Search Posts

Nyheder2018november02

MOST POPULAR

Obama Plays the Closer as the Midterms Approach

MIAMI—The rally began with a rabbi, priest and imam joining together to pray for the victims of last week’s shootings and the targets of the mail bombs. Then each, in turn, ended their prayers with the words, “to bring it home.” Democratic National Committee chairman Tom Perez knew who was best suited for that: “Bring in the closer,” he said as the rally began. After everyone looking for votes in

43min

17h

Fireworks: How do they work and how are they made?

The surprisingly simple science behind the clever chemistry that helps your night go off with a bang.

now

Sponsored

LATEST

The Atlantic Daily: A Tightrope of Our Own Making

What We’re Following Harvard vs.: Harvard defended itself in court for the past three weeks over allegations that it applies unfair admissions standards to Asian applicants (the lawsuit was brought by a coalition of Asian American students, cobbled together by the conservative legal strategist Edward Blum ). It’s unclear if the lawsuit will lead to changes in Harvard’s admissions process. But if

4min

The Family Weekly: The Health Crisis for Black Moms in Georgia

This Week in Family Stacey Abrams, a candidate for governor in Georgia, has put forward a plan to help solve one of the most pressing problems for women, particularly black women like herself, in the state—infant and maternal mortality. The Atlantic staff writer Vann R. Newkirk II puts the crisis in context: “If black Georgia were a separate country, it would be one of the riskiest places in the

1h

Should voting be incentivized?

Netvote founder Jonathan Alexander is considering a rewards system in his blockchain-based API. Incentivizing voters with a tax credit could increase participation. Australia penalizes non-voters, but incentivizing the process might encourage enthusiastic responses. None While social media giants receive a fair amount of blame for disseminating misleading and false information in regards to elect

1h

F.D.A. Approves Powerful New Opioid Despite Warnings of Likely Abuse

The head of a review panel predicted the drug, Dsuvia, would cause more overdose deaths. But the F.D.A. said there were adequate safeguards.

1h

How to spot misleading statistics in the news

Science Three tips to avoid sneaky tricks. Whether it's a story about which foods will kill you or which politicians are likely to get elected, chances are some simple stats knowledge can help you out.

1h

Creating an Axe Handle | Master of Arms

Learn how to make a handle for a battle axe! Catch the season premiere of Master of Arms, Friday 10p on Discovery. Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Discovery Follow on Twitter: https://twitter.com/Discovery We're on Instagram! https://instagram.com/DiscoveryChannel From: Discovery

2h

Alcohols as carbon radical precursors

Carbon radicals are attractive intermediates for organic synthesis because of their diversity and high reactivities. In this research, we realized radical C-C bond formation reactions using alcohols as straightforward carbon radical precursors. We used a newly developed low-valent titanium reagent to cleave the C-O bonds of benzyl alcohol derivatives to generate the corresponding carbon radicals.

2h

'Good guys' in superhero films more violent than villains

New research found that protagonists in superhero films engage in more violent acts, on average, than the villains.

2h

The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: Game of Sanctions

Written by Olivia Paschal ( @oliviacpaschal ) and Madeleine Carlisle ( @maddiecarlisle2 ) Today in 5 Lines The Trump administration announced that the United States will reinstate sanctions on Iran that had previously been lifted under the Obama administration. Eight countries will receive temporary waivers allowing them to keep importing some oil from Iran. Following the announcement, Trump twee

2h

How to enter the 'flow state' for effortless creativity

We experience the "flow state" when a given task becomes effortless and time slips by without our noticing. The concept has appeared in many ancient philosophies like Stoicism and Taoism, and modern research has confirmed this experience is real. By learning more about the flow state and how to trigger it, we can both work more productively and feel more satisfied with life. None When writing the

2h

Scientists can now map molecular structures in minutes

X-ray crystallography allows scientists to accurately map molecular structures, but the process is slow thanks to the need to grow sufficiently sized crystals. Two independent research teams have discovered a way to use electron diffraction to accurately map molecular structures with incredibly small samples. The results of their research have been published in both Angwandte Chemie and ChemRxiv

2h

Here's how an AI lie detector can tell when you're fibbing

Technology Deception detection meets artificial intelligence. A border project in the EU involves tech focused on deception detection. Just how accurate can it be?

2h

First Benefit of Knowing Your Genome

The "low hanging fruit" of genome-related health care will be knowing which drugs are likely to treat you best, says science journalist Carl Zimmer. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

2h

Where ‘Yes! To Affordable Groceries’ Really Means No to a Soda Tax

Coke, PepsiCo and other big beverage companies are the unseen forces (and funders) behind ballot initiatives that would ban taxes on food sales.

3h

Trilobites: When Human Relatives First Visited a Green Arabian Peninsula

Evidence of the activities of early hominins found in the Saudi desert suggests that they found an area that once was similar to the East African savanna.

3h

Molecular virologist fights influenza at the molecular level

In research to improve influenza therapies against H7N9 and other influenza strains, Chad Petit and his University of Alabama at Birmingham colleagues have detailed the binding site and mechanism of inhibition for two small-molecule experimental inhibitors of influenza viruses. Their report is published in the Journal of Biochemistry,

3h

Tying the knot: New DNA nanostructures

In new research appearing in the journal Nature Communications, Hao Yan and his colleagues Fei Zhang, Xiaodong Qi and others describe a method for coaxing segments of single-stranded DNA into complex 2- and 3D knotted structures.

3h

Gadget Lab Podcast: How Sonos Will Compete With, But Also Work With, Amazon and Google

An interview with Sonos CEO Patrick Spence, taped at WIRED’s 25th anniversary festival.

3h

Online program helps prevent teen depression

A new study highlights the positive effect of a web-based depression prevention intervention, called CATCH-IT, among adolescents most at risk.

3h

Hack Brief: Someone Posted Private Facebook Messages From 81,000 AccountsPrivate Facebook Messages

The data appears to have been stolen with malicious browser extensions, and not by exploiting an issue with Facebook’s platform.

3h

Hubble has been busy since coming back online

Since getting back to work on October 26, the Hubble Space Telescope has been studying red dwarf flares, among other celestial objects.

3h

Using Wi-Fi to “see” behind closed doors is easier than anyone thought

With nothing but a smartphone and some clever computation, researchers can exploit ambient signals to track individuals in their own homes.

3h

Study finds hospital communication-and-resolution programs do not expand liability risk

Brigham and Women's Hospital evaluated liability effects of communication-and-resolution programs. Their results found these programs were associated with improved trends in rate of new claims & legal defense costs.

3h

Why a warmer world may mean a wetter Arctic

The Arctic is warming faster than the rest of the globe, and as it does, it’s predicted to get wetter. To find out why, scientists looked at what happened during a period of warming 8,000 years ago. According to a new study, in this ancient time, western Greenland became more humid, a trend that’s often linked to increased precipitation. The study also shows that two different climactic processes

3h

4h

FDA Approves Controversial New Opioid 10 times More Powerful than Fentanyl

The decision was made despite criticism that the drug could be a danger to public health — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

4h

Don't worry, those weird patterns you see with your eyes closed are real

Head Trip We still don’t understand why we see the particular images we do. Sometimes the noggin’s wiring goes haywire and sends phantom cues called phosphenes. They are the tiny stars that blur your vision when you whack your head or rub your…

4h

With Frozen Ground, Parker is Behind Schedule | Gold Rush

After a failed attempt at mining his own ground, Parker is three weeks behind schedule and struggling. Stream Full Episodes of Gold Rush: https://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/gold-rush/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/GoldRush/ https://www.facebook.com/Discovery Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/Gold_Rush https://twitter

4h

Study: Laying Off Pot Improved Teens' Learning : Shots

submitted by /u/nyct0phile [link] [comments]

4h

Food for thought

From the standpoint of heart health, the Tsimane are a model group. A population indigenous to the Bolivian Amazon, the Tsimane demonstrate next to no heart disease. They have minimal hypertension, low prevalence of obesity and and their cholesterol levels are relatively healthy. And those factors don't seem to change with age.

4h

Spaced-out nanotwins make for stronger metals

Researchers from Brown University and the Institute of Metals Research at the Chinese Academy of Sciences have found a new way to use nanotwins—tiny linear boundaries in a metal's atomic lattice that have identical crystalline structures on either side—to make stronger metals.

4h

Despite Warnings, FDA Approves Potent New Opioid Painkiller

Critics, including some leading anesthesiologists, say the drug is unnecessary, and they worry it will be diverted and abused. The Food And Drug Administration says it is addressing safety concerns. (Image credit: Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)

5h

The Women-Led Opposition to Brazil’s Far-Right Leader

As polling stations in Brazil closed last Sunday following the country’s presidential election, many Brazilian women started replacing their social-media profile photos with a simple black square. Some included the word luto , which is Portuguese for “mourning”: Jair Bolsonaro, a far-right former military officer who made virulent attacks against blacks, minorities, and women, would be their next

5h

Photos of the Week: Giant Minotaur, Spooky Streets, Duck Boats

A gull swims through a flooded Venetian piazza, a different bird lands on a head in Zimbabwe, Halloween and Dia de los Muertos celebrations, political rallies in the U.S. and Brazil, mourning in Pittsburgh, the Red Sox bring the World Series trophy home, Central American migrants continue their trip north through Mexico, a giant military exercise in Norway, and much more

5h

The End of the Beginning of the Harvard Trial

BOSTON—There was a fog over the John Joseph Moakley Courthouse in mid-October. Harvard was headed to court to defend its admissions policies; a coalition of Asian American students, cobbled together by the conservative legal strategist Edward Blum, was there to challenge them. The group, Students for Fair Admissions, alleged that Harvard had discriminated against them. But there was a broader que

5h

Help Put a Scientist's Face on the UK's New £50 Bill!

Pardon me, do you have change for a Hawking?

5h

A Gunman's Regret

Science can help society grapple with the horrors of modern gun violence — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

5h

Don’t Be Duped by Voting Misinformation Before the Midterms

How to find accurate voting information for the midterm elections

5h

Glaciers Created a Huge 'Flour' Dust Storm in Greenland

If you're in Greenland and a strange cloud darkens the sky, that cloud might be made up of something scientists call "glacier flour."

5h

Dig through dirt uncovers new way to fight TB

An antibiotic found in dirt may offer a way to destroy mutant mycobacteria, the microbe responsible for tuberculosis, a new study shows. For decades, doctors have been using antibiotics to fight TB. And consistently, the microbe responsible for the disease, Mycobacterium tuberculosis , has been fighting back. When confronted with current drugs, such as the antibiotic rifamycin, the bacterium ofte

5h

Instant soup sends a shocking number of kids to the hospital

Health Flimsy cups of scalding water are not stable snacks. It shouldn’t surprise us that flimsy styrofoam and plastic cups aren’t exactly stable vessels to contain boiling water.

5h

Spaced-out nanotwins make for stronger metals

New research shows that metals can be made dramatically stronger by varying the spacing between nanoscale boundaries in the metal's atomic lattice.

5h

'Robust' corals primed to resist coral bleaching

A world-first study reveals that 'robust' reef-building corals are the only known organisms in the animal kingdom to make one of the 'essential' amino acids, which may make them less susceptible than other corals to global warming.

5h

Study: Culture strongly influences coping behaviors after natural disasters

Demographic and cultural differences strongly influence the coping styles young people use when they're affected by a natural disaster, and these disparities should be taken into account when providing services to help them recover from these traumatic experiences, University of Illinois social work professors Tara M. Powell and Kate M. Wegmann found in a new study.

5h

Racial, ethnic minorities face greater vulnerability to wildfires

Massive wildfires, which may be getting more intense across the US due to climate change and a long history of fire-suppression policies, have strikingly unequal effects on minority communities, a new study shows.

5h

Two Milky Way satellite galaxies once collided

New research provides the first unambiguous evidence that two satellite galaxies of the Milky Way recently collided. If you’re standing in the Southern Hemisphere on a clear night, you can see two luminous clouds offset from the Milky Way. These clouds of stars are satellite galaxies called the Small Magellanic Cloud and the Large Magellanic Cloud, or SMC and LMC. Using the newly released data fr

6h

Urban or suburban? It’s not just about your zip code

Individual perceptions about safety and school quality play critical roles in how people define their communities, according to a new study. Moreover, these subjective social factors can influence the notion of what separates a city from its suburbs just as physical boundaries traditionally make that distinction. A person’s zip code remains the biggest predictor of how people define their communi

6h

Byggebranchen er en stor klimasynder, men der er en udvej

Byggematerialer skal gøres grønnere, hvis vi skal standse den globale opvarmning – en ny rapport viser vejen.

6h

The One Issue That’s Really Driving the Midterm Elections

Here’s an amazing political statistic: In 2016, the Affordable Care Act came up in just 10 percent of pro-Democrat campaign advertisements and 16 percent of pro-Republican ones. This year, it came up in more than half of Democratic ads and nearly a third of those for Republicans. Those numbers , which come from the Wesleyan Media Project, help demonstrate the way the law’s politics have gone tops

6h

The Books Briefing: Which Comes First, the Story or the Setting?

In every story, something has to happen somewhere. And that somewhere —a place, landscape, world—is crucial to the stories we’re showcasing this week. In Lauren Groff’s short-story collection, Florida , condos and drugstores clash against snakes, alligators, sinkholes, and inclement weather to create a sense of existential anxiety. Sam Anderson’s Boom Town lasers in on Oklahoma City, often consid

6h

Dirty Jokes in Latrine Mosaics Entertained Ancient Romans

Floor mosaics with explicit content were found inside a Roman latrine in Turkey.

6h

Racial, ethnic minorities face greater vulnerability to wildfires

Environmental disasters in the U.S. often hit minority groups the hardest.

6h

Surprise! Kids' apps are full of manipulative, unregulated advertising

Technology And that’s just the start of a kindergartener’s gaming woes. A new study shows that 95 percent of children’s apps contain at least one type of advertising, a number that worries physicians and parents, and isn’t regulated under…

6h

Ryanair warned to respect national labour laws in Europe

Ministers from five European governments warned the Irish low cost airline Ryanair on Friday that it could face legal trouble if it ignores national labour laws.

6h

LIGO to publish new paper in wake of New Scientist investigation

Following New Scientist’s investigation into doubts around the 2015 discovery of gravitational waves, LIGO has announced it will publish a new clarifying paper

6h

Ozone hole modest despite optimum conditions for ozone depletion

The ozone hole that forms in the upper atmosphere over Antarctica each September was slightly above average size in 2018, NOAA and NASA scientists reported today.

6h

Ozone hole modest despite optimum conditions for ozone depletion

The ozone hole that forms in the upper atmosphere over Antarctica each September was slightly above average size in 2018, NOAA and NASA scientists reported today.

6h

Nao’s Atmospheric R&B Shines on Saturn

Nobody floats quite like Nao. The British singer-songwriter, née Neo Jessica Joshua, first found her voice in East London, where she spent her childhood collecting a diverse tapestry of musical influences: U.K. garage and grime, jazz, gospel, and funk. Now, the former backing vocalist weaves these sundries into wings. On her second studio album, Saturn , Nao guides listeners through a galactic jo

6h

New antimatter gravity experiments begin at CERN

We learn it at high school: Release two objects of different masses in the absence of friction forces and they fall down at the same rate in Earth's gravity. What we haven't learned, because it hasn't been directly measured in experiments, is whether antimatter falls down at the same rate as ordinary matter or if it might behave differently. Two new experiments at CERN, ALPHA-g and GBAR, have now

6h

Voters' preexisting opinions shift to align with political party positions

The views expressed by political party leaders can change how individual voters feel about an issue, according to findings from a longitudinal study of voters in New Zealand. The findings are published in Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science.

6h

Unraveling a genetic network linked to autism

Donnelly Centre Researchers have uncovered a network of more than 200 genes linked to autism. They have also unpicked an exact sequence of events during microexon splicing, known to be disrupted in autism, as a first step toward developing targeted treatments.

6h

Researchers identify additional inoculation source for lambic beer production

Researchers in Belgium have identified an additional inoculation source – the wooden casks or foeders – for producing lambic beers. Traditional lambic beer production takes place through wort inoculation with environmental air and fermentation and maturation in wooden barrels. Up to now, these lambic barrels have only been examined with culture-dependent techniques, missing a part of the microorga

6h

Researchers discover potential antidote to botulism

Researchers have identified a compound that strongly inhibits botulinum neurotoxin, the most toxic compound known. That inhibiting compound, nitrophenyl psoralen (NPP), could be used as a treatment to reduce paralysis induced by botulism. Botulinum neurotoxin is considered a potential bioweapon because there is no FDA-approved antidote. The research is published in Applied and Environmental Microb

6h

Fear of disloyalty drives bias against bicultural immigrants

Members of a majority group tend to hold negative views of minority-group individuals who claim more than one identity, according to new research. The negative bias is driven by fear that dual-identity individuals will be disloyal to the majority, the researchers said.

6h

Alibaba revenue jumps ahead of shopping bonanza Singles Day

Chinese e-commerce giant Alibaba Friday posted a 54 percent boost in revenue in the second quarter and saw profits rebound ahead of Singles Day, the largest shopping holiday of the year in China.

6h

Vietjet inks $6.5 bn deal with Airbus for 50 planes

Airbus signed a deal with Vietnamese budget airline Vietjet for 50 new planes worth $6.5 billion in Hanoi on Friday during a visit by the French premier to the fast-growing communist nation where the aviation sector is booming.

6h

Smartphone sales down for fourth straight quarter

Global smartphone sales fell for a fourth consecutive quarter in the period through September, suggesting a challenging market for device makers awaiting catalysts to spark sales, researchers said.

6h

UK fracking firm produces first shale gas

UK energy company Cuadrilla said Friday it has extracted a small but "encouraging" amount of shale gas for the first time since resuming fracking in Britain less than three weeks ago.

6h

Requiem for a Revolutionary Space Probe

The Kepler Mission introduced us to a dazzling array of solar systems — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

7h

Apple shares slide after disappointing holiday outlook

Apple shares tumbled Friday a day after quarterly results showing strong profits but weaker-than-anticipated iPhone sales and a disappointing outlook for the key holiday period.

7h

Uber wants to resume self-driving car tests on public roadsUber Pennsylvania Self

Nearly eight months after one of its autonomous test vehicles hit and killed an Arizona pedestrian, Uber wants to resume testing on public roads.

7h

New insights on comet tails are blowing in the solar wind

Engineers and scientists gathered around a screen in an operations room at the Naval Research Laboratory in Washington, D.C., eager to lay their eyes on the first data from NASA's STEREO spacecraft. It was January 2007, and the twin STEREO satellites—short for Solar and Terrestrial Relations Observatory—which had launched just months before, were opening their instruments' eyes for the first time.

7h

Key gene find could enable development of disease-resistant crops

Discovery of a gene that helps plants control their response to disease could aid efforts to develop crops that are resistant to infection, research suggests.

7h

Researchers identify additional inoculation source for lambic beer production

Researchers in Belgium have identified an additional inoculation source—the wooden casks or foeders—for producing lambic beers. Traditional lambic beer production takes place through wort inoculation with environmental air and fermentation and maturation in wooden barrels. Up to now, these lambic barrels have only been examined with culture-dependent techniques, missing a part of the microorganism

7h

Physicists explain how large spherical viruses form

A virus, the simplest physical object in biology, consists of a protein shell called the capsid, which protects its nucleic acid genome—RNA or DNA. The capsid can be cylindrical or conical in shape, but more commonly it assumes an icosahedral structure, like a soccer ball.

7h

What's in the air? There's more to it than we thought

Yale researchers have found that a type of air pollution is much more complicated than previous studies indicated.

7h

NASA finds Tropical Depression Yutu fading off China coast

Once a Super Typhoon, now a ghost of its former self, Tropical Depression Yutu was fading off the coast of southeastern China on Nov.2 when NASA's Aqua satellite passed overhead.

7h

NASA finds Tropical Depression Yutu fading off China coast

Once a Super Typhoon, now a ghost of its former self, Tropical Depression Yutu was fading off the coast of southeastern China on Nov.2 when NASA's Aqua satellite passed overhead.

7h

New insights on comet tails are blowing in the solar wind

Combined observations of Comet McNaught — one of the brightest comets visible from Earth in the past 50 years — have revealed new insights on the nature of comets and their relationship with the Sun.

7h

A ‘Dark Money’ Loophole in the Midterms

Want to influence Tuesday’s midterm election but keep your identity a secret from voters? No problem. Here’s how you do it: Step 1. Pick a super PAC name, treasurer, and bank account. Step 2. File a short form with the Federal Election Commission. Step 3. Wait until October 18 to begin spending your money. That way, you won’t have to report your donors until an entire month after Election Day. Th

7h

Who knew?

As Palau bans sunscreen to protect coral reefs, we look at other products causing environmental damage.

7h

How do daughters affect their dad’s voting?

Dads may be more likely to vote for female political candidates if they have a daughter—but only if the daughter is their first-born child. That’s the finding of a new research paper in the journal Political Behavior . In a second paper, which appears in Public Opinion Quarterly , the research team found that dads with daughters were more likely to support policies designed to increase gender equ

7h

She Chose To 'Go Flat' And Wants Other Breast Cancer Survivors To Know They Can Too

After her double mastectomy, writer Catherine Guthrie came to embrace her new body, without breast reconstruction. But, she has learned, women have to push the medical system to support this choice. (Image credit: Courtesy of Catherine Guthrie)

7h

Too much Christmas music can mentally harm you

It's that time of year again, when we start hearing Christmas music at every store we go to. Studies show that hearing Christmas songs too many times increases stress. Maybe wait a few weeks before you start playing "Frosty The Snowman" everywhere you go, if you value your sanity. We've all heard it, the endless stream of Christmas music on the radio, in the mall, and on street corners that start

7h

Google and NatGeo team up to combat climate change

A recently proposed campaign among scientists aims to protect 30 percent of Earth's land and oceans by 2030. In light of this, National Geographic and Google announce an unprecedented mapping project to help government leaders make better decisions in regard to climate change, and to meet the 2030 targets. The Wyss Campaign for Nature Foundation is pledging $1 billion to help meet the 2030 target

7h

InSight: The jeopardy of landing on Mars

Nasa releases a video describing the perilous landing its InSight Mars probe will face later this month.

7h

America Misunderstands the Declaration of Independence Because of a Typo

Few Americans are aware of the fact that the first printing of the Declaration of Independence contained a copy error. As a result, many subsequent republications of the text display the typo. In a new video filmed at the 2018 Aspen Ideas Festival in June, Danielle Allen , a political theorist and professor at Harvard University, explains why this seemingly innocuous oversight can have grave cons

7h

How one tough shrub could help fight hunger in Africa

The trick to boosting crops in drought-prone, food-insecure areas of West Africa could be a ubiquitous native shrub that persists in the toughest of growing conditions.

7h

Physicists explain how large spherical viruses form

A team of physicists and a virologist, led by a scientist at the University of California, Riverside, explains how large virus shells are formed. Their work can also be used also to explain how large spherical crystals form in nature. This understanding may help researchers interrupt viruses' formation, containing the spread of viral diseases.

7h

Researchers explore division of public opinion on Black Lives Matter

Researchers at The University of Texas at Dallas examined public opinions about Black Lives Matter, an activist movement founded in 2013 that has gained national attention in subsequent years.

7h

What's in the air? There's more to it than we thought

Using high-powered equipment to analyze air samples, Yale researchers were able to get a detailed look at the molecular makeup of organic aerosols, which have a significant presence in the atmosphere. Posing risks to health and climate, these airborne particles generally fall into two categories: Primary organic aerosols that can form during combustion, such as in car and truck exhaust, and second

7h

Fleets of drones could aid searches for lost hikers

In a paper being presented at the International Symposium on Experimental Robotics conference next week, MIT researchers describe an autonomous system for a fleet of drones to collaboratively search under dense forest canopies. The drones use only onboard computation and wireless communication — no GPS required.

7h

Key gene find could enable development of disease-resistant crops

Discovery of a gene that helps plants control their response to disease could aid efforts to develop crops that are resistant to infection, research suggests.

7h

Regeneration may cause isolation for older people, study finds

A study by an academic from The University of Manchester has found that urban regeneration in poor neighbourhoods can actually backfire, and lead to older people feeling isolated.

7h

Will there be enough water in the future?

The average person in Europe uses 3000-5000 litres of water per day, of which the lion's share is spent on food production—a considerable part on the other side of the globe. The world's limited water resources are becoming an even more pressing issue as populations grow and climate change causes droughts in the global South and North. While studies have already provided a number of ways to reduce

7h

Reliably simulating polyurethane foams

Car seats, mattresses and insulation materials are often made of polyurethane foams. The foaming process of the liquid polymer emulsions is complex. Fraunhofer researchers are now able to simulate the foaming behavior and reliably characterize the material. This also works with composite materials in which the plastic foams are combined with textile structures.

7h

Solar Power Is About to Boom in the Sunshine State

Florida has lagged in renewable energy use, but declining solar costs are set to change that — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

7h

Gene PPM1D gives stem cells a 'winning boost' after chemotherapy

Researchers show that gene PPM1D, whose function in blood production was unknown, can confer blood cells exposed to the chemotherapy agent cisplatin a survival advantage that might favor the development of leukemia years later.

7h

Seed banking not an option for over a third of threatened species

In paper published today in Nature Plants, researchers at the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew, detail for the first time the scale of threatened species that are unable to be conserved in seed banks. The paper reveals that when looking at threatened species, 36 percent of 'critically endangered' species produce recalcitrant seeds. This means they can't tolerate the drying process and therefore cannot b

7h

First discovery of adventive populations of Trissolcus japonicus

In the paper 'First discovery of adventive populations of Trissolcus japonicus', published in the Journal of Pest Science, the CABI scientists outline how—after a survey of native egg parasitoids of the brown marmorated stink bug—they discovered the Trissolcus japonicus was already present in apple orchards in the Canton Ticino, southeastern Switzerland.

7h

Producing everyday products with fungi

Most detergents, cosmetics, and clothes, to name just a few products, are manufactured using petroleum, making such everyday items anything but eco-friendly. It is now possible to produce the bio-based and CO2-neutral basic chemicals for such articles with the help of fungi. Fraunhofer research teams are developing fermentation techniques and manufacturing processes to produce them on an industria

7h

UK climate: Longer warm spells, hotter summer days

Britain's national weather forecasting service says warm spells and tropical nights are increasing in Britain as the climate changes.

8h

Researchers turn plastic bottle waste into ultralight supermaterial with wide-ranging applications

Researchers from the the National University of Singapore (NUS) have made a significant contribution towards resolving the global issue of plastic waste, by creating a way to convert plastic bottle waste into aerogels for many useful applications.

8h

Seed banking not an option for over a third of threatened species

In paper published today in Nature Plants, researchers at the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew, detail for the first time the scale of threatened species that are unable to be conserved in seed banks. The paper reveals that when looking at threatened species, 36 per cent of 'critically endangered' species produce recalcitrant seeds . This means they can't tolerate the drying process and therefore cannot

8h

A high-performance nanopowder facility for metal 3-D printing

Scientists from the Department of Industrial Technologies of the Yurga Institute of Technology of Tomsk Polytechnic University are developing an advanced high-performance facility for the production of metal powders used for 3-D printing. The TPU project has been recently supported by the Russian Science Foundation.

8h

Will there be enough water in the future? Interactive world map visualises water scarcity around the globe

The Water Scarcity Atlas is a freely available educational tool to help us all make more sustainable choices in day-to-day life.

8h

Soil and Seaweed: Farming Our Way to a Climate Solution

We can sequester carbon and improve our nutrition through regenerative farming of land and sea — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

8h

New findings on ocean warming: Five questions answered

A new study by scientists in the United States, China, France and Germany estimates that the world's oceans have absorbed much more excess heat from human-induced climate change than researchers had estimated up to now. This finding suggests that global warming may be even more advanced than previously thought. Atmospheric scientist Scott Denning explains how the new report arrived at this result

8h

Image: Semarang, Indonesia

The Copernicus Sentinel-2B satellite takes us over Semarang, Indonesia. A port city on the north coast of Java, Semarang is the fifth-largest city in the country, covering some 374 sq km and home to just over 1.5 million people.

8h

A new measurement bolsters the case for a (slightly) smaller proton

The PRad physics experiment has come up with a result favoring a punier proton.

8h

Good sleep quality encourages better recovery after sport-related concussion

New research suggests that sleep is not only important for physical, mental, and cognitive well-being, but also seems to play a pivotal role in the recovery of the brain following a sport-related concussion.

8h

Study suggests childhood obesity linked to poor school performance and coping skills

Study suggests that childhood obesity, now at epidemic levels in the United States, may affect school performance and coping skills for challenging situations.

8h

Instant soups and noodles responsible for burning nearly 10,000 children each year

Microwavable instant soup products cause at least two out of every 10 scald burns that send children to emergency departments each year, according to a new study.

8h

Researchers help map and scout for hydrothermal vents in Gulf of California

Almost 4,000 meters below the sea surface, in the southern Pescadero Basin, jagged ivory towers rise from the seafloor and emit hot shimmering fluid. They are the deepest known hydrothermal vents in the Gulf of California.

8h

One way to reduce food waste: Use it to make soil healthier

Imagine that one-third of cars manufactured by Ford or GM were never even driven once, but instead were left to rust and ended up in landfills. This exact situation is true today in agriculture, where up to 40 percent of food produced every year in the United States is never eaten.

8h

Report: Just 23% of Earth's wilderness remains

"77% of land (excluding Antarctica) and 87% of the ocean has been modified by the direct effects of human activities," states a new paper in Nature. Just 5 countries—Russia, Canada, Australia, the U.S., and Brazil—contain 70% of the world's wilderness (excluding Antarctica). The paper emphasizes the urgent need to protect large-scale ecosystems, calling them a buffer against the Anthropocene. Non

8h

Novel protective mask for medical personnel

Laughter is the best medicine, says medical research. But how are patients supposed to feel like smiling if the faces of the nursing staff and even their beloved ones are covered with masks? Researchers from Empa and EPFL are currently developing a novel face mask, which offers an unobstructed view of the wearer's facial expressions.

8h

Researchers explain the origin of the mysterious periodicity of the genome

Scientists at the Institute for Research in Biomedicine (IRB Barcelona) have found an explanation for a periodicity in the sequence of the genomes of all eukaryotes, from yeast to humans. The results published in the journal Cell offer an alternative explanation to the one based on natural selection, which has been accepted by the scientific community to date.

8h

Ring-shaped protein complex wrangles DNA

Biological physicists at Rice University have a new cellular mechanics theory that rings true.

8h

Natural nanotech anticancer drug

Sanguinarine is a natural product, a chemical made by certain plants including the bloodroot plant (Sanguinaria canadensis), the Mexican prickly poppy (Argemone mexicana), Chelidonium majus, and Macleaya cordata. It is a slightly toxic polycyclic ammonium ion, an alkaloid, and has been demonstrated to have antitumour and antiviral properties. It also blocks the formation of blood vessels, it is an

8h

The Mikulski Archive for Space Telescopes makes all Kepler data publicly available

The Kepler spacecraft launched in 2009 with the goal of finding exoplanets orbiting distant stars. In the years since, astronomers have used Kepler observations to discover 2,818 exoplanets as well as another 2,679 exoplanet candidates which need further confirmation. On October 30, 2018 NASA announced that Kepler had run out of fuel and would be decommissioned. While spacecraft operations have ce

8h

Iltsvindet er forsvundet mange steder

Kraftig blæst i september fik sendt ny ilt til havbunden. Nu kæmper bunddyr, bundlevende fisk og bundplanter kun med moderat iltsvind i det sydlige Lillebælt og Flensborg Fjord.

8h

Tænkeboks: Sandsynligheden for falsk-positiv er 4,6%

Her får du løsningen på Tænkeboksen fra uge 43

8h

This is the world’s tiniest robotic catheter

A very small magnetic steerable catheter will allow surgeons to perform complex movements inside the body with a lower risk of injury to the patient. For patients with cardiac arrhythmia, surgeons routinely perform a minimally invasive procedure to ablate the sections of the heart that cause unwanted electrical impulses. The physician inserts a catheter through a vein into the heart that locally

8h

How often are cost considerations documented in clinical notes?

Treatment in intensive care units (ICUs) is driven by urgency rather than economic considerations. Many clinicians have been trained not to consider financial issues when making treatment decisions but health care costs can be an important concern for patients and their families. To investigate how financial concerns are associated with health care decision making, researchers analyzed clinical no

8h

Study examines racial disparities in patient characteristics, survival after heart attack

This study analyzed data for about 6,400 patients who had heart attacks to compare black and white patients across a range of characteristics (demographic, socioeconomic status, social factors, lifestyle factors, medical history, clinical presentation, health status and depression). Researchers looked at how these patient characteristics differed by race, how they were associated with survival aft

8h

New quantum criticality discovered in superconductivity

Using solid state nuclear magnetic resonance (ssNMR) techniques, scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy's Ames Laboratory discovered a new quantum criticality in a superconducting material, leading to a greater understanding of the link between magnetism and unconventional superconductivity.

8h

Friends to the end? Social cues cause fish to delay survival tactic

Getting into trouble after succumbing to peer pressure isn't just a human experience.

8h

How to make the liquefied natural gas industry more sustainable

The recently announced $40 billion liquefied natural gas (LNG) project in northern British Columbia represents the single largest private sector investment in Canadian history. And construction will soon begin on two more LNG projects, one in Nova Scotia and another in British Columbia.

8h

Border Live | Premieres Wed, December 5, 9-11 PM ET/PT

Discovery has always taken viewers to places they otherwise could not go on their own – whether it’s the depths of the jungle or the turbulent waters of the Bering Sea. Discovery announced it will document the work of law enforcement on the U.S.-Mexico border as well as the real lives, real moments and real stories of those that live and work along its remote stretches in BORDER LIVE. This all-ne

8h

How do planes fly?

Science A simple answer you can explain to your friends. Flight relies on two principles of aerodynamics, or the study of how air moves around objects. These are thrust and lift.

8h

Lax state gun laws linked to more child, teen gun deaths

Compared with US states with the strictest gun control legislation, gun deaths among children and teenagers are twice as common in states with the most lax gun laws, a study has found.

8h

Can chocolate, tea, coffee and zinc help make you more healthy?

Ageing and a low life expectancy are caused, at least partly, by oxidative stress. Scientists have discovered that zinc can activate an organic molecule, helping to protect against oxidative stress.

8h

The winner is CMYK!

Ding ding ding! And there’s the final bell. We have our winner: Team CMYK! We’re glad to know you appreciate our color work for Eyewire swag. Congratulations to all! Artwork by Rabbit Giraud

9h

The Attention Games

On Wednesday afternoon, in the ramp-up to the midterm election, the president of the United States posted a video to his Twitter feed: a political attack ad focused on Luis Bracamontes, the “illegal immigrant,” as the ad calls him, who was convicted of murdering two deputies in Sacramento, California, in 2014. “Democrats let him into our country,” the ad’s text reads—the line is false —while foot

9h

The Incredible Shrinking Planet

In the 19th century, geologists hypothesized that some of Earth’s most dramatic landforms emerged because the planet had shriveled over time, like a juicy grape becoming a raisin. As the Earth contracted, they thought , the ground buckled in on itself, producing towering mountains, steep cliffs, and deep ocean basins. The theory worked only if they assumed that Earth was covered in a homogenous s

9h

Radio Atlantic: Midterms in the Wake of Political Violence

Subscribe to Radio Atlantic: Apple Podcasts | Spotify | Stitcher | Google Play The upcoming midterms mark the first nationwide referendum on the Trump presidency and the GOP-led Congress. Coming amid a shocking spree of political violence and an ugly showdown over voting rights, Tuesday’s election will have massive ramifications. What conclusions can we draw from the vote? Links – “The Jews of Pi

9h

A Theological Murder Mystery Is Rattling Christians in Egypt

CAIRO—Bishop Epiphanius was found lying in a pool of his own blood, his brain spilling out of his crushed skull. The 64-year-old Coptic abbot was discovered near his cell at the Monastery of St. Macarius, in the desert northwest of Cairo, just before dawn on a July morning. He had been on his way to prayers, but before he could perform that final act of devotion, he was murdered—apparently by his

9h

A memory scientist's advice on reporting harassment and discrimination | Julia Shaw

How do you turn a memory, especially one of a traumatic event, into hard evidence of a crime? Julia Shaw is working on this challenge, combining tools from memory science and artificial intelligence to change how we report workplace harassment and bias. She shares three lessons to apply if you've been harassed or discriminated against — and introduces Spot: a free, anonymous, online reporting too

9h

For older adults, does eating enough protein help delay disability?

A research team focused their attention on learning whether eating more protein could contribute to helping people maintain independence. Their study was published in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society.

9h

How cancer-causing papillomaviruses evolved

Cancer-causing human papillomaviruses (HPVs) diverged from their most recent common ancestors approximately half a million years ago, roughly coinciding with the timing of the split between archaic Neanderthals and modern Homo sapiens, according to a new study.

9h

Mental health diagnoses among US children, youth continue to rise at alarming rate

The number of children and adolescents visiting the nation's emergency departments due to mental health concerns continued to rise at an alarming rate from 2012 through 2016, with mental health diagnoses for non-Latino blacks outpacing such diagnoses among youth of other racial/ethnic groups, according to a retrospective cross-sectional study.

9h

Scientists find a 'switch' to increase starch accumulation in algae

New research raises prospects for large-scale production of algae-derived starch, a valuable bioresource for biofuels and other renewable materials. Such bio-based products have the potential to replace fossil fuels and contribute to the development of sustainable systems and societies.

9h

Nature of immune cells in the human brain disclosed

Researchers have disclosed the nature of how T cells protect the brain against harmful viruses. The results of the study are important for investigating the role of the immune system in numerous brain disorders.

9h

‘Jumping gene’ regulator protein curbs cancer growth

Researchers have discovered that low expression of a certain protein can lead to inflammation that supports tumor formation. Sudhakar Jha, an assistant professor and principal investigator at the Cancer Science Institute of Singapore at the National University of Singapore, and his team found that TIP60 protein, a known cancer suppressor for breast and colorectal tumors, works with another protei

9h

Neandertal teeth reveal the earliest known signs of lead exposure

Chemical analyses of teeth from young Neandertals show that lead exposure in hominids goes back some 250,000 years.

9h

One in 10 low-income women sexually harassed by landlord, study finds

During the past year, thousands of women have shared their stories about sexual harassment and assault as part of the Me Too movement. Although many of the stories have often been tied to superiors in the workplace, new research from the University of Missouri reveals another common threat to women, especially low-income women—their landlords.

9h

Brød GDPR-regler: Portugisisk datatilsyn giver hospital bøde på 400.000 euro

Det portugisiske hospital traf ikke de nødvendige foranstaltninger for at forhindre, at fagfolk havde ulovlig adgang til patientdata, mener det portugisiske datatilsyn.

9h

Lateral inhibition keeps similar memories apart

Our brains are able to store memories of very similar events as distinct memories. This, for example, allows you to find your car even though you parked it in a different spot the previous day, and even though the two memories are very similar. Researchers are deciphering how the brain computes this pattern separation in a brain region called the dentate gyrus.

9h

Editing nature: A call for careful oversight of environmental gene editing

Researchers makes the case for a new global governance to assure a neutral and informed evaluation of the potential benefits and risks of gene editing. The complex nature of these technologies, they write, requires a careful and judicious decision-making process that includes the local communities that would feel the biggest and most immediate effects.

9h

Atomic path from insulator to metal messier than thought

Vanadium dioxide has the unusual ability to switch from electrical insulator to conductor at the low temperature of 152 degrees Fahrenheit. By optically triggering this phase transition and pinging its atoms with X-ray pulses, researchers have watched the transition unfold in full detail for the first time, finding that the atoms arrive at their destinations through unpredictable routes independen

9h

New study offers hope for patients suffering from a rare form of blindness

A new form of therapy may halt or even reverse a form of progressive vision loss that, until now, has inevitably led to blindness. This hyper-targeted approach offers hope to individuals living with spinocerebellar ataxia type 7 (SCA7) and validates a new form of therapy with the potential to treat neurogenetic diseases effectively and with far fewer side effects than other medications.

9h

How one tough shrub could help fight hunger in Africa

The trick to boosting crops in drought-prone, food-insecure areas of West Africa could be a ubiquitous native shrub that persists in the toughest of growing conditions. Growing these shrubs side-by-side with the food crop millet increased millet production by more than 900 percent.

9h

First discovery of adventive populations of Trissolcus japonicus

MSc Judith Stahl and Dr Tim Haye led an international team of researchers, including those from the University of Torino and the USDA Agricultural Research Service, who used DNA analysis to confirm the wasp – which is native to China,Japans and Korea – was found in Switzerland in 2017.

9h

Capitalism is killing the world's wildlife populations, not 'humanity'

The latest Living Planet report from the WWF makes for grim reading: a 60% decline in wild animal populations since 1970, collapsing ecosystems, and a distinct possibility that the human species will not be far behind. The report repeatedly stresses that humanity's consumption is to blame for this mass extinction, and journalists have been quick to amplify the message. The Guardian headline reads

9h

Highly secure physically unclonable cryptographic primitives based on interfacial magnetic anisotropy

In a step forward for information security for the Internet of Things, a team of researchers has published a new paper in the online edition of Nano Letters in which they have engineered a new type of physically unclonable function (PUF) based on interfacial magnetic anisotropy energy (IAE). This PUF utilizes the random distribution of magnetization orientation of each device, which originates fro

9h

Quantum predictions

Solving a complex problem quickly requires careful tradeoffs – and simulating the behavior of materials is no exception. To get answers that predict molecular workings feasibly, scientists must swap in mathematical approximations that speed computation at accuracy's expense.

9h

Study finds that consuming a flavonoid in cocoa helped healthy mice delay skeletal muscle aging

As if you needed another reason to enjoy cocoa products, a recent study by Tufts researchers found that epicatechin, a flavonoid found in cocoa, certain fruits and beans, and green tea, has protective anti-aging effects in healthy mice.

9h

Paper-based lateral flow device to detect uranium in groundwater

The presence of uranium in groundwater can lead to severe health problems, from renal failure to cancer. Standard methods to detect uranium involve time-consuming processes and expensive, non-portable equipment. Measurements are therefore rarely performed in-field, which adds time between the moment of contamination and the moment of detection, delaying remediation efforts.

9h

Cellular atlas of brain region leads researchers to new discoveries

For decades, scientists have viewed the brain as a veritable black box—and now Catherine Dulac and Xiaowei Zhuang are poised to open it.

9h

Scientists Create Rare Fifth Form of Matter in Space for the First Time Ever

It's the weirdest, least-understood state of matter in the universe.

9h

2,3 mio mennesker har deltaget i etik-eksperiment. De er ikke enige

Hvor meget siger MIT's Moral Machine-eksperiment egentlig om vores moral? Ikke nødvendigvis så meget, mener dansk professor.

9h

Ring-shaped protein complex wrangles DNA

Rice University scientists determine the whole structure of the condensin protein complex, which helps to organize DNA throughout the life cycle of a cell. By combining sequence and limited structural data, they settle a controversy over whether the condensin protein complex is made of a single ring or a molecular 'handcuff.'

9h

Disorder plays a key role in phase transitions of materials

An international team of researchers discovers that disorder is part of the structural transition of Vanadium Dioxide from an insulator state to a metallic state at extremely small time resolutionsThe results of the study, published in Science, provide a new perspective on how to control matter, especially in the field of superconductivity, which could have major implications for nano-technology a

9h

9h

A Gurgling Mud Pool Is Creeping Across Southern California Like a Geologic Poltergeist

A mysterious, bubbling mud geyser is on the move in southern California, flitting dangerously close to railroad tracks, Highway 111 and some very expensive optic cables like a geologic poltergeist, according to news sources.

9h

Orion capsule: Europe delivers astronaut spaceship's first 'powerhouse'

European industry hands over a key piece of hardware for America's next-generation astronaut capsule.

9h

AI’s weirdest creations include beef truffles and diving board hats

Artificial intelligence has been used to dream up everything from new perfumes to pizzas, I went to them in real life

9h

Dansk læge opdager ny hjertesygdom: Det er ret fantastisk

Henning Bundgaard, der er leder af Rigshospitalets Enhed for Arvelige Hjertesygdomme, fandt forklaring på en mangeårig patients mærkværdige EKG-forandringer – en hidtil ukendt hjertesygdom.

9h

Centrifugation-based Cell Separation Using the Accuspin-Histopaque System

Learn more about the ACCUSPIN system for cell separation and the difference between types of Histopaque gradient media with this resource!

10h

Future Shock in the Countryside

I n the opening scene of Blade Runner 2049 , a flying craft navigates California over an endless expanse of solar farms and tessellated plastic fields on its way to a desolate farmstead. Watching it, I was struck by the dazzling futuristic spectacle, but also surprised to see the countryside at all in a science-fiction film. Often in speculative fiction, the future belongs to the city alone. Rura

10h

Boy Erased Is a Cold, Brittle Conversion-Therapy Tale

The aesthetic of Boy Erased is aggressively drab, and deliberately so. Joel Edgerton’s new film takes place in a world drained of passion and life: a gay “conversion therapy” program that emphasizes negativity and forced reserve. But that intentionality doesn’t make the movie any less exhausting a viewing experience. Based on Garrard Conley’s 2016 memoir, Boy Erased is a methodical work that trie

10h

The Atlantic Names New Top Print Magazine Editors: Don Peck Editor and Denise Wills Deputy Editor

The Atlantic’s editor in chief Jeffrey Goldberg promoted two editors to the top of the magazine’s masthead: naming longtime deputy editor Don Peck as the top print editor, and Denise Wills, currently features editor, stepping into the role of deputy editor for the magazine. The promotions are effective immediately. In a memo to The Atlantic’s staff, Goldberg writes: “I am confident that Don and D

10h

10h

Government urged to ditch 'bonkers' fracking plan

Plans to speed up the planning process to boost fracking are not going down well with some Tory MPs.

10h

One step closer to complex quantum teleportation

For future technologies such as quantum computers and quantum encryption, the experimental mastery of complex quantum systems is inevitable. Scientists from the University of Vienna have succeeded in making another leap. While physicists are trying to increase the number of so-called qubits, the researchers are pursuing the idea to use more complex quantum systems. The developed methods and techno

10h

Voters' preexisting opinions shift to align with political party positions

The views expressed by political party leaders can change how individual voters feel about an issue, according to findings from a longitudinal study of voters in New Zealand. The findings are published in Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science.

10h

Genetic factors tied to obesity may protect against diabetes

Some genetic variations associated with obesity actually protect against Type 2 diabetes, heart attack and stroke, new findings suggest.

10h

Russian physicists upgrade cheap diode laser for use in precise measurements

Physicists have developed a method for drastically narrowing the emission spectrum of an ordinary diode laser, like that in a laser pointer, for use in compact chemical analyzers that can fit into a smartphone, cheap lidars for self-driving cars, as well as security and structural health monitoring systems on bridges, gas pipelines, and elsewhere.

10h

New studies on student alcohol use can inform interventions to reduce blackouts

While most college students who drink alcohol don't intend to drink to the point of blackout, many don't fully understand the specific behaviors and risk factors associated with alcohol-induced memory loss, a suite of new studies found.

10h

Astrophysics: First detailed observations of material orbiting close to a black hole

ESO's GRAVITY instrument confirms black hole status of the Milky Way center. Scientists from the University of Cologne contributed the decisive instruments.

10h

Coral One Review: Get a Handle on This Robovac

The combination handheld and robot vacuum might create more problems than it solves.

10h

Battling Alzheimer's through Better Access to the Brain

Opening the blood-brain barrier with ultrasound could help treat this and other brain disorders — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

10h

Dear Therapist: Is It Possible to Apologize for a Sexual Assault?

Editor’s Note: This special installment of Dear Therapist diverges from the normal format, in that the question addressed does not come from an individual reader. Rather, it’s one that various men have asked our columnist Lori Gottlieb, in her inbox and in her own therapy practice: Is it possible to apologize for a sexual assault? And if so, how? Dear Men Who Have Asked, There are so many reasons

10h

Lægeforeningen raser: Psykologer skal ikke have behandlingsansvar

I satspuljeaftalen lægger regeringen og satspuljepartierne op til, at specialpsykologer i højere grad skal have behandlingsansvar i psykiatrien. »Helt ude i hampen,« lyder det fra Lægeforening.

10h

Samlet uddannelsesforløb skal skaffe flere neurologer og psykiatere til Nord- og Midtjylland

Nord- og Midtjylland kan oprette 11 sammenhængende uddannelsesforløb til speciallæger i psykiatri og neurologi.

10h

Researchers at IRB Barcelona explain the origin of the periodicity of the genome

The team headed by Núria López-Bigas has published an article in Cell about what might have favored the periodicity of certain base pairs in the genomes of eukaryotic organisms.

10h

Molecular biology: Phaser neatly arranges nucleosomes

LMU researchers have, for the first time, systematically determined the positioning of the packing units of the fruit fly genome, and discovered a new protein that defines their relationship to the DNA sequence.

10h

Bohr scientists figure out how to measure electrical activity in a fetal heart

Discovery points to new diagnostic equipment — based on a cloud of cesium atoms locked up in a hermetically closed glass cell. And within just three years this equipment will make it possible to diagnose specific fetal heart conditions, scientists from the Niels Bohr Institute at University of Copenhagen predict.

10h

HKUST-Beijing Tiantan Hospital scientists bring new hope to brain tumor patients

HKUST scientists in collaboration with medical staff at Beijing Tiantan Hospital undertook a groundbreaking large-scale study on secondary glioblastomas (sGBM) to search for new therapy treatments. sGBMs are an aggressive type of brain tumor, target younger patients and existing treatment method is insufficient.

10h

NUS researchers turn plastic bottle waste into ultralight supermaterial

A team led by researchers from the National University of Singapore has found a way to turn plastic bottle waste into ultralight polyethylene terephthalate (PET) aerogels that are suitable for various applications, including heat insulation and carbon dioxide absorption.

10h

Alcohols as carbon radical precursors

Carbon radicals are attractive intermediates for organic synthesis because of their diversity and high reactivities. In this research, we realized radical C-C bond formation reactions using alcohols as straightforward carbon radical precursors. We used a newly developed low-valent titanium reagent to cleave the C-O bonds of benzyl alcohol derivatives to generate the corresponding carbon radicals.

10h

Exploring the structure and properties of new graphene-like polymers

A team of scientists from Siberian Federal University (SibFU) together with foreign colleagues described the structural and physical properties of a group of two-dimensional materials based on polycyclic molecules called circulenes. The possibility of flexible design and variable properties of these materials make them suitable for nanoelectronics. The results are published in the Journal of Physi

10h

New research suggests the imaginary worlds of children reflect positive creativity

Children who create imaginary parallel worlds known as paracosms, alone or with friends, are more found more commonly than previously believed, according to a study led by a University of Oregon psychologist.

10h

Pessimism around youth suicide prevention approaches is unfounded, study shows

A comprehensive Australian study examining the global impact of suicide prevention approaches in young people has found that youth-specific interventions conducted in clinical, educational and community settings can be effective in reducing suicide-related behaviour in young people at risk. The review, by researchers at Orygen, the National Centre of Excellence in Youth Mental Health, has been pub

10h

Add USB ports to your outlets without springing for an electrician

DIY Make charging easier. Ever feel like you have plenty of charging cables, but not enough adapters to plug them into the wall? Here are two easy ways to add USB ports to your walls.

10h

Naps stymie learning in kids with Down syndrome

While napping can help young, typically developing children learn, it may have the opposite effect in children with Down syndrome, according to a new study. For people with the condition, memory difficulties and sleep disorders are common. Researchers say the findings, which appear in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences , are among the first to show that naps may actually increase

10h

Why social media is obsessed with this 'rock star' duck

A mandarin duck has become an online and New York celebrity after mysteriously appearing in Manhattan.

10h

NASA's Dawn mission to asteroid belt comes to end

NASA's Dawn spacecraft has gone silent, ending a historic mission that studied time capsules from the solar system's earliest chapter.

10h

Training with states of matter search algorithm enables neuron model pruning

The approximate logic neuron model (ALNM) is a single neural model with a dynamic dendritic structure. The ALNM uses a neural pruning function to eliminate unnecessary dendrite branches and synapses during training, but use of the backpropagation algorithm restricted the ALMN. A team including a researcher from Kanazawa University implemented a heuristic optimization method called the states of ma

10h

Shortening the rare-earth supply chain via recycling

A Japanese research team led by Kanazawa University used chelator chemistry to recycle rare earths (REs) from spent fluorescent lamps. These technologically crucial but expensive elements were extracted using EDTA, an aminopolycarboxylate, from lamp phosphors. Combined with planetary ball-milling of the RE-containing phosphors, the optimized process recovered REs with efficiencies up to 84 percent

10h

Biomarkers may predict Zika-related birth defects

The highest risk of birth defects is from Zika virus infection during the first and second trimester. A prenatal test has the potential to relieve the concerns of many expectant mothers

10h

New quantum criticality discovered in superconductivity

Using solid state nuclear magnetic resonance (ssNMR) techniques, scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy's Ames Laboratory discovered a new quantum criticality in a superconducting material, leading to a greater understanding of the link between magnetism and unconventional superconductivity.

10h

New £50 note will feature a British scientist

The Bank of England asks the public to nominate worthy candidates to feature on the new banknote.

10h

Tyskere åbner særligt testcenter til at crash-teste elbiler

Elbiler er vanskeligere at kollisionsteste end fossilbiler, blandt andet på grund af de kraftige og brandfarlige batterier.

10h

Why Earth’s water could be older than Earth itself

How did water survive Earth's searingly hot birth? A radical new answer turns planetary history on its head – and could revolutionise the search for alien life

11h

Pacific island to ban some sun creams in a bid to save its coral reefs

The Pacific nation of Palau is banning some sunscreens because they may be damaging to coral reefs. Anyone caught flouting the rules will be fined up to $1000

11h

Lengthy warm spells and heavy rainfall are on the rise in the UK

Warm spells, tropical nights, and heavy rainfall are all on the rise in the UK, according to 60-years of data analysed by the Met Office

11h

Stacey Abrams's Prescription for a Maternal-Health Crisis

S AVANNAH, Ga.— On the campaign trail in Georgia, the phrase sweat equity has acquired new meaning. Down below the gnat line , a month into autumn, organizers in this city swarm around a stage on a sweltering 90-degree Tuesday night. Stacey Abrams’s bus tour, wending its way through hundreds of miles of Georgia towns, has finally made it to Savannah State University, where a crowd of supporters s

11h

Robotaxis Are Coming. So Why Are We Still So Unprepared?

Opinion: We worry about glitchy driverless tech, but we *should* be worried about the remote human minders.

11h

New 'Super Smash Bros. Ultimate' Details Lead the Week in Gaming News

New characters! A story mode! Giant hands! No legs! Oh, the news goes on and on.

11h

Photo Gallery: Look Inside the Scrap Yards Sending Copper to China

When Christian Delfino's father ended up working as a sorter at the Tampa facility, the photographer saw an apt metaphor.

11h

Neighbors band together to get rid of pesky mosquitoes

An innovative control program reduced populations of invasive Asian tiger mosquitoes in several Maryland neighborhoods by an average of 76 percent, according to a new study. The project, called Citizen Action through Science (Citizen AcTS), mobilizes neighbors guided by scientists to address local problems. The findings appear in Scientific Reports . Researchers evaluated the approach in Universi

11h

November 1918: Peace Arrives, but Influenza Sweeps the World

Innovation and discovery as chronicled in Scientific American — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

11h

What Happens If Trump Wins His Bet on Demagoguery?

This week, Donald Trump clarified the stakes in the midterm elections. Speaking on behalf of the Republican Party, he urged his followers to back its congressional candidates at the ballot box in a demagogic video . It opens on a demented murderer speaking Spanish in court and segues to footage of the caravan of Honduran migrants entering Mexico, portraying them as barbarian hordes at the gates.

11h

The ancient Greeks warned us about AI: Chips with Everything podcast

Author Adrienne Mayor discusses the myths that contained the first blueprints for artificial intelligence Philosopher René Descartes’ quote “ cogito, ergo sum ” became well known after being translated into English as “I think, therefore I am.” It was the result of his attempt to figure out which of the things he thought he knew were impervious to doubt. Long before Descartes uttered these words,

11h

Extreme summer weather will be back next year . . . and probably forever

Environment Some research suggest these outliers are shifting to norms. It’s not just in your head: we really are experiencing more dangerous and extreme weather events than ever before in modern times.

12h

Image of the Day: Whale Shark Sonogram

Scuba diving alongside the fish, scientists used ultrasound equipment to image females’ reproductive organs.

12h

Vizio P-Series 4K TV Review (2018): Top Quality, Palatable Price

We review the Vizio P-Series 4K LED TVs, which range from 55-75 inches (P55-F1, P65-F1, P75-F1).

12h

Julian Assange: The Real Houseguest of the Ecuadorian Embassy

As details of his democracy-bending relationship with Roger Stone break, Julian Assange is proving guests, like fish, stink after six years.

12h

'Homecoming' Creator Sam Esmail On Podcasts, Paranoia, and Julia Roberts

The TV auteur managed to get Roberts on the small screen for Amazon's prestige podcast adaptation.

12h

Dansk gennembrud: Sådan kan planter tåle mere frost

Planter tåler bedre frost, hvis man formår at forcere bestemte protein-kollisioner, når plantens dna-strenge bliver aflæst. Det viser forskning fra Københavns Universitet.

12h

Study of Google data collection comes amid increased scrutiny over digital privacy

Google may not know whether you've been bad or good but it knows when you're sleeping and when you're awake. If you use an Android device with the Chrome browser running, the tech giant knows whether you are traveling by foot or car, where you shop, how often you use your Starbucks app and when you've made a doctor's appointment.

12h

New book examines energy justice, how policy affects those outside of decision makers, politicians

The 2015 UN Paris Climate Accords brought energy regulation's role in climate change to the international forefront. And even though the United States has since withdrawn from the agreement, energy development decisions both here and abroad have consequences felt around the globe. A University of Kansas law professor has co-edited a new book that is one of the first to examine energy justice, or h

12h

Physicists upgrade cheap diode laser for use in precise measurements

Russian physicists have developed a method for drastically narrowing the emission spectrum of an ordinary diode laser, like that in a laser pointer. This makes their device a useful replacement for the more complex and expensive single-frequency lasers, enabling the creation of compact chemical analyzers that can fit into smartphones, cheap lidars for self-driving cars, as well as security and str

12h

Norfolk cattle farmer warns of mass balloon release hazard

A cattle farmer warns people about releasing balloons of remembrance after a calf tried eating one.

12h

Fish fingers surprisingly sustainable, say conservationists

Research by conservationists find that some of the most sustainable fingers are also the cheapest.

12h

Vores nabogalakse er døende – og det er kun godt

Australske forskere bekræfter, at dværg-galaksen Lille Magellanske Sky langsomt taber pusten – og på sigt opsluges af Mælkevejen.

12h

New method could lead to more powerful quantum sensors

As quantum technology continues to come into its own, investment is happening on a global scale. Soon, we could see improvements in machine learning models, financial risk assessment, efficiency of chemical catalysts and the discovery of new medications.

12h

Sådan finder vi forsker-navne med Linux-kommandoer på Windows

Linux-kommandoer i terminalen kan bruges til mange ting. Her benytter vi dem til research, hvor vi finder danske forskere, som publicerer i videnskabelige fuptidsskrifter.

12h

Danske internetudbydere er langt bagud med IPv6

Verden er løbet tør for IPv4-adresser. Alligevel er Danmark et af de lande med den laveste IPv6-adoption.

12h

Can 'Microdosing' 'Shrooms Expand Your Creativity? Scientists Are Trying to Find Out.

Small doses of psychedelics could unlock creative thinking.

12h

Photos: Ghostly Dumbo Octopus Dances In the Deep Sea

Images of a graceful deep-sea dumbo octopus captured by the ROV Hercules.

12h

Scientists find a 'switch' to increase starch accumulation in algae

Results from a collaborative study by Tokyo Institute of Technology and Tohoku University, Japan, raise prospects for large-scale production of algae-derived starch, a valuable bioresource for biofuels and other renewable materials. Such bio-based products have the potential to replace fossil fuels and contribute to the development of sustainable systems and societies.

12h

Astronomer Jill Tarter discusses the search for intelligent life

The question of whether we're alone in the universe has haunted humankind for thousands of years, and it's one astronomer Jill Tarter has tried to answer for much of her life. Tarter, chair emeritus of the Center for SETI Research, worked as a project scientist for NASA's SETI program, which aimed to detect transmissions from alien intelligence. She currently serves on the board for the Allen Tele

13h

How Trumpian Nativism Leads to Anti-Semitism

In May 2016, Ben Shapiro—arguably the most influential conservative Jewish pundit in America—did something admirable. He admitted he was wrong. “I’ve spent most of my career arguing that anti-Semitism in the United States is almost entirely a product of the political Left,” Shapiro wrote . “The anti-Semitism I’d heard about from my grandparents — the country-club anti-Semitism, the alleged white-

13h

We Tested Facebook’s Ad Screeners and Some Were Too Strict

When Facebook removed Jo Brower’s fundraiser for disabled veterans just hours after approving it this September, she was surprised and confused. Brower’s nonprofit had previously published similar ads for their annual November bicycle ride in St. Petersburg, Florida. This year, Facebook ruled that the fundraiser was “related to politics or issues of national importance” and needed special authori

13h

The Midterms Could Permanently Change North Carolina Politics

R ALEIGH, N.C. —On an unseasonably cool, gray morning in August, Martin Warf was getting a cool reception in a Wake County courtroom. Warf’s task was to convince Judge Becky Holt that the Republican-led North Carolina General Assembly was within its rights to strip a candidate for the state supreme court of his Republican affiliation on the November ballot. This was a tough task. Chris Anglin, a

13h

A Common Virus Wreaks Uncommon Havoc in a New Jersey Nursing Home for Medically Fragile Children

Ten children have died in the past few weeks as a result of a common viral infection that typically causes mild symptoms. But there is much more to the many adenoviruses than meets the eye.

13h

Hyping Autism Research "News" Is a Disservice to People with Autism

It’s also harmful to serious science — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

13h

First images of asteroid Bennu obtained by the NASA OSIRIS-REx spacecraft

After two years traveling through space, the NASA OSIRIS-REx spacecraft has started to obtain images of the mission target, primitive asteroid Bennu. As part of the scientific team, Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias researchers Javier Licandro and Julia de León have already started to work on the calibration of these images in preparation for the ones that will be obtained in December 2018 usin

13h

Groundwater and precipitation provided water to form Hellas Basin lakes throughout Mars history

The northeastern rim region of Hellas impact basin, located in the southern hemisphere of Mars, contained numerous ephemeral lakes throughout Mars' history, a new study reveals. A new paper published in Astrobiology examines a region where depressions may have been hosted ponding water that originated from different sources, including precipitation, fluvial transportation and ground water. Sedimen

13h

Machine learning tool can predict viral reservoirs in the animal kingdom

Many deadly and newly emerging viruses like Ebola and Zika circulate in wild animal and insect communities long before spreading to humans and causing severe disease. However, finding these natural virus hosts – which could help prevent the spread to humans – currently poses an enormous challenge for scientists.

13h

Chocolate, tea or coffee with zinc could reduce oxidative stress

Ageing and a low life expectancy are caused, at least partly, by oxidative stress. A team of researchers led by Prof. Dr. Ivana Ivanovi-Burmazovi from the Chair of Bioinorganic Chemistry at Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg (FAU), together with researchers from the USA, have discovered that zinc can activate an organic molecule helping to protect against oxidative stress.

13h

Bioluminescent substance discovered in Brazilian cave worm larva

An insect larva found in the caves of Intervales State Park, an Atlantic Rainforest remnant in the municipality of Ribeirão Grande, São Paulo State, Brazil, was initially of no interest to the research group led by biochemist Vadim Viviani, a professor at the Federal University of São Carlos (UFSCar) in Sorocaba. The researchers are investigating bioluminescence, the capacity of living organisms t

13h

New open access database for medieval literature

The new Norse World database will make it easier for researchers to study perceptions of the surrounding world in Medieval Scandinavian literature. The new tool is a digital resource aimed at researchers in fields such as language history and philology, comparative literature, manuscript studies and digital humanities. It is freely available to researchers and the public.

13h

The protein Matrin-3 determines the fate of neural stem cells in brain development

A research group from Kumamoto University, Japan, has discovered a new neurogenic mechanism responsible for brain development. By applying proprietary technology to detect trace proteins in living organisms, they found that a novel protein called Matrin-3 is responsible for determining the fate of neural stem cells. A deficiency of this protein causes a disordered differentiation of neural stem ce

13h

Atomic view of nature's amazing molecular machines at work

Researchers from the MPSD's Department of Atomically Resolved Dynamics at the Center for Free-Electron Laser Science, the Centre for Ultrafast Imaging (all in Hamburg), the University of Toronto in Canada and the ETH in Zurich, Switzerland, have developed a new method to watch biomolecules at work.

13h

13h

The ISS Has a Supercomputer! Never Mind the Fried Disks

After a yearlong test, a supercomputer on the International Space Station has more or less survived and is ready to crunch data.

13h

An Aging Marathoner Tries to Run Fast After 40

Nicholas Thompson had been running marathons for years. At 42, he set out to reverse his slowing speeds with, science, tech, and new dedication.

13h

Open Access-direktør: Pseudo-konferencer kaster dårligt lys over hæderlige arrangører

Ingeniøren tog dansk direktør for Open Access- organisation med til ‘konference’ på Amager. Han var ikke begejstret.

13h

The Galactic Collision That Reshaped Our Milky Way

A new finding is shedding light on how our galaxy—and those throughout the universe—evolve — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

13h

Ny blog: IDAs Bæredygtighedskaravane rejser rundt i hele landet – også til din arbejdsplads

Unge frivillige rejser rundt til ingeniørarbejdspladser i hele landet for bl.a. at konkretisere måder at arbejde med FN's verdensmål på.

13h

Nature of immune cells in the human brain disclosed

Researchers from the Netherlands Institute for Neuroscience and Amsterdam UMC have disclosed the nature of how T cells protect the brain against harmful viruses. The results of the study, which are published in Nature Communications, are important for investigating the role of the immune system in numerous brain disorders.

13h

Lateral inhibition keeps similar memories apart

Our brains are able to store memories of very similar events as distinct memories. This, for example, allows you to find your car even though you parked it in a different spot the previous day, and even though the two memories are very similar. Researchers at IST Austria are deciphering how the brain computes this pattern separation in a brain region called the dentate gyrus. Results of their work

13h

How Anti-Semites Hear Trump

Robert Bowers entered a Pittsburgh synagogue and killed 11 people during a Shabbat prayer service on Saturday, reportedly shouting , “All Jews must die.” When police officers ran into the synagogue to try to stop him—he shot four officers before finally surrendering—he allegedly told them , in substance, “They’re committing genocide to my people. I just want to kill Jews.” His social-media posts

14h

Elizabeth Warren Test-Drives Her Presidential Campaign

ATHENS, Ohio—Elizabeth Warren popped in here Thursday to call her old protégé and gubernatorial candidate Rich Cordray “the nerd we need.” Cordray responded by saying that he didn’t think the trip would be “the last stop on her whistle tour—but we’ll leave that today.” No one said anything about Cherokees. Making her first appearance outside Massachusetts since her attempt to demonstrate the stre

14h

Refusing to Put Fear at the Center of Jewish Identity

PITTSBURGH—In so many other towns, schools have been the targets of choice for people who want to commit acts of violence. The Tree of Life synagogue, where a shooter killed 11 congregants and injured two others on Saturday, is a little more than a mile from Community Day School, a pluralistic Jewish school for kids ages 3 through eighth grade. The two communities are intimately connected: A numb

14h

In Pennsylvania, One Democrat’s Message: ‘Trump, Trump, Trump, Trump’

BRISTOL, Pa.—The King George II Inn, founded in 1681 and situated at the southern tip of Pennsylvania’s First Congressional District, is steeped in iconic Americana. Colonial-era crystal goblets gleam in the cabinets, letters penned on parchment are framed under glass, paintings depict frock-coated families in tricornered hats strolling country lanes, and the low ceilings in the Lincoln and Presi

14h

Small-Town Jews Are Used to Locked Synagogues

A week before the shooting at a Pittsburgh synagogue that left 11 Jews dead, Dana Brown, a student at Brandeis, went to Shabbat services at a Boston synagogue, not far from campus. She was surprised to find that the building’s doors were unlocked. “I had never been to a temple where the doors didn’t lock,” Brown told me. “That was very peculiar to me.” This struck her, and the sense of surprise s

14h

An Unfinished Orson Welles Film Finally Gets a Debut

W hen Orson Welles died at 70, in 1985, he left behind, by one scholar’s meticulous count, some 19 projects in various stages of incompletion: scripts, treatments, fragments, tests, trailers, ideas. But the most famous of them, the film that got away, was The Other Side of the Wind , intended as Welles’s last meta-statement on film itself, its perennially unfinished status seen ever since as a te

14h

The Haunting Possibility of Alternative Lives

The writer Elizabeth Kolbert’s grandfather, a refugee from Nazi Germany, was a huge fan of Westerns written by Karl May. They captivated Kolbert’s grandfather so much that when he immigrated to the United States, he took his kids out West for vacations. Later, Kolbert’s mother did the same. As a child living in Westchester, New York, Kolbert dreamed of moving out West and having adventures of her

14h

Eating less protein may help curb gut bacteria’s growth

A new study in mice and 30 mammal species hints at what controls the types and amounts of gut microbes, which can contribute to health and disease.

14h

EU border 'lie detector' system criticised as pseudoscience

Technology that analyses facial expressions being trialled in Hungary, Greece and Latvia The EU has been accused of promoting pseudoscience after announcing plans for a “smart lie-detection system” at its busiest borders in an attempt to identify illegal migrants. The “lie detector”, to be trialled in Hungary, Greece and Latvia, involves the use of a computer animation of a border guard, personal

14h

What it takes to get vaccines from the lab to the field

The United Nations Sustainable Development Goals (SDG) are a set of 17 directives to be completed by a 2030 deadline, with the aim of significantly improving quality of life for all people on Earth. Pfizer has made a commitment to SDG #3: Good health and well-being for all. Africa bears 25% of the world's disease burden yet has just 3% of the world's health workers. So how do you get life-saving

14h

How to vaccinate the world’s most vulnerable? Build global partnerships.

Community healthcare workers face many challenges in their work, including often traveling far distances to see their clients Pfizer is helping to drive the UN's sustainable development goals through partnerships. Pfizer partnered with AMP and the World Health Organization to develop a training program for healthcare workers. Community healthcare workers are often the only point of contact with t

14h

Giving up marijuana improves memory in just one week, study shows

88 youngsters from Boston were recruited for the study. 55 of them managed to abstain the full 30 days. Memory improved one week after abstaining, although attention rates stayed the same. The researchers hope to conduct a six-month test. None According to a recently study published in the Journal of Clinical Psychiatry , if you stop smoking marijuana, your memory will improve. Real shocker here

14h

NASA scientists are developing rocket fuel made from martian soil

It's a problem that NASA scientists are working on because the weight of the fuel it would take to travel both to and from the Red Planet is immense. What they're proposing now would actually gather fuel from water in the Mars soil. Once that's extracted, then it's fairly simple to separate out hydrogen. When that is combined with carbon from the atmosphere … Voila! Methane. Scientists at NASA

14h

Hør ugens podcast: It-aktivist får stoppet masseovervågning af telekunder

Ugens Transformator-pris går til en aktivist, der med sin indsats har fået sat en stopper for TDC’s masseovervågning af de danske mobilkunder. Du kan også høre om kilogrammet, der skal defineres på ny.

14h

New £50 note: Bank of England asks public to nominate scientist

Scientist has to be British – and dead – with Ada Lovelace and Stephen Hawking early frontrunners to appear on plastic note The Bank of England is to ask the public to nominate a scientist as the face of the new plastic £50 note, with Ada Lovelace, a 19th-century mathematician known as the “grandmother of computing”, an early frontrunner alongside Stephen Hawking and Nobel prizewinner Dorothy Hod

14h

Video: Her sender fejlramt sensor Soyuz-raket ud af kurs

En bøjet sensor var første led i den kædereaktion af begivenheder, der betød, at to astronauter måtte skydes væk fra Soyuz-raket for at redde livet, lyder den officielle forklaring nu.

14h

Hæstorp: Vi er ikke på niveau med andre, fordi udgangspunktet var dårligere

Region Hovedstaden halter kraftigt efter de andre regioner, når det kommer til et velfungerende sundhedsvæsen. Regionsrådsformanden anerkender, at regionen kan blive bedre, men mener også, at Hovedstaden halter, fordi udgangspunktet var for dårligt.

15h

Professor: Diabetespatienter kan se frem til ringere behandling

Aftale mellem regionerne og PLO, der i stor stil sender diabetespatienter fra ambulatorier til almen praksis, er en klar forringelse af behandlingskvaliteten, mener får professor Henning Beck Nielsen.

15h

Hospitaler sender betydeligt færre patienter til almen praksis end forventet

Antallet af personer med type 2-diabetes, der skal flyttes fra ambulatorier til almen praksis, lander langt under det estimerede bl.a. på grund af en stor grad af fejlkodning af sygdommens sværhedsgrad.

15h

Almen praksis vil hive de svageste diabetespatienter ud af kaos

Aftalen mellem PLO og Danske Regioner om at flytte de fleste diabetespatienter til almen praksis kommer til at gavne de allersvageste, som pga. et kaotisk liv udebliver fra ambulatorierne vurderer, Anders Beich, formand for DSAM. Praksislægerne kan skabe det nærvær, der skal til, for at få dem til at dukke op.

15h

Astman: Praksislæger kan – med vejledning – gøre det mindst lige så godt

Danske Regioners næstformand Ulla Astman er i modsætning til flere diabetesprofessorer ikke bekymret for,om praksislæger kan behandle ukomplicerede diabetesforløb lige så godt som ambulatorierne. Hun opfordrer professorerne til at finde sig i den nye rolle som vejleder.

15h

Praksislæger mangler økonomisk incitament for at tage flere diabetespatienter

Ny overenskomst har ingen honorar pr. konsultation for de diabetespatienter, almen praksis overtager fra hospitalerne. Det giver ringe incitament for at tilse disse patienter tilstrækkelig tit, siger praksislæge.

15h

#50 En kirurg i Tanzania

Kirurgen Mohammed Shafiq taler om sundhedssystemet i Tanzania i denne podcast, der også byder på forskernyt om antibiotika og en boganmeldelse.

15h

Scientists find a 'switch' to increase starch accumulation in algae

Results from a collaborative study by Tokyo Institute of Technology and Tohoku University, Japan, raise prospects for large-scale production of algae-derived starch, a valuable bioresource for biofuels and other renewable materials. Such bio-based products have the potential to replace fossil fuels and contribute to the development of sustainable systems and societies.

16h

Top Australia defence firm reports serious cyber breach

A top Australian defence firm with major US Navy contracts has admitted its personnel files were breached and that it was the subject of an extortion attempt.

17h

Small rockets are taking off

In mid-November, a company called Rocket Lab will try to send six small satellites into orbit around Earth—a fairly banal undertaking, save for the size of the launch rocket.

17h

What role should the public play in science? – Science Weekly podcast

How far is too far when it comes to the public directing research? There are concerns than a science journal may revise a paper amid pressure from activists. It raises the issue of what role the public should play and whether science should have boundaries to protect its integrity. Ian Sample presents.

18h

'Good guys' in superhero films more violent than villains

In a film genre more popular than ever, courageous superheroes wield special powers to protect the public from villains. But despite positive themes these films may offer, new research suggests superhero characters often idolized by young viewers may send a strongly negative message when it comes to violence. In fact, according to a study being presented at the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP)

18h

Are children's television programs too cool for school?

Television has a large impact on children's lives; studies have shown that for every 3 hours children spend in school, 5 hours are spent watching TV. While other studies have looked at how television impacts aspects of childhood, such as diet and exercise, little research has been done on how television shapes children's perceptions of school.

18h

Country diary: a magic spot ready to be peopled with fays or gruffaloes

Sutton Bank, North Yorkshire: The ground is hummocky with moss and splotched with scarlet. I’ve never seen so many fly agarics in one place I’ve just walked past a fingerpost directing walkers to “The Finest View in England”. This was the opinion of the writer and local vet James Herriot, and round here, that’s as good as gospel. On this blue dome morning, though, it’s a reasonable claim. I’m on

18h

Mænd har også et biologisk ur: Gamle fædre får mindre sunde børn

Fars alder har også betydning for barnets sundhed, viser ny forskning. Det kan skyldes, at der er flere fejl i ældre mænds sædcellers DNA.

18h

A Month On, We Still Don't Know What Happened to Jamal Khashoggi

On October 2, Jamal Khashoggi walked into Saudi Arabia’s consulate in Istanbul and was not seen publicly again. One month later, the Saudi journalist’s fate has been pieced together incrementally, through media leaks, Turkish official statements, and (oft-changing) Saudi government admissions. We still don’t know much about what happened to Khashoggi. “In a way,” Neil Quilliam, a Middle East expe

19h

Can chocolate, tea, coffee and zinc help make you more healthy?

Ageing and a low life expectancy are caused, at least partly, by oxidative stress. A team of researchers led by Prof. Dr. Ivana Ivanovi-Burmazovi from the Chair of Bioinorganic Chemistry at Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg (FAU), together with researchers from the USA, have discovered that zinc can activate an organic molecule, helping to protect against oxidative stress.

19h

African-American caregivers report better mental health outcomes than white caregivers

African-Americans caring for loved ones with cancer were less likely than their white peers to report distress and depression, possibly due to stronger social support.

19h

Risk of cancer mortality may increase for successive generations of Latino immigrants

Latinos in the United States experienced an overall increased risk of cancer death with each generation born in this country.

19h

Oncologists' LGBT-related knowledge & practices improved after cultural competency training

An interactive online LGBT cultural competency training program for oncologists may be acceptable, feasible, and improve LGBT-related knowledge and clinical practices.

19h

A culturally tailored intervention increased HPV vaccination of Asian-American adolescents

A culturally tailored multilevel strategy designed to remove barriers to human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination among low-income, mostly Chinese-American adolescent girls and boys significantly increased vaccine uptake.

19h

Coverage of hormonal breast cancer therapies increased in states that expanded Medicaid

An evaluation of breast cancer patients enrolled in Medicaid showed that states that expanded Medicaid during 2011 to 2017 had a 27 percent increase in prescriptions for hormonal therapy medications compared to states that did not expand Medicaid during the same period.

19h

A prognostic model may predict survival in African-American women with breast cancer

A prognostic model developed using a machine learning approach could identify African-American breast cancer patients with increased risk of death.

19h

Kids' firearm-related injuries differ: Younger kids are more likely to be injured accidentally

The reasons that children with firearm-related injuries are rushed to the nation's emergency departments differs by the intent of the person discharging the weapon, with younger kids more likely to be injured by accident and older youths more likely to be victims of an assault, according to retrospective, cross-sectional analyses presented during the American Academy of Pediatrics National Confere

19h

Physical activity should be a vital sign of children's overall health

While the benefits of exercise for health and well-being are well documented, new research suggests the vast majority of children do not meet current exercise recommendations.

19h

Injury to a parent can lead to sleep issues in children and teens

When children face an unsettling experience, such as the injury of a parent, it can alter their sleep habits, according to new research being presented at the 2018 American Academy of Pediatrics National Conference & Exhibition.

19h

Differences in intent of pediatric injuries underscore importance of safe firearm storage

Study abstract suggests that younger children were more likely to sustain unintentional firearm injuries, whereas adolescents were more likely to be victims of firearm-related assault or self-harm.

19h

Are children's television programs too cool for school?

Study abstract suggests need to advocate for more positive depictions of academics and school in children's programming, especially as children get older.

19h

Soft furniture doesn't cushion risk of falls by young children

The rate of bed- and sofa-related injuries among young children is on the rise. The findings show a need for increased prevention efforts, including parental education and improved safety design.

19h

Traumatic brain injuries can lead to long-term neurological and psychiatric disorders

Study abstract being presented at American Academy of Pediatrics 2018 National Conference and Exhibition suggests that children who suffer traumatic brain injuries are at significantly increased risk of developing new post-traumatic neuropsychiatric disorders, and may benefit from ongoing outpatient follow-up to facilitate early detection and intervention.

19h

Instant soups and noodles responsible for burning nearly 10,000 children each year

Microwavable instant soup products cause at least two out of every 10 scald burns that send children to emergency departments each year, according to a study abstract being presented at the American Academy of Pediatrics 2018 National Conference & Exhibition.

19h

Study suggests childhood obesity linked to poor school performance and coping skills

Study suggests that childhood obesity, now at epidemic levels in the United States, may affect school performance and coping skills for challenging situations.

19h

Emergency department visits by uninsured patients drop in Illinois after Medicaid expansion

Study adds to growing body of evidence suggesting that the expansion of Medicaid under the Affordable Care Act (ACA) helped low-income families rely less on emergency department visits for medical care.

19h

Good sleep quality encourages better recovery after sport-related concussion

Abstract of findings suggest sleep is not only important for physical, mental, and cognitive well-being, but also seems to play a pivotal role in the recovery of the brain following a sport-related concussion.

19h

Half as many US children die from firearm injuries where gun laws are strictest

New research shows dramatic differences in the number of children hospitalized and killed each year in the US from firearm-related injuries based on their states' gun legislation, even after adjusting for poverty, unemployment, and education rates. It found twice as many pediatric firearm deaths in states with the most lenient gun regulations compared with states where gun laws are strictest.

19h

ACL re-injury appears to be a subject of 'relative risk'

Children with immediate family members who had anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tears have more complicated recoveries when they need surgical reconstruction themselves.

19h

Survey finds 'alarming' percentage of families share leftover antibiotics

Taking antibiotics when they're unnecessary, or in the wrong dose or timeframe, fuels rising rates of antibiotic-resistant infections. Suggesting a need to step-up efforts to raise awareness about this risk, results of a new survey found parents commonly saved leftover antibiotics and gave them to others within and outside the family.

19h

'Good guys' in superhero films more violent than villains

New research being presented at the American Academy of Pediatrics 2018 National Conference & Exhibition found that protagonists in superhero films engage in more violent acts, on average, than the villains.

19h

Grandparents: Raising their children's children, they get the job done

Millions of children are being raised solely by their grandparents, with numbers continuing to climb as the opioid crisis and other factors disrupt families. New research being presented at the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) 2018 National Conference & Exhibition shows that caregivers who step up to raise their grandchildren are overcoming unique challenges to manage just as well as biologica

19h

Distance to nearest pediatric surgeon a potential barrier for millions of US children

Children who need surgery, statistics show, have fewer complications when it's performed by doctors with specialized pediatric surgical training in regionalized centers where a high a volume of procedures are performed. But in ongoing efforts to develop these regional 'centers of excellence,' the distances families must travel to access pediatric surgical care should be a factor.

19h

Most children surveyed couldn't tell real guns from toy guns

Parents surveyed said they were confident their children could tell a real gun apart from a toy gun. The children themselves also said they thought they could recognize the difference. But when shown side-by-side photos of actual and fake firearms, only 41 percent of children identified both correctly. This highlights the need for campaigns to educate parents on the importance of safe firearm stor

19h

Racial and ethnic differences in emergency pain relief for kids with broken bones

Children of all ages are rushed to emergency departments to treat broken bones. However, depending on their race and ethnicity, their pain may be managed differently, according to a multi-institutional study presented during the American Academy of Pediatrics National Conference & Exhibition.

19h

Mental health diagnoses among US children, youth continue to rise at alarming rate

The number of children and adolescents visiting the nation's emergency departments due to mental health concerns continued to rise at an alarming rate from 2012 through 2016, with mental health diagnoses for non-Latino blacks outpacing such diagnoses among youth of other racial/ethnic groups, according to a retrospective cross-sectional study presented during the American Academy of Pediatrics Nat

19h

Vi har været til fup-konference: Kom med i det cirkus, hvor forskerne trækkes rundt i manegen

REPORTAGE: Hvordan politianmelder man bagmændene, og hvorfor er vi ikke blevet advaret, lød det fra deltagerne på en såkaldt videnskabelig konference på Amager, som blot er en lille brik i en global forretning.

19h

'Robust' corals primed to resist coral bleaching

A world-first study reveals that 'robust' reef-building corals are the only known organisms in the animal kingdom to make one of the 'essential' amino acids, which may make them less susceptible than other corals to global warming.

22h

Prenatal exposure to malaria may determine disease susceptibility early in life

Prenatal exposure to malaria considerably alters the newborn's innate immune response (i.e. its first line of defence), particularly when the placenta has been infected, according to a study led by ISGlobal, the Clinical Research Unit of Nanoro (CRUN) and the Institute of Tropical Medicine Antwerp (ITM). The results, published in BMC Medicine, could help explain why some babies are more susceptibl

22h

Weather: UK experiencing hotter days and 'tropical nights' – Met Office

The hottest days are almost 1C hotter than in previous decades and it is not getting as cold, the Met Office says.

22h

22h

22h

22h

'Robust' corals primed to resist coral bleaching

Using advanced genomic techniques, a team of researchers led by Dr. Hua (Emily) Ying of The Australian National University (ANU) and Prof David Miller of the ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies (Coral CoE) at James Cook University (JCU), have found that the group of corals classified as "robust," which includes a number of the brain corals and mushroom corals, have a key physiological

23h

Onkologer: Fejl i samtaler med uhelbredeligt syge ligger ikke hos os

Den svære samtale er svær. Det kan være årsagen til, at det udefra ser ud til, at kræftsyge fejlinformeres. Det siger formanden for Dansk Selskab for Klinisk Onkologi i sit modsvar til overlæge Gitte Irene Juhls kritik af onkologerne.

23h

US Accuses Chinese Company of Stealing Micron Trade Secrets

The indictment alleges a state-owned company and rogue employees stole plans so China could make memory chips—further straining China-US relations.

23h

END OF FEED

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *


CAPTCHA Image
Reload Image