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Nyheder2018maj31

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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Researchers have identified 121 giant planets that may have habitable moonsWe've all heard about the search for life on other planets, but what about looking on other moons?
48min
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Italy's oldest olive oil discovered in peculiar potChemical analysis conducted on ancient pottery discovered from the Early Bronze Age proves Italians started using olive oil 700 years sooner than what's previously been recorded.
9h
Ingeniøren
6
Nye EU-regler skal mindske mængden af plast i haveneFor at mindske mængden af plast i verdenshavene anbefaler Europa-Kommissionen nye regler for plast. De kommer til at dække forbud, oplysningskampagner og afgifter til producenter.
1h

LATEST

Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Image: Black hole bounty captured in the center of the Milky WayAstronomers have discovered evidence for thousands of black holes located near the center of our Milky Way galaxy using data from NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory.
now
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories

Energy efficient homes attract premium sale and rental prices, study findsA new study has found people are willing to pay a premium for energy efficient homes, prompting calls for a mandatory energy efficiency rating (EER) disclosure system to be rolled out Australia-wide.
6min
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Let's not wait a hundred years to close the gender pay gap4th April 2018 marked the deadline in the United Kingdom for companies with more than 250 employees to submit their gender pay gap results.
6min
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Grad student devises simple, inexpensive technique for examining the material of the futureWill Dickinson was facing a conundrum.
6min
Ingeniøren

Eksperter: Nye robotter kan ikke skabe fremtidens fabrik aleneDet er ikke nok 'bare' at udvikle robotter. Industrien er nødt til at gentænke sine processer og fremstillingsmetoder, hvis eksempelvis bilfabrikkerne skal automatiseres yderligere, mener amerikanske automationseksperter.
13min
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Less is more when it comes to predicting molecules' conductivityForward-thinking scientists in the 1970s suggested that circuits could be built using molecules instead of wires, and over the past decades that technology has become reality. A new paper by two University of Chicago chemists presents an innovative method that cuts computational costs and improves accuracy by calculating interactions between pairs of electrons and extrapolating those to the rest o
29min
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
2
Soaking up the water and the sweat—a new super desiccantUNSW scientists have developed a new carbon-based material that could revolutionise moisture control in applications as diverse as electronics, packaging, air conditioning – and keeping footwear fresh.
30min
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
2
Paper sensor to speed up sepsis diagnosis wins innovation competitionA student-founded startup creating paper sensors to monitor breathing rates of hospital patients has won the White City Innovators' Programme.
30min
The Atlantic

Trump’s Pick to Lead Refugee Efforts Is a Critic of ImmigrationWhen President Trump picked Ronald Mortensen to head the State Department office that coordinates the U.S. response to global refugee crises , he listed the nominee’s credentials that make him suitable for the job: Mortensen, a statement issued last week said, was a retired foreign service officer who had served in France, Australia, Mauritania, and Chad. For the past 15 years, he had worked with
32min
Dagens Medicin

Otte foreninger giver indspark til kommende psykiatriplanLægeforeningen er med i nyt indspark til den kommende psykiatriplan, hvor et forslag bl.a. går på at samle misbrugsbehandlingen i regionerne.
32min
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
2
Researchers release risk-management roadmap to denuclearization in North KoreaImmediate denuclearization of North Korea is unrealistic, said Stanford scholars in an in-depth report released by the Stanford Center for International Security and Cooperation (CISAC).
36min
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
1
Pig organs for human patients: A challenge fit for CRISPROver the past few years, researchers led by George Church have made important strides toward engineering the genomes of pigs to make their cells compatible with the human body. So many think that it's possible that, with the help of CRISPR technology, a healthy heart for a patient in desperate need might one day come from a pig.
36min
Science : NPR
8
New Research On Parents And FavoritismParents may think they treat their children equally, but new research shows that parents show bias when forced to choose between spending on sons and daughters.
39min
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
3
How many people can China feed?Tiziana Smith has had her mind on water for years. The San Antonio native learned about the importance of preserving the city's water resources in grade school—and has used that knowledge as a springboard into her research at MIT.
42min
Ingeniøren
4
Svensk Datatilsyn til Google: Retten til at blive glemt er globalRækkevidden af retten til at blive glemt er et fundamentalt vigtigt spørgsmål, mener Datainspektionen i Sverige
43min
Ingeniøren

Big data-analyse skal forudsige populære koncerter på SmukfestEt samarbejde mellem Smukfest og IBM vil sammensætte alt fra lokationsdata til Spotify-aktivitet for at gøre festivalen klogere på gæsternes adfærd.
43min
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
1
Less is more when it comes to predicting molecules' conductivityThe smaller and smarter that phones and devices become, the greater the need to build smaller circuits. Forward-thinking scientists in the 1970s suggested that circuits could be built using molecules instead of wires, and over the past decades that technology has become reality.
48min
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
1
Anthropologist plots new use for motion-capture technologyJar Jar Binks and Gollum: Two characters hailing from entirely disparate cinematic universes, yet linked in perpetuity by the same groundbreaking tool that brought them to life in "Star Wars: Episode I – The Phantom Menace" and the "The Lord of the Rings" film series, respectively.
48min
The Atlantic
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Atheists Are Sometimes More Religious Than ChristiansAmericans are deeply religious people—and atheists are no exception. Western Europeans are deeply secular people—and Christians are no exception. These twin statements are generalizations, but they capture the essence of a fascinating finding in a new study about Christian identity in Western Europe. By surveying almost 25,000 people in 15 countries in the region, and comparing the results with d
50min
Dagens Medicin

Se de nye læger optaget i Kraks Blå Bog12 læger er blandt de 173 nyoptagne personer i Kraks Blå Bog.
1h
NYT > Science
17
The Underground Science Festival Has New Faces to Introduce to YouA weeklong festival at Caveat combines science and humor to bring attention to underrepresented scientists.
1h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
47
Scientists break down tuberculosis structureScientists from the University of British Columbia have taken a crucial step towards starving out tuberculosis, following research into how the infection grows in the body.
2h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Cell-like nanorobots clear bacteria and toxins from bloodEngineers at the University of California San Diego have developed tiny ultrasound-powered robots that can swim through blood, removing harmful bacteria along with the toxins they produce. These proof-of-concept nanorobots could one day offer a safe and efficient way to detoxify and decontaminate biological fluids.
2h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
3
Climate change increasing risks of lightning-ignited fires, study findsFires ignited by lightning have and will likely continue to increase across the Mediterranean and temperate regions in the Southern Hemisphere under a warmer climate, according to a new study co-led by a Portland State University researcher.
3h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
9
Japan whale hunt killed 122 pregnant minkesJapan killed 122 pregnant minke whales during a highly controversial annual whaling expedition that Tokyo defends as scientific research but conservationists call "gruesome and unnecessary."
3h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
4
Current lava flows are hottest, fastest of latest eruptionThe hottest and fastest-moving lava of Kilauea volcano's latest eruption spread across new parts of the Big Island Wednesday, forcing officials to order evacuations in two coastal neighborhoods over fears that the rapidly advancing flows could cut off dwindling escape routes.
3h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
1
Smartphone market to stay cool this year: forecastInternational Data Corporation forecast Wednesday that global smartphone sales would cool this year before heating up with help from new 5G networks and India's vibrant market.
3h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
4
Amazon blocks Australia from global sites over taxUS internet giant Amazon will block Australian shoppers from its international websites to counter new tax laws on online purchases, it announced Thursday.
3h
Ingeniøren

Forældre i Aarhus: Slet vores børns personnumre fra trivselsmålingLokalafdeling af Skole og Forældre beder Undervisningsministeriet om at anonymisere trivselsmålinger for aarhusianske skoleelever.
4h
Ingeniøren
3
Bioposer passer ikke ind i det danske affaldssystemSelv om alle landets kommuner fra 2023 skal indsamle madaffald fra husholdningerne, vil der kun få steder være grund til at bruge bionedbrydelige poser.
4h
Live Science
15
Accelerometer vs. Gyroscope: What's the Difference?Many different sensors exist to identify elements like acceleration and orientation, and the most popular of this are the accelerometer and gyroscope. But each provides a different set of information.
5h
Viden
22
Kampsveder du i skolen? Vis din lærer denne her artikelTemperaturer har stor betydning for, hvordan man klarer sig i skolen, viser undersøgelse.
5h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
4
Climate change increasing risks of lightning-ignited fires, study findsFires ignited by lightning have and will likely continue to increase across the Mediterranean and temperate regions in the Southern Hemisphere under a warmer climate, according to a new study co-led by a Portland State University researcher.
5h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Study estimates increased death rate in Puerto Rico in months after Hurricane MariaThe mortality rate in Puerto Rico rose by 62 percent [95 percent confidence interval (CI) 11percent to 114 percent] after Hurricane Maria, according to a new study led by researchers from Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. The study was conducted in January and February 2018, in collaboration with colleagues from Carlos Albizu University in Puerto Rico and the University of Colorado School
5h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
3
More important for heart patients to be active than thinA new study shows that it is much more important to exercise than to lose weight for patients with coronary heart disease conditions, such as angina pectoris and heart attacks.
5h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Social ties could preserve memory, slow brain agingA strong social network could be the key to preserving memory. New research from The Ohio State University found that mice housed in groups had better memories and healthier brains than animals that lived in pairs.
5h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
5
Some blood stem cells are better than othersIn your body, blood stem cells produce approximately 10 billion new white blood cells, which are also known as immune cells, each and every day. Even more remarkably, if some of these blood stem cells fail to do their part, then other blood stem cells pick up their slack and overproduce whichever specific type of immune cell is lacking.
6h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
24
Recycled electrical products lead to hazardous chemicals appearing in everyday itemsHazardous chemicals such as bromine, antimony and lead are finding their way into food-contact items and other everyday products because manufacturers are using recycled electrical equipment as a source of black plastic, according to a new study.
6h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
2
Promise of faster, more accessible schizophrenia diagnosisA new study shows how the hand-held device RETeval may prove to be a more accessible way to diagnose schizophrenia, predict relapse and symptom severity, and assess treatment effectiveness.
7h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
7
One-step, 3D printing for multimaterial projectsNew WSU research could potentially help manufacturers reduce 3D printing manufacturing steps and use one machine to make complex products with multiple parts in one operation. Until now, 3D printing, also known as additive manufacturing, has been limited to using mostly one material at a time.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
3
Promising news from biomedicine: DNA origami more resilient than previously understoodStudy shows these nanostructures can survive in extremely low magnesium concentrations, opening up a broad spectrum of biophysical and biomedical applications.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
4
Body knows best: A natural healing mechanism for inflammatory bowel diseaseThe findings suggest that boosting signals in certain cells and not in others might even help treat colon cancer.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
28
New research predicts likelihood that one will believe conspiracy theoriesTwo new social psychology studies predict the likelihood that one will believe conspiracy beliefs or theories.
7h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
8
Iron-sulfur cluster research offers new avenues of investigating diseaseResearchers have discovered that disruptions in the construction of iron-sulfur clusters can lead to the buildup of fat droplets in certain cells.
7h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
7
'Hidden' driver discovered that helps prime the anti-tumor immune responseResearchers have used systems biology approaches to reveal key details about regulation of immune function, including T cells that are central to cancer immunotherapy.
7h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Goodbye 'stress granules': Study expands possibilities for treating neurological diseasesCell biologists have deepened understanding of proteins associated with neurodegenerative diseases. The findings could open up new treatment approaches for disorders including Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), among others.
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cognitive science
1
New hope for the blind Worlds first 3d printed cornea ever madesubmitted by /u/davyeminy [link] [comments]
8h
The Scientist RSS

Life Reemerged Just Years After Dinosaur-Killing Asteroid ImpactNutrient-rich water helped marine organisms reinhabit Chicxulub crater relatively quickly after the mass-extinction event.
8h
Science : NPR
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Kilauea's Fast-Moving Lava Threatens Another Community, Volcanic Haze Reaches GuamAs eruptions continue to terrorize people in Hawaii, volcanic haze has drifted across 4,000 miles to bother residents of the Mariana Islands, officials say. (Image credit: Mario Tama/Getty Images)
8h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

A novel data-driven method to personalize cancer treatmentIdentify and prioritize treatment options based on a patient's profile of genetic alterations is a major challenge in personalized cancer medicine. Data-driven approaches such as PanDrugs can help to this end. This new computational resource has been developed by researchers from the Bioinformatics Unit at the Spanish National Cancer Research Centre and is described in a paper published in Genome
9h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
1
Welfare backlash tied to white fear of declining statusWhite Americans' fear of losing their socioeconomic standing in the face of demographic change may be driving opposition to welfare programs, even though whites are major beneficiaries of government poverty assistance, according to new research from the University of California, Berkeley, and Stanford University.
9h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
17
How to build a brain: Discovery answers evolutionary mysteryResearchers have discovered a fundamental process by which brains are built, which may have profound implications for understanding neurodevelopmental conditions like autism and epilepsy. The study also answers an evolutionary mystery about how the delicate balance between different types of brain cells might be maintained across species with vastly different brain sizes.
9h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Flexible and dynamic transport solution for future 5G communications developedA consortium of 20 industry-leading companies and organizations has announced the successful completion of the European research project 5G-Crosshaul. The three-year effort has delivered what is now the de-facto concept for an integrated 5G transport network, a crucial step towards the real-world implementation of the future 5G communications system.
9h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Having an abortion does not lead to depressionHaving an abortion does not increase a woman's risk for depression, according to a new study of nearly 400,000 women. Previous research has found abortion does not harm women's mental health, yet studies claiming that it does have been used to justify state policies that restrict access to abortion in the US. This study's findings suggest those policies are misguided.
9h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
23
Magic in metal could help put excess carbon dioxide to good useA researcher has identified a kind of magic in a metal that may be just what the doctor ordered for Planet Earth. He says the colorful metal, known as bismuth, could help reduce rising carbon dioxide levels in the atmosphere and provide sustainable routes to making fuels.
9h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
5
Sensory-based food education encourages children to eat vegetables, berries and fruitSensory-based food education given to 3-5 year-old children in the kindergarten increases their willingness to choose vegetables, berries and fruit, according to a new study. Sensory-based food education offers new tools for promoting healthy dietary habits in early childhood education and care.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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From Haifa to Tokyo: Medical detectives team up on selenoprotein1/EPT1Ordinary tests couldn't diagnose an Israeli infant's developmental disorder. Until they completed whole-exome sequencing, his doctors were stumped. After finding a homozygous rare allele, they teamed up with Japanese experts on the affected enzyme to describe its hitherto unknown role in myelination.
9h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Study of 'SuperAgers' offers genetic clues to performanceRecent studies have shown that SuperAgers have less evidence of brain atrophy, have thicker parts of the brain related to memory, and lower prevalence of the pathological changes associated with Alzheimer's disease. Now, a study suggests that having resilient memory performance during aging could be inherited, and that a particular gene might be associated with SuperAgers.
9h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Now, you can hold a copy of your brain in the palm of your handMedical imaging technologies like MRI and CT scans produce high-resolution images as a series of 'slices,' making them an obvious complement to 3D printers, which also print in slices. However, the process of manually 'thresholding' medical scans to define objects to be printed is prohibitively expensive and time-consuming. A new method converts medical data into dithered bitmaps, allowing custom
9h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
6
Key molecule for flu infection identifiedAfter decades of research, a research team has discovered the key receptor molecule that enhances the infection of the influenza A virus, providing a novel target for anti-flu drug development.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Activity simulator could eventually teach robots tasks like making coffee or setting the tableRecently, computer scientists have been working on teaching machines to do a wider range of tasks around the house. Researchers demonstrate 'VirtualHome,' a system that can simulate detailed household tasks and then have artificial 'agents' execute them, opening up the possibility of one day teaching robots to do such tasks.
9h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
8
Global warming hits poorest hardestAustralia will still be the lucky country when it comes to changes in local climate as a result of climate change if global average surface temperatures reach the 1.5°C or 2°C limit set by the Paris agreement.
9h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Swabbing cesarean-born babies with vaginal fluids potentially unsafe and unnecessary'Vaginal seeding,' whereby cesarean-delivered babies are immediately swabbed with the mother's vaginal fluids, is unjustified and potentially unsafe, finds a comprehensive scientific review of this practice. Differences in bacterial populations between cesarean- and vaginally delivered babies, thought to account for the greater risk of health problems suffered by cesarean-born babies in later life
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Kicking the car(bon) habit better for air pollution than technology revolutionChanging our lifestyles and the way we travel could have as big — if not more of an impact on carbon dioxide transport emissions, as electric vehicles and the transport technology revolution, according to new research. The study uses Scotland as an example and suggests that, radical lifestyle change can show quicker results than the gradual transition to Electric Vehicles and phasing out of conve
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Hormone therapy may lead to improved cognitive functionHormones affect just about everything that goes on in a woman's body, from reproductive function and sexual libido to weight gain and overall mood. A new study shows how, in the right dosage and combination, hormones also may slow cognitive decline in postmenopausal women as they age.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
5
Increasing heat is driving off clouds that dampen California wildfiresSunny California may be getting too sunny. Increasing summer temperatures brought on by a combination of intensifying urbanization and warming climate are driving off once common low-lying morning clouds in many southern coastal areas of the state, leading to increased risk of wildfires, says a new study.
9h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
13
Welfare backlash tied to white fear of declining statusWhite Americans' fear of losing their socioeconomic standing in the face of demographic change may be driving opposition to welfare programs, even though whites are major beneficiaries of government poverty assistance, according to new research from the University of California, Berkeley, and Stanford University.
9h
Feed: All Latest
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Tesla’s Braking System Gets an Over-the-Air UpdateShortly after Consumer Reports panned the Model 3 for its long stopping distance, Elon pushed a change through the ether to adjust the antilock algorithm.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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What happens when a massive black hole devours a star?A theoretical astrophysicist has recently provided the scientific community with a much-needed computer model. It is necessary for the investigation of tidal disruption events — rare, but extremely forceful events taking place in the center of galaxies.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Huddling for survival: monkeys with more social partners can winter betterWild monkeys which have more social partners form larger huddles in adverse weather and have a better chance of surviving winter, new research has found. The study is the first to show that such social bonding may be connected to higher 'fitness' — the term used by scientists to measure of how well animals can cope with their local ecological conditions, usually measured by reproductive success a
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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New moms' voices get lower after pregnancyThe pitch of new mothers' voices temporarily drops after they have had their first baby.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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After 40 years in limbo: Styrene is probably carcinogenic"Possibly carcinogenic and should be investigated more closely." For forty years, this has been the conclusion of researchers who have been unsure of whether there is an increased risk of cancer associated with styrene. But now an impartial working group has upgraded the warning. Styrene is upgraded from possibly carcinogenic to probably carcinogenic for humans, and the decision is largely based o
10h
Futurity.org
3
Steelhead trout adapted to lake life in just 120 yearsSteelhead trout, members of the salmon family that live and grow in the Pacific Ocean, genetically adapted to the freshwater environment of Lake Michigan in less than 120 years, according to new research. Steelhead were intentionally introduced into Lake Michigan in the late 1800s in order to bolster recreational and commercial fisheries. In their native range, which extends from California to Ru
10h
Live Science
89
The Oldest-Known Tree in Europe Is Having a Growth SpurtAt 1,230 years old, this is the oldest officially dated tree in Europe, but others could be older.
10h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Ban e-cig flavors and misleading adverts to protect youth, says global respiratory groupIn a statement published in the European Respiratory Journal, a coalition of respiratory doctors and scientists from six continents have warned of the dangers posed to children and adolescents by electronic cigarettes. They are calling for an immediate ban on flavorings and on marketing e-cigarettes as lower risk alternatives to children and adolescents.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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XENON1T experimental data establishes most stringent limit on dark matterExperimental results from the XENON1T dark matter detector limit the effective size of dark matter particles to one-trillionth of one-trillionth of a centimeter squared — the most stringent limit yet determined for dark matter as established by the world's most sensitive detector.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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how the brain maintains attentional focus during eye movementsNew findings reveal how the brain maintains attentional focus during eye movements. The research could lead to treatments and therapies for some brain disorders.
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Futurity.org
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Could this eye device detect schizophrenia?A portable device common in optometrists’ offices may hold the key to faster diagnosis of schizophrenia, predicting relapse, and symptom severity and assessing treatment effectiveness, according to a new study. In the study, which appears in the Journal of Abnormal Psychology , researchers used RETeval, a hand-held device developed to record electrical activity from the retina, to replicate and e
10h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
2
Researchers listen for failure in granular materialsIn a pilot study, researchers from North Carolina State University and Haverford College have used naturally arising acoustic vibrations — or sound waves — to monitor the state of granular materials.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Novel RNA-modifying tool corrects genetic diseasesA new tool opens the possibility of creating drugs that can be taken conveniently as pills to correct genetic diseases.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Having an emotional group feeling boosts multiday sports eventsPulling fans into an emotionally connected group atmosphere can enhance brand recall and may secure repeat attendance. That's the key message of a study that analyzed the feelings of fans at a six-day, biannual international track-and-field event.
10h
New on MIT Technology Review
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FDA halts one of the first human CRISPR studies before it begins
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Futurity.org
2
‘Marshmallow test’ may not pick out successful kids, after allA replication study of the well-known “marshmallow test”—a famous psychological experiment designed to measure children’s self-control—suggests that being able to delay gratification at a young age may not be as predictive of later life outcomes as was previously thought. The replication study, which appears in Psychological Science , uses a larger and more diverse sample of children to re-examin
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Futurity.org
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Poll: Half of older adults say ‘no thanks’ to patient portalsA new poll suggests that many older adults still aren’t using online systems to communicate with the doctors and other health care providers they rely on—despite the widespread availability of such systems. Only about half of people aged 50 to 80 have set up an account on a secure online access site, or “patient portal,” that their health care provider offers, according to the new report from the
11h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Metabolically 'healthy' obesity still linked to higher risk of cardiovascular diseaseWomen who are obese face an increased risk of cardiovascular disease, even if they have maintained good metabolic health for decades.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Insufficient vitamin D linked to miscarriage among women with prior pregnancy lossAmong women planning to conceive after a pregnancy loss, those who had sufficient levels of vitamin D were more likely to become pregnant and have a live birth, compared to women with insufficient levels of the vitamin, according to an analysis by researchers at the National Institutes of Health. This study appears in The Lancet Diabetes & Endocrinology.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Researchers magnify the brain in motion with every heartbeatA new imaging technique provides a promising and long-awaited diagnostic tool for spotting concussions and other brain injuries before they become life threatening.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
2
Engineers design color-changing compression bandageEngineers have developed pressure-sensing photonic fibers that they have woven into a typical compression bandage. As the bandage is stretched, the fibers change color. Using a color chart, a caregiver can stretch a bandage until it matches the color for a desired pressure, before, say, wrapping it around a patient's leg.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Too little sleep in child­hood may have neg­at­ive ef­fects on cho­les­terol levelsAdequate sleep duration and sleep quality may support healthy lipid profile among children and youth, according to new research. In addition, earlier circadian preference in childhood may contribute positively to the future health of the child.
11h
NYT > Science
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After Years of Trying, Virginia Finally Will Expand MedicaidSweeping Republican losses in the state’s legislative elections last year laid the groundwork for a deal with Democrats. Expanding the program is a big step forward for Obamacare.
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Futurity.org
2
Why divorce can come with an early death riskDivorce is linked to a wide range of poor health outcomes, including early death. A new study suggests two reasons why: a greater likelihood of smoking and lower levels of physical activity. “We were trying to fill in the gap of evidence linking marital status and early mortality,” says Kyle Bourassa, a psychology doctoral student at the University of Arizona and lead author of the study, which a
11h
Feed: All Latest
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Why Russian Journalist Arkady Babchenko Faked His Own Murder—and What Happens NowRussian war correspondent Arkady Babchenko was reported dead Tuesday. On Wednesday, he showed up at a press conference, very much alive.
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Popular Science
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You could be eating a side of e-waste with your takeoutHealth For once, recycling isn't the best idea. Some plastic products, from takeout containers to children’s toys, are made from black plastic e-waste—meaning they’re contaminated with dangerous heavy metals.
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Science : NPR
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Hawaii's Volcanic Eruption Draws Scientific InterestThe eruption of Kilauea on Hawaii's Big Island is causing local devastation, but it is an exciting research opportunity for volcanologists. (Image credit: U.S. Geological Survey)
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Live Science
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Can Taking Ambien Really Lead to Tweets Like Roseanne's?After a public uproar following a racist post she made on Twitter, actress Roseanne Barr tweeted today (May 30) that she wrote the offensive tweet while on Ambien, a sedative used to treat insomnia.
11h
The Atlantic
4
The Atlantic Daily: Realistic SolutionsWhat We’re Following Political Partners: President Trump’s speech at a rally for Marsha Blackburn didn’t focus very closely on the current congresswoman’s Senate campaign. But that might not matter to Blackburn, who appeared to see the event as an opportunity to show she stands with the president. Another one of Trump’s allies in Congress is House Majority Whip Steve Scalise, who was shot at a co
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The Atlantic
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The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: The Other Kim-Trump Summit-Written by Elaine Godfrey ( @elainejgodfrey ) and Lena Felton ( @lenakfelton ) Today in 5 Lines President Trump expressed regret on Twitter for choosing Jeff Sessions as his attorney general. His tweets came after The New York Times reported that Trump asked Sessions to reverse his recusal from the Russia probe in March 2017. Trump signed the “Right to Try Act,” which allows terminally ill patie
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Futurity.org
2
Light opens tiny ‘Ziploc bags’ for drug deliveryResearchers have created tiny, resealable synthetic packets similar to Ziploc bags that can release their contents on cue—in this case, when exposed to light of a particular wavelength. Such technology could be useful for medicine or other applications, the researchers say. “One could imagine making these to custom-deliver medicine to specific parts of the body, or to release fertilizer or cleanu
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Latest Headlines | Science News
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Treating roads with oil and gas wastewater may spread harmful pollutionWhen spread on roads, wastewater from oil and gas production can leach radium and other contaminants into the environment, a new study finds.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Paradoxically, environmental noise helps preserve the coherence of a quantum systemIn work that could lead to scalable quantum computers, scientists have shown that thanks to the 'quantum Zeno effect,' with a three-particle system, that they can use dephasing — a process that normally would reduce the coherence — to paradoxically maintain coherence in a quantum system.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Insomnia is a likely long-term side effect of stroke, study findsStroke patients experience sustained problems with insomnia potentially reducing their ability to relearn key skills and putting them at increased risk of depression, a new study finds.
12h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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In child-crippling mucolipidosis IV, drug shows hope in lab culturesMedicine offers no treatment for children crippled by mucolipidosis IV, which hits them in the first year of life and gradually becomes fatal. But researchers battling it with limited means at their disposal have captured a glimmer of hope in lab tests on an existing drug.
12h
The Atlantic
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Why Walmart Is Paying for Its Employees to Go to CollegeOn Wednesday, Walmart announced that it would offer to pay, at least in part, for its 1.4 million employees in the United States—part-time, full-time, and salaried—to go to college, with some restrictions. Though it is not the retailer’s first foray into the world of subsidizing education for its employees, it makes it the latest big employer to publicly declare it wants to help its employees get
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The Atlantic
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Pusha T, Drake, and the Limits of Rap BeefLast Friday, Pusha T dropped Daytona , a sharp, sinister 21-minute missive largely finding the rapper in familiar territory: boasting, most often about his cocaine-dealing exploits. Closing out the album’s seven-track run was “Infrared,” a lyrical dig addressing the dubious artistry of Drake, a longtime thorn in Push’s side. Push came out swinging in the first verse with a direct attack on Drake’
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Latest Headlines | Science News
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The first land-walking vertebrates may have emerged from salty estuariesEarly tetrapods were transitional creatures — not only between land and water, but also between fresh and salty environments.
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New on MIT Technology Review
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The machine vision challenge to better analyze satellite images of EarthMachine vision has revolutionized many areas of technology, but satellite image analysis isn’t one of them. That may be about to change.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Sniffing out real trufflesAt a cost of thousands of dollars per pound, truffles are an expensive food. The fungi are prized for their distinctive aroma, and many foods claim truffles or their aromas as ingredients. But some of these foods may actually contain a much less pricey synthetic truffle compound. To help detect food fraud, researchers report that they have developed a technique that discriminates between these nat
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Impaired energy production may explain why brain is susceptible to age-related diseasesBy studying neurons generated directly from skin cells, researchers showed the impact of aged mitochondria on brain cells.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Single injection alleviates chemotherapy pain for months in miceResearchers found that treating mice with a single spinal injection of a protein called AIBP — and thus switching 'off' TLR4, a pro-inflammatory molecule — prevented and reversed inflammation and cellular events associated with pain processing. The treatment alleviated chemotherapy pain in mice for two months with no side effects.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Scientists built own microscope to decipher 'superbugs'A handmade super-microscope — capable of seeing the actual building blocks of a bacterial cell wall — has helped researchers decipher how bacteria are able to literally build a wall against the immune system, leading to often deadly disease. This will provide researchers with key knowledge to disarm 'superbug' resistance to the immune system.
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NYT > Science
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Trilobites: Boulder-Size Clues to How Humans Settled the AmericasScientists have discovered what they say is “direct evidence” supporting the theory that Ice Age migrants from Asia traveled down the Pacific Coast, rather than through North America’s interior.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Seismometer readings could offer debris flow early warningA debris flow that struck Montecito, Calif., in January was detected by a nearby seismometer.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Older men with higher levels of sex hormones could be less religious, study suggestsThe level of sex hormones such as testosterone in a man's body could influence his religiosity. A new study now adds to the growing body of evidence that religiosity is not only influenced by upbringing or psychological makeup, but physiological factors could also play a role.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Genes found related to the reduction of proteins that contribute to Alzheimer's onsetThe creation of a map of the molecular network in the aging brain reveals two new Alzheimer's disease target genes.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Prediction method for epileptic seizures developedEngineers have developed a machine-learning and AI-powered algorithm to predict the onset of epileptic seizures.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
4
Stronger alcohol policies help reduce alcohol-related crash deaths in USStronger alcohol policies, including those targeting both excessive drinking and driving while impaired by alcohol, reduce the likelihood of alcohol-related motor vehicle crash deaths.
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New Scientist – News
25
We need to grab some rocks from Mars – let’s just get on with itA mission to collect samples from the Red Planet and return them to Earth is our best chance of finding life on Mars, says Joelle Renstrom
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New Scientist – News
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Women aren’t being told real risks of cervical cancer screeningEfforts to prevent cervical cancer seem so straightforward that few women question them, but unnecessary treatment can cause miscarriages and premature births
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New Scientist – News
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Drugs that help our cells tidy up might extend lifespanRamping up the body’s ability to remove damaged cells has been found to stave off organ damage and cancer in mice – could a drug get the same effect in humans?
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Live Science
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Scientists Have Figured Out How to 3D-Print Part of the Human EyeIf you damage your cornea, the odds of eventually getting a new one may have just gone up.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Price competition for generic drugs linked to increase in manufacturing-related recallsResearchers from three universities have found that extreme price competition in the generic pharmaceutical market — designed to make medications more affordable — may be putting more patients at serious health risk, as evidenced by a higher number of product recalls caused by manufacturing-related problems.
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Science | The Guardian
2
Weatherwatch: beyond the ordinary – noctilucent or 'night' cloudsThe second in an occasional series on meteorological terminology: the rare and luminous clouds that form in an upper layer of Earth’s atmosphere The majority of our weather occurs in the bottom 4% or so of Earth’s atmosphere, in the troposphere , which extends around 10 miles (16 km) up from the surface. One type of cloud, however, is far more remote and exists in the upper parts of the mesospher
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Scientists show how brain circuit generates anxietyNeuroscientists have identified a neural circuit in the amygdala, the brain's seat of emotion processing, that gives rise to anxiety. Their insight has revealed the critical role of a molecule called dynorphin, which could serve as a target for treatment of anxiety-related disorders including post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD).
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
6
Understanding the origin of Alzheimer's, looking for a cureResearchers look at the promising role played by the BMI1 gene, which could someday help mitigate or even reverse the disease.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
4
Tree species vital to restoring disturbed tropical forestsA family of trees with high drought tolerance could be crucial in restoring the world's deforested and degraded tropical lands, according to new research.
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Science : NPR
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For Some Hard-To-Find Tumors, Doctors See Promise In Artificial IntelligenceScientists are training computers to read CT scans in the hopes that they can catch pancreatic cancer early. (Image credit: Courtesy of The Felix Project)
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The Atlantic
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The Bizarre Not-Murder of Arkady BabchenkoThe news was grim. It was a murder. The apparent victim: Russian soldier-turned-reporter Arkady Babchenko. Obituaries were written, memorials were erected, and mourners gathered outside of his apartment. And, then, something utterly remarkable happened. Babchenko appeared, alive, at a press conference about his own death. Journalists gasped and then applauded as the supposedly dead Babchenko, kno
13h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
9
US judge rejects Kaspersky suit against govt ban on its productsA Washington judge on Wednesday rejected a lawsuit by Russian computer security company Kaspersky Lab against the ban on use of its anti-virus software by government agencies.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
8
New research predicts likelihood that one will believe conspiracy theoriesConspiracy theories about government officials and the institutions they represent are widespread and rooted deep in U.S. history according to the co-author of two new social psychology studies which predict the likelihood that one will believe conspiracy beliefs or theories.
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Latest Headlines | Science News
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Oldest known lizard fossil pushes group’s origins back 75 million yearsCT scan reveals hidden identity of an unusual lizard fossil found years ago in the Italian Alps.
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First Stem Cell Transplant In Utero SuccessfulDoctors treated the fetus, who has alpha thalassemia major, with cells from her mother's bone marrow.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
5
Construction delays make new nuclear power plants costlier than everThe cost of building new nuclear power plants is nearly 20 percent higher than expected due to delays, a new analysis has found.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
4
New drugs could also be deployed against lung and pancreatic cancersA new anti-cancer drug may be effective against a wider range of cancers than previously thought. Using a mouse model and samples taken from cancer patients, a team has shown that a new class of drugs known as SHP2 inhibitors is also effective against aggressive, hard-to-treat tumors such as lung and pancreatic cancers. Clinical trials currently underway had previously excluded patients with these
13h
Live Science
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This 240-Million-Year-Old Reptile Is the 'Mother of All Lizards'The tiny creature gave rise to all squamates, a group that includes lizards and snakes.
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Feed: All Latest
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The Bleak State of Federal Government CybersecurityNearly three out of four federal agencies is unprepared for a cyberattack, and there's no system in place to fix it.
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The Atlantic
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I Talked to Zionists—Then I Was Disinvited by a Major Muslim GroupOn Tuesday, I was disinvited from the 55th annual conference of the Islamic Society of North America, which proclaims itself one of the leading American Muslim organizations. My crimes? Talking to Zionists, writing an article about it, and thanking God for a bowel movement. In a one-page letter, the program committee chair wrote that “our Muslim speakers” are “expected to support broadly our valu
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Two-pronged antibodies draw immune killers directly to cancer cellsDubbed 'T-cell engaging bi-specific antibodies,' these cancer combatants attack malignant cells but leave healthy cells untouched.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Scientists show how tularemia bacteria trick cells to cause diseaseFrancisella tularensis is the bacterium that causes tularemia, a life-threatening disease spread to humans via contact with an infected animal or through mosquito, tick or deer fly bites. Scientists have unraveled the process by which the bacteria cause disease, finding that F. tularensis tricks host cell mitochondria, which produce energy for the cell, in two different phases of infection. These
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Dana Foundation
7
It’s Tick Season Again: From the ArchivesAs North America heats up for summer, so does the activity of ticks, mosquitoes, and fleas, whose bites can carry diseases like Lyme, dengue and Zika, and plague. Between 2004 and 2016, more than 640,000 cases of these diseases were reported , and nine new germs spread by bites from infected mosquitoes and ticks were discovered or introduced in the US, according to the Centers for Disease Control
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Scientific American Content: Global
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A Matter of Taste: Can a Sweet Tooth Be Switched Off in the Brain?A study describes the complex brain circuitry that lets us identify, savor (or recoil from) a taste — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Snap Is No Facebook, and Spiegel Insists He Wants It That WaySpeaking at a technology conference Snap CEO Evan Spiegel takes a few digs at rival Facebook, prompting a reply tweet from a Facebook executive.
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Big Think
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Study: People who need to wear glasses are more intelligentPeople who displayed higher intelligence were 28% more likely to wear glasses. Read More
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Canceling 'Roseanne' Wasn't About Conviction, It Was About CapitalABC acted swiftly yesterday, but it may not be making the grand gesture of civility many seem to think it has.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
2
Electric vehicle startup SF Motors takes over Indiana plantAn electric vehicle startup announced Wednesday that it is retooling an Indiana factory and hopes to conduct trial runs for two new lines of vehicles by the end of the year.
14h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
3
New research predicts likelihood that one will believe conspiracy theoriesTwo new social psychology studies co-authored by Lehigh University researchers predict the likelihood that one will believe conspiracy beliefs or theories.
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Popular Science
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This tiny, laser-powered RoboFly could sniff out forest fires and gas leaksNexus Media News Researchers hope the mechanical bug could help scientists save the climate. A team of mechanical engineers from the University of Washington has developed a wireless insect that holds the potential to sniff out methane gas leaks and perform…
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The Atlantic
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How Russia Tries to Catch Its ‘Criminals’ by Abusing InterpolIt was over almost as soon as it began, but not before it was live-tweeted. Bill Browder, the hedge-fund manager and Putin fan turned human-rights activist and anti-Putin crusader, was in Spain to give evidence in anti-corruption proceedings implicating the Russian government, according to his Twitter account. And then he tweeted this , accompanied by a photo apparently from the back of a Spanish
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
25
Surgical technique improves sensation, control of prosthetic limbResearchers have invented a new neural interface and communication paradigm that is able to send movement commands from the central nervous system to a robotic prosthesis, and relay proprioceptive feedback describing movement of the joint back to the central nervous system in return.
14h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
26
Cellular recycling process is key to longer, healthier lifeBuilding on two decades of research, investigators have determined that 'cellular housekeeping' can extend the lifespan and healthspan of mammals.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
14
New tool improves fishing efficiency and sustainabilityNew software targets most abundant fishing grounds and reduces catch of unwanted or protected species using satellite data, maps and observations.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
66
Cometh the cyborg: Improved integration of living muscles into robotsResearchers have developed a novel method of growing whole muscles from hydrogel sheets impregnated with myoblasts. They then incorporated these muscles as antagonistic pairs into a biohybrid robot, which successfully performed manipulations of objects. This approach overcame earlier limitations of a short functional life of the muscles and their ability to exert only a weak force, paving the way
14h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
28
Disease-causing stomach bug attacks energy generation in host cellsResearchers report in a new study that the bacterium Helicobacter pylori — a major contributor to gastritis, ulcers and stomach cancer — resists the body's immune defenses by shutting down energy production within the cells of the stomach lining that serve as a barrier to infection.
14h
Big Think
3
Ingestible “bacteria on a chip” could help diagnose diseaseUltra-low-power sensors carrying genetically engineered bacteria can detect gastric bleeding. Read More
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Big Think
100+
American Cancer Society says people should begin screening for colon, rectal cancer at 45The updated recommendations come in the wake of research that shows an alarming rise of colon and rectal cancer among young adults. Read More
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

NCI-MATCH precision medicine trial reaches milestoneNCI-MATCH (Molecular Analysis for Therapy Choice), the largest precision medicine trial of its kind, achieves a milestone with the release of results from three treatment arms of the trial at the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) 2018 annual meeting. Spokespersons are available for interviews.
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EurekAlert! – Breaking News
4
NASA finds Subtropical Depression Alberto's center over IndianaNASA's Terra satellite provided infrared data on Subtropical Depression Alberto when it was centered over Indiana and as it moved through the Ohio Valley.
14h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Cellular recycling process is key to longer, healthier lifeBuilding on two decades of research, investigators at UT Southwestern have determined that 'cellular housekeeping' can extend the lifespan and healthspan of mammals.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
33
In ancient boulders, new clues about the story of human migration to the AmericasA geological study provides compelling evidence to support the hypothesis that ancient humans migrated into the Americas via a coastal route. By analyzing boulders and bedrock, a team shows that part of a coastal migration route became accessible to humans 17,000 years ago. During this period, ancient glaciers receded, exposing islands of southern Alaska's Alexander Archipelago to air and sun — a
14h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
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Societies may help promote female representation within academic scienceAcademic societies may be able to increase gender equity through supporting female leadership and making an outward commitment of equality, according to a new study.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
16
Even a shark's electrical 'sixth sense' may be tuned to attackImagine having superhuman hearing. You're at a noisy, cocktail party and yet your ears can detect normally inaudible sounds. But, unlike normal hearing, each of these sounds causes your ears to react in the same way. There is no difference between the quietest and loudest movements. According to a new study, that may be how a shark's electrosensing organ reacts when it detects teensy, tiny electri
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
25
Details that look sharp to people may be blurry to their petsBlind as a bat or eagle-eyed? Scientists compared hundreds of species by the sharpness of their sight. They found a 10,000-fold difference between the most sharp-sighted and the most blurry-eyed species, with humans ranking near the top. The researchers also created a series of images showing how different scenes might appear to animals with different acuities. The images reveal patterns that, whi
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
19
Large Magellanic Cloud: A crowded neighborhoodGlowing brightly about 160,000 light-years away, the Tarantula Nebula is the most spectacular feature of the Large Magellanic Cloud, a satellite galaxy to our Milky Way. A new image reveals a cosmic landscape of star clusters, glowing gas clouds and the scattered remains of supernova explosions. This is the sharpest image ever of this entire field.
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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NASA finds Subtropical Depression Alberto's center over IndianaNASA's Terra satellite provided infrared data on Subtropical Depression Alberto when it was centered over Indiana and as it moved through the Ohio Valley.
14h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
2
Q&A: Should you reboot your router like the FBI says?Last week, the FBI recommended rebooting home and small office routers that could have been infected with disruptive malware, allegedly by sophisticated state-backed Russian hackers . An estimated half million routers and network-attached storage devices have been infected.
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Big Think
11
About 1/4 of people who text about drugs text about methLate night texts provide insights on America’s recreational drug use, documenting good and bad times with meth, cocaine, heroin, pills, marijuana, LSD, and ecstasy. Read More
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
79
Disease-causing stomach bug attacks energy generation in host cellsResearchers report in a new study that the bacterium Helicobacter pylori – a major contributor to gastritis, ulcers and stomach cancer—resists the body's immune defenses by shutting down energy production within the cells of the stomach lining that serve as a barrier to infection.
14h
Live Science
33
Tesla on Autopilot Crashes into Parked Police CarWith another crash, Tesla's autopilot mode takes another hit
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Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
1
Iron-sulfur cluster research offers new avenues of investigating diseaseMany important proteins in the human body need iron-sulfur clusters, tiny structures made of iron and sulfur atoms, in order to function correctly. Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI), the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and the University of Kentucky have discovered that disruptions in the construction of iron-sulfur clusters can lead to the buildup of fat droplets in certain c
14h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
92
Lone water molecules turn out to be directors of supramolecular chemistryScientists in supramolecular chemistry often run into surprising outcomes. A broken seal of a lab cuvette led an American researcher at the Eindhoven University of Technology to the origin of these inexplicable results: the weather. Or the humidity, to be more precise, because this determines the water concentration in oils used as solvents, which was previously thought to be negligible. Research
14h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
10
Lone water molecules turn out to be directors of supramolecular chemistryA broken seal of a lab cuvette led an American researcher in the Netherlands to the origin of many an inexplicable result: the weather. Or the humidity, because this determines the water concentration in oils used as solvents, which was previously thought to be negligible. Lone water molecules in oil aren't just spectators, they firmly direct supramolecular processes. This outcome means that a lot
14h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
25
The smallest biggest theropod dinosaurSpinosaurus is the longest, and among the largest predatory dinosaurs. A tiny claw phalanx of the foot, discovered in Cretaceous-aged sandstones of the Sahara, shows a peculiar shape compatible with an early juvenile Spinosaurus. The fossil is from the smallest known individual of this giant, sail-backed theropod. The findings suggest the small specimen retains the same locomotor adaptations as th
14h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
2
With supercomputing power, scientists solve a next-generation physics problemUsing the Titan supercomputer at the Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility, a team of researchers has calculated a fundamental property of protons and neutrons, known as the nucleon axial coupling, with groundbreaking precision. Ultimately, this and other calculations enabled by the team's computational technique could aid in the search for dark matter and help answer other outstanding questions
14h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Surgical technique improves sensation, control of prosthetic limbResearchers at the Center for Extreme Bionics at the MIT Media Lab have invented a new neural interface and communication paradigm that is able to send movement commands from the central nervous system to a robotic prosthesis, and relay proprioceptive feedback describing movement of the joint back to the central nervous system in return. This involves a novel surgical approach to limb amputation i
14h
Phys.org – latest science and technology news stories
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Does some dark matter carry an electric charge?Astronomers have proposed a new model for the invisible material that makes up most of the matter in the Universe. They have studied whether a fraction of dark matter particles may have a tiny electrical charge.
14h
Live Science
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Why Were 170,000 Birth Control Pill Packs Just Recalled?The pharmaceutical company Allergan has announced it is recalling nearly 170,000 packs of Taytulla, a hormonal birth control. Here's why.
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The Atlantic
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The Curious Incident of the Court That Denied CertLike the dog in Arthur Conan Doyle’s “Silver Blaze ,” the Supreme Court on Tuesday did nothing; and many people are curious about the incident. The Court, without explanation and without recorded dissent, denied review in Planned Parenthood of Arkansas v. Jegley , a case testing Arkansas’s extremely strict regulation of abortion induced by means of medically approved drugs (“medical abortion”). E
14h
Popular Science
57
The weirdest things we learned this week: wild weather, Victorian cannibalism, and the female orgasm (as told by a 12th-century nun)Science Our editors scrounged up some truly bizarre facts. What’s the weirdest thing you learned this week? Well, whatever it is, we promise you’ll have an even weirder answer if you listen to PopSci’s newest podcast.
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Popular Science
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Psychedelics gave me my life backScience Researchers used psilocybin to alleviate the fear of death. After surviving ovarian cancer, Dina Bazer didn't feel like celebrating. Crippled by anxiety that the disease would recur, she turned to hallucinogenics research.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
52
World’s oldest lizard fossil discoveredPaleontologists have identified the world's oldest lizard, providing key insight into the evolution of modern lizards and snakes.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
13
CLL patient goes into remission thanks to single CAR T cellResearchers say a patient treated for chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) in 2013 went into remission because of a single CAR T cell and the cells it produced as it multiplied, and has stayed cancer free in the five years since, with CAR T cells still present in his immune system.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
16
Supercomputers provide new window into the life and death of a neutronScientists have enlisted powerful supercomputers to calculate a quantity known as the 'nucleon axial coupling' — which is central to our understanding of a neutron's lifetime — with an unprecedented precision. Their method offers a clear path to further improvements that may help to resolve the experimental discrepancy.
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Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
21
Scientists use a photonic quantum simulator to make virtual movies of molecules vibratingScientists have shown how an optical chip can simulate the motion of atoms within molecules at the quantum level, which could lead to better ways of creating chemicals for use as pharmaceuticals.
15h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
9
Self-driving cars must reduce traffic fatalities by at least 75 percent to stay on the roadsThe race is on for companies to present their driverless cars to the public, but recent collisions involving autonomous vehicles developed by Uber Technologies Inc. and Tesla Inc. have led consumers to questions whether these vehicles can alleviate traffic issues and increase safety. A new study published in Risk Analysis examined the question 'How safe is safe enough for self-driving vehicles (SD
15h
Latest Science News — ScienceDaily
7
New way to discern what microbes eatA new technique helps researchers determine food eaten by microbes.
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The Atlantic
500+
Ambien Doesn’t Cause RacismTaking a page, perhaps, from Jamie Foxx and T-Pain , Roseanne Barr blamed it on the a-a-a-a-Ambien. On Tuesday, the controversial TV star tweeted, regarding the Obama aide Valerie Jarrett, an African American woman, that “muslim brotherhood & planet of the apes had a baby=vj.” (The tweet was soon deleted.) When her show was canceled as a result, Barr attributed the remark to the sedative sleep dr
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The Atlantic
100+
The Thin Line Between War and Peace in GazaApart from the destruction and death and sometimes paralyzing fear, one memory sticks in my mind from reporting in the Hamas-controlled Gaza Strip during the 2014 war with Israel. It occurred on the terrace of Gaza City’s al-Dera hotel, overlooking the Mediterranean Sea. A few days earlier, an Israeli airstrike had killed four young boys playing soccer on the beach below the terrace, in full view
15h
Feed: All Latest
400+
How a Former US Spy Chief Became Trump’s Fiercest CriticIn his new book, Facts and Fears, James Clapper describes the outrage and anxiety that pulled him back into public life and his new role as a Trump dissenter.
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TED Talks Daily (SD video)
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How we'll become cyborgs and extend human potential | Hugh HerrHumans will soon have new bodies that forever blur the line between the natural and synthetic worlds, says bionics designer Hugh Herr. In an unforgettable talk, he details "NeuroEmbodied Design," a methodology for creating cyborg function that he's developing at MIT, and shows us a future where we've augmented our bodies in a way that will redefine human potential — and, maybe, turn us into super
15h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
4
Study: Disease-causing stomach bug attacks energy generation in host cellsResearchers report in a new study that the bacterium Helicobacter pylori — a major contributor to gastritis, ulcers and stomach cancer — resists the body's immune defenses by shutting down energy production within the cells of the stomach lining that serve as a barrier to infection.
15h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Iron-sulfur cluster research offers new avenues of investigating diseaseResearchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI), the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and the University of Kentucky have discovered that disruptions in the construction of iron-sulfur clusters can lead to the buildup of fat droplets in certain cells.
15h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Scientists use photonic chip to make virtual movies of molecular motionScientists from IUPUI, MIT, Nokia Bell Labs, NTT and the University of Bristol (UK), which led the study, have shown how an optical chip can simulate the motion of atoms within molecules at the quantum level. The study is published in the May 31, 2018 issue of the journal Nature.
15h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

NIH scientists show how tularemia bacteria trick cells to cause diseaseFrancisella tularensis is the bacterium that causes tularemia, a life-threatening disease spread to humans via contact with an infected animal or through mosquito, tick or deer fly bites. NIAID scientists have unraveled the process by which the bacteria cause disease, finding that F. tularensis tricks host cell mitochondria, which produce energy for the cell, in two different phases of infection.
15h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Lone water molecules turn out to be directors of supramolecular chemistryA broken seal of a lab cuvette led an American researcher in the Netherlands to the origin of many an inexplicable result: the weather. Or the humidity, because this determines the water concentration in oils used as solvents, which was previously thought to be negligible. Lone water molecules in oil aren't just spectators, they firmly direct supramolecular processes. This outcome means that a lot
15h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Getting conservationists and fishers on the same pageHistorically, fisheries and the conservation community have struggled to find common ground. Now, a new online tool provides daily computer-generated maps to help fishermen target productive fishing spots while alerting them to areas likely to harbor protected species.
15h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Surgical technique improves sensation, control of prosthetic limbAn MIT study describes first human implementation of a surgical technique that improves a patient's sensation and control of a prosthetic limb.
15h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
1
Is a common antimicrobial harmful to gut health?Scientists have discovered that triclosan, an antimicrobial additive found in thousands of consumer products, causes colon inflammation and exacerbates colon cancer in mice.
15h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
9
Along Alaska's Pacific coast, early humans could have migrated to the AmericasNew dating of rocks and reanalysis of animal bones from islands along the shore of southeastern Alaska suggests that a narrow corridor between the Pacific Ocean and the Cordilleran Ice Sheet (CIS) in Alaska may have enabled the migration of humans to the Americas as early as 17,000 years ago.
15h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
2
New tool improves fishing efficiency and sustainabilityNew software targets most abundant fishing grounds and reduces catch of unwanted or protected species using satellite data, maps and observations.
15h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
3
In ancient boulders, new clues about the story of human migration to the AmericasA geological study provides compelling evidence to support the hypothesis that ancient humans migrated into the Americas via a coastal route. By analyzing boulders and bedrock, a University at Buffalo-led team shows that part of a coastal migration route became accessible to humans 17,000 years ago. During this period, ancient glaciers receded, exposing islands of southern Alaska's Alexander Archi
15h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
1
SNU researchers developed electronic skins that wirelessly activate fully soft robotsA research team of Seoul National University has developed a skin-like electronic system that is soft, thin, lightweight and can wirelessly activate soft robots through a simple lamination process. They developed an electronic skin (e-skin) pair as a two-part, wireless soft driving system based on a fully printable 'stretchable hybrid electronics' approach. One part is the e-skin for input sensing
15h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
2
Cometh the cyborg: improved integration of living muscles into robotsResearchers at the University of Tokyo Institute of Industrial Science developed a novel method of growing whole muscles from hydrogel sheets impregnated with myoblasts. They then incorporated these muscles as antagonistic pairs into a biohybrid robot, which successfully performed manipulations of objects. This approach overcame earlier limitations of a short functional life of the muscles and the
15h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Mouse study links triclosan, a common antimicrobial, to colonic inflammationA large research team led by senior author Guodong Zhang at the University of Massachusetts Amherst reports that the antimicrobial ingredient triclosan, found in hand soaps and toothpastes among other products, could have adverse effects on colonic inflammation and colon cancer by altering gut microbiota, the microbes found in our intestines.
15h
EurekAlert! – Breaking News
2
Researchers find leukemia and lymphoma drug may benefit glioblastoma patientsNew Cleveland Clinic research shows for the first time that ibrutinib, an FDA-approved drug for lymphoma and leukemia, may also help treat the most common — and deadliest — type of brain tumor. The findings, published in Science Translational Medicine, offer hope that the drug may one day be used in patients with glioblastoma and improve poor survival rates.
15h

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BioNyt Videnskabens Verden (www.bionyt.dk) er Danmarks ældste populærvidenskabelige tidsskrift for naturvidenskab. Det er det eneste blad af sin art i Danmark, som er helliget international forskning inden for livsvidenskaberne.

Bladet bringer aktuelle, spændende forskningsnyheder inden for biologi, medicin og andre naturvidenskabelige områder som f.eks. klimaændringer, nanoteknologi, partikelfysik, astronomi, seksualitet, biologiske våben, ecstasy, evolutionsbiologi, kloning, fedme, søvnforskning, muligheden for liv på mars, influenzaepidemier, livets opståen osv.

Artiklerne roses for at gøre vanskeligt stof forståeligt, uden at den videnskabelige holdbarhed tabes.

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