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Nyheder2018november01

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Children account for almost half of sport injury-related A&E attendances

Study finds almost half of sport injury-related emergency department attendances and almost a quarter of sport injury-related hospital admissions were in children and adolescents aged 0-19 years.

5min

UK heatwaves lasting twice as long as 50 years ago – Met Office

Tropical nights starting to be recorded and ice days becoming less frequent Heatwaves in the UK are lasting twice as long as they did 50 years ago, ice days are disappearing and tropical nights are starting to occur as far north as Middlesbrough, according to a Met Office report. The first study of climate extremes in the UK by the government agency shows the longer-term trend behind this summer’

22min

Breakthrough in childhood brain cancer

Scientists led by Newcastle University have been able to identify the group of children needing more intensive, aggressive chemotherapy treatment for the most common form of brain cancer.

41min

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The Lancet Oncology: For new HPV DNA test, study finds there may be little benefit in screening women aged 55 with a negative test

Regular cytology screening (pap or smear test) is still the most commonly used HPV screening method, and can prevent cancers up to age 75 years, although benefits decline with age.For the newly introduced HPV DNA test, which offers a higher degree of accuracy, women aged 55 who have a negative test were predicted to be at low risk of cervical cancer.

41min

Fagselskab og Hjerteforeningen maner til ro efter kræftadvarsel

Risikoen for hudkræft ved et populært blodtryksmiddel er så lille, at patienter og fagfolk bør være helt rolige. Det forsikrer formand for Dansk Cardiologisk Selskab og forskningschef i Hjerteforeningen.

52min

The Atlantic Daily: Moving Freely

What We’re Following Hard-liners: President Donald Trump is looking to electrify his base with renewed anti-immigration fervor, releasing a racist ad on Thursday via Twitter and gesturing at an executive order on immigration to come next week. The GOP might need more than base voters to retain political control, though. What’s the long game of the close Trump adviser who’s at the root of some of

1h

Learn to Fly Sikorsky's New Helicopter in Just 45 Minutes

The tablet- and joystick-controlled chopper is part of an effort minimize—and maybe someday eliminate—the role of the human pilot.

1h

HBO Disappears From Dish as Monopoly Concerns Mount

Critics of AT&T's Time Warner acquisition say their fears have been realized, as Dish blacks out HBO amid a contract dispute.

1h

The Latest Target of Trump's Immigration Attacks

In an address from the Roosevelt Room Thursday, President Donald Trump criticized the nation’s immigration laws, decried the Central American migrant caravan moving through Mexico, and announced that he’s “finalizing a plan” that would limit who could claim asylum. “Migrants will have to present themselves lawfully at a port of entry,” Trump said. “Those who choose to break our laws and enter ill

1h

Vanderbilt Professor on Leave After Sexual Assault Allegations

Only after the accusations appeared on Twitter did Vanderbilt suspend neuroscientist David Sweatt.

1h

How Long Should Older Moms Wait Before Getting Pregnant Again?

As a woman ages, choosing when to try for a second or third child means weighing fertility odds against the risks of getting pregnant again too soon. A new study provides more data to help decide. (Image credit: Lauren Bates/Getty Images)

2h

Whoa, dinosaur eggs looked more dope than we thought

Animals Colorful eggs aren't just for the birds. Colorful eggs evolved among dinosaurs when they started nesting above ground. The dinos then passed the trait down to their modern descendants—birds.

2h

Take a lot of sick days? Who you know and where you live might be partly to blame

New research led by Lijun Song, associate professor of sociology at Vanderbilt University, and graduate student Phillip Pettis suggests that knowing people in high and diverse positions may be good or bad for your health. The culprit? Economic inequality.

2h

Your showerhead slime is alive—and mostly harmless

The day after Halloween, something scary may still lurk inside your showerhead. Researchers at CIRES have identified Mycobacterium as the most abundant genus of bacteria growing in the slimy "biofilm" that lines the inside of residential showerheads—and some of those bacteria can cause lung disease.

2h

New study finds unique immunity genes in one widespread coral species

A new study led by researchers at the University of Miami (UM) Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science found that a common coral species might have evolved unique immune strategies to cope with environmental change.

2h

SfN 2018 NeuWriter Picks!

It’s that time of year again…the Society for Neuroscience annual meeting (SfN) starts on Saturday, and this year it’s happening on our home turf! There are a lot of reasons to be excited about SfN in San Diego…the weather is beautiful (sunny and 79 degrees in November!), neuroscience friends come to town, NeuWriteSD presents a […]

2h

Heat-resistant enzymes could produce more cost-effective drugs

A new study published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences could change the way scientists look at one of the most essential enzymes in medicine in hopes of designing better and more cost-effective drugs in the future.

2h

Apple delivers strong profits, but shares slip on outlookApple iPhone iPads

Apple on Thursday delivered stronger than expected profits in the recently ended quarter, but shares slid on disappointing iPhone sales and the forecast going into the year-end holiday.

2h

The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: You Get a Vote! And You Get a Vote!

Written by Elaine Godfrey ( @elainejgodfrey ), Madeleine Carlisle ( @maddiecarlisle2 ), and Olivia Paschal ( @oliviacpaschal ) Today in 5 Lines In a speech from the White House, President Trump announced that he will issue an executive order next week on immigration, and accused asylum seekers of making a “mockery” of immigration laws. In a last-minute effort to turn out his base ahead of the mid

2h

Spacewatch: Nasa retires planet hunter after it runs out of fuel

Mechanical failures ended the most precise phase of Kepler’s observations about five years ago but the craft continued its search Nasa’s Kepler space telescope has run out of fuel and ended its mission to discover planets around other stars. Launched in 2009, Kepler observed 530,506 stars and discovered more than 2600 confirmed planets. Kepler has also identified thousands more possible planets t

2h

Google Walkout Is Just the Latest Sign of Tech Worker Unrest

Workers around the globe protest company's handling of sexual-harassment claims.

2h

Dawn, the first spacecraft to orbit 2 alien worlds, has gone silent

The Dawn probe, which hopped between two objects in the asteroid belt during its seven-year mission, ran out of fuel and stopped calling home.

2h

The protein Matrin-3 determines the fate of neural stem cells in brain development

A Japanese research group has discovered a new neurogenic mechanism responsible for brain development. By applying proprietary technology for detecting trace proteins, they found that a novel protein, Matrin-3, is responsible for determining the fate of neural stem cells.

2h

People with Internet addiction react the worst when WiFi fails

Our fear of missing out predicts extreme reactions when digital technology fails.

2h

The Google Walkout Doesn’t Go Far Enough

Google employees around the globe walked out of their offices today to protest the way the company deals with sexual harassment. It was a well-meaning, but ultimately empty endeavor. The walkout, which took place at 11 a.m. in all time zones, was prompted by a New York Times investigation last month that alleged that the company had mishandled sexual harassment for years to protect key executives

3h

Insurance-related disparities in timely access to gold standard dialysis procedure

In a study that compared uninsured patients starting hemodialysis with similar patients already covered by Medicare or Medicaid, patients with Medicare or Medicaid were more likely to receive dialysis through an arteriovenous fistula or graft by their fourth dialysis month. Patients with Medicare at the start of dialysis also had fewer hospitalizations involving vascular access infection in dialys

3h

Impact of mercury-controlling policies shrinks with every five-year delay, study finds

A new study finds that the longer countries wait to reduce mercury emissions, the more legacy emissions will accumulate in the environment, and the less effective any emissions-reducing policies will be when they are eventually implemented.

3h

Seeing cell membranes in a new light

Scientists have long believed that membranes act like a viscous liquid, akin to honey, and that tension could be transmitted almost instantly from one side of a cell to the other, but new research shows they're actually closer to a semi-solid.

3h

Older fathers associated with increased birth risks, study reports

A decade of data documenting live births in the United States links babies of older fathers with a variety of increased risks at birth, including low birth weight and seizures, according to a new study.

3h

To ward off fatty liver, breast is best for mom

Researchers have discovered that mothers who breastfed a child or children for six months or more are at lower risk for developing non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) years later during mid-life. With no other current prevention options aside from a healthy lifestyle, they say the finding may represent an early modifiable risk factor for a serious and chronic disease.

3h

Cerebellum Does “Quality Control” for Our Thoughts: Study

FMRI data uncover wide variation in network organization between individuals in this oft-neglected brain region.

3h

3h

The US Shot Down a Fake Nuclear Missile in Space with Another Missile (Video)

It was the second-ever success for the joint missile defense program, and a stunning technological accomplishment.

3h

Viewing serotonin activating its receptor for the first time

A team of researchers have used high-powered microscopes to view serotonin activating its receptor for the first time. Images reveal molecular details about the receptor that could improve drug design to treat a multitude of diseases.

3h

Supply chain transparency needed to combat soaring insulin costs

Spiraling insulin costs have created a dangerous barrier for many people with diabetes who need to access lifesaving treatments. The Endocrine Society is calling on stakeholders across the supply chain to help reduce out-of-pocket costs for people with diabetes.

3h

Tennis elbow treatments provide little to no benefit, study finds

In the largest analysis to date, researchers and clinicians have compared the efficacy and safety of non-surgical treatment options for tennis elbow — also called enthesopathy of the extensor carpi radialis brevis (eECRB). Meta-analysis finds treatments not better, more risky than placebo.

3h

Drugs from dirt

Analyzing soil samples from across the country, researchers have identified an antibiotic capable of treating strains of tuberculosis that do not respond to existing therapies.

3h

Where water goes after fracking is tied to earthquake risk

In addition to producing oil and gas, the energy industry produces a lot of water, about 10 barrels of water per barrel of oil on average. New research has found that where the produced water is stored underground influences the risk of induced earthquakes.

3h

Strengthening self-regulation in childhood may improve resiliency later in life

Millions of families live in poverty in the United States. Associated stressors can often lead to adverse life experiences for children in those families, and negative socioemotional outcomes later in life.

3h

Cancer drug insight tactic could spell double trouble for tumors

Researchers have developed a new way of identifying potential cancer drugs, which could streamline the development of therapies.

3h

Single women freeze their eggs to avoid 'panic parenting,' study finds

Most single women who freeze their eggs for non-medical reasons are doing so to avoid 'panic parenting' (entering into unwise relationships to have a genetically related child), a new study finds.

3h

Waiting For Opportunity To Get In Touch

NASA mission managers haven't heard from the Martian rover Opportunity since June. A dust storm interfered with communication but the storm is over now and engineers hope to hear from the rover soon. (Image credit: Courtesy NASA/JPL-Caltech)

3h

MDM2 inhibitors could be promising new treatment for uveitis

A new study from UNT Health Science Center shows that a class of drugs known as MDM2 inhibitors could lead to a promising new treatment for uveitis, which accounts for 10 percent of all cases of blindness in the United States.

3h

Death Metal fans feel joy and peace from violent music

submitted by /u/badhairyay [link] [comments]

3h

Memory improves after abstaining from marijuana use

88 youngsters from Boston were recruited for the study. 55 of them managed to abstain the full 30 days. Memory improved after abstaining, although attention rates stayed the same. The researchers hope to conduct a 6-month test. None According to a recently study published in the Journal of Clinical Psychiatry , if you stop smoking marijuana, your memory will improve. Real shocker here from the sc

3h

One big problem of landing on Mars? Fuel to go back to Earth.

It's a problem that NASA scientists are working on because the weight of the fuel it would take to travel both to and from the Red Planet is immense. What they're proposing now would actually gather fuel from water in the Mars soil. Once that's extracted, then it's fairly simple to separate out hydrogen. When that is combined with carbon from the atmosphere … Voila! Methane. Scientists at NASA

3h

Unique immunity genes in one widespread coral species

A new study has found that a common coral species might have evolved unique immune strategies to cope with environmental change.

3h

Take a lot of sick days? Who you know and where you live might be partly to blame

New research suggests that knowing people in high places may not always be good for your health. The culprit? Economic inequality.

3h

Heat-resistant enzymes could produce more cost-effective drugs

A new study could change the way scientists look at one of the most essential enzymes in medicine in hopes of designing better and more cost-effective drugs in the future.

3h

Twenty years on, measuring the impact of human stem cells

A new paper describes the global scope and economic impact of stem cell science, including the clinical, industrial and research use of the cells.

3h

Bee diversity and richness decline as anthropogenic activity increases, scientists confirm

Researchers compared wild bee communities in the tropical dry forest of Mexico living in three habitat conditions: preserved vegetation, agricultural sites and urbanized areas.

3h

Cluster of cocaine-fentanyl overdoses in Philadelphia underscores need for more 'test strips' and rapid response

Emergency department physicians are calling for more readily available testing strips to identify the presence of fentanyl in patients experiencing a drug overdose, and a rapid, coordinated response among health care providers and city agencies to help curb overdoses and identify high potency high risk drugs.

3h

New tech delivers high-tech film that blocks electromagnetic interference

Researchers have fashioned low-cost EMI-blocking composite films, employing spin-spray layer-by-layer processing (SSLbL), letting them produce high-quality films in less time than traditional methods, such as dip coating.

3h

Russia Blames a Bad Sensor for Its Failed Soyuz Rocket Launch

An investigation into the crewed Soyuz rocket that aborted mid-flight blamed the incident on a handling error.

3h

We want chatbots to express emotions the right way

Most people appreciate a chatbot that offers sympathetic or empathetic responses, according to a new study. But that reaction may rely on how comfortable the person is with the idea of a feeling machine. The study shows that people preferred receiving sympathetic and empathetic responses from a chatbot—a machine programmed to simulate a conversation—over receiving a response from a machine withou

4h

New images show serotonin activating its receptor for first time

A team of researchers from Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine have used high-powered microscopes to view serotonin activating its receptor for the first time. Images published in Nature reveal molecular details about the receptor that could improve drug design to treat a multitude of diseases.

4h

Confirmed: The Milky Way's monstrous black hole

Scientists have provided the first confirmation that what's at the center of the Milky Way is a supermassive black hole. The discovery caught the interaction of gasses and a small star spinning around the mysterious object. This is thought to be compelling proof of the black hole's central role in a galaxy. At the center of the Milky Way, about 25,000 light years away, is a faint source of radio

4h

The blockchain phone is coming… but what does this mean?

Sirin Labs' Finney and the HTC's Exodus are set to become the first blockchain phones on the market. In the long-term, blockchain phones could be used to increase our security and shift the control of our data away from large corporations back to the individual users. In the future, it is likely that the concept could become mainstream due to the benefits it provides. Blockchain has made some hug

4h

Children who experience violence early in life develop faster

A study has shown that exposure to violence early in life — such as physical, emotional, or sexual abuse — is associated with faster biological aging, including pubertal development and a cellular metric of biological aging called epigenetic age.

4h

Mystery of the 'bird from Atlantis' solved

The world's smallest flightless bird can be found on Inaccessible Island in the middle of the South Atlantic. Less than 100 years ago, researchers believed that this species of bird once wandered there on land extensions now submerged in water, and therefore named it Atlantisia. The researchers have now shown that the ancestors of the Atlantisia flew to Inaccessible Island from South America about

4h

Mega Church And Mega Issues: Pastor Adam Hamilton

Reverend Hamilton pastors Church of the Resurrection — the biggest United Methodist church in the country. (Image credit: SAUL LOEB/AFP/Getty Images)

4h

Fossil Pigments Reveal Dinosaur Origin of Bird Egg Colors

The hues and patterns of modern bird eggs trace back to their dinosaurian ancestors — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

4h

New study finds evidence of brain injuries in football players at surprisingly young age

A new study reveals that lasting evidence of brain injuries is present at an alarmingly young age. The study tested the blood of college football players for biomarkers that indicate traumatic brain injuries. They found that players not only had higher levels of these markers than those who didn't play football, but that the biomarkers were elevated before the season even started.

4h

Zika circulates among wild animals in the Americas, making eradication nearly impossible

Researchers report that wild monkeys in the Americas are transmitting the Zika virus to humans via mosquitoes, making complete eradication of the virus in the Americas very unlikely.

4h

Chemists develop safe alternatives to phthalates used in plastics

Researchers have developed safer alternatives to the phthalate plasticizers used to enhance the suppleness, flexibility, and longevity of plastics. Phthalates leach out of plastics into food, water, and the environment, and there is mounting evidence suggesting that phthalate exposure can lead to a variety of health problems. The new chemicals are effective as plasticizers for polyvinyl chloride (

4h

Monthly Stats for Eyewire: October 2018

As we pull ourselves from the horripilating haze of Halloween, we find that October has finished. Time flies! And how we did we do? Well, we finished 53 cells, toured the marvelous Grim’s Haunted Carnival, did two marathon cells at 13 hours 10 minutes and 14 hours 2 minutes, and even held our very first coloring contest. For more stats, read on below! New Scouts: Wow_such_neurons TheStatPow bookb

4h

BD: Rhapsody™ Single-Cell Analysis System

See how simple single-cell analysis can be.

4h

‘Heavy’ multitasking may cramp your memory

A new review summarizes a decade’s worth of research on the relationship between media multitasking and various domains of cognition, including working memory and attention. When doing the analysis, Anthony Wagner noticed a trend emerging in the literature: People who frequently use several types of media at once, or “heavy media multitaskers,” performed significantly worse on simple memory tasks

4h

Massive, 5,655-Carat 'Lion Emerald' Unearthed in Africa

The massive emerald weighs about as much as an adult human brain.

4h

Gut Microbiomes Lose Diversity with Immigration: Study

As people move to the United States from Southeast Asia, the microbes in their digestive tracts begin to Westernize, possibly explaining high rates of obesity and other metabolic issues in these immigrant populations.

4h

Research: heat-resistant enzymes could produce more cost-effective drugs

A new study published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences could change the way scientists look at one of the most essential enzymes in medicine in hopes of designing better and more cost-effective drugs in the future.

4h

Take a lot of sick days? Who you know and where you live might be partly to blame

New research led by Lijun Song, associate professor of sociology at Vanderbilt University, and graduate student Phillip Pettis suggests that knowing people in high places may not always be good for your health. The culprit? Economic inequality.

4h

New study finds unique immunity genes in one widespread coral species

A new study led by researchers at the University of Miami (UM) Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science found that a common coral species might have evolved unique immune strategies to cope with environmental change.

4h

Your showerhead slime is alive

A CIRES-led citizen-science study reveals lung-disease causing strains of bacteria are especially common in certain environments.

4h

Russia Set to Resume Astronaut Trips to the International Space StationSoyuz Russian Roscosmos

The announcement signals that the Soyuz spacecraft has been deemed safe for crewed travel following two astronauts’ harrowing emergency return to Earth in October.

4h

Humans have altered almost the entire planet—we need to save what’s left

Environment Wild lands are disappearing fast. The world's last wildernesses are disappearing fast, and we need to act quickly if we want to save them.

4h

People link body shapes with personality traits

When we meet new people, our first impressions of their personality may depend, at least in part, on their body shape, according to new research.

4h

Quantum on the edge: Light shines on new pathway for quantum technology

Scientists have for the first time demonstrated the protection of correlated states between paired photons using the intriguing physical concept of topology. This experimental breakthrough opens a pathway to build a new type of quantum bit, the building blocks for quantum computers.

5h

Long-term prognosis of Chagas patients improved with anti-parasite drug

Researchers have found that the anti-parasite drug benznidazole may improve the long-term prognoses of patients with chronic Chagas disease.

5h

Bioluminescent substance discovered in Brazilian cave worm larva

Identification of the first luciferin-producing insect belonging to the order Diptera in the Neotropics paves the way for researchers to investigate other biochemical functions of the molecule in these organisms.

5h

How Might the Appendix Play a Key Role in Parkinson's Disease?

Those who’ve had it removed get the neurodegenerative disorder later or not at all, study finds — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

5h

McLaren's $2.4 million Speedtail hypercar can hit 250 miles per hour

Cars Sadly, they only made 106 and they're all sold out. It takes a lot of engineering to make a car this fast.

5h

How Beethoven Talks to My Wife, Carol

How Beethoven Talks to My Wife, Carol One of the things people with Alzheimer's disease understand is music. Carol-Portrait.jpg Carol Howard, 69, was diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease six years ago. Image credits: Joel Shurkin Human Thursday, November 1, 2018 – 15:00 Joel Shurkin, Contributor (Inside Science) — The second movement of Ludwig van Beethoven's Seventh Symphony begins with a minor-k

5h

Facts About Hippos

Hippos are giant creatures that spend most of their lives in the water, but they don't actually swim. They can still kill you, though.

5h

With a little help from their friends

A new study shows that plant-associated bacteria protect their hosts by competing with harmful filamentous microbes for access to plant roots.

5h

Fatal measles case highlights importance of herd immunity in protecting the vulnerable

A new report describes a recent case highlighting the importance of maintaining high vaccination coverage in the community to help protect people with compromised immune systems from measles and other vaccine-preventable infections.

5h

Adorable, Remorseless Killing Machine Is World's Deadliest Cat

The deadliest cat in the world isn't a lion, leopard or tiger.

5h

Meet the Rare and Fabulous Felines of 'Super Cats' (Photos)

Wild cats are among the most diverse and successful predators on Earth.

5h

Army scientist seeks enhanced soldier systems through quantum research

Researchers at the U.S. Army Research Laboratory and the Joint Quantum Institute have created a pristine quantum light source that has the potential to lead to more secure communications and enhanced sensing capabilities for Soldiers.

5h

Bioluminescent substance discovered in Brazilian cave worm larva

Identification of the first luciferin-producing insect belonging to the order Diptera in the Neotropics paves the way for researchers to investigate other biochemical functions of the molecule in these organisms.

5h

Matter: How to Turbocharge Flu Protection (Llamas Required)

A giant antibody created in the laboratory shielded mice against dozens of flu strains, offering new hope against a winter misery.

5h

Quick Roundup Of Monthly Science Stories

Quick Roundup Of Monthly Science Stories A month's worth of cool science stories summed up. Quick Roundup Of Monthly Science Stories Video of Quick Roundup Of Monthly Science Stories Human Thursday, November 1, 2018 – 14:15 Alistair Jennings, Contributor Alistair Jennings sums up some of the most interesting science stories for the month. Filed under Neuroscience Republish Authorized news sources

5h

The Guardian view on vegans: a dietary challenge | Editorial

A huge reduction in meat-eating is called for. No wonder carnivores are feeling defensive Veganism, once widely seen as an alternative, if not an extreme, lifestyle, is now in the mainstream. Exactly how many people in the UK have eliminated animal products including dairy and honey from their diets is uncertain. One recent survey suggested there could be as many as 3.5 million vegans in the UK .

5h

RNA defects linked to multiple myeloma progression in high risk patients

Researchers have uncovered an association between RNA abnormalities and multiple myeloma progression. The findings offer novel insights for new, effective therapeutic strategies to be developed.

5h

How invading jumping genes are thwarted

Almost half of our DNA is made up of jumping genes, moving around the genome in developing sperm and egg cells. They trigger DNA damage, mutations, sterility or death. Organisms have survived these invasions, but little is known about where this adaptability comes from. Now, researchers have discovered that reproductive stem cells boost production of non-coding RNA elements that suppress jumping g

5h

Immigration to the United States changes a person's microbiome

Researchers new evidence that the gut microbiota of immigrants and refugees rapidly Westernize after a person's arrival in the United States. The study of communities migrating from Southeast Asia to the US could provide insight into some of the metabolic health issues, including obesity and diabetes, affecting immigrants to the country.

5h

Glutamine metabolism affects T cell signaling and function

The cellular nutrient glutamine launches a metabolic signaling pathway that promotes the function of some immune system T cells and suppresses others, researchers have discovered.

5h

High exposure to radio frequency radiation associated with cancer in male rats

The National Toxicology Program (NTP) concluded there is clear evidence that male rats exposed to high levels of radio frequency radiation (RFR) like that used in 2G and 3G cell phones developed cancerous heart tumors, according to final reports released today.

5h

'Cryptic' interactions drive biodiversity decline near the edge of forest fragments

The fragmentation of tropical forests weakens the effects of the 'natural enemies' of some tree species, reducing their ability to maintain biodiversity, a new Yale-led study found. In an experiment, researchers found that fragmentation weakens the impact of fungal pathogens and insect herbivores, enabling some tree species to thrive near the forest edges in ways that they could not deeper in the

5h

Zebrafish larvae help in search for appetite suppressants

Researchers have developed a new strategy in the search for psychoactive drugs. By analyzing the behavior of larval zebrafish, they can filter out substances with unwanted side effects right from the start. This method has resulted in the discovery of a number of new appetite modulators.

5h

A shortcut in the global sulfur cycle

Chemists have discovered a completely unexpected shortcut in the global sulfur cycle. This process is determined by tiny organisms in the ocean's plankton.

5h

eDNA emerges as powerful tool for tracking threatened river herring in Chesapeake Bay

Using environmental DNA (eDNA) to track the presence of fish in waterways is emerging as a powerful tool to detect and understand the abundance of species in aquatic environments. However, relatively few studies have compared the performance of this emerging technology to traditional catch or survey approaches in the field.

5h

$5bn project to map DNA of every animal, plant and fungus

International sequencing drive will involve reading genomes of 1.5m species An ambitious international project to sequence the DNA of every known animal, plant and fungus in the world over the next 10 years has been launched. Described as “the next moonshot for biology”, the Earth BioGenome Project is expected to cost $4.7bn (£3.6bn) and involve reading the genomes of 1.5m species. Continue readi

6h

New study offers hope for patients suffering from a rare form of blindness

A new form of therapy may halt or even reverse a form of progressive vision loss that, until now, has inevitably led to blindness. This hyper-targeted approach offers hope to individuals living with spinocerebellar ataxia type 7 (SCA7) and validates a new form of therapy with the potential to treat neurogenetic diseases effectively and with far fewer side effects than other medications.

6h

eDNA emerges as powerful tool for tracking threatened river herring in Chesapeake Bay

Using environmental DNA (eDNA) to track the presence of fish in waterways is emerging as a powerful tool to detect and understand the abundance of species in aquatic environments. Researchers from the University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science and Smithsonian Environmental Research Center field tested using eDNA — tracking the presence of fish by identifying DNA that has been left be

6h

Making a map of the brain

Harvard scientists have created a first-of-its-kind cellular atlas of an important region in the brains of mice. Using a cutting-edge imaging technology, researchers examined more than 1 million cells in a 2-millimeter by 2-millimeter by 0.6 millimeter block of brain, and not only identified more than 70 different types of neurons, but also pinpointed where the cells were located and their various

6h

NIH BRAIN Initiative debuts cell census of mouse motor cortex — for starters

Researchers have reached a milestone in their quest to catalog the brain's 'parts list.' The NIH BRAIN Initiative Cell Census Network (BICCN) has issued its first data release. Posted on a public web portal for researchers, it profiles molecular identities of more than 1.3 million mouse motor cortex cells. In a related development, researchers announced the discovery of cellular secrets of key soc

6h

Road to cell death more clearly identified for Parkinson's disease

In experiments performed in mice, Johns Hopkins researchers report they have identified the cascade of cell death events leading to the physical and intellectual degeneration associated with Parkinson's disease.

6h

Diabetes medications may reduce Alzheimer's disease severity

People with Alzheimer's disease who were treated with diabetes drugs showed considerably fewer markers of the disease — including abnormal microvasculature and disregulated gene expressions — in their brains compared to Alzheimer's patients without treatment for diabetes, Mount Sinai researchers report.

6h

Fishing for new leads in a rare melanoma

Many cancers arise from a double hit: activation of a tumor-promoting gene plus loss of a tumor suppressor gene. A new study shows that zebrafish, a versatile model for disease research and drug discovery, can help tease out the interplay of genetic alterations in cancer, and could help guide treatment strategies. The study involved mucosal melanomas, a rare, poorly understood and often deadly typ

6h

Editing nature: A call for careful oversight of environmental gene editing

Writing in Science, an interdisciplinary team led by Yale researchers makes the case for a new global governance to assure a neutral and informed evaluation of the potential benefits and risks of gene editing. The complex nature of these technologies, they write, requires a careful and judicious decision-making process that includes the local communities that would feel the biggest and most immedi

6h

Composite Materials special issue

In this special issue of Science, 'Composite Materials,' three Review articles overview the current applications, constraints and future opportunities for composite materials, those made from two or more materials with significantly different physical or chemical properties.

6h

Llama-derived antibodies provide universal flu protection

Researchers have generated a new anti-flu antibody that demonstrates long-lasting and universal protection from a wide variety of influenza A and B viruses, including avian-borne strains like H1N1.

6h

'Posture cells' encode 3D body position in the brain

Newly found neurons in the brain encode body posture and spatial awareness in mice, a study finds.

6h

'Predicting' the origins of mysterious outbreaks using viral RNA

Researchers have used machine learning to develop a model capable of predicting hosts and vectors of otherwise mysterious viral infections.

6h

Atomic path from insulator to metal messier than thought

Vanadium dioxide has the unusual ability to switch from electrical insulator to conductor at the low temperature of 152 degrees Fahrenheit. By optically triggering this phase transition and pinging its atoms with X-ray pulses, researchers have watched the transition unfold in full detail for the first time, finding that the atoms arrive at their destinations through unpredictable routes independen

6h

Quantum on the edge: Light shines on new pathway for quantum technology

Scientists in Australia have for the first time demonstrated the protection of correlated states between paired photons using the intriguing physical concept of topology. This experimental breakthrough opens a pathway to build a new type of quantum bit, the building blocks for quantum computers.

6h

How cancer-causing papillomaviruses evolved

Cancer-causing human papillomaviruses (HPVs) diverged from their most recent common ancestors approximately half a million years ago, roughly coinciding with the timing of the split between archaic Neanderthals and modern Homo sapiens, according to a study published Nov. 1 in the open-access journal PLOS Pathogens by Zigui Chen of the Chinese University of Hong Kong, Robert Burk of the Albert Eins

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Lymph nodes are niches for prolonged tuberculosis infection

Lymph nodes can contain large numbers of tuberculosis-causing bacteria and serve as long-term reservoirs of bacterial persistence, according to a study published Nov. 1, 2018, in the open-access journal PLOS Pathogens by JoAnne Flynn of the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, and colleagues. As niches for persistent infection, these organs are likely to play a larger role in tuberculosis

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The FASEB Journal: Young plasma restores aged livers

A recent study published in The FASEB Journal examined the effect of young plasma on aged livers, and livers' sensitivity to ischemia reperfusion injury (IRI) in experimental animals. IRI occurs when blood flow to an organ is temporarily interrupted, and can be a serious postoperative complication of liver resection and transplantation, especially among elderly patients.

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Long-term prognosis of Chagas patients improved with anti-parasite drug

Researchers have found that the anti-parasite drug benznidazole may improve the long-term prognoses of patients with chronic Chagas disease, according to a study published in PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases, by Clareci Silva Cardoso at the Federal University of São João del-Rei, Divinópolis, Brazil, and colleagues from the SaMi-Trop study, a project funded by NIAID/NIH.

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Farvel til Store K

Efter mange års diskussion og forberedelser bliver det internationale kilogramlod i Paris sendt på pension.

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New photonic devices are said to be poised to enable the next leap in deep space exploration

New directed energy propulsion systems may enable the first interstellar missions, with small, robotic spacecraft exploring neighboring solar systems, according to experimental cosmologist Philip Lubin. He will present these and other advances at The Optical Society's (OSA) Laser Congress, Light the Future Speaker Series, 4-8 Nov. in Boston.

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Yangtze dams put endangered sturgeon's future in doubt

Before the damming of the Yangtze River in 1981, Chinese sturgeon swam freely each summer one after another into the river's mouth, continuing upriver while fasting all along the way. They bred in the upper spawning ground the following fall before returning quickly back to the sea. Now, researchers offer new insight into the threat the dams have since posed to the critically endangered fish.

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Reducing US coal emissions through biomass and carbon capture would boost employment

While the need for solutions for the impending consequences of rising global temperatures has become increasingly urgent, many have expressed concerns about the loss of jobs as current technologies like coal-fired power plants are phased out. A new study has run the numbers associated with the impacts of cutting coal plant jobs while at the same time employing techniques for bioenergy coupled with

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Coal power regulations neglect sulfur dioxide danger

Cleaning up or replacing coal-fired power plants that lack sulfur pollution controls could help nearby residents breathe cleaner, healthier air, according to a new study that measured the effects of emissions from 13 coal plants in Texas. Along with the researchers’ conclusions on the modeling systems themselves, the findings show that residents downwind of coal plants would be far better off tod

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Type 3 injury

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Oceans of help

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A general synthesis approach for supported bimetallic nanoparticles via surface inorganometallic chemistry

The synthesis of ultrasmall supported bimetallic nanoparticles (between 1 and 3 nanometers in diameter) with well-defined stoichiometry and intimacy between constituent metals remains a substantial challenge. We synthesized 10 different supported bimetallic nanoparticles via surface inorganometallic chemistry by decomposing and reducing surface-adsorbed heterometallic double complex salts, which

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Catalytic palladium-oxyallyl cycloaddition

Exploration of intermediates that enable chemoselective cycloaddition reactions and expeditious construction of fused- or bridged-ring systems is a continuous challenge for organic synthesis. As an intermediate of interest, the oxyallyl cation has been harnessed to synthesize architectures containing seven-membered rings via (4+3) cycloaddition. However, its potential to access five-membered skel

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Topological protection of biphoton states

The robust generation and propagation of multiphoton quantum states are crucial for applications in quantum information, computing, and communications. Although photons are intrinsically well isolated from the thermal environment, scaling to large quantum optical devices is still limited by scattering loss and other errors arising from random fabrication imperfections. The recent discoveries rega

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Ultrafast disordering of vanadium dimers in photoexcited VO2

Many ultrafast solid phase transitions are treated as chemical reactions that transform the structures between two different unit cells along a reaction coordinate, but this neglects the role of disorder. Although ultrafast diffraction provides insights into atomic dynamics during such transformations, diffraction alone probes an averaged unit cell and is less sensitive to randomness in the trans

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Defining the human C2H2 zinc finger degrome targeted by thalidomide analogs through CRBN

The small molecules thalidomide, lenalidomide, and pomalidomide induce the ubiquitination and proteasomal degradation of the transcription factors Ikaros (IKZF1) and Aiolos (IKZF3) by recruiting a Cys 2 -His 2 (C2H2) zinc finger domain to Cereblon (CRBN), the substrate receptor of the CRL4 CRBN E3 ubiquitin ligase. We screened the human C2H2 zinc finger proteome for degradation in the presence of

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Predicting reservoir hosts and arthropod vectors from evolutionary signatures in RNA virus genomes

Identifying the animal origins of RNA viruses requires years of field and laboratory studies that stall responses to emerging infectious diseases. Using large genomic and ecological datasets, we demonstrate that animal reservoirs and the existence and identity of arthropod vectors can be predicted directly from viral genome sequences via machine learning. We illustrate the ability of these models

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East Asian hydroclimate modulated by the position of the westerlies during Termination I

Speleothem oxygen isotope records have revolutionized our understanding of the paleo East Asian monsoon, yet there is fundamental disagreement on what they represent in terms of the hydroclimate changes. We report a multiproxy speleothem record of monsoon evolution during the last deglaciation from the middle Yangtze region, which indicates a wetter central eastern China during North Atlantic coo

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Efficient cortical coding of 3D posture in freely behaving rats

Animals constantly update their body posture to meet behavioral demands, but little is known about the neural signals on which this depends. We therefore tracked freely foraging rats in three dimensions while recording from the posterior parietal cortex (PPC) and the frontal motor cortex (M2), areas critical for movement planning and navigation. Both regions showed strong tuning to posture of the

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Experimental evolution of a fungal pathogen into a gut symbiont

Gut microbes live in symbiosis with their hosts, but how mutualistic animal-microbe interactions emerge is not understood. By adaptively evolving the opportunistic fungal pathogen Candida albicans in the mouse gastrointestinal tract, we selected strains that not only had lost their main virulence program but also protected their new hosts against a variety of systemic infections. This protection

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Structural basis of the nucleosome transition during RNA polymerase II passage

Genomic DNA forms chromatin, in which the nucleosome is the repeating unit. The mechanism by which RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) transcribes the nucleosomal DNA remains unclear. Here we report the cryo–electron microscopy structures of RNAPII-nucleosome complexes in which RNAPII pauses at the superhelical locations SHL(–6), SHL(–5), SHL(–2), and SHL(–1) of the nucleosome. RNAPII pauses at the major

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Universal protection against influenza infection by a multidomain antibody to influenza hemagglutinin

Broadly neutralizing antibodies against highly variable pathogens have stimulated the design of vaccines and therapeutics. We report the use of diverse camelid single-domain antibodies to influenza virus hemagglutinin to generate multidomain antibodies with impressive breadth and potency. Multidomain antibody MD3606 protects mice against influenza A and B infection when administered intravenously

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New Products

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Extra strengthening and work hardening in gradient nanotwinned metals

Gradient structures exist ubiquitously in nature and are increasingly being introduced in engineering. However, understanding structural gradient–related mechanical behaviors in all gradient structures, including those in engineering materials, has been challenging. We explored the mechanical performance of a gradient nanotwinned structure with highly tunable structural gradients in pure copper.

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Poly(ADP-ribose) drives pathologic {alpha}-synuclein neurodegeneration in Parkinsons disease

The pathologic accumulation and aggregation of α-synuclein (α-syn) underlies Parkinson’s disease (PD). The molecular mechanisms by which pathologic α-syn causes neurodegeneration in PD are not known. Here, we found that pathologic α-syn activates poly(adenosine 5'-diphosphate–ribose) (PAR) polymerase-1 (PARP-1), and PAR generation accelerates the formation of pathologic α-syn, resulting in cell d

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News at a glance

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Moments to spare

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Shifting summer rains

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Composites from renewable and sustainable resources: Challenges and innovations

Interest in constructing composite materials from biosourced, recycled materials; waste resources; and their combinations is growing. Biocomposites have attracted the attention of automakers for the design of lightweight parts. Hybrid biocomposites made of petrochemical-based and bioresourced materials have led to technological advances in manufacturing. Greener biocomposites from plant-derived f

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Biological composites–complex structures for functional diversity

The bulk of Earth’s biological materials consist of few base substances—essentially proteins, polysaccharides, and minerals—that assemble into large varieties of structures. Multifunctionality arises naturally from this structural complexity: An example is the combination of rigidity and flexibility in protein-based teeth of the squid sucker ring. Other examples are time-delayed actuation in plan

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Composites with carbon nanotubes and graphene: An outlook

Composite materials with carbon nanotube and graphene additives have long been considered as exciting prospects among nanotechnology applications. However, after nearly two decades of work in the area, questions remain about the practical impact of nanotube and graphene composites. This uncertainty stems from factors that include poor load transfer, interfacial engineering, dispersion, and viscos

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Posture in the brain

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Paul O’Brien obituary

Materials chemist who perfected nanoscientific techniques and enabled important advances in electronics In 1995 the leading British materials chemist Paul O’Brien, who has died aged 64 after suffering from brain cancer, began to use chemical synthesis to make quantum dots, which are tiny semiconductor particles, only nanometres across, that can be made to emit light of varying colours according to

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New view on Roman text rewrites wine-making history

New research may upend nearly a century of assumptions about when, how, and why ancient food technology changed. Today, quintessentially Mediterranean food habits have crossed the seas through trade, immigration, and technological diffusion. It’s a pattern that wouldn’t surprise an ancient Roman. The Romans transported wine and oil across the Empire in thousands of trade ships, by mule and ox-car

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Cooling 'brains on fire' to treat Parkinson's

A promising new therapy to stop Parkinson's disease in its tracks has been developed by scientists who found that a small molecule, MCC950, stopped the development of Parkinson's in several animal models. The team hope to commence human clinical trials in 2020.

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Hubble reveals cosmic Bat Shadow in the Serpent's Tail

The NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope has captured part of the wondrous Serpens Nebula, lit up by the star HBC 672. This young star casts a striking shadow — nicknamed the Bat Shadow — on the nebula behind it, revealing telltale signs of its otherwise invisible protoplanetary disc.

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Mycoplasma pathogens sneaking past our line of defense

New research reveals that Mycoplasma pathogens make DNA in a unique way that may protect them from our immune response. The result could provide new avenues to combat the pathogens that utilize this strategy.

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Domestic violence is widely accepted in most developing countries, new study reveals

Societal acceptance of domestic violence against women is widespread in developing countries, with 36 per cent of people believing it is justified in certain situations.

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Baby-naming trends reveal ongoing quest for individuality

Choosing a baby's name that is distinctive is becoming harder, research reveals. Greater media access, global communication and rising immigration have increased people's exposure to different names, but also ensures these become common more quickly.

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Review reveals ambiguous understanding of genetic privacy in US study participants

Confusion and ambiguity in how US patients and researchers perceive genetic privacy is uncovered by a new study.

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Neuroscientists find molecular clue in ALS, suggesting potential new drug target

Researchers have uncovered a link between motor neurons' inability to repair oxidative genome damage in ALS, suggesting that DNA ligase-targeted therapies may prevent or slowdown disease progression. The defect found was with DNA ligase III, an important enzyme for connecting single-stranded DNA breaks in mature neurons that, once worn out, are no longer capable of new growth or being replenished

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What Is Cellulitis?

Cellulitis is a common infection caused by bacteria that normally live harmlessly on the surface of our skin and enter the body through a cut or wound. If the skin infection is not treated quickly, it can lead to serious complications.

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Quantum on the edge: Light shines on new pathway for quantum technology

Scientists in Australia have for the first time demonstrated the protection of correlated states between paired photons—packets of light energy—using the intriguing physical concept of topology. This experimental breakthrough opens a pathway to build a new type of quantum bit, the building blocks for quantum computers.

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Editing nature: Scientists call for careful oversight of environmental gene editing

In Burkina Faso, the government is considering the use of genetically modified mosquitoes to eradicate malaria. In Nantucket, Mass., officials are looking at gene editing as a tool in the fight against Lyme disease. And scientists are using gene technology to adapt coral to changing ocean conditions from the Caribbean to the Great Barrier Reef.

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Atomic path from insulator to metal messier than thought

Researchers have peeked behind the curtain of the ultrafast phase transition of vanadium dioxide and found its atomic theatrics are much more complicated than they thought. It's a material that has fascinated scientists for decades for its ability to shift from being an electrical insulator to a conductor.

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How cancer-causing papillomaviruses evolved

Cancer-causing human papillomaviruses (HPVs) diverged from their most recent common ancestors approximately half a million years ago, roughly coinciding with the timing of the split between archaic Neanderthals and modern Homo sapiens, according to a study published November 1 in the open-access journal PLOS Pathogens by Zigui Chen of the Chinese University of Hong Kong, Robert Burk of the Albert

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Vanadium dioxide’s weird phase transition just got weirder

When shifting from one crystalline structure to another, the atoms inside vanadium dioxide bumble around a lot more than expected.

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The Milky Way feasted on a smaller galaxy 10 billion years ago

The Milky Way swallowed another galaxy billions of years ago, and the leftover stars are still roaming the sky.

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Scenes From Halloween 2018

As the costumes are put away, the decorations taken down, and candy wrappers gathered from every corner of the house, I thought it would be fun to take one last look at this year’s fun and creepy Halloween celebrations, with photographs from Canada, Turkey, the United States, China, Japan, Chile, England, Poland, and more. It’s only a matter of days before Christmas music will start to fill every

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Researchers solve the mystery of the bird from Atlantis

The world's smallest flightless bird can be found on Inaccessible Island in the middle of the South Atlantic. Less than 100 years ago, researchers believed that this species of bird once wandered there on land extensions now submerged in water, and therefore named it Atlantisia. In a new study led by biologists at Lund University in Sweden, the researchers have now shown that the ancestors of the

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Dawn mission to asteroid belt comes to end

NASA's Dawn spacecraft has gone silent, ending a historic mission that studied time capsules from the solar system's earliest chapter.

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It’s Not Just Pre-Existing Conditions. Voters Weigh Many Health Issues on State Ballots

Referendums include issues from Medicaid expansion to abortion, dialysis costs to indoor vaping, and much more.

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NASA’s Dawn Mission to the Asteroid Belt Says Good Night

Launched in 2007, the spacecraft discovered bright spots on Ceres and forbidding terrain on Vesta.

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As populations decline, here’s how towns can ‘shrink smart’

As small Iowa towns continue to lose population, a strong social infrastructure—rather than economic or physical factors—determines whether residents report greater quality of life, according to new research. Over the past year, a research team studied the 99 communities in the Iowa Small Town Poll to figure out why some towns losing population are “shrinking smart,” while others are not. “It’s n

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Watching whales from space

Scientists have used detailed high-resolution satellite images to detect, count and describe four different species of whales. The research is a big step towards developing a cost-effective method to study whales in remote and inaccessible places, that will help scientists to monitor population changes and understand their behavior.

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Can wearable technology identify irregular heart rhythms?

A clinical trial to determine whether a smartwatch app that analyzes pulse-rate data can screen for a heart-rhythm disorder has enrolled more than 400,000 participants.

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Half of women over 50 experience incontinence, but most haven't talked to a doctor, poll finds

Nearly half of women over 50 say they sometimes leak urine, according to a new national poll. Of more than 1,000 women between the ages of 50 and 80 who answered the poll, 43 percent of women in their 50s and early 60s said they had had experienced urinary incontinence, as had 51 percent of those age 65 and over. Yet two-thirds of these women hadn't talked to a doctor about the issue.

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Diagnosing and treating personality disorders needs a dynamic approach

New research suggests that lumping those with personality disorders into a package of traits should be left behind for more dynamic analysis instead.

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We all want 'healthy aging,' but what is it, really? New report looks for answers

Led by Paul Mulhausen, MD, MHS, FACP, AGSF, colleagues from the American Geriatrics Society (AGS) set looking critically at what 'healthy aging' really means. Their definition–published in a white paper today in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society (DOI: 10.1111/jgs.15644) — explores the intersection between our personal care goals and innovations in science, education, and public poli

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Workers without paid sick leave endure significant financial worries

A study shows that Americans without paid sick leave worry significantly about both short-term and long-term financial issues. The highest odds of reporting worry were associated with normal monthly bills like housing expenses. Concern about making the minimum payment on credit cards was statistically significant, too. Conversely, workers with paid sick leave were less likely to report worrying ab

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Roadmap for filling the gaps in forest pollinator research

Actively managed conifer forests may also provide important habitat for the pollinators that aid the reproduction of food crops and other flowering plants around the globe.

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Signs of interactive form of quantum matter observed

Researchers have, for the first time, isolated groups of a few atoms and precisely measured their multi-particle interactions within an atomic clock. The advance will help scientists control interacting quantum matter, which is expected to boost the performance of atomic clocks, many other types of sensors, and quantum information systems.

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Ballistic beetles seek safety in numbers by sheltering with other species

A group of ground beetles known as bombardier beetles are famous for shooting a boiling-hot, noxious liquid at would-be attackers, but despite their formidable defense, they prefer not to shelter alone, according to a new study.

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Earliest recorded lead exposure in 250,000-year-old Neanderthal teeth

Using evidence found in teeth from two Neanderthals from southeastern France, researchers report the earliest evidence of lead exposure in an extinct human-like species from 250,000 years ago.

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Storbyer tester løs: Her er selvkørende biler på vejene lige nu

Selvkørende biler bliver i øjeblikket testet midt i udenlandske millionbyers trafikkaos. Imens er forsøg med selvkørende busser på vej i Danmark.

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The Best Gifts for Teens Who Love Science

If a teen in your life is a big old science nerd, or just loves thinking and learning, we've got some great gift ideas to suggest.

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Cancer Risk May Increase with Height for a Simple Reason

The taller you are, the greater your risk of cancer may be, a new study finds.

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A record-long polymer DNA negative

A fragment of a single strand of DNA, built of the nucleobases cytosine and guanine, can be imprinted in a polymer, researchers have shown. The resulting artificial negative, with a record-long length, functions chemically like a normal strand of deoxyribonucleic acid.

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Origin of an isolated bird species on South Atlantic island

By wings or maybe riding on debris, that's how a now-flightless and rare species of tiny birds likely got to Inaccessible Island, an aptly named small island of volcanic origin in the middle of the South Atlantic. And it turns out that the bird, a rail, needs a name change.

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Buckling down on child car seat use in ride-share vehicles

The average Uber or Lyft vehicle does not generally come equipped with a car seat, and only in certain cities is it an option to request one. A new study looks at child ridership and child safety seat use in ride-share vehicles.

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What happened in the past when the climate changed?

New research shows for the first time how the changing climate in Asia, from 5,000 to 1,000 years ago, transformed people's ability to produce food in particular places. The model enables the co-authors to get at the causes of some dramatic historic and cultural changes.

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Major corridor of Silk Road already home to high-mountain herders over 4,000 years ago

Long before the formal creation of the Silk Road, pastoral herders living in the mountains of Central Asia helped form new cultural and biological links across the region, new research shows.

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Concurrent chemo-radiotherapy should be a treatment option for elderly patients with LS-S

Elderly patients with limited-stage small cell lung cancer (LS-SCLC) showed similar survival and toxicity compared to their younger counterparts when treated with concurrent chemo-radiotherapy. Concurrent chemo-radiotherapy should be a treatment option for fit patients aged 70 years or older.

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Trump Rollback of Disability Rules Can Make Doctor's Visits Painstaking

Patients with disabilities cope with rollback of regulations to make medical treatment more accessible — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Deepfake-busting apps can spot even a single pixel out of place

Two startups are using algorithms to track when images are edited—from the moment they’re taken.

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Ethereum founder Vitalik Buterin says his creation can’t succeed unless he takes a step back

At Ethereum’s annual developer conference, its founder tells us why his technology can only be truly decentralized if it stops depending on him.

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Karate kicks keep cockroaches from becoming zombies, wasp chow

Far from being a weak-willed sap easily paralyzed by the emerald jewel wasp's sting to the brain — followed by becoming a placid egg carrier and then larvae chow — the cockroach can deliver a stunning karate kick that saves its life.

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Babies born at home have more diverse, beneficial bacteria, study finds

Infants born at home have more diverse bacteria in their guts and feces, which may affect their developing immunity and metabolism, according to a new study.

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Don't underestimate the force

Researchers have identified the weak molecular forces that hold together a tiny, self-assembling box with powerful possibilities. The study demonstrates a practical application of a force common in biological systems and advances the pursuit of artificial chemical life.

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Childhood antibiotics and antacids may be linked to heightened obesity risk

Young children prescribed antibiotics and, to a lesser extent, drugs to curb excess stomach acid, may be at heightened risk of obesity, new research suggests.

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The Appendix May Be Linked to Parkinson's Disease. But Don't Run Out and Have Surgery.

Those clumps of proteins that are a telltale sign of Parkinson's? Yeah, you have a lot of those in your appendix.

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To fight email scammers, take a different view. Literally.

A team of researchers is helping law enforcement crack down on email scammers, thanks to a new visual analytics tool that dramatically speeds up forensic email investigations and highlights critical links within email data. Email scams are among the most prevalent, insidious forms of cybercrime. The research team has already begun sharing Beagle with law enforcement agencies at no cost to assist i

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To ward off fatty liver, breast is best for mom

Researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine and Kaiser Permanente have discovered that mothers who breastfed a child or children for six months or more are at lower risk for developing non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) years later during mid-life. With no other current prevention options aside from a healthy lifestyle, they say the finding may represent an early mo

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Trump’s Race-Baiting Ad Could Backfire in the Midterms

With a few days left before the election, there’s an aroma of panic emanating from the White House. President Donald Trump appears to be trying everything he can to seize control of the news cycle and appeal to base voters with strident, xenophobic rhetoric. That includes, on Thursday alone, the release of a race-baiting ad about immigrants and crime, and a scheduled speech at the White House in

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The Oceans Are Heating Up Faster Than Expected

The planet may be more sensitive to warming that previously thought, making climate goals more difficult to meet — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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As Humanities Majors Decline, Colleges Try to Hype Up Their Programs

Even as college students on the whole began to shun humanities majors over the past decade in favor of vocational majors in business and health, there was one group of holdouts: undergraduates at elite colleges and universities . That’s not the case anymore, and as a result, many colleges have become cheerleaders for their own humanities programs, launching promotional campaigns to make them more

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Where water goes after fracking is tied to earthquake risk

In addition to producing oil and gas, the energy industry produces a lot of water, about 10 barrels of water per barrel of oil on average. New research led by The University of Texas at Austin has found that where the produced water is stored underground influences the risk of induced earthquakes.

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Zika circulates among wild animals in the Americas, making eradication nearly impossible

A collaborative group of researchers from The University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston and the Faculty of Medicine of Sao Jose do Rio in Brazil is the first to report that wild monkeys in the Americas are transmitting the Zika virus to humans via mosquitoes, making complete eradication of the virus in the Americas very unlikely. The paper is currently available in Scientific Reports.

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Quit rates are low and not increasing among cigarette smokers with mental health problems

Even as more and more American quit smoking cigarettes, individuals with serious psychological distress (SPD) are much less likely to extinguish their habit. A new study by scientists at the Columbia Mailman School of Public Health and The City University of New York found that individuals with mental health problems quit cigarettes at half the rate of those without psychological distress.

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Efter FM-sluk: Norske lokalradioer kaprer lyttere med ulovligt høj sendestyrke

Lokalradiostationer omkring Oslo benytter sig af sendere, der er for kraftige, lyder det fra norske myndigheder. Stationerne står til at blive pålagt dagsbøder, hvis ikke sendingerne stoppes.

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Searching in soil, scientists find a new way to combat tuberculosis

For decades, doctors have been using antibiotics to fight tuberculosis (TB). And consistently, the microbe responsible for the disease, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, has been fighting back. When confronted with current drugs, such as the antibiotic rifamycin, the bacterium often mutates in ways that make it resistant to the treatment.

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Study: Impact of mercury-controlling policies shrinks with every five-year delay

Mercury is an incredibly stubborn toxin. Once it is emitted from the smokestacks of coal-fired power plants, among other sources, the gas can drift through the atmosphere for up to a year before settling into oceans and lakes. It can then accumulate in fish as toxic methylmercury, and eventually harm the people who consume the fish.

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Semiconductors for higher efficiency, comfort and affordability of EVs

Electric cars are increasingly complex and frequently recalled. But does it necessarily have to be that way? A post-market in-vehicle diagnostics system and semiconductor-based technologies developed under the 3Ccar project promise greater integration of car systems, as well as constant monitoring and updates to prevent failures.

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How a protein factor contributes to cancer cell migration

Researchers have discovered a new protein factor that contributes to a fibroblast cell's ability to migrate to a wound and participate in its healing process. The study's results could help scientists prevent cancer cells from using the same mechanisms to move throughout the body and spread.

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Empathetic machines favored by skeptics but might creep out believers

Most people would appreciate a chatbot that offers sympathetic or empathetic responses, according to a team of researchers, but they added that reaction may rely on how comfortable the person is with the idea of a feeling machine.

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Amyloid assemblies once believed to be toxic found to play key role in muscle generation

Amyloid-like protein assemblies, long believed to be toxic and fuel diseases like ALS, have been found to play a key role in healthy muscle regeneration.

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Location of wastewater disposal drives induced seismicity at US oil sites

The depth of the rock layer that serves as the disposal site for wastewater produced during unconventional oil extraction plays a significant role in whether that disposal triggers earthquakes in the US, according to a new study that takes a broad look at the issue.

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NASA team investigates ultrafast laser machining for multiple spaceflight applications

An ultrafast laser that fires pulses of light just 100 millionths of a nanosecond in duration could potentially revolutionize the way that NASA technicians manufacture and ultimately assemble instrument components made of dissimilar materials.

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Sensor gives farmers more accurate read on plant health, provides valuable crop data

A Purdue University professor has built an innovative handheld sensor that gives plant scientists and farmers a more precise way of measuring the health of crops while gathering up-to-the-minute data that state and federal officials and others will find valuable.

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NASA's GPM examines weaker Tropical Storm Yutu's rainfall

Typhoon Yutu produced heavy rainfall as it passed over the island of Luzon in the northern Philippines. The Global Precipitation Measurement mission or GPM core satellite provided data on that rainfall. The storm has since weakened to a tropical storm and triggered warnings in China.

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Judge grounds Ryanair's plan to transfer Dutch pilots

A Dutch court Thursday slapped down Ryanair's plan to transfer more than a dozen Dutch pilots elsewhere in Europe, saying the no-frills airline "abused its power" in deciding to close its Eindhoven base.

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The Sea May Be Absorbing Way More Heat Than We Thought

Scientists have developed a radical new method for measuring global warming-induced rising ocean temperatures: They aren't sampling water, but air.

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Schadenfreude May Come in 3 Flavors, Some Meaner Than Others

People enjoy the misery of others for a few different reasons.

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Watching whales from space

Scientists have used detailed high-resolution satellite images provided by Maxar Technologies' DigitalGlobe, to detect, count and describe four different species of whales. Reported this week in the journal Marine Mammal Science, this study is a big step towards developing a cost-effective method to study whales in remote and inaccessible places, that will help scientists to monitor population cha

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Launch of global effort to read genetic code of all complex life on earth

The Earth BioGenome Project (EBP), a global effort to sequence the genetic code, or genomes, of all 1.5 million known animal, plant, protozoan and fungal species on Earth, officially launches today (1 November) as key scientific partners and funders from around the globe gather in London, UK to discuss progress in organising and funding the project.

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Think you're bad at math? You may suffer from 'math trauma'

I teach people how to teach math, and I've been working in this field for 30 years. Across those decades, I've met many people who suffer from varying degrees of math trauma – a form of debilitating mental shutdown when it comes to doing mathematics.

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Searching in soil, scientists find a new way to combat tuberculosis

Analyzing soil samples from across the country, researchers have identified an antibiotic capable of treating strains of tuberculosis that do not respond to existing therapies.

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NASA's GPM examines weaker Tropical Storm Yutu's rainfall

Typhoon Yutu produced heavy rainfall as it passed over the island of Luzon in the northern Philippines. The Global Precipitation Measurement mission or GPM core satellite provided data on that rainfall. The storm has since weakened to a tropical storm and triggered warnings in China.

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Drug combination for treatment resistant depression no more effective than single

A large clinical trial published in the British Medical Journal today, looked at the effectiveness of adding mirtazapine to an SSRI or SNRI in patients who remain depressed after at least six weeks of conventional (SSRI or SNRI) antidepressant treatment. They found that this combination was no more effective in improving depression than placebo and call on doctors to rethink its use.

8h

Study: Impact of mercury-controlling policies shrinks with every five-year delay

A new MIT study finds that the longer countries wait to reduce mercury emissions, the more legacy emissions will accumulate in the environment, and the less effective any emissions-reducing policies will be when they are eventually implemented.

8h

The blockchain phone is coming…but what does this mean?

Sirin Labs" Finney and the HTC's Exodus are set to become the first blockchain phones on the market. In the long-term, blockchain phones could be used to increase our security and shift the control of our data away from large corporations back to the individual users In the future, it is likely that the concept could become mainstream due to the benefits it provides. Blockchain has made some hug

8h

New Atlas Used to ID Brain Parts for Plans and Actions

A detailed picture of cell types in some areas of the mouse cortex is put to the test — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

8h

Nyt forsøg blåstempler selvbehandling med antibiotika i hjemmet

Aarhus Universitetshospital har oplært en række patienter i selv at stå for antibiotikabehandling i eget hjem, og forsøget viser, at mange patienter fremover kan behandle sig selv med antibiotika og dermed undgå indlæggelse.

8h

Fejldosering med gigtmiddel: Erstatning i ti sager, hvor patienter døde

Patienterstatningen har afgjort 11 sager, der vedrører fejlmedicinering af methotrexat. Kun en patient overlevede forgiftningen.

8h

Toward temperature-resilient EVs

The OSEM-EV project has come up with an entirely new concept of heat management for electric cars. These advances should enable a new generation of EVs with a greater and more predictable driving range.

8h

New fast-charge system makes e-buses a more appealing solution than ever

The replacement of diesel bus fleets by electric ones will only become possible when the latter can compete in terms of operation time, comfort, weight and cost. Heliox has found a single solution to all these problems in a new fast-charge technology.

8h

Aviation memorabilia from Glenn, Armstrong up for auction

As the sons of a legendary astronaut, Matt Carpenter says he and his little brother "were blessed to grow up around some pretty interesting stuff."

8h

Hate speech is still easy to find on social media

Shortly after the synagogue shooting in Pittsburgh, I noticed that the word "Jews" was trending on Twitter. As a social media researcher and educator, I became concerned that the violence would spread online, as it has in the past.

8h

NY Times in profit column as digital subscriptions rise

The New York Times said Thursday that digital subscriptions topped three million in the past quarter, keeping the prestigious daily profitable in a difficult environment for the news media.

8h

Dangerous blood pressure caused by specific signalling in the brain

Scientists have found that high blood pressure caused by specific signalling from the brain promotes heart disease by altering stem cells with the bone marrow. The results demonstrate how an overactive sympathetic nervous system that causes elevated blood pressure can instruct bone marrow stem cells to produce more white blood cells that clog up blood vessels.

8h

Nanostraws deliver molecules to human cells safely and efficiently

Miniscule nanostraws could help solve the problem of how to deliver precise doses of molecules directly into many cells at once.

8h

'Game-changing' skin sensor could improve life for a million hydrocephalus patients

A new wireless, Band-Aid-like sensor could revolutionize the way patients manage hydrocephalus, a potentially life-threatening condition in which excess fluid builds up in the brain. A tube or 'shunt' drains the fluid, but shunts often fail, and diagnosing shunt failure leads to CT scans, MRIs or surgery. This skin sensor will non-invasively read within five minutes if a patient's treatment is wor

8h

High-resolution MRI imaging inspired by the humble antenna

Radio frequency (RF) probes designed like by microstrip patch antennas create uniform and strong magnetic field in high frequency MRI machines, unlike convention coil and bird cage shaped coils used today. These probes also showed smaller radiation losses, making them competitive, even advantageous to conventional methods.

8h

Campaign set up to oppose spaceport in Sutherland

Some crofters have concerns about the impact the site would have on the environment and their rights.

8h

What Does Working From Home Do to Your Immune System?

October, as it turns out, is not an optimal time to start sealing yourself into a tin can of humanity twice a day after years of riding the subway only occasionally. I just got a new job at The Atlantic , and before that, I worked from home. Writing online doesn’t necessarily involve a lot of leaving the house, and most of the friends I see regularly live within walking distance of me, so for the

8h

The Midterms Could Spell the End for America's Lonely Moderates

E ven Oscar Wilde , socialist and anarchist that he was, would likely bristle at the radical dysfunction of American politics today. Wilde famously preferred “everything in moderation, including moderation.” But 2018 may be the year that lawmakers and voters alike crystallize their preference for a slight spin on the playwright’s words: a Congress in which nothing is in moderation, except for mod

8h

NASA sees Hurricane Oscar transitioning to extratropical low

Hurricane Oscar has transitioned into an extra-tropical low pressure area in the northeastern Atlantic Ocean. The Global Precipitation Measurement mission or GPM core satellite provided a look at rainfall occurring within the storm.

8h

3 proteins may play key role in infertility and cancer

Three proteins regulate each other with surprising twists and turns in female mouse eggs, according to a new study. The discovery could play an important role in female infertility and cancer biology. The unexpected complexity in how these proteins regulate one another doesn’t happen in any other healthy cell type, says Karen Schindler, an associate professor in the genetics department at Rutgers

8h

Cancer drug insight tactic could spell double trouble for tumors

Researchers have developed a new way of identifying potential cancer drugs, which could streamline the development of therapies.

8h

NASA sees Hurricane Oscar transitioning to extratropical low

Hurricane Oscar has transitioned into an extra-tropical low pressure area in the northeastern Atlantic Ocean. The Global Precipitation Measurement mission or GPM core satellite provided a look at rainfall occurring within the storm.

8h

Study finds tennis elbow treatments provide little to no benefit

In the largest analysis to date, researchers and clinicians at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (BIDMC) have compared the efficacy and safety of non-surgical treatment options for tennis elbow — also called enthesopathy of the extensor carpi radialis brevis (eECRB). Meta-analysis finds treatments not better, more risky than placebo.

8h

Electric light vehicles just got handier and smarter

A consortium of 14 partners has developed technology demonstrators for what the compact and efficient electric vehicles of the future could look like. The three light vehicles, developed under the supervision of Piaggio and KTM, anticipate new design approaches for the sector.

8h

Phubbing (phone snubbing) happens more in the bedroom than when socialising with friends

Have you ever been around people who spend more time looking at their phone than they do at you? Then you know what it feels like to be "phubbed" – and you're probably guilty of doing it yourself.

8h

Amazon's sexist hiring algorithm could still be better than a human

Amazon decided to shut down its experimental artificial intelligence (AI) recruiting tool after discovering it discriminated against women. The company created the tool to trawl the web and spot potential candidates, rating them from one to five stars. But the algorithm learned to systematically downgrade women's CV's for technical jobs such as software developer.

8h

Can maths solve the fake news voting conundrum?

With the American midterm elections around the corner, rumours of a UK general election in the winter, and a potential second referendum on Brexit, mathematicians from the University of Surrey and AXA Switzerland have produced a mathematical model that details the impact of fake news on voting behaviour.

8h

Spotify earnings hit sour note on Wall Street

Spotify shares took a hit Thursday after a disappointing growth outlook offset the first-ever quarterly profit posted by the streaming music sector leader.

8h

Super-computer brings 'cloud' to astronauts in space

A super-computer at the International Space Station aims to bring "cloud" computing to astronauts in space and speed up their ability to run data analysis in orbit, Hewlett-Packard Enterprise said Thursday.

8h

Study challenges conventional wisdom of how cell membranes work

If you want to understand how the cell membrane works, Adam Cohen says, look no further than your kitchen.

8h

Chemists develop safe alternatives to phthalates used in plastics

Researchers at UC Santa Cruz have developed safer alternatives to the phthalate plasticizers used to enhance the suppleness, flexibility, and longevity of plastics.

8h

Reef RangerBot becomes 'LarvalBot' to spread coral babies

QUT's reef protector robot is set to become 'mother' to hundreds of millions of baby corals in a special delivery coinciding with this month's annual coral spawning on the Great Barrier Reef.

8h

Atoms use tunnels to escape graphene cover

Graphene has held a great promise for applications since it was first isolated in 2004. But we still don't use it in our large-scale technology, because we have no way of producing graphene on an industrial scale. Leiden physicists have now visualized for the first time how atoms behave in between graphene and a substrate. This insight could be instrumental for future implementations of industrial

8h

Numbers in the news? Make sure you don't fall for these 3 statistical tricks

"Handy bit of research finds sexuality can be determined by the lengths of people's fingers" was one recent headline based on a peer-reviewed study by well-respected researchers at the University of Essex published in the Archives of Sexual Behavior, the leading scholarly publication in the area of human sexuality.

8h

Photos in social media reveal socio-cultural value of landscapes

Every day, users upload millions of photos on platforms such as Flickr, Instagram and Facebook. A study by researchers of Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) now shows that these photos can be used to assess the social importance of certain landscapes. For this purpose, they developed a new image analysis method based on artificial intelligence. The results might be of particular importance fo

8h

What teeth can tell about the lives and environments of ancient humans and Neanderthals

Increasing variation in the climate has been implicated as a possible factor in the evolution of our species (Homo sapiens) 300,000 years ago, as well as the more recent demise of our enigmatic evolutionary cousins, the Neanderthals.

8h

Fear of disloyalty drives bias against bicultural immigrants

Members of a majority group tend to hold negative views of minority-group individuals who claim more than one identity, according to new Yale-led research. The negative bias is driven by fear that dual-identity individuals will be disloyal to the majority, the researchers said.

8h

New tech delivers high-tech film that blocks electromagnetic interference

Electromagnetic interference (EMI), which can harm smartphones, tablets, chips, drones, wearables, and even aircraft and human health, is increasing with the explosive proliferation of devices that generate it. The market for EM-blocking solutions, which employ conductive or magnetic materials, is expected to surpass $7 billion by 2022.

9h

Workers without paid sick leave endure significant financial worries

Many Americans, even middle-class earners, are living paycheck-to-paycheck. While worrying about making ends meet is a common concern for many Americans, new research shows that it is even more troublesome for working adults without paid sick leave.

9h

Farmers market vendors need training to improve food-safety practices

Many vendors at farmers markets take inadequate precautions to prevent the spread of foodborne illness, and they should be trained to reduce food-safety risks, according to Penn State researchers who completed the final phase of an innovative five-year study.

9h

The GOP Is Leaning on Immigration Because It’s Losing on Health Care

Butch Otter, the outgoing Republican governor of Idaho, didn’t attract nearly as much attention for his big announcement on Tuesday as President Donald Trump did when he pledged to issue an executive order ending birthright citizenship. But Otter’s endorsement of a ballot initiative to expand Medicaid in one of the nation’s most conservative states explains as much about the GOP’s situation in th

9h

Danskere sætter strøm til oliebrøndens sidste rester

Danske EOR Technologies sidder måske på en teknologi, som kan øge olieproduktionen betragteligt, ændre oliens strukturer og bruges i brønde, som ellers er opgivet. Nu gennemfører de en felttest med et stort olieselskab og en uvildig observatør for at bevise at det virker.

9h

How parents' resources shape their children's attitudes to the future

Everyone's family background has affected them, for better or worse. In the UK today, it is difficult for young people to get a good job, and this means that families are having to provide more support for young people. In a recent survey of 3,000 18- to 35-year-olds in the UK, my colleagues and I found that 38% of these young people still live with their parents, and 47% had "boomeranged" back in

9h

Tipping point: Huge wildlife loss threatens the life support of our small planet

A report by the WWF published on October 30 reveals how our actions are degrading the natural world – the very basis on which our livelihood depends. The Living Planet Report 2018 shows that between 1970 and 2014, vertebrate – mammal, fish, bird, amphibian and reptile – population sizes have been reduced by 60 percent. South and Central America have been hit particularly hard, suffering population

9h

Organisations often learn too little from disasters and crises

From recurrent oil disasters to the outbreak of contagious diseases or major fires. Public organisations often learn too little from such crises, according to public administration specialist Wout Broekema. Staff frequently fail to communicate information adequately, which means that lessons are often forgotten. Ph.D. defence 7 November.

9h

Heating up the electric vehicle market

The EU-funded MAXITHERM project has developed an alternative heating system for electric vehicles that reduces energy consumption, increases range and ensures passenger comfort.

9h

Small tweaks to nanoribbon edge structures can drastically alter heat conduction

Black phosphorene, an unusual two-dimensional (2-D) compound, may offer strategies for avoiding damaging hot spots in nanoscale circuits, a new study from A*STAR researchers has revealed.

9h

Yangtze dams put endangered sturgeon's future in doubt

Before the damming of the Yangtze River in 1981, Chinese sturgeon swam freely each summer one after another into the river's mouth, continuing upriver while fasting all along the way. They bred in the upper spawning ground the following fall before returning quickly back to the sea. Now, researchers reporting in Current Biology on November 1 offer new insight into the threat the dams have since po

9h

'Cryptic' interactions drive biodiversity decline near the edge of forest fragments

When humans cut contiguous tropical forests into smaller fragments, ecologists say, forests along the edges of those fragments tend to experience a number of changes (e.g. higher temperatures, lower humidity), collectively known as "edge effects." One such edge effect is a decline in tree species diversity. What causes this effect, however, has never been fully understood.

9h

Team helps establish roadmap for filling the gaps in forest pollinator research

Actively managed conifer forests may also provide important habitat for the pollinators that aid the reproduction of food crops and other flowering plants around the globe.

9h

Bee diversity and richness decline as anthropogenic activity increases, confirm scientists

Changes in land use negatively affect bee species richness and diversity, and cause major shifts in species composition, reports a recent study of native wild bees, conducted at the Sierra de Quila Flora and Fauna Protection Area and its influence zone in Mexico.

9h

Seeing cell membranes in a new light

Scientists have long believed that membranes act like a viscous liquid, akin to honey, and that tension could be transmitted almost instantly from one side of a cell to the other, but Professor of Chemistry and Chemical Biology and of Physics Adam Cohen and Zheng Shi, a post-doctoral fellow working in Cohen's lab showed they're actually closer to a semi-solid like Jell-O.

9h

New study takes first step toward treating endometriosis

Researchers at Northwestern Medicine have taken the first step in bioengineering the human uterus to treat endometriosis, uterine-factor infertility and endometrial cancer.

9h

Plants rely on their resident bacteria to protect them from harmful microbes

New study shows that plant-associated bacteria protect their hosts by competing with harmful filamentous microbes for access to plant roots.

9h

Twenty years on, measuring the impact of human stem cells

A paper published today (Nov. 1, 2018) in the journal Cell Stem Cell describing the global scope and economic impact of stem cell science, including the clinical, industrial and research use of the cells.

9h

Glutamine metabolism affects T cell signaling and function

The cellular nutrient glutamine launches a metabolic signaling pathway that promotes the function of some immune system T cells and suppresses others, Vanderbilt researchers have discovered.They show that a drug that inhibits glutamine metabolism — currently in clinical trials as an anticancer agent — might be useful as a treatment for inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. The study, published o

9h

Specific CD8 T cell states may indicate response to immune checkpoint therapy for melanoma

A multi-institutional research team, led by investigators at Massachusetts General Hospital and the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard, has identified specific states of cytotoxic CD8 T cells associated with patient response to checkpoint immunotherapy for melanoma. Their study providing data that could help better understand why checkpoint therapy doesn't work for all patients and may enable deve

9h

Reducing US coal emissions through biomass and carbon capture would boost employment

While the need for solutions for the impending consequences of rising global temperatures has become increasingly urgent, many have expressed concerns about the loss of jobs as current technologies like coal-fired power plants are phased out. A new study appearing Nov. 1 in the journal Joule has run the numbers associated with the impacts of cutting coal plant jobs while at the same time employing

9h

Immigration to the United States changes a person's microbiome

Researchers at the University of Minnesota and the Somali, Latino, and Hmong Partnership for Health and Wellness have new evidence that the gut microbiota of immigrants and refugees rapidly Westernize after a person's arrival in the United States. The study of communities migrating from Southeast Asia to the US, published Nov. 1 in the journal Cell, could provide insight into some of the metabolic

9h

Yangtze dams put endangered sturgeon's future in doubt

Before the damming of the Yangtze River in 1981, Chinese sturgeon swam freely each summer one after another into the river's mouth, continuing upriver while fasting all along the way. They bred in the upper spawning ground the following fall before returning quickly back to the sea. Now, researchers reporting in Current Biology on Nov. 1 offer new insight into the threat the dams have since posed

9h

How invading jumping genes are thwarted

Almost half of our DNA is made up of jumping genes, moving around the genome in developing sperm and egg cells. They trigger DNA damage, mutations, sterility or death. Organisms have survived these invasions, but little is known about where this adaptability comes from. Now, Carnegie researchers have discovered that reproductive stem cells boost production of non-coding RNA elements that suppress

9h

UCSC chemists develop safe alternatives to phthalates used in plastics

Researchers have developed safer alternatives to the phthalate plasticizers used to enhance the suppleness, flexibility, and longevity of plastics. Phthalates leach out of plastics into food, water, and the environment, and there is mounting evidence suggesting that phthalate exposure can lead to a variety of health problems. The new chemicals are effective as plasticizers for polyvinyl chloride (

9h

Fossils hint hominids migrated through a ‘green’ Arabia 300,000 years ago

A once-green Arabia may have enabled Stone Age entries by Homo groups.

9h

Babies born at home have more diverse bacteria

Infants born at home have more diverse bacteria in their guts and feces, which may affect their developing immunity and metabolism, according to new research. Understanding why babies born at home have more diverse microbiota for at least a month after birth, compared with those born in a hospital, could help prevent disease later in life. The human microbiome consists of trillions of bacteria, f

9h

Deep sea chemical dispersants ineffective in Deepwater Horizon oil spill, study finds

A new study of the response to the 2010 Deepwater Horizon in the Gulf of Mexico showed that massive quantities of chemically engineered dispersants injected at the wellhead — roughly 1,500 meters (4,921 feet) beneath the surface — were unrelated to the formation of the massive deepwater oil plume.

9h

Observation of blood vessel cell changes could help early detection of blocked arteries

A study in mice has shown that it may be possible to detect the early signs of atherosclerosis, which leads to blocked arteries, by looking at how cells in our blood vessels change their function.

9h

Micro-earthquakes preceding a 4.2 earthquake near Istanbul as early warning signs?

Researchers have observed foreshocks that, if analyzed accordingly and in real-time, may possibly increase the early-warning time before a large earthquake from just a few seconds up to several hours.

9h

Forskning i diabetes-stress afgørende for bedre medicinsk behandling

Steno Diabetes Center Copenhagen og Københavns Universitet opretter nyt fælles forskningsområde…

9h

How sheep grazing affects the Norwegian mountains

When animals graze, they affect the environment. They keep meadows open, their faeces fertilizes the soil, and forests yield to cultivated landscapes. But what effect does grazing have on overall biomass? Does grazing affect carbon capture, too? How many plants survive and what kind?

9h

McDonald's Monopoly—A statistician explains the real odds of winning

In 2000, a fraud worth over $24 million was uncovered in the United States. Jerome Jacobson, who served 15 years in prison for his role in the deception, was at the centre. This was not your typical heist, however. No identify theft or insider trading here. Jacobson's crime: He cheated McDonald's Monopoly.

9h

People would change their consumption habits to help the climate, study finds

A new study has found that people would change their consumption habits to help the climate—even if this would have implications for their personal lives and shopping habits—and that this could play a significant role in helping the UK to reduce its carbon emissions.

9h

Resilience of supply chain networks to major disruptions can now be measured using a multi-factor test

By analyzing the structure of a supply chain network and the resilience of its components, A*STAR researchers have developed an analytic measure that will allow a company to determine its vulnerability to major supply chain disruptions. The measure has the potential to dramatically improve decision-making in supplier management and lower financial risk across many sectors.

9h

Mycoplasma pathogens sneaking past our line of defense

New research reveals that Mycoplasma pathogens make DNA in a unique way that may protect them from our immune response. The result could provide new avenues to combat the pathogens that utilize this strategy. The study is published today in the scientific journal Nature.

9h

A record-long polymer DNA negative

A fragment of a single strand of DNA, built of the nucleobases cytosine and guanine, can be imprinted in a polymer—this has been shown by chemists from Warsaw, Denton and Milan. The resulting artificial negative, with a record-long length, functions chemically like a normal strand of deoxyribonucleic acid. This achievement finally confirms the possibility of creating polymer imprints of DNA, funct

9h

Genes that could lead to improvement of beef cattle are identified

Beef cattle improvement programs have focused for decades on promoting the rapid growth of calves. Now, the goal is to improve other traits, such as meat tenderness or ribeye muscle area.

9h

It's Now Easier to Use Uber Eats on Your Company’s Dime

Integrating Uber Eats into Uber for Business locks ever more customers into the ride-hailing's ecosystem in advance of an IPO.

9h

Even short dressers can crush kids, so anchor them to the wall

Health Regulations don’t govern furniture under 30 inches, but a new Consumer Reports investigation shows they’re still deadly. Among the litany of screws and plastic doo-hickeys remaining after you assemble tall IKEA furniture, you may have noticed a separate plastic bag containing brackets.

9h

New tech delivers high-tech film that blocks electromagnetic interference

Andre Taylor, associate professor of chemical and biomolecular engineering at the NYU Tandon School of Engineering and collaborators fashioned low-cost EMI-blocking composite films, employing spin-spray layer-by-layer processing (SSLbL), a method pioneered by Taylor, letting them produce high-quality films in less time than traditional methods, such as dip coating.

9h

Children who experience violence early in life develop faster

A study in Biological Psychiatry has shown that exposure to violence early in life — such as physical, emotional, or sexual abuse — is associated with faster biological aging, including pubertal development and a cellular metric of biological aging called epigenetic age.

9h

People with Internet addiction react the worst when WiFi fails

Our fear of missing out predicts extreme reactions when digital technology fails.

9h

Study of Cellphone Risks Finds ‘Some Evidence’ of Link to Cancer, at Least in Male Rats

Many caveats apply, and the results involve radio frequencies long out of routine use.

9h

Palestinian 'birdman' watches out over West Bank

As the sun rises over the mountains behind the Dead Sea, Anton Khalilieh squints into a telescope and scans the skies.

9h

Cause of long, potentially damaging channels on Antarctic ice shelves found

Large rock hills deep below glaciers can cause huge channels on the ice surface – even if the hills are buried under two kilometres of ice.

9h

Greater flexibility for growers needed during droughts

A report, recently published by Cranfield University and the National Farmers Union (NFU), highlights the benefits for water users of more flexible mechanisms to access water during dry periods.

9h

Genetic code of 66,000 UK species to be sequenced

The genetic codes of 66,000 species in the UK are planned to be sequenced by the Wellcome Sanger Institute and its collaborators as part of a global effort to sequence the genomes of all 1.5 million known species of animals, plants, protozoa and fungi on Earth.

9h

Students genetically engineer E. coli for skin ailment treatments

Keratin is a naturally occurring protein that anchors skin cells to one another and plays a crucial role in forming the epidermis. But sometimes there can be too much of a good thing.

9h

How invading jumping genes are thwarted

Since Carnegie Institution's Barbara McClintock received her Nobel Prize on her discovery of jumping genes in 1983, we have learned that almost half of our DNA is made up of jumping genes—called transposons. Given their ability of jumping around the genome in developing sperm and egg cells, their invasion triggers DNA damage and mutations. This often leads to animal sterility or even death, threat

9h

Plants rely on their resident bacteria to protect them from harmful microbes

Fungi and other filamentous microbes called oomycetes cause many devastating plant diseases and are together responsible for more than 10 percent of all crop loss. A groundbreaking new study now shows that even healthy plants host potentially harmful fungi and oomycetes in plant roots. That they do not succumb to illness is due to the simultaneous presence of a wide range of co-residing bacteria,

9h

Reducing US coal emissions through biomass and carbon capture would boost employment

While the need for solutions for the impending consequences of rising global temperatures has become increasingly urgent, many people have expressed concerns about the loss of jobs as current technologies like coal-fired power plants are phased out. A new study appearing November 1 in the journal Joule has run the numbers associated with the impacts of cutting coal plant jobs while at the same tim

9h

Simulation of the forces induced on cylinders by ocean currents could help in the design of off-shore platforms

A*STAR researchers have developed a model that can simulate the complicated forces exerted by flowing water on an array of cylinders supporting water-borne structures such as oil rigs. The work demonstrates the usefulness of numerical simulations to investigate complex physical real-world scenarios.

9h

Laser-activated silk sealants outperform sutures for tissue repair

NIBIB funded researchers have developed laser-activated nanomaterials that integrate with wounded tissues to form seals that are superior to sutures for containing body fluids and preventing bacterial infection.

9h

Glutamine metabolism affects T cell signaling and function

The cellular nutrient glutamine launches a metabolic signaling pathway that promotes the function of some immune system T cells and suppresses others, Vanderbilt researchers have discovered.

9h

Immigration to the US changes a person's microbiome

Researchers at the University of Minnesota and the Somali, Latino, and Hmong Partnership for Health and Wellness have new evidence that the gut microbiota of immigrants and refugees rapidly Westernize after a person's arrival in the United States. The study of communities migrating from Southeast Asia to the U.S., published November 1 in the journal Cell, could provide insight into some of the met

9h

Developing environmentally friendly materials

A new research article introduces a nanofiber material produced by the electrospinning device at the Laboratory of Polymers and Textile Technology in Tallinn University of Technology, and a range of applications. The article, titled "A method for producing conductive graphene biopolymer nanofibrous fabrics by exploitation of an ionic liquid dispersant in electrospinning," was published in Carbon.

9h

Just Months of American Life Change the Microbiome

In Thailand, a small group of Hmong women lived in a rural village, far from the nearest town. They grew everything they ate, mostly rice and vegetables. They boiled most of their food, and they rarely consumed meat. But then something happened to these Hmong women that shocked their systems, permanently altering, in just a short time, the course of their health—as well as the very germs that dwe

9h

Hot brew coffee has higher levels of antioxidants than cold brew

Comparing the properties of cold- and hot-brew coffee, researchers found similar acidity in both, but higher antioxidant levels in hot coffee.

9h

Preparing quantum computers to leave the lab

A new advance using microwave technology promises to ensure quantum computers can operate under realistic conditions, bringing us closer to the realization of commercial quantum computing.

9h

Barn swallows may indeed have evolved alongside humans

The evolution of barn swallows, a bird ubiquitous to bridges and sheds around the world, might be even more closely tied to humans than previously thought, according to new study.

9h

Coconut oil compounds repel insects better than DEET

Compounds derived from coconut oil are better than DEET at repelling blood-sucking insects, according to a new U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) study.

9h

Micro-earthquakes preceding a 4.2 earthquake near Istanbul—an early warning sign?

A new study led by Peter Malin and Marco Bohnhoff of the GFZ German Research Center for Geosciences reports on the observation of foreshocks that, if analyzed accordingly and in real-time, may possibly increase the early warning time before a large earthquake from just a few seconds up to several hours.

9h

Giraffes: Equals stick together

In 2016, virtually overnight, one giraffe species turned into four. Using new, even more extensive genetic tests, Senckenberg scientists have now been able to show that the four giraffe populations identified as separate species practically never interbreed, even where they occur in close vicinity to each other. The negligible number of hybrids serves as additional evidence that the Southern, Masa

9h

Regionerne: Ikke vores skyld, at psykiatrien mangler senge

De penge, der bliver afsat til psykiatrien, bliver også brugt, som de skal, mener formand for regionernes psykiatriudvalg, Sophie Hæstorp Andersen. Formand for Dansk Psykiatrisk Selskab mener, at både regionerne og regeringen har et ansvar.

9h

Heino Knudsen indkalder til møde om Nordic Medicare

Efter underskriftindsamling vil regionsrådsformand i Region Sjælland holde møde med Nordic Medicare.

9h

Could 'Oumuamua be an extraterrestrial solar sail?

On October 19th, 2017, the Panoramic Survey Telescope and Rapid Response System-1 (Pan-STARRS-1) in Hawaii announced the first-ever detection of an interstellar asteroid, named 1I/2017 U1 (aka, "Oumuamua). In the months that followed, multiple follow-up observations were conducted that allowed astronomers to get a better idea of its size and shape, while also revealing that it had the characterist

9h

How much danger are we in when chemicals are spilled in local rivers?

When a chemical spill in Elk River contaminated the drinking water of nearly 300,000 West Virginians in 2014, little was known about the contaminant MCHM, a type of methanol used industrially for cleaning coal. But now that it was in a local water source … is it a safety issue? Would exposure harm brain development in children?

9h

Novel antibacterial drugs developed at University of Eastern Finland

Researchers at the University of Eastern Finland have developed novel antibacterial compounds, focusing on the role of LsrK kinase. LsrK kinase is a protein involved in bacterial communication. In a new study published in ChemMedChem, the researchers explore LsrK kinase as a target in antibacterial drug design.

9h

Five things to know about InSight's Mars landing

Every Mars landing is a knuckle-whitening feat of engineering. But each attempt has its own quirks based on where a spacecraft is going and what kind of science the mission intends to gather.

9h

How to let go of being a "good" person — and become a better person | Dolly Chugh

What if your attachment to being a "good" person is holding you back from actually becoming a better person? In this accessible talk, social psychologist Dolly Chugh explains the puzzling psychology of ethical behavior — like why it's hard to spot your biases and acknowledge mistakes — and shows how the path to becoming better starts with owning your mistakes. "In every other part of our lives,

9h

US army tool will automatically inject an antidote during a gas attack

The US army is building a device that during a chemical attack will automatically identify the chemical agent and then inject an antidote

9h

Biomarker discovered for most common form of heart failure

Researchers have discovered a biomarker — a protein found in the blood — for the most common type of heart failure, a new study shows.

9h

Lyme disease predicted to rise in United States as climate warms

A new study looked at the relationship between climatic variables and the incidence of Lyme disease in 15 U.S. states. The study found that rising temperatures are expected to boost the number of cases of Lyme disease by more than 20 percent by mid-century.

9h

Shape-shifting robots perceive surroundings, make decisions for first time

Researchers have developed modular robots that can perceive their surroundings, make decisions and autonomously assume different shapes in order to perform various tasks — an accomplishment that brings the vision of adaptive, multipurpose robots a step closer to reality.

9h

New study finds evidence of brain injuries in football players at surprisingly young age

A new study by Orlando Health reveals that lasting evidence of brain injuries is present at an alarmingly young age. The study, which was completed in collaboration with the Concussion Neuroimaging Consortium, tested the blood of college football players for biomarkers that indicate traumatic brain injuries. They found that players not only had higher levels of these markers than those who didn't

9h

Strengthening self-regulation in childhood may improve resiliency later in life

Millions of families live in poverty in the United States. Associated stressors can often lead to adverse life experiences for children in those families, and negative socioemotional outcomes later in life.

9h

Supply chain transparency needed to combat soaring insulin costs

Spiraling insulin costs have created a dangerous barrier for many people with diabetes who need to access lifesaving treatments. The Endocrine Society is calling on stakeholders across the supply chain to help reduce out-of-pocket costs for people with diabetes.

9h

Cocaine-fentanyl overdoses underscore need for more 'test strips' and rapid response

Penn Medicine emergency department physicians are calling for more readily available testing strips to identify the presence of fentanyl in patients experiencing a drug overdose, and a rapid, coordinated response among health care providers and city agencies to help curb overdoses and identify high potency high risk drugs.

9h

Should genealogy data be used to solve crimes?

New research shows how police could use forensic DNA to track down a suspect’s relatives in genealogy databases that store a different kind of genetic data—and that were never intended for use in police investigations. In other words, if your sibling leaves DNA at a crime scene, it could lead detectives to your door. That suggests new investigative possibilities for police—and also new concerns a

9h

Stephen Miller’s Biggest Gamble Yet

With less than a week to go before the midterm elections, President Donald Trump is warning darkly of an imminent immigrant “invasion,” deploying thousands of troops to the U.S.-Mexico border, releasing a racist ad on Twitter, and threatening to issue an executive order aimed at ending birthright citizenship. The president has, in pundit-speak, found his “closing argument” for the 2018 campaign s

10h

People link body shapes with personality traits

When we meet new people, our first impressions of their personality may depend, at least in part, on their body shape, according to research published in Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science.

10h

Fear of disloyalty drives bias against bicultural immigrants

Members of a majority group tend to hold negative views of minority-group individuals who claim more than one identity, according to new Yale-led research. The negative bias is driven by fear that dual-identity individuals will be disloyal to the majority, the researchers said.

10h

'Cryptic' interactions drive biodiversity decline near the edge of forest fragments

The fragmentation of tropical forests weakens the effects of the 'natural enemies' of some tree species, reducing their ability to maintain biodiversity, a new Yale-led study found. In an experiment, researchers found that fragmentation weakens the impact of fungal pathogens and insect herbivores, enabling some tree species to thrive near the forest edges in ways that they could not deeper in the

10h

Experts call for a targeted approach to cancer prevention

Policymakers around the world should consider introducing more targeted early interventions in a bid to tackle cancer, according to experts at the University of Stirling.

10h

A shortcut in the global sulfur cycle

Chemists at the Friedrich Schiller University Jena (Germany) and their US colleagues have now discovered a completely unexpected shortcut in the global sulfur cycle. This process is determined by tiny organisms in the ocean's plankton. The scientists have described their discovery in the latest edition of the renowned research journal Nature.

10h

Updated European guidance for the diagnosis and management of osteoporosis in women

IOF and ESCEO have published an updated guidance to aid healthcare professionals in diagnosing and managing osteoporosis in postmenopausal women. The present guidance reviews and updates the 2013 guidance in all key areas and includes new information on the evaluation of bone microstructure in fracture risk assessment, the role of FRAX® and Fracture Liaison Services in secondary fracture preventio

10h

High exposure to radio frequency radiation associated with cancer in male rats

The National Toxicology Program (NTP) concluded there is clear evidence that male rats exposed to high levels of radio frequency radiation (RFR) like that used in 2G and 3G cell phones developed cancerous heart tumors, according to final reports released today. There was also some evidence of tumors in the brain and adrenal gland of exposed male rats. For female rats, and male and female mice, the

10h

Online sperm donors more agreeable: QUT study

As prospective parents increasingly seek sperm donors online, an international study by an Australian researcher at QUT has analysed what sort of men are donating sperm in this informal setting as opposed to a traditional clinic. And it seems a key characteristic is they are more agreeable. The findings have just been published in the international Journal of Reproductive and Infant Psychology.

10h

The Privacy Battle to Save Google From Itself

Interviews with over a dozen current and former Google employees highlight a commitment to privacy—and the inherent tensions that creates.

10h

Model paves way for faster, more efficient translations of more languages

Researchers have developed a novel 'unsupervised' language translation model — meaning it runs without the need for human annotations and guidance — that could lead to faster, more efficient computer-based translations of far more languages.

10h

New method peeks inside the 'black box' of artificial intelligence

Computer scientists have developed a promising new approach for interpreting machine learning algorithms. Unlike previous efforts, which typically sought to 'break' the algorithms by removing key words from inputs to yield the wrong answer, the researchers instead reduced the inputs to the bare minimum required to yield the correct answer. On average, the researchers got the correct answer with an

10h

Gut bacteria may control movement

A new study puts a fresh spin on what it means to 'go with your gut.' The findings suggest that gut bacteria may control movement in fruit flies and identify the neurons involved in this response.

10h

2D magnetism: Atom-thick platforms for energy, information and computing research

A class of 2D magnetic materials — known as van der Waals materials — may offer one of the most ambitious platforms yet to understand and control phases of matter at the nanoscale.

10h

Statens Naturhistoriske Museum får nyt organisatorisk ståsted

Statens Naturhistoriske Museum fusionerer med Biologisk Institut på Københavns Universitet….

10h

Ewine van Dishoeck, the Netherlander Who Traced Water’s Origin

“Somebody from the Netherlands is unavoidably linked with water,” said the astrochemist Ewine van Dishoeck , herself a native of the low-lying country, much of which has been claimed from the sea through the construction of polders, dikes, embankments and Archimedes’ screws. Water laps at the land beneath her feet, comprises most of her body, and absorbs her. Van Dishoeck, 63, the winner of this

10h

Owls shed light on how we focus on what’s important

In a world where the senses are overloaded with information, scientists believe they’ve taken an important step toward learning how the brain chooses what deserves attention. The finding in barn owls likely applies to all animals, including humans, the researchers say. It offers potential new insight into what goes wrong in the brain with diseases like attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (AD

10h

Breakthrough in treating paralysis

Three patients with chronic paraplegia were able to walk over ground thanks to precise electrical stimulation of their spinal cords via a wireless implant. In new research, Swiss scientists show that, after a few months of training, the patients were able to control previously paralyzed leg muscles even in the absence of electrical stimulation.

10h

Aging dormice shorten their hibernation for more reproduction

Edible dormice are extremely long-lived thanks to their seasonal dormancy with hibernation periods lasting between at six and eleven months. Researchers hypothesized that older animals should shorten their winter dormancy in favor of a reproductive advantage and confirmed this for both sexes in a database analysis.

10h

LG V40 ThinQ Review: The Five-Camera Phone

LG's latest flagship phone has a camera for every finger on your hand.

10h

Zebrafish larvae help in search for appetite suppressants

Researchers at the University of Zurich and Harvard University have developed a new strategy in the search for psychoactive drugs. By analyzing the behavior of larval zebrafish, they can filter out substances with unwanted side effects right from the start. This method has resulted in the discovery of a number of new appetite modulators.

10h

The protein Matrin-3 determines the fate of neural stem cells in brain development

A Japanese research group has discovered a new neurogenic mechanism responsible for brain development. By applying proprietary technology for detecting trace proteins, they found that a novel protein, Matrin-3, is responsible for determining the fate of neural stem cells. A deficiency of this protein causes a disordered differentiation of neural stem cells into neurons, resulting in the collapse o

10h

Novel antibacterial drugs developed at University of Eastern Finland

Researchers at the University of Eastern Finland have developed novel antibacterial compounds, focusing on the role of LsrK kinase. LsrK kinase is a protein involved in bacterial communication.

10h

The Vulnerabilities of Our Voting Machines

When Americans go to the polls, will hackers unleash chaos? — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

10h

Spørg Fagfolket: Hvordan vender en kat sig i luften?

Hvordan kan en kat rotere lynhurtigt i luften uden at tage fra på noget? Det vil en læser gerne vide, og amerikansk professor svarer.

10h

Touring Bubba Wallace's Car | In the Pit

Bubba Wallace shows off his Camaro #43. Stream Full Episodes of In the Pit: https://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/in-the-pit/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Discovery Follow on Twitter: https://twitter.com/Discovery We're on Instagram! https://instagram.com/DiscoveryChannel From: Discovery

10h

Bee diversity and richness decline as anthropogenic activity increases, confirm scientists

Changes in land-use affect negatively bee species richness and diversity and cause major changes in species composition, reports a recent study of native wild bees from the Sierra de Quila Flora and Fauna Protection Area and its influence zone, Mexico. In their paper in the open-access Journal of Hymenoptera Research, the researches compare three conditions within the tropical dry forest study sit

10h

Making collective sense of brainwaves

A new statistical tool for collectively analyzing large sets of brainwaves promises to accelerate neurofunctional research.

10h

TTP Ventus introduces the XP Series of micropumps

·Award-winning Disc Pump range expanded to address a broader range of applications·New micropump series offers improved performance, efficiency, and wider operating temperature range·The XP Series will be on display at MEDICA 2018 in Düsseldorf, Germany

10h

Google and Apple Maps have plenty of errors. Here’s how to fix them.

DIY Flag missing roads, update restaurants' opening hours, and more. We constantly consult mapping apps like Google Maps and Apple Maps. But we can also contribute to them. Edit existing data, add new information, and even register your…

10h

Kepler finally ran out of gas, but it will always fuel our planet-hunting ambitions

Space It defied the odds to discover thousands of planets. NASA’s TESS mission launched in April and will take over the exoplanet search.

10h

Ny forskning: Havet har slugt langt mere global opvarmning, end vi hidtil har troet

Det er på tide, at vi bliver realistiske omkring konsekvenserne, siger klimaprofessor.

10h

10h

Watching whales from space

Scientists have used detailed high-resolution satellite images provided by Maxar Technologies' DigitalGlobe, to detect, count and describe four different species of whales. Reported this week in the journal Marine Mammal Science, this study is a big step towards developing a cost-effective method to study whales in remote and inaccessible places, that will help scientists to monitor population cha

11h

Workers without paid sick leave endure significant financial worries

A study shows that Americans without paid sick leave worry significantly about both short-term and long-term financial issues. The highest odds of reporting worry were associated with normal monthly bills like housing expenses. Concern about making the minimum payment on credit cards was statistically significant, too. Conversely, workers with paid sick leave were less likely to report worrying ab

11h

Fatal measles case highlights importance of herd immunity in protecting the vulnerable

Last year, a 26-year-old man receiving treatment for leukemia went to a Swiss hospital's emergency room with a fever, a sore throat, and a cough, and was admitted. His condition worsened, and 17 days later, he died from severe complications of measles. The man's weakened immune system was unable to fight off the disease, even though he was vaccinated against measles as a child.

11h

Farmers market vendors need training to improve food-safety practices

Many vendors at farmers markets take inadequate precautions to prevent the spread of foodborne illness, and they should be trained to reduce food-safety risks, according to Penn State researchers who completed the final phase of an innovative five-year study.

11h

Anti-convulsant drug significantly reduced major depression symptoms

Researchers from the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai found that patients with Major Depressive Disorder (MDD) exhibited a significant reduction of depressive symptoms after being treated with ezogabine, an FDA approved drug used to treat seizures.

11h

New method peeks inside the 'black box' of artificial intelligence

A group of computer scientists at the University of Maryland has developed a promising new approach for interpreting machine learning algorithms. Unlike previous efforts, which typically sought to 'break' the algorithms by removing key words from inputs to yield the wrong answer, the UMD group instead reduced the inputs to the bare minimum required to yield the correct answer. On average, the rese

11h

Investigators study how a protein factor contributes to cancer cell migration

UCLA researchers have discovered a new protein factor that contributes to a fibroblast cell's ability to migrate to a wound and participate in its healing process. The study's results could help scientists prevent cancer cells from using the same mechanisms to move throughout the body and spread.

11h

OSU helps establish roadmap for filling the gaps in forest pollinator research

Actively managed conifer forests may also provide important habitat for the pollinators that aid the reproduction of food crops and other flowering plants around the globe.

11h

Women’s choice drives more sustainable global birth rate

If the average fertility rate in 1970 still held true, the global population would be 14 billion, or twice what it is today. So what’s behind the change? Choices by women, according to a new report on global fertility rates. This is, in fact, one of the most important but least recognized achievements in human history, says Peter McDonald, professor of demography at the University of Melbourne an

11h

Why air travel makes deadly disease pandemics less likely

Air travel may actually be reducing the risk of a deadly pandemic. This is because its harder for new microbes to stay isolated and become incredibly lethal

11h

The EU plans to test an AI lie detector at border points

submitted by /u/trot-trot [link] [comments]

11h

Dyrlæger med i internationalt samarbejde

Veterinære forskere fra Københavns Universitet har netop indgået et internationalt…

11h

Researchers find that cells can at times have superelastic properties

A team of researchers from Spain, France, Germany and Singapore has found that some cells under certain conditions can exhibit superelastic properties. In their paper published in the journal Nature, the group describes their study of epithelial cells and what they found. Manuel Théry and Atef Asnacios with Paris Diderot University have written a News and Views piece on the work done by the team i

11h

FBI forensics hits Hollywood speed, researcher says

If you believe everything you see on TV, forensic scientists can wrap up a case in an hour.

11h

Ny afdeling skal styrke cybersikkerheden i sundhedsvæsenet

Sundhedsdatastyrelsens nye afdeling skal frem til årsskiftet lave en særlig strategi for cyber- og informationssikkerhed på sundhedsområdet.

11h

Peter Riis Hansen er ny klinisk professor i kardiologi

Overlæge Peter Riis Hansen glæder sig til, at han som professor i kardiologi kan udbygge sine forskning om betydningen af inflammation for hjertesygdomme.

11h

'Prospect': A Lo-Fi, DIY Sci-Fi Film That's Better Than Its Big-Budget Brethren

The indie presents an alternative universe and an alternate Hollywood, one where directors make visual effects in their basements.

11h

This Coffin-Shaped Iceberg Is Drifting Toward Death

An astronaut snapped a photo of this big, old chunk of ice, which is finally on its way to die.

11h

SQZ cell engineering technology shows key advantages for developing cell therapies

SQZ Biotech characterized the biological impact of electroporation, a commonly used cell engineering method, with the SQZ cell therapy platform which utilizes a microfluidic cell squeezing technique to engineer cells. The findings will be published in PNAS, one of the most well-regarded peer-reviewed scientific publications, this week.

11h

NUS study: RNA defects linked to multiple myeloma progression in high risk patients

Researchers from the Cancer Institute of Singapore (CSI Singapore) at the National University of Singapore have uncovered an association between RNA abnormalities and MM progression.

11h

Model paves way for faster, more efficient translations of more languages

MIT researchers have developed a novel 'unsupervised' language translation model — meaning it runs without the need for human annotations and guidance — that could lead to faster, more efficient computer-based translations of far more languages.

11h

As Insect Populations Decline, Scientists Are Trying to Understand Why

The real story behind reports of an “insect Armageddon” is more nuanced—but probably just as unsettling — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

11h

Why Oral Cancer Threatens Men

Researchers wrestle with rising rates of throat cancers caused by common papillomaviruses — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

11h

Hollandske tog kan køre på batterier fra 2025

Togene i to hollandske regioner kan inden for få år køre på batterier hjulpet på vej af brændselsceller eller korte stræk med køreledninger.

11h

Police may be able to use forensic DNA to track down a suspect’s relatives in genealogy databases that store a differen…

Police may be able to use forensic DNA to track down a suspect’s relatives in genealogy databases that store a different kind of genetic data—and that were never intended for use in police investigations. In other words, if your sibling leaves DNA at a crime scene, it could lead detectives to your door. That suggests new investigative possibilities for police—and also new concerns about genetic p

11h

New report shows viability of reversing cost of diabetes, driving significant savings impact

As Americans head to the polls this coming Tuesday, a top issue for all voters is the rising cost of healthcare. A new report has found that addressing chronic diseases, and in particular diabetes, could save tens of billions of dollars in healthcare costs annually.

11h

The truth behind ASMR and the craze for videos causing ‘head orgasms’

Many people experience "ASMR", a relaxing sensation often triggered by gentle, whispering videos. We are finally working out what it is and that it can be good for you

11h

Rock, paper, scissors with 100 people could last a quadrillion rounds

Playing a game of rock, paper, scissors with 100 people would take more than 100,000,000,000,000,000 rounds before there's a winner

11h

Health risks increase for babies born to fathers aged 45 or over

Babies with fathers that are 45 years old or over are more likely to have a low birth rate, be admitted to an intensive care unit, or be born premature

11h

DNA project to decode 'all complex life' on Earth

Scientists set out to read the DNA of 1.5 million species, starting a "new chapter in biology".

11h

Chemists discover previously unknown metabolic pathway in plankton

Sulfur is found in many different compounds throughout the world – not only in the atmosphere, but also in the oceans and on land. All these manifestations are connected in a cycle. To put things simply, the element in its mineral form is reduced and transferred into organic compounds. These are passed around by organisms before finally reaching the atmosphere, where they are oxidized before they

11h

The Science of Music: A Talk with Pascal Wallisch, Ph.D.

Image: Shutterstock Why do humans listen to music? Why do we create it? And what does our taste in music say about us as individuals? These were some of the questions that Pascal Wallisch, Ph.D, set out to address in his talk at a local New York City event titled, The Science of Music . “To be honest with you,” he said, “I don’t think we fully understand what music is.” Wallisch, a clinical assis

11h

Lasers sniff out toxins in less than half a second

Scientists have refined a gas-sniffing device so that it can detect poisonous toxins and explosives in less than half a second. The laser-based method could be a security device in airports or monitor for pollutants and toxins in the environment. The findings build upon a method researchers developed last year that detects gases in about four or five minutes. The current device, which researchers

12h

The Singular of "Data" Is Not "Anecdote"

Why the singular of “data” is not “anecdote” — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

12h

Virtual reality therapy has real-life benefits for some mental disorders

Cheap, user-friendly virtual reality hardware could help VR therapy go mainstream. Some treatments are ready for primetime, while others are still in early testing.

12h

Trading sex for sleep—aging dormice shorten their hibernation for more reproduction

Edible dormice are extremely long-lived for their size, thanks to their seasonal dormancy. The animals are veritable record holders in longevity, with hibernation periods lasting between at least six and a maximum of 11 months. The factors influencing the variable duration of the hibernation period, apart from the specific environmental conditions, have so far been unknown. Researchers at Vetmedun

12h

Using a crystal to link visible light to infrared opens a window on infrared sensing

A cheap, compact technique for analyzing samples at infrared wavelengths using visible-wavelength components could revolutionize medical and material testing.

12h

Billions on herbal remedies – and for what?

Consumers spend billions each year on herbal remedies, with little to show for it.

12h

Lab 3-D scans human skeletal remains dating back to the American Civil War

In the Virtual Curation Laboratory, the lab's director, Bernard Means, Ph.D., is holding a realistic-looking 3-D printed replica of a human skull fragment that was dented by a bomb explosion during the Civil War.

12h

Active noise control for a quantum drum

Researchers at the Schliesser Lab at the Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, have demonstrated a new way to address a central problem in quantum physics: at the quantum scale, any measurement disturbs the measured object. This disturbance limits, for example, the precision with which the motion of an object can be tracked. But in a millimeter-sized membrane that vibrates like a drumhea

12h

Scientists make first detailed measurements of key factors related to high-temperature superconductivity

In superconducting materials, electrons pair up and condense into a quantum state that carries electrical current with no loss. This usually happens at very low temperatures. Scientists have mounted an all-out effort to develop new types of superconductors that work at close to room temperature, which would save huge amounts of energy and open a new route for designing quantum electronics. To get

12h

Estonian soil is surprisingly rich in species

Due to its biodiversity and theoretically huge number of taxa waiting to be discovered, soil fauna has been called the poor man's rain forest. If a researcher cannot head to the tropics but wishes to discover something new, they can take a shovel and start digging in the home forest or meadow.

12h

Layered chambers open a window for drug release

Implantable arrays of microchambers show potential capacity for holding and releasing precisely controlled quantities of drugs on command, report A*STAR researchers with colleagues in Singapore, Russia and the United Kingdom.

12h

Coral: Palau to ban sunscreen products to protect reefs

The Pacific island nation becomes the first country to impose a widespread ban on sunscreen products.

12h

Quantum Physicists Found a New, Safer Way to Navigate

GPS can be hacked, so airplanes and ships need a backup system. These quantum physicists think they have an answer.

12h

Smoketree Photos: The Ghosts of the North American Desert

The Desert Smoketree is a ghostly looking resident of the southwest deserts of North America that often looks more dead than alive.

12h

Machine learning improves accuracy of particle identification at LHC

Scientists from the Higher School of Economics have developed a method that allows physicists at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) to separate between various types of elementary particles with a high degree of accuracy. The results were published in the Journal of Physics.

12h

Dams and the damage they do

Ted Scudder, a social anthropologist and fixture on the Caltech campus for more than 50 years, is one of the world's foremost experts on large dams. He's also one of their fiercest critics. That wasn't always the case though. Early in his career, he, like many people at the time, saw big dam projects as a societal good and a path to prosperity for developing nations. His experiences over the next

12h

Hairy nanotechnology provides green anti-scaling solution

A new type of cellulose nanoparticle, invented by McGill University researchers, is at the heart of a more effective and less environmentally damaging solution to one of the biggest challenges facing water-based industries: preventing the buildup of scale.

12h

Don't rule out severe global climate change yet

A key metric of global warming is the Earth's "equilibrium climate sensitivity" (ECS), which represents the global surface warming that will accompany a doubling of atmospheric carbon dioxide. For nearly four decades, ECS was thought to be somewhere between 2.7 degrees Fahrenheit (F) and 8.1 degrees F, but a more precise estimate has eluded climate scientists.

12h

Environmentally friendly concrete from industrial waste is as strong as traditional

Scientists at Kaunas University of Technology (KTU), Lithuania are developing methods for producing concrete without cement, using fly ash, an industrial waste product. The final product is as strong as traditional concrete, is more resilient to damaging effects of acid, and more stable in cases of exposure to extreme heat and cold.

12h

Bohemian Rhapsody Is a Personality-Free Queen Biopic

Bohemian Rhapsody starts in medias res, on the eve of one of Queen’s biggest concerts: the band’s legendary 1985 set at Live Aid. The film then cuts back in time and progresses through an abbreviated history of the group. There’s a young Freddie Mercury (Rami Malek) being tutted at by his disapproving parents for making music rather than pursuing a sensible career. There’s the ornery record-label

12h

Truth vs. Social Justice

What is the telos––the purpose, end, or goal––of the university? In a thought-provoking 2016 lecture, the social psychologist Jonathan Haidt argued that the answer ought to be “truth,” but that increasingly, America’s top universities are embracing social justice as a second or alternative telos. While acknowledging that those goals are not always at odds, he argued that “the conflict between tru

12h

Image of the Day: Bacterial Blues

A photograph of microbes producing the antibiotic actinorhodin is one of many images on display at the Oxford University Museum of Natural History this winter.

12h

Falling Walls: New Materials for a New Age

You probably haven’t heard of “multiferroics,” but they could lead to entirely new ways of designing technologies, some of which we are only just starting to imagine — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

12h

Ultrasensitive toxic gas detector

In a paper published in Nano, researchers from the School of Microelectronics in Tianjin University have discovered a two-step sputtering and subsequent annealing treatment method to prepare vertically aligned WO3-CuO core-shell nanorod arrays which can detect toxic NH3 gas.

12h

Big thaw

Melting Arctic sea ice may be about to open up the Northwest Passage to cargo shipping.

12h

When it comes to bias-based hate, U.S. appears to be slipping, analyst says

With 11 people killed in a Pittsburgh synagogue, racially motivated shootings in a Kentucky store, and bombs in the mail, it seems like ethnic, religious, and racial hate are increasingly running unchecked in America.

12h

Sundhedsdatastyrelsen opruster sikkerheden i hele sundhedsvæsnet

Ny cybersikkerhedsafdeling skal overvåge den overordnede sikkerhed, gennemføre beredskabsøvelser på tværs af sundhedssektoren, og udbrede fælles sikkerhedsstandarder.

12h

Havmålinger afslører: Kloden er mere følsom over for CO2, end vi troede

Ny undersøgelse bekræfter, at en fordobling i indholdet af CO2 i atmosfæren mindst fører til en temperaturstigning på 2 grader og ikke kun mindst 1,5 grader, som IPCC hidtil har vurderet.

12h

A 31-year global diurnal sea surface temperature dataset

Based on a second-order turbulence mixed layer model, Dr. Tiejun Ling, senior scientist of the National Marine Environmental Forecasting Center, China (NMEFC), and his research team, have developed a new ocean mixed layer model.

12h

Children Are Getting Great Practice at Being Sold to All the Time

When young children are playing on smartphones, many parents have low expectations for what’s on the screen: bright colors, loud noises, a general lack of any greater moral lesson. A study released earlier this week , unfortunately, adds to that list: It found that the most frequently downloaded apps aimed at children ages 5 and under—even those categorized as “educational” and even ones that cos

12h

Are we losing one of our biggest carbon dioxide sinks?

In a new study spanning coastal areas of the Northern Hemisphere, a coordinated research network led by MSc Emilia Röhr, Assoc. Prof. Christoffer Boström from Åbo Akademi University and Prof. Marianne Holmer from University of Southern Denmark explored the magnitude of organic carbon stocks stored and sequestered by eelgrass (Zostera marina) meadows—the most abundant seagrass species in temperate

12h

China develops world's first instrument system for Raman-activated cell sorting and sequencing

The world's first instrument system for Raman-activated cell sorting and sequencing (RACS-SEQ) was recently developed in East China's Qingdao City, allowing functional identification, sorting and sequencing of individual cells, in a label-free manner.

12h

Chirality of vitamin D derivative affects the protonation states of its receptor protein

Researchers at Toyohashi University of Technology, in cooperation with researchers at Teijin Pharma Ltd. and Teikyo University, have highlighted the possibility that chirality of vitamin D derivatives can affect the protonation states of histidine residues in the vitamin D receptor protein via ab initio molecular simulations and biomedical analyses. This finding emphasizes that protonation states

12h

Eco-friendly waterproof polymer films synthesized using novel method

In a paper published in Nano, a researcher from the Department of Chemistry at Myongji University has applied a novel method to control the wettability of polymeric substrates, which has numerous practical implications.

12h

First two-dimensional material that performs as both topological insulator and superconductor

A transistor based on the 2-D material tungsten ditelluride (WTe2) sandwiched between boron nitride can switch between two different electronic states—one that conducts current only along its edges, making it a topological insulator, and one that conducts current with no resistance, making it a superconductor—researchers at MIT and colleagues from four other institutions have demonstrated.

12h

A new approach to liquid-repelling surfaces

"Omniphobic" might sound like a way to describe someone who is afraid of everything, but it actually refers to a special type of surface that repels virtually any liquid. Such surfaces could potentially be used in everything from ship hulls that reduce drag and increase efficiency, to coverings that resist stains and protect against damaging chemicals. But the omniphobic surfaces developed so far

12h

Why protesters could swing the midterm elections

From anti-war marches in the 1960s to the Tea Party rallies of 2010 and the almost nonstop progressive protests in 2018, marching in the streets has been a fixture of modern American life.

12h

'Smart shrinkage' in small towns driven by strong social infrastructure, research shows

As small Iowa towns continue to lose population, a strong social infrastructure – rather than economic or physical factors – determines whether residents report greater quality of life, according to new research out of Iowa State University.

12h

How the Trust Trap Perpetuates Inequality

Corruption, distrust and inequality reinforce one another in a destructive loop — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

13h

13h

Poll: Half of women over 50 experience incontinence, but most haven't talked to a doctor

Nearly half of women over 50 say they sometimes leak urine according to a new national poll. Of more than 1,000 women between the ages of 50 and 80 who answered the poll, 43 percent of women in their 50s and early 60s said they had had experienced urinary incontinence, as had 51 percent of those age 65 and over. Yet two-thirds of these women hadn't talked to a doctor about the issue.

13h

Soyuz rocket: 'Faulty sensor' led to launch failureSoyuz Russian Roscosmos

Russian officials have been looking into why the rocket’s booster malfunctioned during a launch last month.

13h

13h

Will 'Deepfakes' Disrupt the Midterm Election?

Advances in machine learning allow almost anyone to create plausible imitations of candidates in video and audio, potentially sowing confusion.

13h

Daylight Saving Time Ends Sunday (So You Get 1 More Hour of Sleep)

This Sunday, people across the United States can luxuriate in an extra hour of sleep as daylight saving time comes to an end.

13h

My Grandfather Thought He Solved a Cosmic Mystery

When my grandfather died last fall, it fell to my sisters and me to sort through the books and papers in his home in East Tennessee. My grandfather was a nuclear physicist, my grandmother a mathematician, and among their novels and magazines were reams of scientific publications. In the wood-paneled study, we passed around great sheaves of papers for sorting, filling the air with dust. My younges

13h

Progress Without Peace in the Middle East

Flanked by his wife, his national-security adviser, and the head of the Mossad, Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu made a surprise visit last week to Oman and met with its leader, Sultan Qaboos bin Said. Beyond the headline is a stunningly paradoxical trend line: The most significant period of Israeli-Arab de facto cooperation since the last real peace process, in the 1990s, is now taking

13h

About That Monstrous Black Hole We’re All Orbiting

Contrary to what its name suggests, the black hole at the center of our Milky Way galaxy is not an empty void. It’s a piece of space that weighs as much as several million suns. Here, gravity reigns, and it is relentless; the black hole tugs inexorably at anything that gets too close—a cloud of cosmic dust, an entire star the size of our sun—and swallows it. Nothing, not even light, can escape a

13h

The Term "Republican Environmentalist" Is Not an Oxymoron

But today's GOP makes it seem that way—which is why George H. W. Bush's EPA director is endorsing a Democrat for Congress — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

13h

Universiteter dumper Miljøministeriet: Har udskudt kritiseret konkurrenceudsættelse

Universiteter dumper Miljø- og Fødevareministeriets konkurrenceudsættelse i en intern evaluering. Nu er resten af ministeriets planer sat i bero.

13h

A Deadly, Fast-Spreading Form of Super-Ice Could Be Killing Off Alien Life-Forms

Ice that forms at a speed faster than sound could be ripping life on alien planets to shreds before it even has a chance to get going.

13h

Black Holes Can Raise the Cosmic Dead

The Goldilocks of black holes can resurrect dead stars before killing them again.

13h

Scientist-Politicians Go Local: From Lab Bench to a Deep Bench

In state and city races, out of the spotlight, researchers-turned-candidates try to build a base of science-friendly officeholders — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

13h

You can now hire a video game coach to turn you into a Fortnite expert

With the growth in e-sports, more gamers are investing in some personal tutoring to help them progress. We paid a Fortnite coach to teach us his top tips.

13h

Observation of blood vessel cell changes could help early detection of blocked arteries

A study in mice has shown that it may be possible to detect the early signs of atherosclerosis, which leads to blocked arteries, by looking at how cells in our blood vessels change their function.

14h

Micro-earthquakes preceding a 4.2 earthquake near Istanbul as early warning signs?

In a new study, led by Peter Malin and Marco Bohnhoff of the GFZ German Research Center for Geosciences, the authors report on the observation of foreshocks that, if analyzed accordingly and in real-time, may possibly increase the early-warning time before a large earthquake from just a few seconds up to several hours.

14h

How extreme beauty might defy survival of the fittest

The Great Argus Pheasant is a six-foot-long bird with elaborate ornamentation on its wings, including golden orbs that create a 3D optical illusion. It fans its feathers in a full hemisphere above the female hen as part of its mating display. Is all that beauty just a signal of fit and healthy genes? Perhaps not, says Yale ornithologist Richard Prum. The 'beauty happens' hypothesis, or aesthetic

14h

Fighting for the Right to Vote in a Tiny Texas County

In Waller County, Texas, a 40,000-strong exurb to the northwest of Houston, early voting is simple. Texas law mandates that the county maintain a main voting site, located in the county seat of Hempstead, that is open for at least five hours every day from Monday, October 22, to Friday, November 2. During those two weeks, satellite centers provide voting hours farther out in the county. Residents

14h

House of Cards Is Chillier Than Ever in Its Final Season

This article contains spoilers through the Season 5 finale of House of Cards. House of Cards will be remembered as the first streaming-TV success , an Obama-era fable turned eerily apt under Donald Trump , and—after sexual-harassment allegations against Kevin Spacey on set and off —an emblem for pop culture given an asterisk by #MeToo. But it also stands as an oil-and-vinegar showcase in acting.

14h

The Saruman Trap

Conservatives in distress turn to ancient texts. In the current circumstance, those of us of a Hebraic cast reach for the prophet Isaiah in his darker moods, or the even fiercer denunciations of Amos. Devout Christians despairing of a society in full malodorous rot look to The Rule of St. Benedict. Classicists might pick up a volume of Seneca, sighing wistfully as they contemplate the philosopher

14h

Russia blames rocket failure on mistake during assembly

A Russian official says an investigation has found that a failed rocket launch three weeks ago was caused by a sensor that was damaged during assembly.

14h

Chinese-style 'digital authoritarianism' grows globally: studyUS Chinese Taiwan Micron

Governments worldwide are stepping up use of online tools, in many cases inspired by China's model, to suppress dissent and tighten their grip on power, a human rights watchdog study found Thursday.

14h

An AI physicist can derive the natural laws of imagined universes

Teaching an AI system the tricks physicists use to understand the real world produces an extraordinarily powerful machine.

14h

In-hospital infections increase odds of readmission for stroke patients

Ischemic stroke patients who have an infection, even one as common as a urinary tract infection, identified while hospitalized are more likely than others to be readmitted within the first 30 days after being discharged.

15h

Stanford, Apple describe heart study with over 400,000 participants

A clinical trial to determine whether a smartwatch app that analyzes pulse-rate data can screen for a heart-rhythm disorder has enrolled more than 400,000 participants. Researchers at Stanford Medicine, in collaboration with Apple, launched the Apple Heart Study last November to determine whether a mobile app that uses the optical sensor on the Apple Watch to analyze pulse rate data can identify a

15h

Irina tester stoffer på sin computermodel – i stedet for på patienterne

Irina Antonescu læser ph.d. i farmaceutisk videnskab på SDU i håbet om at udvikle computermodeller, så man kan målrette medicin med færre kliniske forsøg.

15h

Apple's Heart Study Is the Biggest Ever, But With a Catch

The study enrolled a whopping 400,000 people, but it still won't answer researchers' biggest question: whether mass screening does more good than harm.

15h

If Terrorists Launch a Major Cyberattack, We Won’t See It Coming

“The FBI assesses the cyberterrorism threat to the U.S. to be rapidly expanding,” said one law-enforcement official, testifying before Congress. “Terrorist groups will either develop or hire hackers, particularly for the purpose of complementing large physical attacks with cyber attacks.” That assessment was made nearly 15 years ago . In the meantime, a generation of tech-savvy jihadists has expl

15h

AI wades into the debate on age of ancient Chinese cave murals

The dates of some murals in the Caves of the Thousand Buddhas in China have long been debated, so researchers are using AI to help settle the row

16h

Forskere finder ni 'nye' hormonforstyrrende stoffer: »Vi ser kun toppen af isbjerget«

Forskere fra DTU og SDU har fundet ni ’nye’ hormonforstyrrende stoffer, heriblandt Bisphenol AF. Man er klar over, at man kun ser toppen af isbjerget.

16h

Japan anti-trust authorities to investigate tech giants

Japan's anti-trust authorities will probe whether tech giants such as Google and Amazon are using their market-leader positions to exploit contractors or obstruct competition, the country's fair trade chief said Thursday.

16h

Germans to vent VW fury in mass 'dieselgate' suit

Volkswagen will on Thursday get a taste of the anger felt by duped German diesel drivers when consumer groups file the country's first class-action suit over an emissions cheating scandal.

16h

Slashed award accepted in Monsanto cancer trial

A cancer-stricken groundskeeper has accepted a slashed award in a landmark trial focused on weed-killer Roundup, setting the stage for an appeal by maker Monsanto.

16h

Perilous times for Australia wildlife amid severe drought

From abandoned baby kangaroos to wallabies being blinded by the sun and koalas having to go walkabout to look for eucalyptus leaves, Australia's exotic wild animals are struggling to adapt to a crippling drought.

16h

Google employees to walk out to protest treatment of womenGoogle Sundar Pichai

Hundreds of Google engineers and other workers are expected to walk off the job Thursday morning to protest the internet company's lenient treatment of executives accused of sexual misconduct.

16h

Palau plans sunscreen ban to save coral

The tiny Pacific island nation of Palau will ban "reef-toxic" sunscreens from 2020 in what it claims is a world-first initiative to stop chemical pollution killing its famed corals.

16h

Barn swallows may indeed have evolved alongside humans

The evolution of barn swallows, a bird ubiquitous to bridges and sheds around the world, might be even more closely tied to humans than previously thought, according to new study from the University of Colorado Boulder.

17h

Politiet har ulovligt gemt data fra nummerpladegenkendelse i op til 60 dage

En midlertidig backup-funktion hos politiet har i over seks måneder opbevaret data fra automatisk nummerpladegenkendelse (ANPG) i dobbelt så lang tid, som den må.

18h

Scientists count whales from space

UK scientists demonstrate the practicality of identifying and counting whales from orbit.

18h

Climate change: Oceans 'soaking up more heat than estimated'

The Earth is far more sensitive to fossil fuel emissions than previously thought, a study says.

18h

Hawaii's Supreme Court OKs Construction Of Giant Telescope Despite Native Objections

The massive telescope with a nearly 100-foot mirror is set to be built atop 13,800-foot Mauna Kea, considered sacred land by some of the project's opponents. (Image credit: Caleb Jones/AP)

18h

Flere millioner mennesker har talt: Hvem må selvkørende biler køre ned?

I en ikke så fjern fremtid skal selvkørende biler måske beslutte, hvem der skal dø i en ulykke. Forskere har nu kortlagt, hvad vi mennesker synes.

18h

Appendectomy May Lower Risk of Parkinson's Disease

The neurodegenerative disease shares protein clumps in common with appendixes, perhaps explaining why removing the organ is protective.

19h

End-of-life care preferences of Chinese adults vary based on whether they have children

Chinese adults who have children prefer to receive end-of-life care from family members at home, while those who lost their only child prefer to be cared for in hospice or palliative care institutions, finds a new study led by an international team of researchers and published in the November issue of The Journal of Palliative Medicine. Income, property ownership, and support from friends also inf

20h

Story tips from the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory, November 2018

ORNL story tips: ORNL's simulation shows 40 percent fuel savings when cars drive themselves; colliding tin isotopes helps scientists better understand unstable nuclei in exploding stars; new method to control HVACs in buildings provides grid stability, occupant comfort; AK Steel uses neutrons to see how new steel for vehicle components performs during various manufacturing processes.

20h

Barn swallows may indeed have evolved alongside humans

The evolution of barn swallows, a bird ubiquitous to bridges and sheds around the world, might be even more closely tied to humans than previously thought, according to new study from the University of Colorado Boulder.

20h

How sheep grazing affects the Norwegian mountains

You might think that grazers like sheep would have a big effect on alpine communities where they spend the summer grazing. But a new study shows that only in heath communities did sheep have a potentially significant effect on plant growth.

20h

Dangerous blood pressure caused by specific signalling in the brain

Scientists at the Baker Heart and Diabetes Institute have found that high blood pressure caused by specific signalling from the brain promotes heart disease by altering stem cells with the bone marrow. The results, published in Haematologica demonstrate how an overactive sympathetic nervous system that causes elevated blood pressure can instruct bone marrow stem cells to produce more white blood c

20h

Study buckles down on child car seat use in ride-share vehicles

The average Uber or Lyft vehicle does not generally come equipped with a car seat, and only in certain cities is it an option to request one.

20h

Women carrying rare breast cancer variants more likely to develop interval breast cancers

While the presence of common breast cancer mutations was indicative of increased breast cancer risk, the presence of certain rare mutations was indicative of increased risk from interval breast cancers and death.

20h

Lax state gun laws linked to more child, teen gun deaths, Stanford study finds

Compared with US states with the strictest gun control legislation, gun deaths among children and teenagers are twice as common in states with the most lax gun laws, a study from the Stanford University School of Medicine has found.

20h

Massiv fejlbudgettering af Ringsted Station blev blåstemplet af tre forskellige konsulentfirmaer

Ombygningen af Ringsted Station viste sig at blive fordyret med 118 procent, selv om myndighederne købte konsulentbistand fra ikke mindre end tre forskellige virksomheder.

20h

Award Winner

Geneticist and profilee Hoda Zoghbi describes her work on rare diseases.

20h

20h

20h

After a Lobectomy, a Boy Still Recognizes Words and Faces

A longitudinal study tracking the progress of an epilepsy patient after surgery shows the brain's ability to reorganize itself to function nearly normally.

20h

Ten-Minute Sabbatical

Take a break from the bench to puzzle and peruse.

20h

Infographic: Welcoming Service Dogs into the Lab

Tips for accommodating students with animal helpers in laboratory courses.

20h

Retina Recordings Reinvented

Ultraflexible mesh electrodes monitor the intact, functioning eyes of awake animals.

20h

Faulty Cell Transport System Implicated in Alzheimer's Disease

Tau proteins disrupt the movement of molecules into and out of neuronal cells' nuclei.

20h

Using Temperature-Sensitive Channels to Study Neural Circuitry

Meet the researchers building a thermogenetic toolbox.

20h

Infographic: Exercise's Effects on the Brain

Identifying the molecular interactions that occur all over the body during exercise could reveal how it affects learning and memory.

20h

Global Virus Doc

Author and researcher Peter Hotez explains the campaign to combat neglected tropical diseases.

20h

Infographic: Leaky Gates

A study explores how nuclear pore complexes are disrupted in Alzheimer's disease.

20h

Infographic: What Makes a Brain Smart?

Scientists have proposed a variety of features influence one’s ability to remember things and solve problems.

20h

Caught on Camera

Selected Images of the Day from the-scientist.com

20h

Contributors

Meet some of the people featured in the November 2018 issue of The Scientist.

20h

Examining Grad Student Mental Health

Some academic institutions are beginning to complement the work of student organizations in addressing mental health problems in graduate school.

20h

Noninvasive Brain Stimulation Modulates Memory Networks

Studies have demonstrated that magnetic and electrical currents can enhance memory in human subjects, but the technology is not yet ready for prime time.

20h

Genetic Neurologist: A Profile of Huda Zoghbi

Turning to molecular genetics, the Baylor pediatric neurologist and geneticist works to discover the biological basis for the rare neurological diseases she sees in her patients.

20h

Robb Rutledge Pinpoints the Factors That Make Us Happy—Or Not

The University College London researcher is a pioneer in the use of smartphone apps for psychology research.

20h

Vaccines Did Not Cause My Daughter’s Autism

In a new book, a vaccine researcher describes the scientific facts and personal anecdotes behind his family’s experience with autism and its comorbid disabilities.

20h

Dialogue Improves Children's Learning Abilities

Regardless of parental income and education, children who engage in more two-way conversation with their parents learn better.

20h

Winter Brain Blues

Researchers identify neurological pathways through which light affects mood and learning in mice.

20h

Genetic Sequencing Uncovers New Options for Multiple Myeloma Patients

A small pilot study suggests the approach can identify effective treatments already approved for other cancers.

20h

Infographic: Behind Mouse Eyes

A mesh records retinal cells’ firings in live animals.

20h

Defeating Fear Depends on Amygdala Suppression

Researchers determine the neurological mechanics underpinning a technique to extinguish fearful memories using goal-directed eye movements.

20h

Cranial Craters, 1000-1250

Prehistoric Andeans seemed especially fond of trepanation—holes drilled in the skull as a treatment for various ills.

20h

Smarts and Hearts

IQ can't capture the breadth, depth, or variety of human intelligence.

20h

A Researcher's Best Friend

Meet Joey Ramp, a University of Illinois neuroscience student who is fighting to continue her education with her service dog by her side.

20h

How Exercise Reprograms the Brain

As researchers unravel the molecular machinery that links exercise and cognition, working out is emerging as a promising neurotherapy.

20h

Tips and Drips: The Game of Pipetting

Is precision your middle name when it comes to pipetting, or is your technique more elementary? Find out with this poster from The Scientist and Thermo Fisher Scientific!

20h

Missed Connections: The Structural and Biochemical Markers of Neurodegeneration

Learn about how scientists use the presence of biomarker molecules, released when cellular or tissue integrity has been compromised, to detect and gauge neurological injury with this poster from The Scientist and Quanterix!

20h

The Biological Roots of Intelligence

Imaging, behavioral, and genetic data yield clues to what's behind effective thinking.

20h

When Should Service Dogs Be Admitted into the Lab?

Becoming a neuroscientist with a service dog by your side presents numerous challenges. Joey Ramp, who went back to college to study her own post-traumatic stress disorder, is learning this the hard way.

20h

Ryan Zinke Faces Increased Ethics Scrutiny

The criticism escalated sharply after reports this week that an investigation into Mr. Zinke had been referred to the Justice Department, a potential prelude to a criminal investigation.

22h

CNN's Don Lemon: White men are 'biggest terror threat' to U.S.

Lemon was having a conversation about a recent shooting, which appeared to be racially motivated, when he made the remark. He's been criticized by many conservatives on Twitter, some of whom say his comments are hypocritical. Reddit co-founder Alexis Ohanian also addressed a similar topic this week in an interview with Quartz . CNN anchor Don Lemon said Monday that "the biggest terror threat in t

22h

10 people who got famous from the grave

It's been said that "You can be a king or a street sweeper, but everybody dances with the grim reaper." These ten folks made huge advances in their field… but never lived long enough to see the fruits of their labors. Can you think of someone alive today who might make the list in the future? Depending on who you believe, life is either just a ride or a series of endless possibilities, like, sa

22h

10 paradoxes that will stretch your mind

While it's one of the best on Earth, the human brain has a lot of trouble accounting for certain problems. We've evolved to think of reality in a very specific way, but there are plenty of paradoxes out there to suggest that reality doesn't work quite the way we think it does. Considering these paradoxes is a great way to come to grips with how incomplete our understanding of the universe really

22h

Taking the Oceans’ Temperature, Scientists Find Unexpected Heat

Using a new technique, researchers found that between 1991 and 2016 the oceans warmed an average of 60 percent more per year than previous estimates.

23h

A zap from a laser could make bigger quantum computers possible

A breakthrough in controlling entanglement with laser or microwave pulses could let us make more accurate quantum computers without having to cool them down

23h

Sussex breakthrough prepares quantum computers to leave the lab

Breakthrough, which uses microwave technology, will ensure quantum computers can operate under realistic conditions, bringing us closer to the realisation of commercial quantum computing.

1d

Scientists 'tame' some disruptive environmental effects on quantum computers

A team of scientists, led by Professor Winfried Hensinger at the University of Sussex, have made a major breakthrough concerning one of the biggest problems facing quantum computing: how to reduce the disruptive effects of environmental "noise" on the highly sensitive function of a large-scale quantum computer.

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