and
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Patent On Autism Genetic Test May Stifle ScienceLabCorp might be able to charge a licensing fee to any scientists who wish to sequence the gene HOMER1 in people who may have autism.
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New Scientist – News
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AI inspired by the film Spotlight could track down child abusersJournalists at the Boston Globe painstakingly sifted patterns in public records to find priests who had sexually abused children. Now an AI might do the same
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Oil and gas wastewater on the road could mean health and environment woesA truck kicking up dust as it speeds down a dirt road is a typical image in country music videos. But this dust from unpaved roads is also an environmental and health hazard. To prevent dust clouds, some states treat dirt motorways with oil and gas wastewater. Now one group reports in Environmental Science & Technology that this wastewater contains harmful pollutants that have the potential to do
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Would you pay 10 cents extra for gas to save the planet?The idea is deceptively simple—offset 100 percent of your car's carbon emissions by volunteering to pay an extra 10 cents a gallon at the pump.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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A splash of detergent makes catalytic compounds more powerfulResearcher David Rosenberg examines images of a white powder under a powerful scanning electron microscope. Up close, the powder looks like coarse gravel, a heap of similar but irregular chunks. Then he looks at a second image—the same material produced by colleague Hongyou Fan instead of purchased from a catalog—and he sees perfectly smooth, uniform spheres.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Two-way symmetry in molecular physicsUntil he completed his doctorate in chemical physics in 2012, Fábri had spent his entire life in his native Hungary. He studied at one of the country's most prestigious universities, Eötvös Loránd University, and developed chemistry software for Hungarian-based ChemAxon.
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Science : NPR
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Get Screened Earlier For Colorectal Cancer, Urges American Cancer SocietyNoting a sharp rise in colorectal cancer among younger people, the American Cancer Society now suggests that healthy adults get their first screening five years earlier — at age 45. (Image credit: SPL/Science Source)
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Body knows best: A natural healing mechanism for inflammatory bowel diseaseThe findings suggest that boosting signals in certain cells and not in others might even help treat colon cancer.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Screening for colorectal cancer in under-55-year-olds with family history: Benefit unclearAn update of the 2013 assessment shows that, due to a lack of suitable studies, data are missing for people with a family history of colorectal cancer.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Huddling for survival: monkeys with more social partners can winterWild monkeys which have more social partners form larger huddles in adverse weather and have a better chance of surviving winter, new research has found. The study is the first to show that such social bonding may be connected to higher 'fitness' — the term used by scientists to measure of how well animals can cope with their local ecological conditions, usually measured by reproductive success a
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Promising news from biomedicine: DNA origami more resilient than previously understoodStudy shows these nanostructures can survive in extremely low magnesium concentrations, opening up a broad spectrum of biophysical and biomedical applications.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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How do local behavioural ecology studies compare globally?South African researchers contribute more than 3% of the global literature on mammalian behavioural ecology, with a strong focus on the broader themes of mating, social and foraging behaviour.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Less food wasted in South Africa than in EuropeFood waste in South Africa is lower than that in Europe but greater than in the rest of sub-Saharan Africa. Households in South Africa dispose of less food into the municipal bin than European households do, but more than households in the rest of sub-Saharan Africa, excluding food fed to pets or disposed of onto compost heaps at home.
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Ingeniøren

Minister vil lade kraftværker køre, selv om det er overflødigtMed en ændring af elforsyningsloven, vil energiministeren sætte systembærende ydelser i udbud. Men der slet ikke behov for disse ydelser.
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Futurity.org
5
DACA-eligible moms less afraid to use WIC to feed kidsChildren born in the United States of undocumented immigrant mothers are significantly more likely to participate in a federal nutrition program if the moms are DACA-eligible and therefore less worried about deportation, a study suggests. The study of nearly 2,000 US citizen children and their mothers adds to growing evidence that the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals immigration policy bene
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New Scientist – News
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Mystery ghost ape species found hidden in bonobo’s genomeA comparison of chimpanzee genomes has found signs that a previously unknown species of chimpanzee once lived in the forests of central Africa
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New on MIT Technology Review
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Nvidia wants to dominate the AI cloud arms race
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Popular Science
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Muting, snoozing, and other ways to quietly ignore people on social mediaDIY Dial down the volume on your most attention-seeking friends. Your noisiest contacts are hogging all your attention on Instagram, Facebook, and Twitter. Here's how to hide, mute, and generally hear less from them.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Two sides of the same starIf you've ever heard of the phrase two sides of the same coin, you know it means two things that at first appear to be unrelated are actually parts of the same thing. Now, a fundamental example can be found in the deep recesses of space in the form of a neutron star.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Researchers develop flexible materials that switch from nano-porous 3-D to 2-D structures in a reversible wayLike Transformers, the living robotic beings that have the ability to change their bodies at will, scientists have now developed novel 3-D nano-porous materials that go through conformational changes and transform into a 2-D non-porous structures as a result of an external stimulus. They can then shift to the original 3-D nano-porous structure when the stimulus is reversed.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Here is what it looks like, when a massive black hole devours a starDr. Jane Lixin Dai, theoretical astrophysicist and assistant professor and Professor Enrico Ramirez-Ruiz, both from the DARK Cosmology Center at the Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, have recently provided the scientific community with a much-needed computer model. It is necessary for the investigation of tidal disruption events — rare, but extremely forceful events taking place in
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Ants provide clues to why biodiversity is higher in the tropicsNew global data of invertebrate distributions suggests time holds key to species diversity.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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Swabbing cesarean-born babies with vaginal fluids potentially unsafe and unnecessary'Vaginal seeding,' whereby cesarean-delivered babies are immediately swabbed with the mother's vaginal fluids, is unjustified and potentially unsafe, finds a comprehensive scientific review of this practice. Differences in bacterial populations between cesarean- and vaginally delivered babies, thought to account for the greater risk of health problems suffered by cesarean-born babies in later life
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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Statistics: Brazil will play Germany in the FIFA World Cup finalThe favorites for this year's World Cup title are Brazil and Germany. The two teams are almost on a par with their chances of winning, as statisticians around Achim Zeileis from the University of Innsbruck show. With their statistical model based on bookmakers' odds, the researchers have successfully predicted several tournaments in the past, among them the correct world champion Spain in the 2010
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Igniting the rheumatoid arthritis flame through a cellular cascadeOsaka University-led international researchers identified a network of cells responsible for secretion of a key inflammatory cytokine in development of rheumatoid arthritis in a mouse model of disease. Mouse Th17 cells were shown to produce IL-17, which controls secretion of the cytokine GM-CSF from other immune cells and cells of connective tissue, leading to initiation and maintenance of arthrit
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Big Think
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Depression linked to disrupted circadian rhythms, UK scientists findThere’s a chicken and egg thing going on here when it comes to having a mood disorder and discordant circadian rhythms. Read More
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Big Think
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What makes Fortnite so addictive?Fortnite surpassed 40 million users recently. What's the appeal? Read More
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Researchers develop novel technique to identify counterfeit flash memoryCounterfeiting electronic components may sound like a plot point lifted from a technothriller by Daniel Suarez or Michael Crichton, but it's a very real – and growing – threat to the safety and reliability of our critical infrastructure.
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NYT > Science
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He Fled the Ash That Buried Pompeii, Only to Be Crushed by a RockArchaeologists in Italy found the skeleton of a man protruding from a huge block of stone, almost 2,000 years after he died.
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New on MIT Technology Review
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Papua New Guinea has imposed a month-long Facebook ban
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The Atlantic
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Playing Second Fiddle at Your Own Campaign RallyNASHVILLE, Tenn.—On an overcast Tuesday night, Marsha Blackburn made peace with being a wallflower. The Tennessee congresswoman is running to replace the retiring Republican Senator Bob Corker, but even in this redder-than-red state, she’s currently neck-and-neck with her Democratic opponent, former governor Phil Bredesen. President Trump was thus called in to provide reinforcements. His Tuesday-
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Waves have variable impact on sea ice in the Southern Ocean, study findsOver the last two decades, sea ice steadily increased in the Southern Ocean, but starting in 2016, researchers were astonished by a rapid decline. This unforeseen diminishing of sea ice highlights the inadequacy of existing models of sea ice extent and thickness. This is significant because the Southern Ocean plays a key role in regulating the global carbon cycle by regulating the uptake of carbon
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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The International Space Station goes under the microscopeA Cardiff University academic has spent two years embedded with the teams working on the International Space Station (ISS) programme to compile the most comprehensive study of its work.
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Big Think
61
Does smoking marijuana make it harder for couples to have children?Does smoking marijuana make it less likely that couples will have children? A study out of Boston University has arrived at a clear conclusion. Read More
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

NUS scientists discover a new way to control blood pressureNUS Medicine researchers have found a new means of controlling blood pressure that involves the protein Galectin-1, present in blood vessels and various other tissues. The researchers showed that Galectin-1 reduces the activity of CaV1.2 calcium channels in blood vessels, causing lowering of blood pressure. Conversely, blood pressure could be raised by disrupting the interaction between Galectin-1
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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One-step, 3D printing for multimaterial projects developed by WSU researchersNew WSU research could potentially help manufacturers reduce 3D printing manufacturing steps and use one machine to make complex products with multiple parts in one operation. Until now, 3D printing, also known as additive manufacturing, has been limited to using mostly one material at a time.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

ASCO to honor Ludwig scientists at 2018 Annual MeetingThe American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) will honor two Ludwig scientists at its 2018 Annual Meeting in Chicago, Ill., June 1-5, 2018.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

New cooking training significantly decreases sodium levels in Chinese take-out mealsWhile Chinese dishes are known to have one of the highest salt contents of all food categories, new research finds that a cooking training for Chinese take-out chefs and restaurant owners can result in substantial reductions in sodium in the foods they serve with no substantial loss of taste.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Whiskered auklets lack wanderlust, are homebodies insteadA new study from The Auk: Ornithological Advances presents some of the best evidence that whiskered auklets are an outlier in the auklet family by not migrating and instead staying close to 'home' (their breeding colonies) year-round.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Key molecule for flu infection identifiedAfter decades of research, a research team has discovered the key receptor molecule that enhances the infection of the influenza A virus, providing a novel target for anti-flu drug development.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
1
Prediction method for epileptic seizures developedUniversity of Sydney engineers led by Dr. Omid Kavehei have developed a machine-learning and AI-powered algorithm to predict the onset of epileptic seizures.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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Now, you can hold a copy of your brain in the palm of your handMedical imaging technologies like MRI and CT scans produce high-resolution images as a series of 'slices,' making them an obvious complement to 3D printers, which also print in slices. However, the process of manually 'thresholding' medical scans to define objects to be printed is prohibitively expensive and time-consuming. A new method converts medical data into dithered bitmaps, allowing custom
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
1
TGen, Northwestern University study of 'SuperAgers' offers genetic clues to performanceRecent studies have shown that SuperAgers have less evidence of brain atrophy, have thicker parts of the brain related to memory, and lower prevalence of the pathological changes associated with Alzheimer's disease. Now, a study by the TGen and Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine suggests that having resilient memory performance during aging could be inherited, and that a particula
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
1
Growth hormone may provide new hope for stroke survivorsLess fatigue and better recovery of cognitive abilities such as learning and memory. These may be the results of growth hormone treatment after a stroke, an experimental study of mice published in the journal Stroke suggests.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
2
When the heat is on, student learning suffersHeat waves are taking their toll on schoolchildren, particularly those from low-income families and minority groups. That is one takeaway from a new research study examining the impact of cumulative heat exposure on cognitive skill development, co-authored by Harvard Kennedy School Associate Professor Joshua Goodman.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
86
Putting excess carbon dioxide to good useThe chunk of metal sitting on a table in Joel Rosenthal's office at the University of Delaware looks like it should belong in a wizard's pocket. Shiny silver with shocks of pink and splashes of gold, it's called bismuth, and it's currently used to make products ranging from shotgun pellets to cosmetics and antacids, including Pepto-Bismol.
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The Scientist RSS

More Vaccinations, Experimental Drugs as Potential Ebola Contacts RiseThe World Health Organization predicts the number of cases in Democratic Republic of Congo will rise up to 300 by July.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
71
Earliest ever evidence of lead pollution found in the Balkans – from 3600 BCSometime around 3600 BC, people in the Balkan peninsula reached a major milestone: their mining and metal smelting created enough pollution for us to detect it today. Our research has revealed this was the beginning of the Bronze Age in the region, and the birth of large-scale metallurgy in Europe.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
1
DNA origami more resilient than previously understoodThe DNA origami technique is a widely used method for making complex, yet well-defined nanostructures, with applications in biophysics, molecular biology, as well as drug and enzyme delivery. A major challenge, however, has been in achieving long-lasting stability under the conditions required for these applications.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Comet C/2016 R2 (Pan-STARRS) is rich in carbon monoxide and depleted in hydrogen cyanide, study findsC/2016 R2 (Pan-STARRS) is a comet abundant in carbon monoxide and lacking hydrogen cyanide, according to a new study conducted by researchers from the University of South Florida (USF) in Tampa, Florida. The finding is detailed in a paper published May 17 on the arXiv pre-print repository.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
2
New high-precision instrument enables rapid measurements of protein crystalsA team of scientists and engineers at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Brookhaven National Laboratory have developed a new scientific instrument that enables ultra-precise and high-speed characterization of protein crystals at the National Synchrotron Light Source II (NSLS-II)—a DOE Office of Science User Facility at Brookhaven, which generates high energy x-rays that can be harnessed to prob
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Dagens Medicin

En overlæges første dag på nyåbnet akutblok i SkejbyI går, tirsdag åbnede den nye akutblok på Aarhus Universitetshospital i Skejby, hvor nye arbejdsgange og systemer skulle afprøves i praksis for første gang. Overlæge Nikolaj Raaber var ansvarshavende akutlæge i dagvagten. Læs her, hvordan dagen forløb.
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Dagens Medicin

Løkke varsler ny psykiatriplan efter sommerferienDer er brug for at styrke psykiatrien, mener statsminister Lars Løkke Rasmussen. Derfor varsler regeringen en ny, samlet plan for psykiatri efter sommerferien.
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Science | The Guardian
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Speculative biology: understanding the past and predicting our futureA new edition of After Man by Dougal Dixon, a landmark piece of speculative biology which influenced a generation of palaeontologists, has been released In 1981, a remarkable book was published: After Man: A Zoology of the Future , by Dougal Dixon. As a child of the eighties, growing up in a science fiction bubble where daleks, vogons and the fighting machines of the War of the Worlds were at lea
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How to Preorder the Nintendo NES Classic Mini (And Make Sure You Get One)Nintendo's tiny console is coming back, and here's how to get one on lock early.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
5
Here's what really happened to that camera that melted during a rocket launchNASA photographers have always understood that taking pictures of space launches is a risky business. No one is more familiar with this than Bill Ingalls, a NASA photographer who has taking pictures for the agency for the past 30 years. Both within the agency and without, his creativity and efforts are well known, as his ability to always know exactly where to set up his cameras to get the perfect
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
13
Ants provide clues to why biodiversity is higher in the tropicsIt's a puzzle that has confounded biologists for centuries: the earth's tropical regions are home to an enormous variety of plant and animal species, but as you travel north or south, away from the equator, the level of diversity dwindles.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Chemicals are leaching from Norwegian roads and tunnelsDespite national objectives of reduced use and substitution of hazardous substances, more than two hundred tons were still in use in transport related products in Norway in 2012. Which chemicals are they, how exposed are we humans, and do they leak out to the environment? Newly published research provides some answers.
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Scientific American Content: Global
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Can Humans Live Well without Pillaging the Planet?— Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Genes found related to the reduction of proteins that contribute to Alzheimer's onsetCreation of a map of the molecular network in the aging brain reveals two new Alzheimer's disease target genes.
5h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Bees adjust to seasons with nutrients in flowers and 'dirty water'Researchers discovered that honey bees alter their diet of nutrients according to the season. A spike in calcium consumption in the fall, and high intake of potassium, help prepare the bees for colder months when they likely need those minerals to generate warmth. A careful inventory of the bees' nutrient intake revealed shifting sources and how limitations in nutrient availability from these sour
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The Atlantic
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Roseanne’s Wake-Up Call for the Populist RightWhen ABC rebooted Roseanne , the half-hour comedy’s eponymous star had an opportunity to reinvigorate her career, to earn a pile of money, and to help her country. Like All in the Family a generation before, the hit sitcom offered families divided by the polarized politics of their era a comedic vehicle to confront and defuse at least some of the tensions that threatened to tear them apart. And t
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
4
Records show more floods across Europe over past 150 years, but fewer deaths and financial lossesA team of researchers at Delft University has found that while the number of floods across Europe over the past century and a half has increased, the number of resulting deaths has decreased, as have financial losses. In their paper published in the journal Nature Communications, the group describes studying flood records and what they found. Brenden Jongman with the University of Amsterdam offers
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Biogas does not need subsidiesSubsidizing the combustion of biogas is expensive and prevents its use in a more effective way, according to Ghent University (Belgium) scientists in the leading journal Energy & Environmental Sciences. They propose using biogas as raw material for the production of chemicals, with advantages for businesses, governments and the environment.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
28
It's less than 2cm long, but this 400 million year old fossil fish changes our view of vertebrate evolutionPublished today, our new paper describes a spectacular 400 million-year-old 3-D-preserved fossil fish, Ligulalepis.
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Science : NPR
3K
The Conflicting Educations Of Sam SchimmelMore than 50 years after the federal government forced hundreds of Native Alaskans into boarding schools, their descendants are haunted by — and trying to overcome —residual trauma. (Image credit: Jeremy Schimmel)
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Dagens Medicin

Lov om Nationalt Genom Center vedtagetAlle Folketingets partier på nær Enhedslisten har stemt for at vedtage lov om National Genom Center.
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Ingeniøren
1
Krankollaps forsinker ny bro over Københavns HavnEn kran knækkede, da den var i gang med at laste brofag til en ny bro over Københavns Havn. To af brofagene blev totalskadede og skal nyproduceres.
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Scientific American Content: Global
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What to Do (and Not Do) When You Feel InsecureWhatever you call it—self-doubt, insecurity, inadequacy—it’s a universal phenomenon. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
2
What a new study reveals about selfies and teenage body imageFrom Facebook and Twitter, to Instagram and Snapchat, it's no secret social media has become a common form of communication, but have you ever left your feeds feeling bad about yourself? If so, you're not alone, according to a new study conducted by Ilyssa Salomon, doctoral student, and Christia Spears Brown, professor of psychology, at the University of Kentucky.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
4
The deadliest stage in self-driving developmentLast week, the US National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) released its preliminary report into the Uber self-driving crash that killed a woman in March.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
19
Climate change hits poorest hardest, new research showsAustralia will still be the lucky country when it comes to changes in local climate as a result of climate change if global average surface temperatures reach the 1.5°C or 2°C limit set by the Paris agreement.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
4
Global warming hits poorest hardest, new research showsAustralia will still be the lucky country when it comes to changes in local climate as a result of climate change if global average surface temperatures reach the 1.5°C or 2°C limit set by the Paris agreement.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
1
Oil and gas wastewater on the road could mean health and environment woesA truck kicking up dust as it speeds down a dirt road is a typical image in country music videos. But this dust from unpaved roads is also an environmental and health hazard. To prevent dust clouds, some states treat dirt motorways with oil and gas wastewater. Now one group reports in Environmental Science & Technology that this wastewater contains harmful pollutants that have the potential to do
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Research finds pain expectation is pain reality for childrenThe study reinforces that pain expectation informs pain experience in children, significantly. The research used the application of thermal pain at varying temperatures, accompanied by verbal commands.
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Science | The Guardian
17
Alan Bean obituaryMember of Nasa’s Apollo 12 mission who was the fourth person to walk on the moon The astronaut Alan Bean, a member of Nasa’s Apollo 12 mission, who has died aged 86, was the fourth person to step on to the surface of the moon, and the only one to go on to depict the view from outer space in paintings. His fellow astronaut John Glenn described Bean’s work as seeing “the same monochromatic world as
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The Scientist RSS

Image of the Day: Agar ArtThe American Society for Microbiology held its 4th contest for images created from microorganisms feeding on agar.
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New Scientist – News
14
Pigeons can understand probabilities – just like primates canWe know that humans and some other primates can instinctively distinguish between high and low probabilities – now pigeons have shown they might share the skill
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
15
New machine learning approach could accelerate bioengineeringScientists from the Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) have developed a way to use machine learning to dramatically accelerate the design of microbes that produce biofuel.
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Science-Based Medicine
500+
Routine Vitamin Supplementation Mostly UselessA new meta-analysis shows no benefit from multivitamins or routine supplementation. These results should motivate users to take a fresh look at their supplementation.
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The Atlantic
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Letter: We Need to Support Working FamiliesOlder Moms Are an Elite Club In May, Caroline Kitchener explored the advantages and disadvantages for mothers who wait until midlife to have kids. Your recent article seeks to warn women off planning for kids at 40+, emphasizing the cost and unreliability of fertility treatments. Characterizing moms at 40+ as “elite” (because they tend to be in stable relationships, college educated, professional
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
40
Fungi respire millennium-old carbon from Antarctic soilFungi in Antarctic soils release carbon, as carbon dioxide, that is more than a thousand years old, a team led by scientists at the British Antarctic Survey (BAS) has found. This discovery sheds light on how carbon is released into the atmosphere as polar regions warm.
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Popular Science
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There are only 13 actual vitamins, and you’ll die without themHealth But do you need supplements? Here’s the confusing thing about vitamins: your life literally depends on them—but that doesn’t mean you need to take them.
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Feed: All Latest
58
Why Darpa Wants Everyone to Launch Tiny SatellitesA flock of little guys is less vulnerable to attack than one big bird. Also, you could maybe send them up with space balloons.
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40
The Creepy Rise of Real Companies Spawning Fictional DesignSpeculative design tasks creators with building a better world through public thought experiments. But with companies like Google adapting the practice, it can feel like a taunting display of power.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
2
High principal evaluations predict student achievementStudent achievement gains are higher in schools where principals' leadership practices are rated more positively by their supervisors, according to a new brief by the Tennessee Education Research Alliance at Vanderbilt University's Peabody College of education and human development.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
6
Image: Our sputtering sunAn active region rotated into view and sputtered with numerous small flares and towering magnetic field lines that stretched out many times the diameter of Earth (May 23-25, 2018).
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
6
Red Planet rover set for extreme environment workoutA representative model of the ExoMars rover that will land on Mars in 2021 is beginning a demanding test campaign that will ensure it can survive the rigours of launch and landing, as well as operations under the environmental conditions of Mars.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
2
Sentinel-1 warns of refugee island flood riskIn what the UN describes as the world's fastest growing refugee crisis, almost
6h
Ingeniøren

Dansk satellitindustri stryger til himmelsGomspace i Aalborg har ordrebogen fuld og går nu fra prototypebaseret produktion til industriel serieproduktion af nanosatellitter.
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Scientific American Content: Global
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The Case for Disabled AstronautsIn some situations, spacefarers with visual or other impairments could actually make a mission safer — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Scientific American Content: Global
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How Did Life Begin?Untangling the origins of organisms will require experiments at the tiniest scales and observations at the vastest — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
2
Image: ESA's Cheops satelliteESA's Cheops satellite – seen here at Airbus in Madrid – will measure the sizes of known exoplanets by detecting tiny fluctuations in the light of their parent stars. Due to be ready for launch at the end of this year, Cheops, or 'CHaracterising ExOPlanet Satellite' is only 1.5 m by 1.4 m by 1.5 m in size. It weighs in at about 300 kg fully fuelled – less than a large motorbike.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
4
New technique for additive manufacturing designA Sandia National Laboratories team built a telescope to demonstrate how to design for additive manufacturing, familiarly known as 3-D printing, to take advantage of the technique's strengths and weaknesses.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
3
Smartphone to help farmers test for poultry infectionChicken farmers in the Philippines will soon test their birds for deadly pathogens with a new hand-held device and smartphone app they can use on their own farms.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
23
Ocean-migrating trout adapt to freshwater environment in 120 yearsSteelhead trout, a member of the salmon family that live and grow in the Pacific Ocean, genetically adapted to the freshwater environment of Lake Michigan in less than 120 years.
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BBC News – Science & Environment
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New motor neurone brace makes 'substantial difference'One patient had "no doubt" that the Sheffield-designed collar had improved his quality of life.
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Futurity.org
4
Ancient rain changes our view of Earth’s climateAncient rainfall records stretching 550,000 years into the past may upend scientists’ understanding of what controls the Asian summer monsoon and other aspects of the Earth’s long-term climate, according to a new study. Milutin Milankovitch developed the standard explanation of the Earth’s regular shifts from ice ages to warm periods in the 1920s. He suggested the oscillations of the planet’s orb
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The Atlantic
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How to Impregnate a RhinoWhen Parker Pennington first saw the embryo, she gasped—but very quietly. At the time, as is often the case for her these days, she had her arm fully inside the rectum of a white rhino, and she didn’t want to alarm the animal by yelping excitedly. In her immersed hand, she held an ultrasound probe, which revealed that the rhino, who goes by Victoria, had a tiny marble in her uterus. She was pregn
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Scientific American Content: Global
14
Stronger, Wetter, Slower: How Hurricanes Will ChangeExperts show how 22 recent hurricanes would be different if they formed near the end of this century — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Futurity.org
9
These kinds of regrets last the longestOur most enduring regrets are the ones that stem from our failure to live up to our ideal selves, according to new research. Regrets about failing to fulfill hopes, goals, and aspirations haunt people more than those about failing to fulfill duties, obligations, and responsibilities, researchers find. “In the short term, people regret their actions more than inactions. But in the long term, the i
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Some blood stem cells are better than othersIn your body, blood stem cells produce approximately 10 billion new white blood cells, which are also known as immune cells, each and every day. Even more remarkably, if some of these blood stem cells fail to do their part, then other blood stem cells pick up their slack and overproduce whichever specific type of immune cell is lacking, according to a new USC Stem Cell study published in the journ
7h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Poll: Half of older adults don't use health provider's secure patient communication siteA new poll suggests that many older adults still aren't using online systems to communicate with the doctors and other health care providers they rely on — despite the widespread availability of such systems. Only about half of people aged 50 to 80 have set up an account on a secure online access site, or 'patient portal.' The likelihood was higher among those who were younger, more educated or h
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Dagens Medicin

Lægemiddel­styrelsen varsler omkring 15 fyringerLægemiddelstyrelsen skal afskedige i omegnen af 15 ansatte. Ni medarbejdere har taget imod en frivillig fratrædelse.
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Why the US-China ‘Trade War’ Remains a War of WordsTrump again threatened tariffs on Chinese goods, but if the past weeks are any guide, it would seem that harsh words may not translate into harsh actions.
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100+
23andMe Is Suing Ancestry Over Some Pretty Ancient IPAnd the outcome of the case could reshape the genetic genealogy testing industry.
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Feed: All Latest
100+
Your Next Glass of Wine Might Be a Fake—and You'll Love ItReplica Wine makes cheaper copies of your favorite wine at a discount by analyzing its chemistry. Often, even professional critics can't tell the difference. Is this heresy or just good business?
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Science | The Guardian
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Women's voices become temporarily deeper after pregnancyNew mothers’ voices are lower and more monotone for about a year after the birth The voices of new mothers temporarily drop by more than two musical notes after pregnancy, scientists have claimed. Researchers from the University of Sussex found new mothers’ voices become lower and more monotonous after they have had their first baby. Continue reading…
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Latest Headlines | Science News
36
Finally, a plan on how to include pregnant women in clinical trialsThe FDA is providing initial guidance on how to include pregnant women in clinical trials that study drugs, research that has largely excluded this group in the past.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
9
Once lost archaeology revealed by satellite images and aerial photographyHow do you study ancient cities when they're hidden from view, covered with hundreds or thousands of years of human development by the growth of towns and cities?
7h
Live Science
1K
Is Too Much Protein Bad for Men's Heart Health?High-protein diets are popular these days, but such diets may increase the risk of heart failure in middle-aged men, a new study from Finland suggests.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
4
Making sense of the drought situation in Cape TownCape Town has come dangerously close to running out of water after 3 years of persistent drought.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
1
'Smart' material enables novel applications in autonomous driving and roboticsResearch led by scientists from the University of Luxembourg has shown the potential of liquid crystal shells as enabling material for a vast array of future applications, ranging from autonomous driving to anti-counterfeiting technology and a new class of sensors.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
1
Nokia had to weed out a culture of fear to embrace a future without smartphonesAalto University Professor Timo O. Vuori and Professor Quy N. Huy from Singapore's INSEAD University have studied Nokia's transformation during 2007-2013. Their new results show how Nokia's board contributed to the company's radical strategic renewal after years of difficulties by regulating top managers' emotions. The board increased trust by enforcing new conversational norms for dialogue with t
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
1
Fruit flies fear lion fecesA new doctoral thesis from Lund University in Sweden shows how fruit flies use their sense of smell and humidity to find food, avoid dehydration and discover the best place to lay their eggs—in overripe marula fruits. Faeces from herbivores are also suitable, but the flies reject carnivore excrement.
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New Scientist – News
58
Wish you had perfect pitch? You may be able to learn itMozart had it, Mariah Carey has it – now you can have it too. A study suggests that some adults may be able to learn perfect pitch in just a few weeks
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New Scientist – News
35
Facebook AI turns your idle humming into a Bach orchestra pieceTurn your whistles into sonatas with a Facebook AI that can translate between styles of music, such as converting metal riffs into symphonies
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
13
Research enhances enzyme that degrades plasticSince it was discovered, the enzyme known as PETase has drawn a great deal of scientific interest for its capacity of digesting PET (polyethylene terephthalate).
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
2
Hormesis and paradoxical effects in plants upon exposure to formaldehyde are common phenomenaFor the first time, hormesis and paradoxical effects have been shown to occur commonly in plants upon exposure to formaldehyde, which is a widespread pollutant.
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Scientific American Content: Global
300+
How Close Are We–Really–to Building a Quantum Computer?Intel’s head of quantum computing talks about the challenges of developing algorithms, software programs and other necessities for a technology that doesn’t yet exist — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Live Science
100+
Lost City of Irisagrig Comes to Life in Ancient Stolen TabletsThe cuneiform tablets reveal what the 4,000-year-old city would have been like. Nobody really knows its exact location in Iraq.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
1
A new analysis system to identify pollutants from cosmetics in seawaterA University of Cordoba research group has designed a method to detect the presence of pollutants in seawater in a faster and more efficient way, and also at very low concentrations.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
3
Methodology for discovering common principles governing complex systemsYou may complain about the unpredictability of the weather that spoiled your vacation, or worry about whether your job will be taken by highly intelligent robots in the near future, or whether the chemical plant near your residence is safe enough, but you may not realize that these seemingly unrelated problems may share a solution deeply rooted in an emerging science.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
1
Researchers test FIFA World Cup game balls in the laboratoryThe official ball for the 2018 FIFA World Cup in Russia has received Empa's stamp of approval after numerous rigorous tests. Some goalkeepers had been critical of its flight characteristics, but the reason for this may lie somewhere else – the rather unconventional appearance of the new ball.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
1
Blame the mother's gene: Discovery for a blinding canine eye diseaseA gene for canine congenital eye disease has been identified by a collaborative research led by Professor Hannes Lohi's research group in the University of Helsinki. Defective RBP4 leads to vitamin A deficiency and abnormal eye development during pregnancy. The study defines a novel recessive mode of maternal inheritance, which may underlie other types of birth defects.
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Dagens Medicin

DSAM: Henvis bekymrede patienter til forsker bag ‘præfaktuelt’ studieForskeres trang til at præsentere registerundersøgelser som ny viden bekymrer patienterne og belaster almen praksis. Det mener DSAM, som på baggrund af nyt studie om kræft og blodtryksmedicin opfordrer til at sende bekymrede patienter videre til forskeren bag studiet.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
1
Multisensory experiences enhance sales and feeling of comfort in shops and restaurantsAccording to research, the combination of food, lighting, colours, furniture, table setting, atmosphere, sound and environment create a multisensory experience that has an effect on consumers' behaviour and general feeling of comfort. The preliminary results show that sounds of nature that were played in the fruit and vegetable section of a grocery shop had a clear impact on the shop's sales. The
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
1
Novel hydrogel harnesses air moisture for practical applicationsHigh humidity causes discomfort and makes hot days feel more unbearable. A team of researchers from the National University of Singapore (NUS) has invented a novel gel-like material that not only effectively dehumidifies ambient air to improve thermal comfort, but it also harnesses the moisture in the air for a wide range of practical applications, such as functioning as a sun or privacy screen, c
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Ingeniøren
21
I Finland kører de uden hænderLoven siger jo ikke noget om, at der absolut skal være en chauffør bag rattet.
7h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

A crowded neighborhoodGlowing brightly about 160,000 light-years away, the Tarantula Nebula is the most spectacular feature of the Large Magellanic Cloud, a satellite galaxy to our Milky Way. The VLT Survey Telescope at ESO's Paranal Observatory in Chile has imaged this region and its rich surroundings in exquisite detail. It reveals a cosmic landscape of star clusters, glowing gas clouds and the scattered remains of s
8h
The Atlantic
14
A Pardon Arrives 105 Years Too LateDonald Trump corrected a misuse of justice when he issued a posthumous presidential pardon to Jack Johnson on May 24, 2018. But his pardon of Jack Johnson, which came 105 years too late, is not enough to address the scourge of racially motivated policing, or the entanglements of white supremacy and sexual regulation. Over a century ago, in May 1913, an Illinois jury found the world-famous heavywe
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The Atlantic
100+
Fly On, My Sleek Electric BirdIt was a pleasant evening in mid-March, warm enough to saunter down to the strand at dusk in linen pants and clear enough to see Catalina Island against the horizon. The sun was low in the sky over Philip Marlowe’s old haunts when I broke the first rule of living in Venice Beach: I agreed to venture east of the 405 at rush hour. A brunette was calling. She was prepossessing, persuasive, and propo
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
6
New insights into the inner clock of the fruit flySeveral months ago, professors Jeffrey Hall, Michael Rosbash and Michael Young received the Nobel Prize for their work on deciphering the mechanisms of the biological clock. Many other scientists around the world are also investigating this topic, including the group of researchers headed by Prof Ralf Stanewsky (a former trainee in Jeffrey Hall's lab) at the University of Münster, Germany. Althoug
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
2
Positive feedback between East Asian mid-latitude circulation and land surface temperatureThe interannual variability of the East Asian upper-tropospheric westerly jet (EAJ) in summer is characterized by the meridional displacement of its axis, or a seesaw pattern of zonal wind anomalies between the northern and southern flanks of the EAJ. It plays a crucial role in summer climate anomalies in East Asia.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
35
Tarantula Nebula: A crowded neighborhoodTaking advantage of the capacities of the VLT Survey Telescope (VST) at ESO's Paranal Observatory in Chile, astronomers captured this very detailed new image of the Tarantula Nebula and its numerous neighbouring nebulae and star clusters. The Tarantula, which is also known as 30 Doradus, is the brightest and most energetic star-forming region in the Local Group of galaxies.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
12
Inner component of Japan's upgraded particle accelerator nears completionAn international team of researchers has announced the completion of the outermost shell of the Silicon Vertex Detector (SVD) on May 24 after six years of work. The completed SVD will be placed inside one of Japan's biggest particle accelerators later this year.
8h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
2
Insulator-metal transition at the nanoscaleControlling the flow of electrons within circuits is achieved through the appropriate choice of materials. Metals allow electrons to flow freely and insulators prevent conduction. In general, the electrical properties of a material are determined when the material is fabricated and cannot be changed afterwards without changing the material. However, there are materials that can exhibit metal or in
8h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
14
What do animals want? Team unpacks behavioral strategies using machine learningScientists have developed a new approach to understanding animal preferences, and the findings could provide greater insight into decision-making in humans.
8h
Science | The Guardian
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Scientists are human too, so why are we shocked when they fall short?When our heroes – like Richard Feynman – turn out to be less than perfect, it’s an open question as to whether we should write off their work as well Another week, another social media tar-and-feathering of a prominent male scientist. A few weeks ago was physicist Richard Feynman, every scientist’s beloved old uncle: he of the charm, the bongo-playing, the practical jokes, the breathtaking clarit
8h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
10
Construction waste to be turned into gas masks and sports equipmentHuge volumes of waste building materials that are discarded every year could be recycled into new products such as gas masks and sports equipment following research being conducted by scientists and recycling firms.
8h
Dagens Medicin

Kongres baner vej for nye guidelines til behandling af ungeEn taskforce under EAACI arbejder på højtryk med et systematisk review, der skal pege på hvilke interventioner, der kan få unge til i højere grad at følge en medicinsk behandling af astma eller allergi.
8h
Ingeniøren
11
BAGGRUND: Sådan bliver bioposer nedbrudt af bakterierHvad er bioplast? Hvordan nedbrydes det? Er der andre metoder?
8h
Ingeniøren

Generationskløft: Digitale unge skal rådgive cheferneDen vestjyske maskinbygger Bramidan vil opsamle data fra sine maskiner over hele verden og udvikle nye forretningsmodeller på basis af de data. Men det kræver hjælp udefra fra yngre, digitale eksperter.
8h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Insomnia is a likely long-term side effect of strokeStroke patients experience sustained problems with insomnia potentially reducing their ability to relearn key skills and putting them at increased risk of depression, a new study in the journal Scientific Reports finds.
8h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
3
Paradoxically, environmental noise helps preserve the coherence of a quantum systemIn work that could lead to scalable quantum computers, scientists from the RIKEN Center for Emergent Matter Science and collaborators have shown that thanks to the 'quantum Zeno effect,' with a three-particle system, that they can use dephasing — a process that normally would reduce the coherence — to paradoxically maintain coherence in a quantum system.
8h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
3
Adults with high blood pressure face higher healthcare costsAdults with high blood pressure are estimated to pay almost $2,000 more in annual healthcare costs compared to those without high blood pressure. Nationally, annual healthcare costs for the US population with high blood pressure are estimated to be $131 billion higher compared to those without the disease.
8h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
1
Creating an automated high-throughput flow cytometry systemNew research highlights a diversity of approaches that automated high-throughput flow cytometry has enabled for phenotypic drug discovery.
8h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
5
Singapore Airlines to launch world's longest flightSingapore Airlines said on Wednesday that it will relaunch the world's longest commercial flight in October, a journey of almost 19 hours from the city-state to New York, but it will not be available to economy travellers.
8h
cognitive science
1
Researchers have now devised a new drug-delivering nanoparticle that could offer a better way to treat glioblastoma.submitted by /u/davyeminy [link] [comments]
9h
cognitive science
1
A new paper in JPSP explores the value of rituals for choices that involve self-control.submitted by /u/markmana [link] [comments]
9h
cognitive science
1
Explaining, what is System 1 and System 2 from Daniel Kahneman's book: "Thinking, fast and slow"submitted by /u/Naty_Mad [link] [comments]
9h
Dagens Medicin

Depotformuleret smertemiddel forbliver på markedet i DanmarkLægemiddelstyrelsen trækker ikke depotformuleret paracetamol tilbage fra det danske marked. Dansk behandlingsvejledning ved overdosering af paracetamol, som er baseret på at behandle alene ved mistanke om forgiftning, er en væsentlig del af forklaringen.
9h
Ingeniøren

GDPR tvinger virksomheder til at slette ansøgninger på mailPersondataforordningen, der trådte i kraft fredag, er sat i verden for at beskytte borgerne. En bivirkning er dog, at det kan blive mere besværligt, når vi i fremtiden skal søge job.
9h
Ingeniøren
1
Politikere i USA bekymrede over Amazons potentielt racistiske overvågningsprogramEn gruppe politikere fra Repræsentanternes Hus har i to åbne breve udtrykt bekymring over Amazons nye overvågningsprogram Rekognition, som markedsføres til politiet.
9h
Ingeniøren

Hackere mod banker: Penge eller vi offentliggør jeres kunderDer er et datamæssigt gidseldrama i gang i Canada.
9h
Viden

Blodtryksmedicin kædes for tredje gang sammen med kræftEt nyt dansk studie kæder blodtryksmedicin, der indeholder stoffet hydrochlorthiazid (HCTZ), sammen med kræft.
10h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
1
Grey gold: Ivory Coast cashes in on the cashewFamous for its cocoa and coffee, the Ivory Coast has drawn up an ambitious five-year plan for the cashew industry, seeking to modernise production in a sector where it is already the world's number-one exporter.
10h
Viden
8
Tesla-bil torpederer politibil i CalifornienUheldet er det seneste i en række, hvor Teslas delvist selvkørende biler har været involveret.
10h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
14
No, don't roast marshmallows at the Hawaii volcano: USGSSomeone actually asked the US Geological Survey if it is OK to roast marshmallows over volcanic lava.
11h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
5
After pair of 1-in-1000 year floods, a town seeks safeguardsThe deadly flash flood that devastated a Maryland town's historic center in July 2016 was dubbed a 1-in-1000 year event. Yet less than two years later, another treacherous flood again ravaged the town, gutting shops and killing a visitor.
11h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
2
Radish cover crop traps nitrogen; mystery followsWhen you think of a radish, you may think of the small, round, crunchy, red-and-white vegetable that is sliced into salads. You might be surprised to learn that a larger, longer form of this root vegetable is being used in agriculture as a cover crop.
11h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
99
What happens to plasmalogens, the phospholipids nobody likes to think aboutAlzheimer's disease patients lose up to 60% of a component called plasmalogen from the membranes of the cells in their brains, but it's still not known how or why. In a paper to be published in the June 1 issue of the Journal of Biological Chemistry, researchers at Washington University in St. Louis provide the first report of an enzyme that breaks down plasmalogens, a breakthrough in understandin
11h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
1
Galapagos iguanas transferred due to overpopulationSix land iguanas, endemic to the Galapagos Islands, have been relocated within the Pacific archipelago due to food shortages and overpopulation on the islet where they lived, Ecuador's Galapagos National Park said Tuesday.
11h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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XENON1T experimental data establishes most stringent limit on dark matterExperimental results from the XENON1T dark matter detector limit the effective size of dark matter particles to 4.1X10-47 square centimeters—one-trillionth of one-trillionth of a centimeter squared—the most stringent limit yet determined for dark matter as established by the world's most sensitive detector.
11h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
100+
Recycled electrical products lead to hazardous chemicals appearing in everyday itemsHazardous chemicals such as bromine, antimony and lead are finding their way into food-contact items and other everyday products because manufacturers are using recycled electrical equipment as a source of black plastic, according to a new study.
11h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
3
New technology could revolutionize testing, tracking of brain performanceA UTA engineering researcher has led the development of computer tests and games, that are both web-based and contained in a cell phone application, that show and track individual human brain functioning.
11h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
2
Switzerland launches program to test AI for refugee integrationSwitzerland is embracing innovation in its response to the global refugee crisis, becoming the first country to place asylum seekers in different parts of the country using artificial intelligence.
11h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
1
Tesla in Autopilot mode crashes into California police carAuthorities say a Tesla sedan in Autopilot mode has crashed into a parked police cruiser in Southern California.
11h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
14
Quake helps clear the blackened air over Nepal's brick kilnsBelow skies darkened by thick black smoke, hundreds of thousands of brick kiln workers endure back-breaking labour and suffocating heat working in almost medieval conditions across South Asia.
11h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
2
Papua New Guinea mulls 'temporary' ban on FacebookPapua New Guinea said Wednesday it was mulling a temporary shutdown of Facebook to uncover false accounts and block fake news in the Pacific nation, which hosts a major global summit later this year.
11h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
1
AirAsia shares hit as India probes FernandesShares of budget carrier AirAsia fell to a six-month low Wednesday after Indian authorities raided the airline's local offices and accused its boss Tony Fernandes of illegally obtaining operating licences.
11h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
1
Hawaii lava crosses key highway, destroys utility polesLava crossed a key highway in the mostly rural district of the Big Island where Kilauea volcano was erupting, local authorities in Hawaii said Tuesday.
11h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
7
Germany clings to diesel, even as first driving bans hitHamburg will on Thursday become the first German city to ban older diesel vehicles from some highly polluted stretches of road, as public confidence in the once-loved technology goes up in smoke.
11h
Dagens Medicin

Forskningens venlige pitbullterrierMindeord: Nobelprismodtager Jens Christian Skou var et ordentligt og insisterende menneske, som livet ud var en stærk fortaler for den frie grundforskning. Han døde 99 år gammel mandag 28. maj.
11h
Viden

Ansatte om ansøgninger: Vi har ikke tænkt på vores persondataEU’s nye persondataforordning får virksomhederne til at stramme op på håndteringen af ansøgninger. Det er nu ikke nødvendigvis noget, medarbejderne går så højt op i.
11h
Viden
67
Ekstremt truede næsehorn skal reddes af frossen DNADe voldsomt truede nordlige hvide næsehorn kan overleve gennem kloning og kunstig befrugtning, mener forskere.
11h
Ingeniøren

»Cookie-problemet« er ikke løst med GDPR: Kampen fortsætter i EUDer hersker stadig tvivl om væsentlige dele af GDPR-reglerne på cookie-området, og den danske EU-parlamentariker Christel Schaldemose (A) forventer først for alvor, at »cookie-problemet« bliver håndteret med den forsinkede og omstridte ePrivacy-forordning.
12h
Viden
500+
Nye data-regler sætter en stopper for jobansøgninger via mailLukkede systemer skal beskytte virksomheder mod fejltrin med personlige oplysninger.
12h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

New study finds parasites affect flight ability of wild seabirdsA study led by the University of Liverpool and the Centre for Ecology & Hydrology (CEH) has found that parasites affect flight ability of wild seabirds, which may make it harder for them to raise chicks.
12h
Science | The Guardian
500+
Nasa full of 'fear and anxiety' since Trump took office, ex-employee saysThose still at the agency fear climate science funding will be cut since it is now considered a ‘sensitive subject’ Nasa’s output of climate change information aimed at the public has dwindled under the Trump administration, with a former employee claiming “fear and anxiety” within the agency has led to an online retreat from the issue. Laura Tenenbaum, a former science communicator for Nasa, sai
13h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
2
Radish cover crop traps nitrogen; mystery followsNew research supports the use of radish as a cover crop as a trap crop for fall nitrogen. However, what happens to that nitrogen afterward remains unknown.
14h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Promise of faster, more accessible schizophrenia diagnosis, Rutgers study showsA Rutgers study shows how the hand-held device RETeval may prove to be a more accessible way to diagnose schizophrenia, predict relapse and symptom severity, and assess treatment effectiveness.
14h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
10
Recycled electrical products lead to hazardous chemicals appearing in everyday itemsHazardous chemicals such as bromine, antimony and lead are finding their way into food-contact items and other everyday products because manufacturers are using recycled electrical equipment as a source of black plastic, according to a new study.
14h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
3
Teaching chores to an AIRecently, computer scientists have been working on teaching machines to do a wider range of tasks around the house. In a new paper spearheaded by MIT's Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (CSAIL) and the University of Toronto, researchers demonstrate 'VirtualHome,' a system that can simulate detailed household tasks and then have artificial 'agents' execute them, opening up the
14h
Feed: All Latest
81
How to Get a Robot to (One Day) Do Your ChoresIf we are going to have home assistants that set our tables and fold our clothes, we’re going to have to train them in simulations first.
14h
The Scientist RSS

New Treatments for Phenylketonuria Aim to Loosen Reins on Strict DietBiotechs have developed enzyme replacements and genetically modified probiotics to treat patients with the rare metabolic disorder.
14h
New on MIT Technology Review
100+
It’s fiction, but America just got wiped out by a man-made terror germAt “germ games” held in Washington, DC, pandemic planners get a look at the threat posed by synthetic biology.
14h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
200+
First 3D-printed human corneasThe first human corneas have been 3D printed by scientists.
14h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
39
Self-tuning brain implant could help treat patients with Parkinson's diseaseDeep brain stimulation has been used to treat Parkinson's disease symptoms for 25 years, but limitations have led researchers to look for ways to improve the technique. This study describes the first fully implanted DBS system that uses feedback from the brain itself to fine-tune its signaling.
14h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
11
Scientists improve ability to measure electrical properties of plasmaNew research indicates a way to more accurately measure the electrical properties of plasma when it meets a solid surface.
14h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
61
Blame the mother's gene: Discovery for a blinding canine eye diseaseA new gene for canine congenital eye disease has been identified. Defective RBP4 leads to vitamin A deficiency and abnormal eye development during pregnancy. The study defines a novel recessive mode of maternal inheritance, which may underlie other types of birth defects.
14h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
61
New study finds parasites affect flight ability of wild seabirdsA study led by the University of Liverpool and the Centre for Ecology & Hydrology (CEH) has found that parasites affect flight ability of wild seabirds, which may make it harder for them to raise chicks.
14h
Science | The Guardian
2
Men to get their own magazine agony aunt – archive, 30 May 197430 May 1974: Woman’s Own hopes it will encourage more men to put their worries on paper instead of sustaining a painful and harmful cover-up Woman’s Own has started a problem page for men only. A gimmick? An imaginative new service? Keeping up with the times? Angela Willans (“Mary Grant,” the magazine’s “Can I help you?” lady) is too sincerely concerned about people to go in for gimmicks, and too
14h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
49
Smoking, lack of exercise linked to early death after divorceA growing body of research links divorce to a wide range of poor health outcomes, including greater risk for early death. A new study points to two possible culprits: a greater likelihood of smoking after divorce and lower levels of physical activity.
14h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
16
What happens to plasmalogens, the phospholipids nobody likes to think aboutIn a paper to be published in the June 2 issue of the Journal of Biological Chemistry, researchers at Washington University in St. Louis provide the first report of an enzyme that breaks down plasmalogens, a breakthrough in understanding the molecular processes that occur during Alzheimer's and other diseases.
14h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
23
Soy lecithin NSAID combo drug protects against cancer with fewer side effects, UTHealth reportsWhen scientists applied a chemical found in soybeans to a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID), they increased its anticancer properties and reduced its side effects.
14h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
39
Cognitive training reduces depression, rebuilds injured brain structure and connectivity after traumatic brain injuryNew research shows that certain cognitive training exercises can help reduce depression and improve brain health in individuals years after they have suffered a traumatic brain injury (TBI).
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
58
Woulda, coulda, shoulda: The haunting regret of failing our ideal selvesOur most enduring regrets are the ones that stem from our failure to live up to our ideal selves, according to new research.
14h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
39
Walk this way: Novel method enables infinite walking in VRIn the ever-evolving landscape of virtual reality (VR) technology, a number of key hurdles remain. But a team of computer scientists have tackled one of the major challenges in VR that will greatly improve user experience — enabling an immersive virtual experience while being physically limited to one's actual, real-world space.
14h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
14
Black holes from an exacomputerWhat happens when two black holes merge, or when stars collide with a black hole? This has now been simulated using a novel numerical method. The simulation code 'ExaHyPE' is designed in such a way that it will be able to calculate gravitational waves on the future generation of 'exascale' supercomputers.
14h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
23
'Will this be on the test?' Even if it isn't, students might remember itA new study shows that teachers don't have to test everything they want their students to remember — as long as the knowledge they want to convey fits together well, and the test questions are well-chosen. The finding builds on a proven phenomenon known as 'retrieval-enhanced learning' — that the very act of recalling something reinforces it in a person's memory.
14h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
12
What do animals want?Researchers apply machine learning to understand how potential food rewards guide the movements of nematodes, finding that the subjects combine multiple sensations into strategic behaviors that uses the minimal amount of energy.
14h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
15
E. coli infection induces delirium in aging ratsActivation of the immune system by an infection may temporarily disrupt formation of long-term memories in healthy, aging rats by reducing levels of a protein required for brain cells to make new connections, suggests new research.
14h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
23
Brain scientists identify 'cross talk' between neurons that control touch in miceScientists report they have uncovered a previously overlooked connection between neurons in two distinct areas of the mammalian brain. The neurons, they say, control the sense of touch, and their experiments in mice offer insights into mapping brain circuitry that is responsible for normal and abnormal perception and movements linked to touch.
14h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
10
How to code a functional molecular machine?An international team has developed a model that simulates protein evolution. Starting from stiff, unfunctional proteins, the computer model shows how evolving protein components can work together to give rise to dynamic and efficient molecular machines.
15h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
26
Key mechanism behind the formation of spider silkScientists have examined the soluble precursor of spider silk and found that a previously undiscovered structural element is key to how the proteins form into the beta-sheet conformation that gives the silk its exceptional strength.
15h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
10
Combination pack battles cancerFor efficient cancer therapy with few side effects, the active drug should selectively attain high concentration in the tumor. Scientists have introduced a new approach, in which two synergistic drug components are combined into a dimer. This dimer can be incorporated into polymeric nanotransporters at exceptionally high concentration. The components are activated when the dimer is split within th
15h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
16
Fruit flies fear lion fecesNew research shows how fruit flies use their sense of smell and humidity to find food, avoid dehydration and discover the best place to lay their eggs — in overripe marula fruits. Feces from herbivores are also suitable, but the flies reject carnivore excrement.
15h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
17
How eye loss occurs in blind cavefishLoss of eye tissue in blind cavefish (Astyanax mexicanus), which occurs within a few days of their development, happens through epigenetic silencing of eye-related genes, according to a new study. Epigenetic regulation is a process where genes are turned off or on, typically in a reversible or temporary manner. This mechanism differs from genetic mutations, which are permanent changes in the DNA c
15h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
57
A photosynthetic engine for artificial cellsResearchers have engineered a cell-like structure that harnesses photosynthesis to perform metabolic reactions, including energy harvesting, carbon fixation and cytoskeleton formation.
15h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
100+
Noninvasive technique to correct visionEngineers have developed a noninvasive approach to permanently correct vision that shows great promise in preclinical models. The method uses a femtosecond oscillator for selective and localized alteration of the biochemical and biomechanical properties of corneal tissue. The technique, which changes the tissue's macroscopic geometry, is non-surgical and has fewer side effects and limitations than
15h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
15
Social stress linked to shortened lifespan in miceA new study has demonstrated that psychosocial stress can shorten the lifespan in mice. For years, stress and socio-economic status has been connected to morbidity and mortality in humans, but until now, it has not been mechanically understood or explored in animal models.
15h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
51
Early-life seizures prematurely wake up brain networks tied to autismEarly-life seizures prematurely switch on key synapses in the brain that may contribute to further neurodevelopmental delay in children with autism and other intellectual disabilities, suggests a new study from researchers at Penn Medicine.
15h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
25
Smell receptor fuels prostate cancer progressionResearchers have found that an olfactory receptor plays a critical role in the progression of prostate cancer. They found that activating the receptor — called OR51E2 — in prostate cancer cells caused the cancer to morph into the more aggressive, castration-resistant form of the disease. The finding suggests that taking the opposite approach — blocking the receptor with specific molecules, or p
15h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
11
Novel hydrogel harnesses air moisture for practical applicationsA team of researchers has invented a novel gel-like material that not only effectively dehumidifies ambient air to improve thermal comfort, but it also harnesses the moisture in the air for a wide range of practical applications, such as functioning as a sun or privacy screen, conductive ink and even a battery. These interesting properties are inherent in the material after water absorption, witho
15h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
7
The mystery of masculinization in Daphnia magna unraveledResearchers discovered lncRNAs to activate the male-determining gene doublesex1 (Dsx1) necessary for sex determination in the crustacean Daphnia magna.
15h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
13
AI software assists design of new material for solar cellsResearchers have used machine learning to design new polymers for organic photovoltaics (solar cells). After mining data from previous studies, they input the physical properties of polymers, together with the resulting solar cell efficiencies, into a Random Forest model to statistically predict the effectiveness of new materials. This informatics-based screening, combined with traditional knowled
15h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
12
Framework to stop cyber attacks on internet-connected carsA new study examines the cybersecurity risks for new generations of smart which includes both autonomous and internet connected cars.
15h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
11
Assessment of biomarkers of subconcussive head traumaResearchers evaluated the usefulness of biomarker testing in determining the potential extent of brain trauma suffered from repetitive subconcussive head impacts sustained over the course of a college football season.
15h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
8
Scientists identify novel cellular mechanism that can lead to cancer metastasisScientists have added a new dimension to the understanding of how cells alter their communication with one another during development, wound healing, and the spread of cancer.
15h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
29
High protein diet associated with small increased heart failure risk in middle-aged menFor middle-aged men, eating higher amounts of protein was associated with a slightly elevated risk for heart failure than those who ate less protein. Proteins from fish and eggs were not associated with heart failure risk in this study.
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Viden
300+
Ny bog vil gøre op med mandemyter: Mænd kan ikke altid præstere en stenhård rejsningMænd mangler gode råd og viden til at blive bedre til at tale om seksualitet og følelser, mener læge og forfatter til ny bog.
15h
Scientific American Content: Global
8
Pinnipeds Don't Appreciate Biped DisturbanceSea lions and fur seals in Uruguay have become a tourist attraction—but the animals have become less, not more, accepting of humans. Jason G. Goldman reports. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
16h
New Scientist – News
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Brains grow brand new neurons after experimental drug injectionWe make very few new brain cells as adults, but a chemical cocktail that creates new neurons in mice could change that, and help treat Alzheimer’s and stroke
17h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
14
Switched on: A breakthrough for spintronicsResearchers have discovered a switch to control the spin current, a mechanism needed for information processing with full spin-based devices.
18h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
19
Blackcurrant dye could make hair coloring safer, more sustainableWhether they're trying to hide some gray or embrace a new or quirky color, people adore hair dyes. But some of these dyes may be harmful to humans and the environment. Now scientists report that they have developed a natural, non-toxic hair dye derived from blackcurrant skins that is as durable as conventional dyes and capable of sustaining hair color through multiple washings.
18h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
72
Wars and clan structure may explain a strange biological event 7,000 years agoGenetic data suggest there was a collapse in male, but not female, genetic diversity starting 7,000 years ago. The reason may be wars between clans structured around male ancestry.
18h
Futurity.org
2
‘Lung on a chip’ mimics deadly diseaseNew biotechnology could speed up the development of medicines to treat pulmonary fibrosis, one of the most common and serious forms of lung disease, research shows. Developing new medicines isn’t easy, researchers say, because it’s difficult to simulate how the disease damages and scars lung tissue over time. Scientists have to use a hodgepodge of time-consuming and costly techniques to assess th
18h
Futurity.org
3
‘Decorated’ nanotubes may be ready for next-gen materialsScientists have found a way to enhance boron nitride nanotubes using a chemical process called the Billups-Birch reaction. The work suggests boron nitride nanotubes are primed to become effective building blocks for next-generation composite and polymer materials. Boron nitride nanotubes, like their carbon cousins, are rolled sheets of hexagonal arrays. Unlike carbon nanotubes, they’re electrical
18h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
20
First 3D-printed human corneasThe first human corneas have been 3D printed by scientists at Newcastle University, UK.
19h
Futurity.org
20
We neglect this factor when choosing healthy foodThe perceived healthiness of a food tends to influence people more than a food’s portion size, research finds. Encouraging people to compare different portion sizes side-by-side can partly mitigate the tendency, according to the study, which will appear in the journal Management Science . Consumers believe the type of food they are eating has a much greater impact on their ability to achieve heal
19h
Futurity.org
9
Here’s what to do if you find a baby animalSpring is baby wildlife season, which means more people come face-to-face with newborn animals. Sometimes they are orphaned or injured and need help, but most of the time, they need to be left alone. “It is illegal to care for or keep a wild animal without the proper license—it is not safe for the person or for the animal.” Sara Childs-Sanford, chief of service at Cornell University’s Janet L. Sw
19h
Futurity.org
3
Will bat-borne Nipah virus be the next global pandemic?A recent outbreak in South India has renewed interest in Nipah virus, a disease with no vaccine or cure that generally spreads from bats or pigs to humans and kills nearly three-quarters of those infected. The virus, discovered 20 years ago, has so far killed 11 people in the current outbreak, with 14 additional cases confirmed. It has many strains capable of spreading from person to person, whic
19h
The Atlantic
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The Final Fall of Eric GreitensMissouri Governor Eric Greitens, once seen as a rising star and possible presidential candidate in the Republican Party, will resign on Friday, less than a year and a half into his term. The scandal-plagued Greitens made the announcement in a surprisingly defiant statement late Tuesday afternoon in Jefferson City, where he faced possible impeachment. He will be replaced by Lieutenant Governor Mik
19h
Feed: All Latest
1K
How 'Killing Eve' Reverse-Engineered Binge WatchingThis spring BBC America's spy thriller quietly went from novelty to must-watch TV, thanks to a little help from Orphan Black.
19h
The Atlantic
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The True Scope of the Disaster in Puerto RicoJust about nobody believes Puerto Rico’s official death toll for Hurricane Maria. Researchers and journalists alike generally accept that the island’s tally of 64 people killed by the storm last September is a massive undercount, so obviously inaccurate that the Puerto Rican government has agreed to review and revise its figures . But with Puerto Rico still in disarray—from the storm’s casualties
19h
Popular Science
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Scientists just discovered 125 million-year-old dinosaur dandruffAnimals Dinos got dandruff, too. It’s no secret dinosaurs possessed their own fair share of dirty habits. But dandruff? Nobody really saw that coming.
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The Atlantic
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The Atlantic Daily: Rising GenerationWhat We’re Following International Relations: Recent comments from Secretary of State Mike Pompeo suggest that the goal of President Trump’s decision to reimpose sanctions on Iran is to force a regime change. That plan could backfire. It’s also disrupted the United States’ relations with its European allies, who now frown upon the Trump administration’s disengagement with global politics. The cou
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The Atlantic
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The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: Roseanne Barred-Written by Elaine Godfrey ( @elainejgodfrey ) Today in 5 Lines The White House said it will impose a 25-percent tariff on $50 billion worth of Chinese goods. The list of imports that will be covered will be announced by June 15. A Harvard study found that Hurricane Maria killed roughly 4,600 people in Puerto Rico, more than 70 times the official death toll. Missouri Governor Eric Greitens said h
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Live Science
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Pompeii Man Had a Really, Really Bad Day 2,000 Years AgoA decapitated skeleton is the latest find among the ruins of Pompeii
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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Cognitive training reduces depression, rebuilds injured brain structure & connectivity after traumatic brain injuryNew research from the Center for BrainHealth at The University of Texas at Dallas shows that certain cognitive training exercises can help reduce depression and improve brain health in individuals years after they have suffered a traumatic brain injury (TBI).
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Popular Science
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Here’s what kind of data genetics testing companies can shareTechnology And how to delete your account if you want. It’s natural to want to scratch at the itch of identity—and these days you can, for about $99. But what do the companies do with your genetic information?
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Big Think
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Here’s what you can—and can’t—do under Starbucks’ new policiesAfter revealing new policies, Starbucks closed more than 8,000 of its stores Tuesday afternoon so some 175,000 employees could undergo racial bias training. Read More
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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Soy lecithin NSAID combo drug protects against cancer with fewer side effects, UTHealth reportsWhen scientists at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth) applied a chemical found in soybeans to a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID), they increased its anticancer properties and reduced its side effects. Findings of the preclinical study of phosphatidylcholine, also called lecithin, appear in the journal Oncology Letters.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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XENON1T Experimental data establishes most stringent limit on dark matterExperimental results from the XENON1T dark matter detector limit the effective size of dark matter particles to 4.1X10-47 square centimeters–one-trillionth of one-trillionth of a centimeter squared–the most stringent limit yet determined for dark matter as established by the world's most sensitive detector.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

What happens to plasmalogens, the phospholipids nobody likes to think aboutIn a paper to be published in the June 2 issue of the Journal of Biological Chemistry, researchers at Washington University in St. Louis provide the first report of an enzyme that breaks down plasmalogens, a breakthrough in understanding the molecular processes that occur during Alzheimer's and other diseases.
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Latest Headlines | Science News
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Hurricane Maria killed at least 4,645 people in Puerto Rico, a study estimatesResearchers estimate Puerto Rico’s death toll from Hurricane Maria at more than 4,500 people based on household surveys — dwarfing the official count of 64.
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New on MIT Technology Review
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Facebook wants AI-powered chips to stop people from streaming suicides and murders
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The Atlantic
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Syria Is Now In Charge of the UN's Disarmament Efforts. Really.In ordinary times, the work of the Geneva-based Conference on Disarmament, a UN body that negotiates international arms-control agreements, draws little attention. Then came this week’s news that Syria, a country with a well-known propensity for using chemical weapons against civilians, would assume the organization’s rotating, four-week presidency. The temporary post gives Syria the power to tak
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Chemical compound produces beneficial inflammation, remyelination that could help treat multiple sclerosisResearchers report that indazole chloride, a synthetic compound that acts on one form of the body's estrogen receptors, is able to remyelinate (add new myelin to) damaged axons and alter the body's immune system — findings that could help treat multiple sclerosis. Drugs available to treat MS alter the immune system but do not induce repair of damaged axons.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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Smoking, lack of exercise linked to early death after divorceA growing body of research links divorce to a wide range of poor health outcomes, including greater risk for early death. A new University of Arizona study points to two possible culprits: a greater likelihood of smoking after divorce and lower levels of physical activity.
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New on MIT Technology Review
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Self-serving cryptocurrency miners are attacking small blockchain networks
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The Atlantic
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Why ABC Finally Had to Cancel Roseanne“You can’t control Roseanne Barr,” Ben Sherwood, the president of ABC, said in an interview with The New York Times in March. “Many who have tried have failed. She’s the one and only.” It was an easy deflection, one that made the star of his biggest sitcom sound like a brilliant, maverick artiste. But Sherwood was instead responding to a question about Barr’s Twitter account, which often features
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The Atlantic
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How Trump Could Revive the Iranian Regime“When your enemy is making a mistake,” Napoleon purportedly cautioned, “never interrupt him.” In recent months the Islamic Republic of Iran has been battered by accumulating crises—including a collapsing currency , an irrepressible citizen’s -rights and feminist movement, and persistent labor strikes—that have called into question its continued viability. It is increasingly evident that the Trump
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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Young women at high genetic risk of breast cancer — plastic surgeons play key role in treatmentWith available testing for breast cancer risk genes, some women are learning at young ages that they are at high lifetime risk of breast cancer. Plastic surgeons play a key role in counseling and managing this group of high-risk young adults, according to a special topic paper in the June issue of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery®, the official medical journal of the American Society of Plastic
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Science : NPR
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How Scientists In Kenya Are Trying To Understand Cow EmissionsMethane is a powerful greenhouse gas and livestock account for a lot of the gas produced in agriculture. In Kenya, climate scientists are experimenting with different types of feed to reduce the amount cows burp.
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Science : NPR
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WATCH: Rare Maned Wolves Need A MatchmakerThis long-legged canid is in trouble. Its habitat in the Brazilian Savannah is being destroyed. So Smithsonian scientists are racing to breed a healthy backup population. (Image credit: NPR)
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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2nd powered test flight for Virgin Galactic spaceshipVirgin Galactic has conducted the second rocket-powered test flight of its tourism spaceship in the skies over California.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Toxic pesticide use rising at illegal California pot farmsResearchers and U.S. authorities are finding what they say is an alarming increase in the use of a powerful banned pesticide at illegal marijuana farms hidden on public land in California.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Conservation groups' pact will help save Atlantic salmonTwo conservation groups said Tuesday a deal has been struck with commercial fishermen in Greenland and the Faroe Islands that will help thousands of vulnerable Atlantic salmon return to rivers in the United States, Canada and Europe.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Wars and clan structure may explain a strange biological event 7,000 years agoStarting about 7,000 years ago, something weird seems to have happened to men: Over the next two millennia, recent studies suggest, their genetic diversity —specifically, the diversity of their Y chromosomes—collapsed. So extreme was that collapse that it was as if there was only one man left to mate for every 17 women.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Ceramics can deform like metals if sintered under an electric field, study showsResearchers have observed a way that the brittle nature of ceramics can be overcome as they sustain heavy loads, leading to more resilient structures such as aircraft engine blade coatings and dental implants.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Lung cancer risk drops substantially within five years of quitting, new research findsJust because you stopped smoking years ago doesn't mean you're out of the woods when it comes to developing lung cancer. That's the 'bad' news. The good news is your risk of lung cancer drops substantially within five years of quitting.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Communication in the cell: Important step of signal transmission elucidatedThe effectiveness of new drugs depends crucially on a fundamental understanding of the complex processes within the cells of the body. Scientists have deciphered an important molecular step of cellular signal transmission. Their findings could help the development of specific drugs against various diseases, such as asthma and high blood pressure.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Better, faster, stronger: Building batteries that don't go boomUnderstanding how lithium reacts to pressure developed from charging and discharging a battery could mean safer, better batteries.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Oxytocin, vasopressin flatten social hierarchy and synchronize behaviorsResearch found that the neuropeptides oxytocin and vasopressin flatten the social hierarchy and synchronize behaviors of rhesus macaques. The work has the potential to lead to new therapies and treatment alternatives for social impairments in disorders like autism and schizophrenia.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Big savings in removing dams over repairsA new study finds billions of dollars could be saved if the nation's aging dams are removed rather than repaired, but also suggests that better data and analysis is needed on the factors driving dam-removal efforts.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Could we work together with our bacteria to stop infection?The benefits of antibiotics to both human and animal health are undisputed. However, as microbes have become increasingly resistant to antimicrobials and other drugs, scientists have become interested in new solutions to the growing superbug crisis, including the use of defensive microbes and fecal transplants. In new research, scientists have developed a lab-based approach, creating positive co-d
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Water is not the same as water: Two forms differWater molecules exist in two different forms with almost identical physical properties. For the first time, researchers have succeeded in separating the two forms to show that they can exhibit different chemical reactivities.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Characteristics of microorganisms most likely to cause a global pandemicA potential global catastrophic risk-level pandemic pathogen will most likely have a respiratory mode of transmission; be contagious during the incubation period, prior to symptom development, or when infected individuals show only mild symptoms; and need specific host population factors (e.g., immunologically naïve persons) and additional intrinsic microbial pathogenicity characteristics (e.g., a
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The Atlantic
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Cardi B’s ‘I Like It’ Is the Song of the SummerThe perfect song of the summer doesn’t always identify itself on first listen. It can evade recognition when played through headphones, avoid detection amid the vast wilderness of desktop playlists. There is no foolproof algorithm for discovery. But one barometer never lies: the distinct boom of the speakers outfitted onto the cars driving down your block with windows open and stereo blaring. Adm
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Big Think
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Mass shootings are changing views on gun control—when they’re localSupport for increased gun control in the U.S. is slowly rising, but one group of Americans seems to change their minds faster than others. Read More
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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The case of the relativistic particles solved with NASA missionsEncircling Earth are two enormous rings—called the Van Allen radiation belts—of highly energized ions and electrons. Various processes can accelerate these particles to relativistic speeds, which endanger spacecraft unlucky enough to enter these giant bands of damaging radiation. Scientists had previously identified certain factors that might cause particles in the belts to become highly energized
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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Self-tuning brain implant could help treat patients with Parkinson's diseaseDeep brain stimulation has been used to treat Parkinson's disease symptoms for 25 years, but limitations have led researchers to look for ways to improve the technique. This study describes the first fully implanted DBS system that uses feedback from the brain itself to fine-tune its signaling. The study was supported by the National Institutes of Health's Brain Research through Advancing Innovati
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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Smell receptor fuels prostate cancer progressionResearchers have found that an olfactory receptor plays a critical role in the progression of prostate cancer. They found that activating the receptor — called OR51E2 — in prostate cancer cells caused the cancer to morph into the more aggressive, castration-resistant form of the disease. The finding suggests that taking the opposite approach — blocking the receptor with specific molecules, or p
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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Wars and clan structure may explain a strange biological event 7,000 years agoGenetic data suggest there was a collapse in male, but not female, genetic diversity starting 7,000 years ago. The reason may be wars between clans structured around male ancestry.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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High-risk, undertreated mystery heart attacks occurring more commonly in womenA mysterious type of heart attack known as MINOCA is more common and poses a higher risk than previously thought, especially for women, according to a new University of Alberta study.
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TED Talks Daily (SD video)
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A teen scientist's invention to help wounds heal | Anushka NaiknawareWorking out of her garage, Anushka Naiknaware designed a sensor that tracks wound healing, becoming the youngest winner (at age 13) of the Google Science Fair. Her clever invention addresses the global challenge of chronic wounds, which don't heal properly due to preexisting conditions like diabetes and account for billions in medical costs worldwide. Join Naiknaware as she explains how her "smart
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Scientific American Content: Global
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Manhattanhenge: What It Is, and How to See ItThe New York City phenomenon takes place Tuesday and Wednesday, and again in July — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Group making digital tool for documenting life on Earth adopts new organizational modelFor more than 20 years, scientists managing biological research collections around the world have used open-source Specify software for data entry, managing museum curation, linking images and documents to specimens, and for sharing species information for education and research. Recently, the project has added options for mobile and cloud-computing technology.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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NASA and NOAA satellites track Alberto in the US southOn Tuesday, May 29, 2018, the National Hurricane Center issued the last public advisory on Alberto. NASA and NOAA satellites continued to provide imagery that showed the extent and strength of the storm in the southern U.S. Alberto has weakened to a subtropical depression. The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) instrument aboard NASA's Aqua satellite captured an infrared image o
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Want to make your factory wireless? NIST can guide youIt's been called the "smart factory" and even given the lofty moniker of "the fourth industrial revolution." The manufacturing operation of the just-around-the-corner future will be one in which networked systems monitor and direct processes, machines communicate with each other and with humans at high speeds, and the factory itself makes decisions about how to optimize and facilitate production.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Study shows ceramics can deform like metals if sintered under an electric fieldPurdue researchers have observed a way that the brittle nature of ceramics can be overcome as they sustain heavy loads, leading to more resilient structures such as aircraft engine blade coatings and dental implants.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Novel RNA-modifying tool corrects genetic diseases, including driver of triple-negative breast cancerAs scientists gain insights into which genes drive diseases, they are pursuing the next logical question: Can gene editing technologies be developed to treat or even cure those diseases? Much of that effort has focused on developing technologies such as CRISPR-Cas9, a protein-based system.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Mathematical model explains why metastasis can occur even when cancer is caught earlyLeaning on evolutionary and ecological theory, researchers modeled how a tumor's various cancer cell lineages compete for dominance. Their findings help explain a surprising observation: Most metastatic tumors derive from cancer cell lineages that emerge at early stages of the disease.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Liquid crystal shells: 'Smart' material enables novel applications in autonomous driving and roboticsResearch has shown the potential of liquid crystal shells as enabling material for a vast array of future applications, ranging from autonomous driving to anti-counterfeiting technology and a new class of sensors.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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New tool for female reproductive geneticsThe fruit fly Drosophila is powerful for studying development and disease and there are many tools to genetically modify its cells. One tool, the Gal4/UAS system, has been a mainstay of Drosophila genetics for twenty-five years. But it only functions effectively in non-reproductive cells, not in egg-producing cells. It has not been known why. Scientists have discovered why and developed a new tool
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Why heart function is reduced at high altitudeFor over a century, we have known that high altitude reduces the amount of blood the heart pumps around the body with each beat. New research has unearthed why this is the case and the findings will be important for people who live, travel and exercise at high altitudes.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Man against machine: AI is better than dermatologists at diagnosing skin cancerResearchers have shown for the first time that a form of artificial intelligence or machine learning known as a deep learning convolutional neural network (CNN) is better than experienced dermatologists at detecting skin cancer.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Limiting global warming could avoid millions of dengue fever casesLimiting global warming to 1.5°C could avoid around 3.3 million cases of dengue fever per year in Latin America and the Caribbean alone — according to new research. A new report reveals that limiting warming to the goal of the UN Paris Agreement would also stop dengue spreading to areas where incidence is currently low.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Face recognition experts perform better with AI as partnerScientists have tested the accuracy of professional face identifiers, experts who often play a crucial role in criminal cases. The team found that these trained human beings perform best with a computer as a partner, not another person.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Mongooses remember and reward helpful friendsDwarf mongooses remember previous cooperative acts by their groupmates and reward them later, according to new work.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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The stick insects that survive being eaten by birdsIt's commonly assumed that when insects are eaten by birds, they and their unborn young have no chance of survival. However, a team of researchers hypothesized that the eggs within insect bodies can pass through birds undigested. They tested this hypothesis with stick insects, known for their hard eggs, and found that some eggs are excreted unharmed and successfully hatch. Stick insects cannot tra
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Big Think
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Why A.I. can’t solve everythingThe hysteria about the future of artificial intelligence (AI) is everywhere. Here's how to tone it down. Read More
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New Treatments for Phenylketonuria Aim to Loosen Reigns on Strict DietBiotechs have developed enzyme replacements and genetically modified probiotics to treat patients with the rare metabolic disorder.
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The Scientist RSS

Jens Christian Skou, Discoverer of the Sodium-Potassium Pump, DiesThe Nobel laureate was the first to identify an enzyme moving material across the cell membrane.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Chemical compound produces beneficial inflammation, remyelination that could help treat MSDrugs available to treat multiple sclerosis, a leading cause of neurological disability affecting roughly 2.3 million people worldwide, alter the body's immune system to reduce disease symptoms and disability.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Scientists improve ability to measure electrical properties of plasmaAny solid surface immersed within a plasma, including those in satellite engines and fusion reactors, is surrounded by a layer of electrical charge that determines the interaction between the surface and the plasma. Understanding the nature of this contact, which can affect the performance of the devices, often hinges on understanding how electrical charge is distributed around the surface. Now, r
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Researchers listen for failure in granular materialsIn a pilot study, researchers from North Carolina State University and Haverford College have used naturally arising acoustic vibrations—or sound waves—to monitor the state of granular materials. This passive approach represents a way to probe disordered or granular materials without disturbing them, and may enable researchers to forecast the failure of these materials.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Hacker gets five years for Russian-linked Yahoo security breachA young computer hacker who prosecutors say unwittingly worked with a Russian spy agency was sentenced to five years in prison Tuesday for using data stolen in a massive Yahoo data breach to gain access to private emails.
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Big Think
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Why 3,000 researchers are boycotting a new science journalThe field of Artificial Intelligence is pushing back against a newcomer — for good reason. Read More
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Popular Science
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Watch a camera capture its own fiery death in the wake of a rocket launchSpace Alas, poor Canon. Capturing stunning images of rockets blasting off into space might not be rocket science, but it does take skill.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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Proxies less likely to use interventions when patients are close to deathResearchers from Hebrew SeniorLife's Institute for Aging Research (IFAR) have discovered that to begin with, proxies are a fairly accurate judge of the length of life left for their loved one with advanced dementia. Secondly, when proxies have judged that their loved one has less than 6 months to live they are more likely to have discussed goals of care with the health care team, and less likely t
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Inside Science
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Oysters to Fight Erosion and Help Preserve Southern Louisiana HistoryOysters to Fight Erosion and Help Preserve Southern Louisiana History As erosion claims land, local scientists explore using oysters to preserve parts of the Mississippi delta. gulfcoast.jpg An aerial image of the Gulf Coast above Louisiana. Image credits: Kurt Bauschardt/Flickr Rights information: CC BY-SA 2.0 Earth Tuesday, May 29, 2018 – 14:15 Brian Owens, Contributor (Inside Science) — In so
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Science | The Guardian
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Skeleton unearthed of man crushed by huge rock in Vesuvius eruptionBlock of stone violently thrown up by volcanic cloud fell on to victim, Pompeii archaeologists say Officials at the Pompeii archaeological site have announced the discovery of the skeleton of a man crushed by an enormous stone while trying to flee the eruption of Mount Vesuvius in 79 AD. Pompeii officials on Tuesday released a photograph showing the skeleton protruding from beneath a large block
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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New research finds lung cancer risk drops substantially within five years of quittingJust because you stopped smoking years ago doesn't mean you're out of the woods when it comes to developing lung cancer. That's the 'bad' news. The good news is your risk of lung cancer drops substantially within five years of quitting.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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Custom 3D-printed models help plastic surgeons plan and perform rhinoplastyComputer-designed, 3D-printed models are emerging as a useful new tool for planning and carrying out cosmetic plastic surgery of the nose, reports a paper in the June issue of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery®, the official medical journal of the American Society of Plastic Surgeons (ASPS).
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Study shows ceramics can deform like metals if sintered under an electric fieldPurdue researchers have observed a way that the brittle nature of ceramics can be overcome as they sustain heavy loads, leading to more resilient structures such as aircraft engine blade coatings and dental implants.
23h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Novel RNA-modifying tool corrects genetic diseasesThe new tool opens the possibility of creating drugs that can be taken conveniently as pills to correct genetic diseases.
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The Atlantic
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Hooves in the Water: Swimming Pigs and Diving HorsesApropos of nothing in particular, today we have a collection of images of hoofed mammals swimming and splashing about. Paddling pigs, diving horses, leaping bulls, lunging hippos, racing piglets, wading camels, soaking buffaloes, dripping moose, and more.
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Live Science
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Aboriginal People Held a Kangaroo Feast Around a Campfire 20,000 Years AgoAbout 20,000 years ago, a group of aboriginal people gathered around a campfire and feasted on kangaroo meat, according to an excavation of a remote cave in Western Australia's Pilbara region.
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
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In This Issue [This Week in PNAS]Lead pollution in Greenland ice links emissions and economic activity Ice-core analysis. Lead and silver ore mining powered ancient economies, but previously reported measurements of lead pollution in Arctic ice were based on sparse sampling and inconclusive dating. Joseph McConnell et al. (pp. 5726–5731) used precisely dated measurements of lead…
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Water dynamics in concentrated electrolytes: Local ion effect on hydrogen-bond jumps rather than collective coupling to ion clusters [Physical Sciences]Zhang et al. (1) suggest that water rotational dynamics slows down in all concentrated ionic solutions mostly because of a collective effect due to the coupling between water dynamics and the motion of large ion clusters. These conclusions were based on simulations of aqueous NaSCN and KSCN salts, with a…
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Reply to Stirnemann et al.: Frame retardation is the key reason behind the general slowdown of water reorientation dynamics in concentrated electrolytes [Physical Sciences]Stirnemann et al. (1) argue that the general deceleration of water reorientation dynamics in the concentrated electrolytes is not entirely due to the frame retardation, since suppressing frame reorientation entirely leads to a maximum slowdown of 1τreorjump+1τreorframe1τreorjump≈1.6, smaller than the deceleration in many concentrated electrolytes. This same argument, however, can…
23h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Little evidence for the vocal similarity hypothesis [Biological Sciences]Bowling et al. (1) report musical consonance judgements of various musical chords and a model designed to assess their “vocal similarity,” claiming the fit between model and data provides evidence that the perceived consonance of tone combinations is explained in part by their “relative similarity to voiced speech sounds.” I…
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Reply to Goffinet: In consonance, old ideas die hard [Biological Sciences]Goffinet’s complaints (1) about our vocal similarity hypothesis (2) are unwarranted on both practical and theoretical grounds. First, the issue of tuning is a red herring. We used standard just intonation intervals to evaluate the consonance of chords because their role in music across historical and cultural boundaries is foundational…
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Retrospective of Charles Pence Slichter (NAS 1967) [Retrospectives]Charles Pence Slichter died on February 19 of this year at the age of 94. Charlie, as he was known to his friends, was one of the giants of postwar physics, a pioneer of electron and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), and a renowned expert on superconductivity, a remarkably influential educator,…
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

The promise of genes for understanding cause and effect [Social Sciences]The Search for Identification Since the 1980s, social scientists have become increasingly interested in how to make credible claims about cause and effect using observational data (1). Ignited by seminal papers demonstrating the promise of natural experiments (2), the causal revolution has put social scientists on the lookout for “as-if”…
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
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Root-exuded coumarin shapes the root microbiome [Plant Biology]Roots of land plants grow through soil, one of the most microbially rich and diverse environments on earth (1). A long history of work has revealed that plant roots interact with these microbes and help establish microbial communities distinct from the surrounding soil (2). This is partly because roots provide…
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
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Biological electron transport goes the extra mile [Microbiology]Microorganisms stand out by the creative ways in which they gain energy during respiration. Using versatile metabolic networks, respiratory microorganisms harvest electrons from organic or inorganic donor molecules and transfer them to specialized electron transport chains, which redirect their flow toward a terminal electron acceptor. Respiratory electrons move with a…
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Hydrogel delivery of lysostaphin eliminates orthopedic implant infection by Staphylococcus aureus and supports fracture healing [Engineering]Orthopedic implant infections are a significant clinical problem, with current therapies limited to surgical debridement and systemic antibiotic regimens. Lysostaphin is a bacteriolytic enzyme with high antistaphylococcal activity. We engineered a lysostaphin-delivering injectable PEG hydrogel to treat Staphylococcus aureus infections in bone fractures. The injectable hydrogel formulation adheres
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Genetic instrumental variable regression: Explaining socioeconomic and health outcomes in nonexperimental data [Social Sciences]Identifying causal effects in nonexperimental data is an enduring challenge. One proposed solution that recently gained popularity is the idea to use genes as instrumental variables [i.e., Mendelian randomization (MR)]. However, this approach is problematic because many variables of interest are genetically correlated, which implies the possibility that many genes…
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Methylglucosylation of aromatic amino and phenolic moieties of drug-like biosynthons by combinatorial biosynthesis [Applied Biological Sciences]Glycosylation is a prominent strategy to optimize the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties of drug-like small-molecule scaffolds by modulating their solubility, stability, bioavailability, and bioactivity. Glycosyltransferases applicable for “sugarcoating” various small-molecule acceptors have been isolated and characterized from plants and bacteria, but remained cryptic from filamentous
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Isolation of state-dependent monoclonal antibodies against the 12-transmembrane domain glucose transporter 4 using virus-like particles [Applied Biological Sciences]The insulin-responsive 12-transmembrane transporter GLUT4 changes conformation between an inward-open state and an outward-open state to actively facilitate cellular glucose uptake. Because of the difficulties of generating conformational mAbs against complex and highly conserved membrane proteins, no reliable tools exist to measure GLUT4 at the cell surface, follow its trafficking,…
23h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Helical rotation of the diaphanous-related formin mDia1 generates actin filaments resistant to cofilin [Biochemistry]The complex interplay between actin regulatory proteins facilitates the formation of diverse cellular actin structures. Formin homology proteins (formins) play an essential role in the formation of actin stress fibers and yeast actin cables, to which the major actin depolymerizing factor cofilin barely associates. In vitro, F-actin decorated with cofilin…
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Chaperone AMPylation modulates aggregation and toxicity of neurodegenerative disease-associated polypeptides [Biochemistry]Proteostasis is critical to maintain organismal viability, a process counteracted by aging-dependent protein aggregation. Chaperones of the heat shock protein (HSP) family help control proteostasis by reducing the burden of unfolded proteins. They also oversee the formation of protein aggregates. Here, we explore how AMPylation, a posttranslational protein modification that…
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Chemokine C-C motif ligand 33 is a key regulator of teleost fish barbel development [Developmental Biology]Barbels are important sensory organs in teleosts, reptiles, and amphibians. The majority of ∼4,000 catfish species, such as the channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus), possess abundant whisker-like barbels. However, barbel-less catfish, such as the bottlenose catfish (Ageneiosus marmoratus), do exist. Barbeled catfish and barbel-less catfish are ideal natural models for determination…
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Effects of the hippopotamus on the chemistry and ecology of a changing watershed [Ecology]Cross-boundary transfers of nutrients can profoundly shape the ecology of recipient systems. The common hippopotamus, Hippopotamus amphibius, is a significant vector of such subsidies from terrestrial to river ecosystems. We compared river pools with high and low densities of H. amphibius to determine how H. amphibius subsidies shape the chemistry…
23h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Transhemispheric ecosystem disservices of pink salmon in a Pacific Ocean macrosystem [Ecology]Pink salmon (Oncorhynchus gorbuscha) in the North Pacific Ocean have flourished since the 1970s, with growth in wild populations augmented by rising hatchery production. As their abundance has grown, so too has evidence that they are having important effects on other species and on ocean ecosystems. In alternating years of…
23h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

The genome-wide rate and spectrum of spontaneous mutations differ between haploid and diploid yeast [Evolution]By altering the dynamics of DNA replication and repair, alternative ploidy states may experience different rates and types of new mutations, leading to divergent evolutionary outcomes. We report a direct comparison of the genome-wide spectrum of spontaneous mutations arising in haploids and diploids following a mutation-accumulation experiment in the budding…
23h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Selection and environmental adaptation along a path to speciation in the Tibetan frog Nanorana parkeri [Evolution]Tibetan frogs, Nanorana parkeri, are differentiated genetically but not morphologically along geographical and elevational gradients in a challenging environment, presenting a unique opportunity to investigate processes leading to speciation. Analyses of whole genomes of 63 frogs reveal population structuring and historical demography, characterized by highly restricted gene flow in a…
23h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

PRDM1 silences stem cell-related genes and inhibits proliferation of human colon tumor organoids [Genetics]PRDM1 is a tumor suppressor that plays an important role in B and T cell lymphomas. Our previous studies demonstrated that PRDM1β is a p53-response gene in human colorectal cancer cells. However, the function of PRDM1β in colorectal cancer cells and colon tumor organoids is not clear. Here we show…
23h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
1
A cytokine network involving IL-36{gamma}, IL-23, and IL-22 promotes antimicrobial defense and recovery from intestinal barrier damage [Immunology and Inflammation]The gut epithelium acts to separate host immune cells from unrestricted interactions with the microbiota and other environmental stimuli. In response to epithelial damage or dysfunction, immune cells are activated to produce interleukin (IL)-22, which is involved in repair and protection of barrier surfaces. However, the specific pathways leading to…
23h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Targetable BET proteins- and E2F1-dependent transcriptional program maintains the malignancy of glioblastoma [Medical Sciences]Competitive BET bromodomain inhibitors (BBIs) targeting BET proteins (BRD2, BRD3, BRD4, and BRDT) show promising preclinical activities against brain cancers. However, the BET protein-dependent glioblastoma (GBM)-promoting transcriptional network remains elusive. Here, with mechanistic exploration of a next-generation chemical degrader of BET proteins (dBET6), we reveal a profound and consistent i
23h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Distinct macrophage populations direct inflammatory versus physiological changes in adipose tissue [Medical Sciences]Obesity is characterized by an accumulation of macrophages in adipose, some of which form distinct crown-like structures (CLS) around fat cells. While multiple discrete adipose tissue macrophage (ATM) subsets are thought to exist, their respective effects on adipose tissue, and the transcriptional mechanisms that underlie the functional differences between ATM…
23h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Size-tagged preferred ends in maternal plasma DNA shed light on the production mechanism and show utility in noninvasive prenatal testing [Medical Sciences]Cell-free DNA in human plasma is nonrandomly fragmented and reflects genomewide nucleosomal organization. Previous studies had demonstrated tissue-specific preferred end sites in plasma DNA of pregnant women. In this study, we performed integrative analysis of preferred end sites with the size characteristics of plasma DNA fragments. We mined the preferred…
23h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Sequencing-based counting and size profiling of plasma Epstein-Barr virus DNA enhance population screening of nasopharyngeal carcinoma [Medical Sciences]Circulating tumor-derived DNA testing for cancer screening has recently been demonstrated in a prospective study on identification of nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) among 20,174 asymptomatic individuals. Plasma EBV DNA, a marker for NPC, was detected using real-time PCR. While plasma EBV DNA was persistently detectable in 97.1% of the NPCs identified,…
23h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Pseudomonas aeruginosa transcriptome during human infection [Microbiology]Laboratory experiments have uncovered many basic aspects of bacterial physiology and behavior. After the past century of mostly in vitro experiments, we now have detailed knowledge of bacterial behavior in standard laboratory conditions, but only a superficial understanding of bacterial functions and behaviors during human infection. It is well-known that…
23h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Broad receptor engagement of an emerging global coronavirus may potentiate its diverse cross-species transmissibility [Microbiology]Porcine deltacoronavirus (PDCoV), identified in 2012, is a common enteropathogen of swine with worldwide distribution. The source and evolutionary history of this virus is, however, unknown. PDCoV belongs to the Deltacoronavirus genus that comprises predominantly avian CoV. Phylogenetic analysis suggests that PDCoV originated relatively recently from a host-switching event between…
23h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
10
Socioeconomic status moderates age-related differences in the brain’s functional network organization and anatomy across the adult lifespan [Neuroscience]An individual’s environmental surroundings interact with the development and maturation of their brain. An important aspect of an individual’s environment is his or her socioeconomic status (SES), which estimates access to material resources and social prestige. Previous characterizations of the relation between SES and the brain have primarily focused on…
23h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Mapping cortical brain asymmetry in 17,141 healthy individuals worldwide via the ENIGMA Consortium [Neuroscience]Hemispheric asymmetry is a cardinal feature of human brain organization. Altered brain asymmetry has also been linked to some cognitive and neuropsychiatric disorders. Here, the ENIGMA (Enhancing NeuroImaging Genetics through Meta-Analysis) Consortium presents the largest-ever analysis of cerebral cortical asymmetry and its variability across individuals. Cortical thickness and surface area…
23h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Regulation of myeloid cell phagocytosis by LRRK2 via WAVE2 complex stabilization is altered in Parkinson’s disease [Neuroscience]Leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2) has been implicated in both familial and sporadic Parkinson’s disease (PD), yet its pathogenic role remains unclear. A previous screen in Drosophila identified Scar/WAVE (Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein-family verproline) proteins as potential genetic interactors of LRRK2. Here, we provide evidence that LRRK2 modulates the phagocytic response…
23h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Functional organization of intrinsic and feedback presynaptic inputs in the primary visual cortex [Neuroscience]In the primary visual cortex (V1) of many mammalian species, neurons are spatially organized according to their preferred orientation into a highly ordered map. However, whether and how the various presynaptic inputs to V1 neurons are organized relative to the neuronal orientation map remain unclear. To address this issue, we…
23h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Quantitative assessment of prefrontal cortex in humans relative to nonhuman primates [Neuroscience]Humans have the largest cerebral cortex among primates. The question of whether association cortex, particularly prefrontal cortex (PFC), is disproportionately larger in humans compared with nonhuman primates is controversial: Some studies report that human PFC is relatively larger, whereas others report a more uniform PFC scaling. We address this controversy…
23h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Mapping the functional anatomy of Orai1 transmembrane domains for CRAC channel gating [Physiology]Store-operated Orai1 channels are activated through a unique inside-out mechanism involving binding of the endoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ sensor STIM1 to cytoplasmic sites on Orai1. Although atomic-level details of Orai structure, including the pore and putative ligand binding domains, are resolved, how the gating signal is communicated to the pore and…
23h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Salicylic acid-independent role of NPR1 is required for protection from proteotoxic stress in the plant endoplasmic reticulum [Plant Biology]The unfolded protein response (UPR) is an ancient signaling pathway designed to protect cells from the accumulation of unfolded and misfolded proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Because misregulation of the UPR is potentially lethal, a stringent surveillance signaling system must be in place to modulate the UPR. The major…
23h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

MYB72-dependent coumarin exudation shapes root microbiome assembly to promote plant health [Plant Biology]Plant roots nurture a tremendous diversity of microbes via exudation of photosynthetically fixed carbon sources. In turn, probiotic members of the root microbiome promote plant growth and protect the host plant against pathogens and pests. In the Arabidopsis thaliana–Pseudomonas simiae WCS417 model system the root-specific transcription factor MYB72 and the…
23h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
3
Noncatalytic chalcone isomerase-fold proteins in Humulus lupulus are auxiliary components in prenylated flavonoid biosynthesis [Plant Biology]Xanthohumol (XN) and demethylxanthohumol (DMX) are specialized prenylated chalconoids with multiple pharmaceutical applications that accumulate to high levels in the glandular trichomes of hops (Humulus lupulus L.). Although all structural enzymes in the XN pathway have been functionally identified, biochemical mechanisms underlying highly efficient production of XN have not been…
23h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
2
Corticoinsular circuits encode subjective value expectation and violation for effortful goal-directed behavior [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]We are presented with choices each day about how to invest our effort to achieve our goals. Critically, these decisions must frequently be made under conditions of incomplete information, where either the effort required or possible reward to be gained is uncertain. Such choices therefore require the development of potential…
23h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Temperature regulates NF-{kappa}B dynamics and function through timing of A20 transcription [Systems Biology]NF-κB signaling plays a pivotal role in control of the inflammatory response. We investigated how the dynamics and function of NF-κB were affected by temperature within the mammalian physiological range (34 °C to 40 °C). An increase in temperature led to an increase in NF-κB nuclear/cytoplasmic oscillation frequency following Tumor…
23h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
6
Endocast morphology of Homo naledi from the Dinaledi Chamber, South Africa [Anthropology]Hominin cranial remains from the Dinaledi Chamber, South Africa, represent multiple individuals of the species Homo naledi. This species exhibits a small endocranial volume comparable to Australopithecus, combined with several aspects of external cranial anatomy similar to larger-brained species of Homo such as Homo habilis and Homo erectus. Here, we…
23h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Why we need to look beyond the glass transition temperature to characterize the dynamics of thin supported polymer films [Applied Physical Sciences]There is significant variation in the reported magnitude and even the sign of Tg shifts in thin polymer films with nominally the same chemistry, film thickness, and supporting substrate. The implicit assumption is that methods used to estimate Tg in bulk materials are relevant for inferring dynamic changes in thin…
23h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Design of an allosterically modulated doxycycline and doxorubicin drug-binding protein [Biochemistry]The allosteric interplay between distant functional sites present in a single protein provides for one of the most important regulatory mechanisms in biological systems. While the design of ligand-binding sites into proteins remains challenging, this holds even truer for the coupling of a newly engineered binding site to an allosteric…
23h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Elastic coupling power stroke mechanism of the F1-ATPase molecular motor [Biochemistry]The angular velocity profile of the 120° F1-ATPase power stroke was resolved as a function of temperature from 16.3 to 44.6 °C using a ΔμATP = −31.25 kBT at a time resolution of 10 μs. Angular velocities during the first 60° of the power stroke (phase 1) varied inversely with…
23h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Conformations of peptoids in nanosheets result from the interplay of backbone energetics and intermolecular interactions [Biophysics and Computational Biology]The conformations adopted by the molecular constituents of a supramolecular assembly influence its large-scale order. At the same time, the interactions made in assemblies by molecules can influence their conformations. Here we study this interplay in extended flat nanosheets made from nonnatural sequence-specific peptoid polymers. Nanosheets exist because individual polymers…
23h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Ultrafast nonthermal heating of water initiated by an X-ray Free-Electron Laser [Biophysics and Computational Biology]The bright ultrafast pulses of X-ray Free-Electron Lasers allow investigation into the structure of matter under extreme conditions. We have used single pulses to ionize and probe water as it undergoes a phase transition from liquid to plasma. We report changes in the structure of liquid water on a femtosecond…
23h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Cochlear amplification and tuning depend on the cellular arrangement within the organ of Corti [Biophysics and Computational Biology]The field of cochlear mechanics has been undergoing a revolution due to recent findings made possible by advancements in measurement techniques. While it has long been assumed that basilar-membrane (BM) motion is the most important determinant of sound transduction by the inner hair cells (IHCs), it turns out that other…
23h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Heterometallic Ru-Pt metallacycle for two-photon photodynamic therapy [Chemistry]As an effective and noninvasive treatment of various diseases, photodynamic therapy (PTD) relies on the combination of light, a photosensitizer, and oxygen to generate cytotoxic reactive oxygen species that can damage malignant tissue. Much attention has been paid to covalent modifications of the photosensitizers to improve their photophysical properties and…
23h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

An operando X-ray diffraction study of chloroaluminate anion-graphite intercalation in aluminum batteries [Chemistry]We investigated rechargeable aluminum (Al) batteries composed of an Al negative electrode, a graphite positive electrode, and an ionic liquid (IL) electrolyte at temperatures down to −40 °C. The reversible battery discharge capacity at low temperatures could be superior to that at room temperature. In situ/operando electrochemical and synchrotron X-ray…
23h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

High-capacity rechargeable batteries based on deeply cyclable lithium metal anodes [Chemistry]Discovering new chemistry and materials to enable rechargeable batteries with higher capacity and energy density is of paramount importance. While Li metal is the ultimate choice of a battery anode, its low efficiency is still yet to be overcome. Many strategies have been developed to improve the reversibility and cycle…
23h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Approach to classify, separate, and enrich objects in groups using ensemble sorting [Chemistry]The sorting of objects into groups is a fundamental operation, critical in the preparation and purification of populations of cells, crystals, beads, or droplets, necessary for research and applications in biology, chemistry, and materials science. Most of the efforts exploring such purification have focused on two areas: the degree of…
23h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

The glycolipid GM1 reshapes asymmetric biomembranes and giant vesicles by curvature generation [Chemistry]The ganglioside GM1 is present in neuronal membranes at elevated concentrations with an asymmetric spatial distribution. It is known to generate curvature and can be expected to strongly influence the neuron morphology. To elucidate these effects, we prepared giant vesicles with GM1 predominantly present in one leaflet of the membrane,…
23h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

The role of the permanent wilting point in controlling the spatial distribution of precipitation [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]Convection-permitting simulations on an idealized land planet are performed to understand whether soil moisture acts to support or impede the organization of convection. Initially, shallow circulations driven by differential radiative cooling induce a self-aggregation of the convection into a single band, as has become familiar from simulations over idealized sea…
23h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Harnessing bistability for directional propulsion of soft, untethered robots [Engineering]In most macroscale robotic systems, propulsion and controls are enabled through a physical tether or complex onboard electronics and batteries. A tether simplifies the design process but limits the range of motion of the robot, while onboard controls and power supplies are heavy and complicate the design process. Here, we…
23h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Additive-free carbon nanotube dispersions, pastes, gels, and doughs in cresols [Engineering]Cresols are a group of naturally occurring and massively produced methylphenols with broad use in the chemical industry. Here, we report that m-cresol and its liquid mixtures with other isomers are surprisingly good solvents for processing carbon nanotubes. They can disperse carbon nanotubes of various types at unprecedentedly high concentrations…
23h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Lead pollution recorded in Greenland ice indicates European emissions tracked plagues, wars, and imperial expansion during antiquity [Environmental Sciences]Lead pollution in Arctic ice reflects midlatitude emissions from ancient lead–silver mining and smelting. The few reported measurements have been extrapolated to infer the performance of ancient economies, including comparisons of economic productivity and growth during the Roman Republican and Imperial periods. These studies were based on sparse sampling and…
23h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
4
Pacing of Paleozoic macroevolutionary rates by Milankovitch grand cycles [Evolution]Periodic fluctuations in past biodiversity, speciation, and extinction have been proposed, with extremely long periods ranging from 26 to 62 million years, although forcing mechanisms remain speculative. In contrast, well-understood periodic Milankovitch climate forcing represents a viable driver for macroevolutionary fluctuations, although little evidence for such fluctuation exists except during
23h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Core Concept: “Twisted” light beams promise an optical revolution [Medical Sciences]Some of history’s most brilliant researchers have studied the nature of light over the centuries, from Newton to Maxwell to Einstein. And yet it continues to surprise. Indeed, one discovery about light’s peculiar behavior offers new insights into how light works while suggesting some intriguing applications. In 2016 researchers used…
23h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

MDA-9/Syntenin regulates protective autophagy in anoikis-resistant glioma stem cells [Medical Sciences]Glioma stem cells (GSCs) comprise a small subpopulation of glioblastoma multiforme cells that contribute to therapy resistance, poor prognosis, and tumor recurrence. Protective autophagy promotes resistance of GSCs to anoikis, a form of programmed cell death occurring when anchorage-dependent cells detach from the extracellular matrix. In nonadherent conditions, GSCs display…
23h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Spatial mutation patterns as markers of early colorectal tumor cell mobility [Medical Sciences]A growing body of evidence suggests that a subset of human cancers grows as single clonal expansions. In such a nearly neutral evolution scenario, it is possible to infer the early ancestral tree of a full-grown tumor. We hypothesized that early tree reconstruction can provide insights into the mobility phenotypes…
23h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Volatile biomarkers of symptomatic and asymptomatic malaria infection in humans [Medical Sciences]Malaria remains among the world’s deadliest diseases, and control efforts depend critically on the availability of effective diagnostic tools, particularly for the identification of asymptomatic infections, which play a key role in disease persistence and may account for most instances of transmission but often evade detection by current screening methods….
23h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
6
Long-distance electron transport in individual, living cable bacteria [Microbiology]Electron transport within living cells is essential for energy conservation in all respiring and photosynthetic organisms. While a few bacteria transport electrons over micrometer distances to their surroundings, filaments of cable bacteria are hypothesized to conduct electric currents over centimeter distances. We used resonance Raman microscopy to analyze cytochrome redox…
23h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
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A neural pathway controlling motivation to exert effort [Neuroscience]The neural mechanisms conferring reduced motivation, as observed in depressed individuals, is poorly understood. Here, we examine in rodents if reduced motivation to exert effort is controlled by transmission from the lateral habenula (LHb), a nucleus overactive in depressed-like states, to the rostromedial tegmental nucleus (RMTg), a nucleus that inhibits…
23h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Estrogen receptor {beta} controls proliferation of enteric glia and differentiation of neurons in the myenteric plexus after damage [Neuroscience]Injury to the enteric nervous system (ENS) can cause several gastrointestinal (GI) disorders including achalasia, irritable bowel syndrome, and gastroparesis. Recently, a subpopulation of enteric glial cells with neuronal stem/progenitor properties (ENSCs) has been identified in the adult ENS. ENSCs have the ability of reconstituting the enteric neuronal pool after…
23h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
1
High-temperature superconductivity using a model of hydrogen bonds [Physics]Recently, there has been much interest in high-temperature superconductors and more recently in hydrogen-based superconductors. This work offers a simple model that explains the behavior of the superconducting gap based on naive BCS (Bardeen–Cooper–Schrieffer) theory and reproduces most effects seen in experiments, including the isotope effect and Tc enhancement as…
23h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
4
Weak Galilean invariance as a selection principle for coarse-grained diffusive models [Physics]How does the mathematical description of a system change in different reference frames? Galilei first addressed this fundamental question by formulating the famous principle of Galilean invariance. It prescribes that the equations of motion of closed systems remain the same in different inertial frames related by Galilean transformations, thus imposing…
23h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
1
Insulin suppresses the production of fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23) [Physiology]Fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23) is produced by bone cells and regulates renal phosphate and vitamin D metabolism, as well as causing left ventricular hypertrophy. FGF23 deficiency results in rapid aging, whereas high plasma FGF23 levels are found in several disorders, including kidney or cardiovascular diseases. Regulators of FGF23 production…
23h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Calcium, conformational selection, and redox-active tyrosine YZ in the photosynthetic oxygen-evolving cluster [Plant Biology]In Photosystem II (PSII), YZ (Tyr161D1) participates in radical transfer between the chlorophyll donor and the Mn4CaO5 cluster. Under flashing illumination, the metal cluster cycles among five Sn states, and oxygen is evolved from water. The essential YZ is transiently oxidized and reduced on each flash in a proton-coupled electron…
23h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
7
AtPep3 is a hormone-like peptide that plays a role in the salinity stress tolerance of plants [Plant Biology]Peptides encoded by small coding genes play an important role in plant development, acting in a similar manner as phytohormones. Few hormone-like peptides, however, have been shown to play a role in abiotic stress tolerance. In the current study, 17 Arabidopsis genes coding for small peptides were found to be…
23h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
1
Nouns slow down speech across structurally and culturally diverse languages [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]By force of nature, every bit of spoken language is produced at a particular speed. However, this speed is not constant—speakers regularly speed up and slow down. Variation in speech rate is influenced by a complex combination of factors, including the frequency and predictability of words, their information status, and…
23h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Placebo treatment facilitates social trust and approach behavior [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]Placebo effect refers to beneficial changes induced by the use of inert treatment, such as placebo-induced relief of physical pain and attenuation of negative affect. To date, we know little about whether placebo treatment could facilitate social functioning, a crucial aspect for well-being of a social species. In the present…
23h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Correction for Vaidyanathan, Core Concept: Microgrids offer flexible energy generation, for a price [Correction]CORE CONCEPTS Correction for “Core Concept: Microgrids offer flexible energy generation, for a price,” by Gayathri Vaidyanathan, which was first published April 24, 2018; 10.1073/pnas.1804507115 (Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 115:4298–4300). The editors note that on page 4298, right column, last paragraph, line 6, “995 kilowatts” should have appeared as…
23h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Correction for DeMille et al., Worldwide distribution of the DCDC2 READ1 regulatory element and its relationship with phoneme variation across languages [Correction]GENETICS, PSYCHOLOGICAL AND COGNITIVE SCIENCES Correction for “Worldwide distribution of the DCDC2 READ1 regulatory element and its relationship with phoneme variation across languages,” by Mellissa M. C. DeMille, Kevin Tang, Chintan M. Mehta, Christopher Geissler, Jeffrey G. Malins, Natalie R. Powers, Beatrice M. Bowen, Andrew K. Adams, Dongnhu T. Truong,…
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Correction for Li et al., G{alpha}i1 and G{alpha}i3 regulate macrophage polarization by forming a complex containing CD14 and Gab1 [Correction]IMMUNOLOGY AND INFLAMMATION Correction for “Gαi1 and Gαi3 regulate macrophage polarization by forming a complex containing CD14 and Gab1,” by Xianjing Li, Duowei Wang, Zhen Chen, Ermei Lu, Zhuo Wang, Jingjing Duan, Wei Tian, Yun Wang, Linjun You, Yulian Zou, Yan Cheng, Qingyi Zhu, Xiaojian Wan, Tao Xi, Lutz Birnbaumer,…
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Correction for Woo et al., Control of motor coordination by astrocytic tonic GABA release through modulation of excitation/inhibition balance in cerebellum [Correction]NEUROSCIENCE Correction for “Control of motor coordination by astrocytic tonic GABA release through modulation of excitation/inhibition balance in cerebellum,” by Junsung Woo, Joo Ok Min, Dae-Si Kang, Yoo Sung Kim, Guk Hwa Jung, Hyun Jung Park, Sunpil Kim, Heeyoung An, Jea Known, Jeongyeon Kim, Insop Shim, Hyung-Gun Kim, C. Justin…
23h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Mathematical model explains why metastasis can occur even when cancer is caught earlyLeaning on evolutionary and ecological theory, University of Pennsylvania researchers modeled how a tumor's various cancer cell lineages compete for dominance. Their findings help explain a surprising observation: Most metastatic tumors derive from cancer cell lineages that emerge at early stages of the disease.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Researchers listen for failure in granular materialsIn a pilot study, researchers from North Carolina State University and Haverford College have used naturally arising acoustic vibrations — or sound waves — to monitor the state of granular materials.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Four skills key in establishing nurse-led cross-sector collaborationsAbout 70 percent of all variations in health care outcomes are explained by individuals' social conditions including housing, neighborhood conditions, and income, data show. In order to establish community cultures of health where people are empowered to live healthier lives, health care providers and community sector leaders in transportation, government, schools, and businesses must collaborate
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Data from online physician review sites may be skewed and misleading to consumers, new study findsPhysician satisfaction scores on online third-party review sites tend to be skewed and can easily mislead patients, according to a new study by Cedars-Sinai investigators. This distortion may have significant consequences as consumers rely increasingly on these scores when choosing a physician.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Scientists improve ability to measure electrical properties of plasmaNew research indicates a way to more accurately measure the electrical properties of plasma when it meets a solid surface.
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Scientific American Content: Global
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"Plug and Play" Genetics, Racial Migrations and Human HistoryGenetically profiling individuals is now cheap and easy, but writing our species’ global history still calls for a lot of hard work — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Live Science
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Will 'Manhattanhenge' Always Light Up NYC Streets?Could anything disrupt NYC's "Manhattanhenge" sunsets?
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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The case of the relativistic particles solved with NASA missionsEncircling Earth are two enormous rings — called the Van Allen radiation belts — of highly energized ions and electrons. Various processes can accelerate these particles to relativistic speeds, which endanger spacecraft unlucky enough to enter these giant bands of damaging radiation. Scientists had previously identified certain factors that might cause particles in the belts to become highly ene
23h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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New model explains what we see when a massive black hole devours a starA star that wanders too close to the supermassive black hole in the center of its galaxy will be torn apart by the black hole's gravity in a violent cataclysm called a tidal disruption event (TDE), producing a bright flare of radiation. A new study provides a unified model that explains recent observations of these extreme events.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Chemical compound produces beneficial inflammation, remyelination that could help treat MSResearchers at the University of California, Riverside, report that indazole chloride, a synthetic compound that acts on one form of the body's estrogen receptors, is able to remyelinate (add new myelin to) damaged axons and alter the body's immune system — findings that could help treat multiple sclerosis. Drugs available to treat MS alter the immune system but do not induce repair of damaged ax
23h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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Woulda, coulda, shoulda: The haunting regret of failing our ideal selvesOur most enduring regrets are the ones that stem from our failure to live up to our ideal selves, according to new Cornell University research.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Numbers about inequality don't speak for themselvesIn a new research paper, Stanford scholars Rebecca Hetey and Jennifer Eberhardt propose new ways to talk about racial disparities.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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MSU neuroscientist publishes research that opens door for brain disorder therapiesJames Mazer, Montana State University associate professor of neuroscience, published findings in the journal Neuron that reveal how the brain maintains attentional focus during eye movements. The research could lead to treatments and therapies for some brain disorders.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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Want to make your factory wireless? NIST can guide you!Knowing that it will take reliable wireless communications to make the smart factory of the not-so-distant future a reality, the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) has published the first-ever set of science-based guidelines to help users select the best wireless system for any specific industrial environment, custom-design the setup to make it work, successfully deploy it, and
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Popular Science
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The EPA has a new plan that's good for business and bad for bodiesEnvironment Faster isn’t always better. The White House’s April call to streamline and make the review process more friendly to industry could change how the standards are set.
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Science : NPR
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Scientists Use Lasers To Map An Ancient City In JordanThe researchers used a technology known as LiDAR to map the city of Jerash. It's helping them understand its past, as a growing modern city encroaches on the well-preserved ancient site. (Image credit: Nasser Nasser/AP)
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The Atlantic
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Ireland Repealed Its Abortion Ban. Is Northern Ireland Next?All eyes were on the Republic of Ireland this weekend when it voted resoundingly in favor of repealing its near-total ban on abortion. In the days since, some of that attention has turned to Northern Ireland, where pressure is mounting to change its own restrictive abortion laws. Though Northern Ireland is a member of the United Kingdom, where abortions are permitted within the first 24 weeks of
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The Atlantic
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The Radical Preacher of Palo AltoHis conservative Christian family in Florida disdainfully called California the “Left Coast,” but Gregory Stevens was eager to embrace the Golden State. He’d grown up queer in a town where he believed everyone looked the same, where people referred to the non-Christian woman in the neighborhood as “the Jew,” where the khaki pants and polo shirts recently co-opted by white supremacists were an uno
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Big Think
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Report: China spotted trading with North Korea in violation of international sanctionsChina has been spotted trading with North Korea by a Japanese patrol plane. If true, the actions would violate international sanctions against North Korea. Read More
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Researchers predict materials to stabilize record-high capacity lithium-ion batteryResearchers have found ways to stabilize a new battery with a record-high charge capacity. By adding chromium or vanadium to the lithium-manganese-oxide cathode, the battery could enable smart phones and battery-powered automobiles to last more than twice as long between charges.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Flow in the asthenosphere drags tectonic plates alongNew simulations of the asthenosphere find that convective cycling and pressure-driven flow can sometimes cause Earth's most fluid layer of mantle to move even faster than the tectonic plates that ride atop it.
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Viden
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Hel nation lukker for Facebook i en månedPapua Ny Guinea vil undersøge, hvad det gør ved folk, hvis de ikke har Facebook og samtidig bekæmpe falske nyheder.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Engineers design color-changing compression bandageEngineers at MIT have developed pressure-sensing photonic fibers that they have woven into a typical compression bandage. As the bandage is stretched, the fibers change color. Using a color chart, a caregiver can stretch a bandage until it matches the color for a desired pressure, before, say, wrapping it around a patient's leg.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

The case of the relativistic particles solved with NASA missionsEncircling Earth are two enormous rings — called the Van Allen radiation belts — of highly energized ions and electrons. Various processes can accelerate these particles to relativistic speeds, which endanger spacecraft unlucky enough to enter these giant bands of damaging radiation. Scientists had previously identified certain factors that might cause particles in the belts to become highly ene
23h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Male thyroid cancer survivors face 50 percent higher risk of heart disease than womenMale thyroid cancer survivors have a nearly 50 percent higher risk of developing heart disease than women within five years of cancer diagnosis, according to a new study published in the Endocrine Society's Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism.
23h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Researchers magnify the brain in motion with every heartbeatA new imaging technique provides a promising and long-awaited diagnostic tool for spotting concussions and other brain injuries before they become life threatening.
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Data Propria Is a New Firm From a Cambridge Analytica AlumData Propria will continue the behavioral targeting pioneered by Cambridge Analytica—but founder Matt Oczkowski says this time will be different.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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In child-crippling mucolipidosis IV, drug shows hope in lab culturesMedicine offers no treatment for children crippled by mucolipidosis IV, which hits them in the first year of life and gradually becomes fatal. But researchers battling it with limited means at their disposal have captured a glimmer of hope in lab tests on an existing drug.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
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Walk this way: Novel method enables infinite walking in VRIn the ever-evolving landscape of virtual reality (VR) technology, a number of key hurdles remain. But a team of computer scientists have tackled one of the major challenges in VR that will greatly improve user experience — enabling an immersive virtual experience while being physically limited to one's actual, real-world space. The research team will present their work at SIGGRAPH 2018.
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Scientific American Content: Global
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Can Yellow Warblers Adapt to a Warmer Climate?Scientists work to understand vulnerability to global warming at the level of animals’ DNA — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Science : NPR
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Canada Buys Controversial Oil Pipeline, Ensures Its ExpansionThis is a key part of Canada's effort to boost oil exports to Asian markets — but the plan has been protested by indigenous groups and environmental activists. (Image credit: Bloomberg via Getty Images)
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