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Nyheder2018november03

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Cheesy music: Swiss experiment with sound to make cheese tastier

When searching a fromagerie for the perfect chunk of cheddar or parmesan, cheese aficionados have probably never grilled vendors over what kind of music was played to their cheeses.

11h

TEGNESERIE Sådan reagerer din krop når sorgen rammer

Når du mister en, der står dig nær, påvirker det dig også fysisk.

10h

Ugens debat: Kan man købe tog som en hyldevare?

Fire leverandører er nu af DSB blevet prækvalificeret til at byde på 100 nye elektriske togsæt. Læserne på ing.dk havde mange gode forslag til, hvilke kriterier, der burde lægges til grund for valget.

6h

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LATEST

What Is an "Almost Prime" Number?

They say you can’t be a little bit pregnant, but maybe a number can be a little bit prime — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

1h

Delfiner og hvaler må råbe for at overdøve menneskeskabt larm i havet

Støjforurening er et voksende problem i naturen, hvor det påvirker både hvaler, fugle, østers og andre dyr.

2h

HQ gaining an hour

‘Tis the season, Eyewirers. Tomorrow, 11/4 , HQ has to roll the clock back from 2:00 AM Eastern Daylight Time to 1:00 AM Eastern Standard Time. Certain competition event notifications automatically display times according to your computer’s clock, but if your country doesn’t switch things up at the same time as ours (or at all), you may notice events have shifted by an hour. As usual, you can che

3h

Kilauea Isn't Erupting (at the moment), but the Science Goes On

Once an eruption ends, the science has barely begun — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

3h

How to save trees from extinction

The world is losing plants at an unprecedented rate with around one in five thought to be at risk of extinction. The race is on to store back-up copies in seed banks.

3h

Does DBS Cause Changes in Personality?

Since 2002, deep brain stimulation (DBS), the surgical implantation of a pacemaker-like device that sends electrical impulses to targeted parts of the brain, has been used as a treatment for motor symptoms of Parkinson’s disease (PD). But are patients trading part of their sense of self in exchange for improved mobility? Packed house for INS annual meeting talk on DBS. In the last decade, a growi

5h

Mere censur: Friheden på internettet falder for ottende år i streg

Kampen mod fake news bliver brugt til at begrænse ytringsfriheden på nettet, skriver amerikansk tænketank.

5h

Human Flaws Demonstrate Evolution, Not Intelligent Design

In his new book Human Errors: A Panorama of Our Glitches, from Pointless Bones to Broken Genes, Nathan Lents, a professor of biology at John Jay College, CUNY, has demonstrated that the human body can’t possibly be considered the product of an intelligent designer. Rather, its flaws tell the story of evolution. No intelligent designer would have put our retinas in backwards, […]

5h

Pushing the Boundaries in Quantum Electronics

So-called “topological insulators” could revolutionize computing — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

5h

Hospital communication-and-resolution programs do not expand liability risk

Researchers evaluated liability effects of communication-and-resolution programs. Their results found these programs were associated with improved trends in rate of new claims and legal defense costs.

6h

Seed banking not an option for over a third of threatened species

Researchers detail for the first time the scale of threatened species that are unable to be conserved in seed banks. The paper reveals that when looking at threatened species, 36 percent of 'critically endangered' species produce recalcitrant seeds. This means they can't tolerate the drying process and therefore cannot be frozen, the key process they need to go through to be safely 'banked.'

6h

Key gene find could enable development of disease-resistant crops

Discovery of a gene that helps plants control their response to disease could aid efforts to develop crops that are resistant to infection, research suggests.

6h

What's in the air? There's more to it than we thought

Using high-powered equipment to analyze air samples, researchers were able to get a detailed look at the molecular makeup of organic aerosols, which have a significant presence in the atmosphere. Posing risks to health and climate, these airborne particles generally fall into two categories: Primary organic aerosols that can form during combustion, such as in car and truck exhaust, and secondary o

6h

Fleets of drones could aid searches for lost hikers

Researchers describe an autonomous system for a fleet of drones to collaboratively search under dense forest canopies. The drones use only onboard computation and wireless communication — no GPS required.

6h

Comet tails blowing in the solar wind

Combined observations of Comet McNaught — one of the brightest comets visible from Earth in the past 50 years — have revealed new insights on the nature of comets and their relationship with the Sun.

6h

The future of the kilo: a weighty matter

A lump of metal in a building near Paris has long served as the global standard for the kilogram. That’s about to change… In a vault inside the elegant Louis XIV Pavillon de Breteuil, outside Paris, a small metal cylinder rests on a shelf beneath a double set of bell jars. It has lain there for more than a century, its repose only occasionally disturbed when the vault’s three key holders perform a

6h

Ozone hole modest despite optimum conditions for ozone depletion

The ozone hole that forms in the upper atmosphere over Antarctica each September was slightly above average size in 2018, scientists reported today.

6h

Culture strongly influences coping behaviors after natural disasters

Demographic and cultural differences strongly influence the coping styles young people use when they're affected by a natural disaster, and these disparities should be taken into account when providing services to help them recover from these traumatic experiences, researchers say.

6h

Spaced-out nanotwins make for stronger metals

New research shows that metals can be made dramatically stronger by varying the spacing between nanoscale boundaries in the metal's atomic lattice.

6h

How diet impact health and well-being

From the standpoint of heart health, the Tsimane are a model group. A population indigenous to the Bolivian Amazon, the Tsimane demonstrate next to no heart disease. They have minimal hypertension, low prevalence of obesity and and their cholesterol levels are relatively healthy. And those factors don't seem to change with age.

6h

Tying the knot: New DNA nanostructures

Researchers describe a method for coaxing segments of single-stranded DNA into complex 2- and 3D knotted structures.

6h

Molecular virologist fights influenza at the molecular level

In research to improve influenza therapies against H7N9 and other influenza strains, researchers have detailed the binding site and mechanism of inhibition for two small-molecule experimental inhibitors of influenza viruses.

6h

One step closer to complex quantum teleportation

For future technologies such as quantum computers and quantum encryption, the experimental mastery of complex quantum systems is inevitable. Scientists have now succeeded in making another leap. While physicists are trying to increase the number of so-called qubits, the other researchers are pursuing the idea to use more complex quantum systems. The developed methods and technologies could in the

6h

Ring-shaped protein complex wrangles DNA

Scientists determine the whole structure of the condensin protein complex, which helps to organize DNA throughout the life cycle of a cell. By combining sequence and limited structural data, they settle a controversy over whether the condensin protein complex is made of a single ring or a molecular 'handcuff.'

6h

Dit DNA kan huske: Du arver måske dine forældres smerter

DNA'et i vores celler lagrer 'minder', og det kan blandt andet få betydning for, om vi senere i livet udvikler kronisk smerte.

6h

How one tough shrub could help fight hunger in Africa

The trick to boosting crops in drought-prone, food-insecure areas of West Africa could be a ubiquitous native shrub that persists in the toughest of growing conditions. Growing these shrubs side-by-side with the food crop millet increased millet production by more than 900 percent.

7h

Imaginary worlds of children reflect positive creativity

Children who create imaginary parallel worlds known as paracosms, alone or with friends, are more found more commonly than previously believed, according to a new study.

7h

Training with states of matter search algorithm enables neuron model pruning

The approximate logic neuron model (ALNM) is a single neural model with a dynamic dendritic structure. The ALNM uses a neural pruning function to eliminate unnecessary dendrite branches and synapses during training, but use of the backpropagation algorithm restricted the ALMN.

7h

Researchers turn plastic bottle waste into ultralight supermaterial

Researchers has found a way to turn plastic bottle waste into ultralight polyethylene terephthalate (PET) aerogels that are suitable for various applications, including heat insulation and carbon dioxide absorption.

7h

College Athlete Dies of Rare Bacterial Illness Called 'Forgotten Disease'

A college student-athlete in Kanas died suddenly from a rare bacterial infection after thinking her symptoms were due to tonsillitis.

7h

How Did People Wake Up Before Alarm Clocks?

How did people wake up before the invention of modern alarm clocks?

7h

'Red Dead Redemption 2': Reaching for Magic on the Shoulders of Indie Games

The idea of using slowness and inaccessibility to push against players bears a powerful resemblance to other corners of the gaming world.

7h

Space Photos of the Week: Ghost Nebula, Prepare to Die

Radiation from neighboring star Gamma Cassiopeiae leads to nebulas’ ruin

7h

Happy with a 20% Chance of Sadness

Researchers are developing wristbands and apps to predict moods—but the technology has pitfalls as well as promise — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

7h

Scientists figure out how to measure electrical activity in a fetal heart

Discovery points to new diagnostic equipment — based on a cloud of cesium atoms locked up in a hermetically closed glass cell. And within just three years this equipment will make it possible to diagnose specific fetal heart conditions, scientists predict.

7h

Molecular biology: Phaser neatly arranges nucleosomes

Researchers have, for the first time, systematically determined the positioning of the packing units of the fruit fly genome, and discovered a new protein that defines their relationship to the DNA sequence.

7h

Road to cell death more clearly identified for Parkinson's disease

In experiments performed in mice, researchers report they have identified the cascade of cell death events leading to the physical and intellectual degeneration associated with Parkinson's disease.

7h

Origin of the periodicity of the genome explained

Scientists have researched what might have favored the periodicity of certain base pairs in the genomes of eukaryotic organisms.

7h

New studies on student alcohol use can inform interventions to reduce blackouts

While most college students who drink alcohol don't intend to drink to the point of blackout, many don't fully understand the specific behaviors and risk factors associated with alcohol-induced memory loss, a suite of new studies found.

7h

New quantum criticality discovered in superconductivity

Using solid state nuclear magnetic resonance (ssNMR) techniques, scientists have discovered a new quantum criticality in a superconducting material, leading to a greater understanding of the link between magnetism and unconventional superconductivity.

7h

Novel antibacterial drugs

Researchers have developed novel antibacterial compounds, focusing on the role of LsrK kinase. LsrK kinase is a protein involved in bacterial communication.

7h

Drug combination for treatment resistant depression no more effective than single

A large clinical trial, looked at the effectiveness of adding mirtazapine to an SSRI or SNRI in patients who remain depressed after at least six weeks of conventional (SSRI or SNRI) antidepressant treatment. They found that this combination was no more effective in improving depression than placebo and call on doctors to rethink its use.

7h

Setting up a secure private email server isn’t as hard as it sounds

DIY Take charge of your privacy. Want to remove your email from the clutches of Microsoft, Apple, or Google? You can configure your own email server. Here are a few ways to do it.

7h

Do Mosquitoes Bite Some People More Than Others?

How do blood type, exercise habits, and even pregnancy factor into whether or not mosquitoes find someone irresistible? — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

8h

Disarm Therapeutics presents new data validating role of SARM1 in axonal degeneration

Data presented at Neuroscience 2018 demonstrates genetic deletion of SARM1 protects axons in the central and peripheral nervous systems with a corresponding reduction of blood neurofilament-light (NF-L), a clinically validated biomarker of axonal degeneration

8h

A New Privacy Bill, Safer White Hat Hacking, and More Security News This Week

A CIA debacle, a new side channel attack, and more security news this week.

8h

8h

Letters: ‘We Are Collectively Heartbroken at Our Loss of Innocence’

A Prayer for Squirrel Hill—And for American Jewry The Pittsburgh synagogue killings, Franklin Foer argued last week , show that dormant hatreds have reawakened. In the wake of the massacre, he wrote, “any strategy for enhancing the security of American Jewry should involve shunning Trump’s Jewish enablers.” I am a former congregant of Tree of Life synagogue in Pittsburgh. I have lived in New York

8h

An Extremely Large Footprint for an Extremely Large Telescope

A first look at the foundations of a 40-meter-class telescope — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

8h

In Case You Missed It

Top news from around the world — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

8h

Readers Respond to the July 2018 Issue

Letters to the editor from the July 2018 issue of Scientific American — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

9h

Der er nok en meget god grund til, at øjenlæger ikke sælger briller

Historien har vist, at danske ørelæger har øjnet og gravet en guldmine på høreområdet. At politikerne nu synes, at tingene skal være anderledes i Danmark, kan man have stor forståelse for.

9h

The Arab Winter Is Coming

Three years ago, then Secretary of Defense Ashton Carter attributed Iran’s growing dominance to its being “in the game, on the ground.” He urged its regional rivals to do the same, thus expressing a widely shared sentiment in policy circles at the time: Arab Gulf states need to rely less on the U.S. and play a greater role in their neighborhood. In many ways, that is exactly what these countries

9h

Ready For The Time Change? Here Are Tips To Stay Healthy During Dark Days Ahead

Every cell in our bodies has a well-tuned timing mechanism. So, when we "fall back" or "spring forward," it takes us time to adjust. We have tips that can help. (Image credit: Katherine Streeter for NPR)

9h

The Best of the Physics arXiv (week ending November 3, 2018)

This week’s most thought-provoking papers from the Physics arXiv.

9h

Apple Abandons the Mass Market, as the iPhone Turns Luxury

The average iPhone sold for nearly $800 in the most recent quarter; if the price keeps climbing at that rate, the average price may soon top $1,000.

9h

Intricate Maps Reveal What US Public Transit Gets Wrong—and Right

One obsessive planner, a bunch of data, and a lot of mapping flair makes for a stirring guide to US transport.

9h

15 of the Best Weekend Deals From Amazon, REI, and More

Start your holiday shopping early with deals on Alexa-enabled devices, Legos, smart TVs, and more.

9h

Ben Marcus' reality is only slightly askew from our own

A grow lamp for humans? A mist that puts you in the right mood for mourning the victims of terrorism? How realism and postmodernism fell in love and had babies. None A "grow light" for humans that cooks a guy's face. A pharmaceutical mist that puts you in the right mood for mourning the victims of terrorism. The year of All Hell Breaks Loose. The Year of the Sensor. Mudslides. Hurricanes. People

9h

NASA's Dawn Mission Ends, But Its Legacy Lives On

After visiting not one but two destinations in the asteroid belt, the interplanetary probe at last ran out of fuel — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

9h

Miseren om Ringsted Station – her får du overblikket

Ingeniøren har over de seneste uger afdækket et usædvanligt forløb i ombygningen af Ringsted Station, som er blevet fordyret med 118 pct. Og må gøres om inden for få år.

10h

The Democrats Are Stuck With Menendez

It’s difficult to pinpoint when Bob Menendez’s name first became synonymous with ethical lapses. Perhaps it was in 2006, when federal prosecutors suspected that the New Jersey senator had steered federal funds to a nonprofit group that was paying him rent. Or perhaps it was in 2014, when the FBI suspected that he’d intervened on behalf of two accused Ecuadorian criminals in exchange for campaign

10h

The Last Liberal Republicans Hang On

The question is not whether Massachusetts Governor Charlie Baker will win reelection. It’s whether he can beat Bill Weld’s 1994 showing, when he took 71 percent of the vote. There’s been no sea change in Massachusetts politics—the state remains a Democratic bastion. But Baker, an overwhelmingly popular Republican, is in the tradition of Weld and a slew of other GOP governors in New England who ha

10h

Iowa Could Turn Blue Again—Just in Time for 2020

S hortly into his flight from Karachi to Peshawar, Pakistan, hijackers took over Fred Hubbell’s plane. It was March of 1981 and Fred and his wife, Charlotte, had just set off for a trip through North Africa and Southeast Asia. They were on the second leg of their journey when members of the terrorist organization Al-Zulfiqar rerouted their Boeing 720 and landed in Kabul, holding all 132 passenger

10h

We Need to Have an Honest Talk About Our Data

VR pioneer Jaron Lanier talks with WIRED about why the original architecture of the internet forced us into a kind of information trickery, and how we can fix it—to everyone’s benefit.

10h

Apple Will Keep Throttling iPhones. Here's How to Stop It

While it seemed like the iPhone 8, 8 Plus, and X might avoid the practice, Apple now says it will throttle them as well.

10h

The alarming rise of a power that knows no borders, and how we resist

Rule-breaking technology is challenging the evidence base on which all functioning societies depend. Two books explore the problem and how to fight back

11h

Are you courageous enough to collaborate with your enemies?

Bishop Omar Jahwar has worked beside all kinds of unlikely allies, from Aryan Brotherhood gang leaders to former Speaker of the House Paul Ryan. What is an enemy? A true enemy is rare, says Bishop Omar. "Enemies come when there is true violation, not true rhetoric… sometimes you have to go beyond the rhetoric so you can see the real." You cannot solve deep problems from the comfort of an echo c

11h

Roger Stone’s Shifting Story Is a Liability

Roger Stone can’t seem to get his story straight. In 2017, the political world’s most well-known “dirty trickster” denied ever having a direct line to WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange, as he repeatedly boasted during the 2016 election. Now, in light of new emails that show he communicated WikiLeaks’ pre-Election Day plans to at least one senior Trump campaign official in the weeks before the elec

11h

Homecoming Is a Taut, Paranoid Puzzle Box

Homecoming , Amazon’s new dramatic series starring Julia Roberts, is pure Hitchcock. In one scene, a Department of Defense investigator, Thomas Carrasco (Shea Whigham), runs down a staircase that’s shot from above, shown from a skewed, helter-skelter perspective that makes it seem like Carrasco is a human ball bearing tilting his way into the center of a labyrinth. The scene plays out over a swoo

11h

India man-eating tigress killed after huge hunt

The animal in western India is said to have killed 13 people and evaded capture for two years.

11h

Thousands of carp die in mysterious circumstances in Iraq

Iraqi fish farmers south of Baghdad have been left reeling after finding thousands of dead carp mysteriously floating in their cages or washed up on the banks of the Euphrates.

11h

Despite crackdown, 'junk news' still flourishes on social media

Despite an aggressive crackdown by social media firms, so-called "junk news" is spreading at a greater rate than in 2016 on social media ahead of the US midterm elections, according to researchers.

11h

Plans for world's largest ocean sanctuary in Antarctic blocked

A plan to create the world's largest marine sanctuary in Antarctic waters was shot down when a key conservation summit failed to reach a consensus, with environmentalists on Saturday decrying a lack of scientific foresight.

11h

Paleontologists discover new sauropod species in Argentina

A team of Spanish and Argentine paleontologists have discovered the remains of a dinosaur that lived 110 million years ago in the center of the country, the National University of La Matanza revealed Friday.

11h

Tying the knot: New DNA nanostructures

Knots are indispensable tools for such human activities as sailing, fishing and rock climbing, (not to mention, tying shoes). But tying a knot in a lacelike strand of DNA, measuring just billionths of a meter in length, requires patience and highly specialized expertise.

11h

Molecular virologist fights influenza at the molecular level

Molecular virologist Chad Petit, Ph.D., uses basic science to fight influenza—through experiments at the atomic level.

11h

In a Land of Quakes, Engineering a Future for a Church Made of Mud

High in the Andes Mountains, conservators are testing traditional methods for strengthening adobe buildings.

11h

Minorities Are Most Vulnerable When Wildfires Strike in U.S., Study Finds

The research illustrates how the kinds of disasters that are exacerbated by climate change often hit people of color and the poor the hardest.

11h

Spørg Fagfolket: Kommer man hurtigere over en influenza ved at sulte sig?

En læser oplever, at han hurtigere bliver frisk efter et influenzaangreb, hvis han faster. Giver det mening? Det svarer seniorforsker fra SSI på.

12h

Melatonin: the body's natural sleep-promoting hormone

Prescriptions for short periods are considered safe, but there is little research into the long-term effects In daylight hours there is so little melatonin in the bloodstream that it is barely detectable. But when the sun goes down, the eyes sense the failing light, and part of the hippocampus signals the pineal gland, a pea-sized lump of tissue near the centre of the brain, to ramp up production

12h

Turing, Lovelace or Franklin? Your choices for the new £50 note

Readers discuss the scientists they would like to see on a new £50 note after the Bank of England asked for nominations Add your suggestion Alan Turing seems a popular choice here and rightly so. He’s the father of AI, which is very on trend technologically right now. He was also treated abominably by the British state so it would be the least they could do in terms of recognition. robertc808 Con

12h

What role should the public play in science? – Science Weekly podcast

How far is too far when it comes to the public directing research? There are concerns than a science journal may revise a paper amid pressure from activists. It raises the issue of what role the public should play and whether science should have boundaries to protect its integrity. Ian Sample presents. Chronic fatigue syndrome is a severe, long-term illness with a wide range of symptoms, the most

12h

Your old, unwanted clothes can be turned into building materials

Every year millions of tons of clothes are sent to landfill. A new project shows how they could be reused as tiles and panels for home interiors

14h

Krager holder begravelse – og tre andre dyr, der sørger

Det er måske med til at sikre artens overlevelse, når dyr og mennesker sørger.

15h

'Test tube trees': An insurance policy against extinction?

Why trees grown in test tubes could be the answer to preserving the world's forests for the future.

15h

New dinosaur species unearthed in Argentina

Sauropod that lived 110 million years ago is found in area that would have been desert A team of Spanish and Argentinian paleontologists have discovered the remains of dinosaurs that lived 110m years ago in the centre of the country, the National University of La Matanza has revealed. The remains came from three separate dinosaurs from the herbivorous group of sauropods, the best known of which a

17h

What kind of personality are psychopaths attracted to?

A study found that people with psychopathic traits are more likely to be attracted to others on the same psychopathic spectrum. Psychopathic qualities include lack of empathy, lack of remorse, and other antisocial traits. Psychopathic traits aren't that attractive to non-psychopathic individuals. There's nothing in our society that rings more alarm bells than the prospect of psychopathic behavior

19h

Trump’s ‘Game of Thrones’ Tweet Is Odd, but Trademark-Infringing? Probably Not

Even if HBO wanted to issue a takedown, it's likely the network wouldn't have a strong legal claim.

20h

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