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Nyheder2018november04

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Genetic risk factor for CTE detected

Researchers have identified a genetic variation that may influence chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) disease severity. TMEM106B is one of the first genes to be implicated in CTE. It may partially explain why some athletes present with severe CTE symptoms while others are less affected despite similar levels of head trauma.

1h

Installing Solar Power in the Wilderness | Alaska: The Last Frontier

Atz Lee and Jane work to install a source of electricity on their remote cabin. Catch an All New ALASKA: THE LAST FRONTIER Sundays 9p on Discovery. Stream Full Episodes of Alaska: The Last Frontier: https://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/alaska-the-last-frontier/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/AlaskaTLF/ https://www.facebook.com/

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Patients with low risk thyroid cancer can receive lower doses of radiation treatment

Thyroid cancer patients whose disease is at low risk of returning can be treated safely with a smaller amount of radiation following surgery, according to results from the world's longest running trial to investigate this — the HiLo trial. The research is presented at the 2018 NCRI Cancer Conference in Glasgow on Monday and means patients can enjoy a better quality of life without being at higher

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Men with prostate cancer willing to accept lower survival odds to avoid side effects

Men who have been newly diagnosed with prostate cancer say they would trade some improvement in their odds of survival for improvements in side effects and quality of life, according to research presented at the 2018 NCRI Cancer Conference.

54min

Melanoma death rates are rising in men but static or falling in women

The rate of men dying from malignant melanoma has risen in populations around the world, while in some countries the rates are steady or falling for women, according to new research.

1h

Online program helps prevent teen depression

A new study highlights the positive effect of a web-based depression prevention intervention, called CATCH-IT, among adolescents most at risk.

1h

Shortening the rare-earth supply chain via recycling

A research team led by Kanazawa University used chelator chemistry to recycle rare earths (REs) from spent fluorescent lamps. These technologically crucial but expensive elements were extracted using EDTA, an aminopolycarboxylate, from lamp phosphors. Combined with planetary ball-milling of the RE-containing phosphors, the optimized process recovered REs with efficiencies up to 84 percent (for ytt

1h

The Real Lesson of My Debate With Steve Bannon

Tickets sold out within 15 minutes after Toronto’s Munk Debates announced I would debate Steve Bannon on their platform. The negative reaction arrived slower, but it was just as emphatic. A few days before the debate, a member of Parliament for Canada’s left-wing New Democratic Party called for its cancelation. The rest of the party—the third largest in Parliament—later signaled agreement with th

2h

Fluorescent marker can help guide surgeons to remove dangerous brain tumor cells more accurately

A chemical that highlights tumor cells has been used by surgeons to help spot and safely remove brain cancer in a recent trial.

2h

Trial finds diet rich in fish helps fight asthma

A clinical trial has shown eating fish such as salmon, trout and sardines as part of a healthy diet can reduce asthma symptoms in children.

2h

Traumatic brain injuries can lead to long-term neurological and psychiatric disorders

New research suggests that children who suffer traumatic brain injuries are at significantly increased risk of developing new post-traumatic neuropsychiatric disorders, and may benefit from ongoing outpatient follow-up to facilitate early detection and intervention.

2h

Soft furniture doesn't cushion risk of falls by young children

The rate of bed- and sofa-related injuries among young children is on the rise. The findings show a need for increased prevention efforts, including parental education and improved safety design.

2h

Most children surveyed couldn't tell real guns from toy guns

Parents surveyed said they were confident their children could tell a real gun apart from a toy gun. The children themselves also said they thought they could recognize the difference. But when shown side-by-side photos of actual and fake firearms, only 41 percent of children identified both correctly. This highlights the need for campaigns to educate parents on the importance of safe firearm stor

2h

Grandparents: Raising their children's children, they get the job done

Millions of children are being raised solely by their grandparents, with numbers continuing to climb as the opioid crisis and other factors disrupt families. New research shows that caregivers who step up to raise their grandchildren are overcoming unique challenges to manage just as well as biological and adoptive parent caregivers.

2h

Survey finds 'alarming' percentage of families share leftover antibiotics

Taking antibiotics when they're unnecessary, or in the wrong dose or timeframe, fuels rising rates of antibiotic-resistant infections. Suggesting a need to step-up efforts to raise awareness about this risk, results of a new survey found parents commonly saved leftover antibiotics and gave them to others within and outside the family.

2h

Neuroscientists Debate A Simple Question: How Does The Brain Store A Phone Number?

Working memory is where the brain keeps bits of information in everyday life handy. But brain scientists don't agree on how working memory works. (Image credit: Jon Berkeley/Ikon Images/Getty Images)

2h

Physicists explain how large spherical viruses form

A team of physicists and a virologist explains how large virus shells are formed. Their work can also be used also to explain how large spherical crystals form in nature. This understanding may help researchers interrupt viruses' formation, containing the spread of viral diseases.

2h

Additional inoculation source for lambic beer production

Researchers in Belgium have identified an additional inoculation source – the wooden casks or foeders – for producing lambic beers. Traditional lambic beer production takes place through wort inoculation with environmental air and fermentation and maturation in wooden barrels. Up to now, these lambic barrels have only been examined with culture-dependent techniques, missing a part of the microorga

2h

Studies highlight lasting effects of early life stress on the genome, gut, and brain

Excessive stress during fetal development or early childhood can have long-term consequences for the brain, from increasing the likelihood of brain disorders and affecting an individual's response to stress as an adult to changing the nutrients a mother may pass on to her babies in the womb. The new research suggests novel approaches to combat the effects of such stress, such as inhibiting stress

2h

Georgia Secretary of State Brian Kemp Accuses Georgia Democrats of HackingGeorgia Stacey Abrams

Georgia's secretary of state is also its GOP gubernatorial candidate. And he just claimed that Democrats committed "cyber crimes."

3h

Neil Armstrong memorabilia fetches $7.5 million at auction

Memorabilia that belonged to the first man to set foot on the moon, Neil Armstrong, has fetched more than $7.4 million at auction.

3h

5.9-magnitude earthquake strikes off Japan's Hokkaido: USGS

A shallow 5.9-magnitude earthquake struck off Japan's northern island of Hokkaido on Monday, the US Geological Survey said.

3h

Potential antidote to botulism

Researchers have identified a compound that strongly inhibits botulinum neurotoxin, the most toxic compound known. That inhibiting compound, nitrophenyl psoralen (NPP), could be used as a treatment to reduce paralysis induced by botulism. Botulinum neurotoxin is considered a potential bioweapon because there is no FDA-approved antidote.

3h

Unraveling a genetic network linked to autism

Researchers have uncovered a network of more than 200 genes linked to autism. They have also unpicked an exact sequence of events during microexon splicing, known to be disrupted in autism, as a first step toward developing targeted treatments.

3h

Disorder plays a key role in phase transitions of materials

Researchers have discovers that disorder is part of the structural transition of Vanadium Dioxide from an insulator state to a metallic state at extremely small time resolutions. The results of the study provide a new perspective on how to control matter, especially in the field of superconductivity, which could have major implications for nano-technology and optoelectronics.

3h

Genetic factors tied to obesity may protect against diabetes

Some genetic variations associated with obesity actually protect against Type 2 diabetes, heart attack and stroke, new findings suggest.

3h

First discovery of adventive populations of Trissolcus japonicus

Researchers used DNA analysis to confirm the wasp – which is native to China, Japans and Korea – was found in Switzerland in 2017.

3h

For older adults, does eating enough protein help delay disability?

A research team focused their attention on learning whether eating more protein could contribute to helping people maintain independence.

3h

Starwatch: Saturn adds special beauty to view of crescent moon

Keep an eye open for northern Taurid meteors coming from the direction of Taurus This week’s must-see moment occurs on the evening of the 11th, just after sunset. Look to the south-west and Saturn will be hanging low in the sky just below a beautiful crescent moon . Continue reading…

3h

Pessimism around youth suicide prevention approaches is unfounded

A comprehensive study examining the global impact of suicide prevention approaches in young people has found that youth-specific interventions conducted in clinical, educational and community settings can be effective in reducing suicide-related behavior in young people at risk.

3h

Scientists bring new hope to brain tumor patients

Scientists undertook a groundbreaking large-scale study on secondary glioblastomas (sGBM) to search for new therapy treatments. sGBMs are an aggressive type of brain tumor, target younger patients and existing treatment method is insufficient.

3h

WSU researchers see cognitive changes in offspring of heavy cannabis-using rats

Washington State University researchers have seen cognitive changes in the offspring of rats exposed to heavy amounts of cannabis. Their work is one of the rare studies to look at the effects of cannabis during pregnancy. The drug is the most commonly used illicit substance among pregnant women.

3h

There are 15 scientists running for Congress. Here's what's at stake.

The Midterm Elections are on November 6th. 1,200 candidates are running for 500 seats that will have an impact on every bit of your life. Scientists and Doctors are running for office. Innumerable environmental issues will be decided. Read up on the candidates, the issues, and then: vote. None The midterm elections are fast approaching. Early voting is underway and setting records for turnout acr

4h

Realizing the potential of gene therapy for neurological disorders

Promising findings from preclinical animal studies show the potential of gene therapy for treating incurable neurological disorders. In new research presented today, scientists successfully used gene therapy to slow the progression and improve symptoms of disorders such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and Parkinson's disease. The findings were presented at Neuroscience 2018, the annual meeting of

4h

Wrong About Polio: A Review of Suzanne Humphries, MD and Roman Bystrianyk’s “Dissolving Illusions” Part 1 (the short version)

Suzanne Humphries and Roman Bystrianyk's book Dissolving Illusions make numerous egregious errors or deceptive statements about polio. Here is part 1 in a series about the truth and true impacts of polio.

5h

Melanoma death rates are rising in men but static or falling in women

The rate of men dying from malignant melanoma has risen in populations around the world, while in some countries the rates are steady or falling for women, according to research presented at the 2018 NCRI Cancer Conference.

5h

New glimpses into brain uncover neurological basis for processing social information

Neuroscientists are developing a clearer picture than ever before of how the animal brain processes social information, from status and competitive advantage in a group to the calls and vocalizations of peers. New studies in mice and marmosets help us understand a range of disorders defined by deficits in social function and identify mechanisms that could also operate in the human brain.

6h

Noam Chomsky Calls Trump and Republican Allies "Criminally Insane"

The great linguist and political critic remains hopeful that we can overcome global warming and other threats. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

7h

Solitary confinement puts brains at risk

Some 80,000 Americans are incarcerated in solitary confinement on any given day, a practice that was deemed cruel and unusual punishment by the United Nations Committee on Torture. This extreme isolation can be damaging and may cause or worsen depression, anxiety, and other mental illness. A roundtable of scientists, a physician, a lawyer, and an individual held in solitary for 29 years will explo

7h

Getting Out the Vote From the County Jail

W hen Meggen Massey learned that she would be able to vote in the 2016 presidential election, she was “ecstatic.” She had always thought of herself as a voter, but when she arrived in jail in Los Angeles County with an arson charge, some of her fellow detainees told her that she had lost that right. “I was devastated,” Massey remembered. “I was like, Oh my God, I’m never going to be able to vote

8h

Bitten Bone a Sign of a Cretaceous Snack

A damaged frill bone allows us to revisit a brief moment in prehistoric time — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

8h

Saturday Night Live Shows Some Teeth Mocking Fox News

Everyone’s panicked. That’s how Saturday Night Live summed up the final days before the midterm elections, from both sides of the spectrum, in an episode that felt a little more knowing and sharp than the show’s broad, goofy portrayals of the Kavanaugh confirmation and its aftermath . The episode began with Kate McKinnon’s parody of Laura Ingraham’s Fox News show, The Ingraham Angle , as she warn

9h

SfN18: Pat Metheny at Dialogues Lecture

Based on past experience at the Society for Neuroscience (SfN) annual meeting , I thought I could just stroll into the opening Dialogues lecture a few minutes before it began and park myself just about anywhere. After all, there are about 5,000 seats in the San Diego Convention Center’s massive ballroom, and there were always open seats in past years. But not this year. That’s because Pat Metheny

9h

Philosophy Has Made Plenty of Progress

Philosopher Tim Maudlin sees advances in free will, morality and the meaning of quantum mechanics — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

9h

Hjælp forskerne: Vil du vide, om du har risiko for kræft?

Forskere fra Rigshospitalet vil undersøge danskernes kendskab til gentests. Du kan deltage i undersøgelsen her.

9h

I Argentina præparerer de æblekager, og i Canada digger de kartofler

I projektet Danske stemmer har sprogforskere undersøgt, hvordan det danske sprog har udviklet…

9h

På Nationalmuseet kæmper de mod plasticdøden

Aktivt kul og nanomaterialer er blandt redskaberne til at sikre, at museums­gæster kan se på gammelt Tupperware og Lego i mange år fremover.

10h

Astronomers Creep Up to the Edge of the Milky Way’s Black Hole

Hot spots have been discovered orbiting just outside the supermassive black hole at the galaxy’s center. Their motions have given us the closest look at that violent environment.

10h

Russia's Soyuz Rocket Returns to Flight with Crewed Launch in Early December

The rocket’s next launch comes less than a month after a major mishap endangered the lives of crewmembers bound for the International Space Station — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

10h

What Was the World's 1st Cyberattack?

In November 1988, Robert Tappan Morris wrote a program that would travel from computer to computer and ask each machine to send a signal back to a control server, which would keep count.

10h

SpaceX's 'Starman' and Its Tesla Roadster Are Now Beyond Mars

Starman has put a lot of miles on his ride in the last nine months.

10h

Neandertalere så helt anderledes ud end vi hidtil har troet

Forskere har rekonstrueret et velbevaret neandertaler-skelet. Og 3D-modellen giver et nyt og mere præcist billede af fortidsmennesket.

11h

Lucia Berlin’s Harrowing, Radiant Fiction

Illustration: Celina Pereira; Nationaal Archief / Wikimedia There’s a mountain recluse who appears twice in Lucia Berlin ’s prose, once in a story from her 2015 collection, A Manual for Cleaning Women , and once in an autobiographical scrap from a new book, Welcome Home: A Memoir With Selected Photographs and Letters . She describes meeting the man when she was a little girl; her father had befri

11h

Trump's 'Game of Thrones' Tweet Tops This Week's Internet News Roundup

But don't forget about the president's attempts to stop birthright citizenship—or Kanye West's announcement that he's quitting politics.

11h

Waymo's Self-Driving Cars Go Human-Free, Plus More This Week in Cars

California lets self-driving cars go fully robo, Tesla upgrades Autopilot, Chevy makes an electric Camaro, and more.

11h

The Scariest Thing in the Universe

It's not what you're probably thinking — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

11h

Trial finds diet rich in fish helps fight asthma

A clinical trial has shown eating fish such as salmon, trout and sardines as part of a healthy diet can reduce asthma symptoms in children.

12h

Actually, You Can Just Drink Some Water

On a recent Wednesday afternoon, the Whole Foods in Williamsburg, Brooklyn, was absolutely bereft of celery. Conventional, organic, whatever—Hilary Sloan was out of luck. Sloan, a former colleague of mine who works in marketing, was looking for celery because a friend had evangelized to her about the health-promoting properties of celery juice. That friend had learned about the juice’s magic in t

12h

Kehinde Wiley on Self Doubt and How He Made It As a Painter

By age 12, Kehinde Wiley had a reputation in his Los Angeles neighborhood for being a talented artist. Teachers at his school recommended him for a program during which he spent the summer of 1989 in Russia with 50 Soviet kids and 50 other Americans, creating murals, learning the Russian language and culture, hiking, swimming, and picking mushrooms. “It was a strange, magical time,” he recalls. W

12h

After Nine Years In Orbit, Kepler Telescope Leaves A Legacy Of Discovery

NASA's Charlie Sobeck, former manager of the Kepler Space Telescope mission, discusses the monumental findings of the spacecraft and NASA's decision to retire it in orbit. (Image credit: NASA/JPL-CALTECH/T. Pyle/Getty Images)

12h

Why WhatsApp Became a Hotbed for Rumors and Lies in Brazil

If WhatsApp lacks Facebook’s most talked-about evil features, why is it still a weaponizable conduit for misinformation?

12h

Cuisinart Extra-Large Rotisserie Fryer and Steamer Review

Fry up your holiday bird with far less risk of an oil fire.

12h

Tech Billionaires’ Obligation to the Cities Around Them

For decades, technology entrepreneurs have established their headquarters in the San Francisco Bay Area, created products that changed the way we live, and reaped millions doing so. But at the same time, the cities around these companies have become harder and harder to live in. Housing prices and homelessness are rising, roads are clogged , transit is over capacity . Tech companies aren’t necess

12h

2 tremors hit near Greek island within 7 minutes

Greek geological experts say two new aftershocks have hit the western Greek island of Zakynthos, but no damage has been reported.

12h

Year of the Governor

MIAMI—Whatever happens on Tuesday, there’s not much Democrats can do to assume control in Washington. They’re running as a check on Donald Trump’s presidency, playing defense, positioning themselves for the long term, at best. Take the House, and even the Senate, and it’s still about playing to a stalemate. But if results break in their favor on Tuesday, Democrats could take control of state gove

13h

Almost Half the Top Jobs in Trump's State Department are Still Empty

Australia is one of the United States’ closest allies anywhere. Its soldiers fought alongside Americans in World War I, World War II, Korea, Vietnam, Afghanistan, and Iraq. It’s a member of the world’s most exclusive intelligence club, the “Five Eyes” (the other four are the United States, Canada, Britain and New Zealand). Its conservative prime minister says he wants to help the United States cu

13h

Andrew Gillum Is Florida's Homecoming King

T ALLAHASSEE, Fla.—There’s nothing quite like the cacophony of the homecoming parade at a historically black university. Here at Florida A&M, children run between floats, yelling and laughing as they chase down pieces of hard candy. Bass from car speakers and from roadside DJs rattle trunks and ear drums. Frying fish crackles and street vendors hawk orange and green shirts. And at the center of i

13h

Does the U.S. Still Have a 'Middle Class'?

The question of how to define the middle class is one of the perennial mysteries of American social life. Most people say they’re “middle class,” so how can we know what this really means? Every few years some intrepid social scientists venture a new definition. This September, the Brookings economist Richard Reeves and Katherine Guyot argued that the middle class is “the middle 60 percent of hou

13h

Tesla's 'Navigate on Autopilot' Changes Lanes—With the Human's Help

The newly released "Navigate on Autopilot" makes choices about when to change lanes, but depends on the human's help—help that will make the system better in the long run.

13h

How to Control What Websites Can Do on Your Computer

If you're not careful, websites can grab all kinds of permissions you don't realize or intend. Take back control in your browser.

13h

Have Americans become too fragile for their own good?

Depression and anxiety rates are through the roof amongst young Americans, with the left and the right sides of the political spectrum blaming each other. Neither has an answer, and it goes beyond buzzwords like "safe spaces" and "triggered". When everyone feels like a victim, are the mediums of communication themselves—social media and search engines—at fault? There is no one right answer, but J

13h

Malaysia is ground zero for the next malaria menace

With deforestation in Malaysia, monkeys and humans are getting closer — and mosquitoes are infecting humans with malaria from monkeys.

13h

Virtual reality 2.0 uses rooms painted superblack instead of helmet

Can a room painted with light-absorbing Vantablack enhance the experience of playing Black Ops 4, the latest game in the Call of Duty series? Our reporter went to find out

13h

The Diary of Anne Frank, Reimagined

After living for a year and a half trapped indoors in her father’s office building, the 14-year-old Anne Frank wrote of her longing to be a regular teenager who could go outside and “look at the world.” She expressed her envy of the people who enter the building “with the wind in their clothes and the cold on their cheeks.” Beyond the walls of the hiding place she shared with seven others in the

14h

Vindmøller er som cykelryttere – bare omvendt

Nye opstillingsmønstre og intelligent drift af mølleparker kan kompensere for lævirkning og minimere udmattelsen af møllerne.

14h

Danske studerende vinder guld: Opfinder medicinfabrik i en kuffert

Hjernerne bag en mobil medicinfabrik vinder guldmedalje ved verdens største konkurrence i syntesebiologi.

15h

Svære fødselsveer, da Ingeniørforeningen kom til verden

De danske ingeniører var sent ude med at organisere sig, fortalte Ingeniørens tidligere chefredaktør Torkil Morsing i sin beretning om DIF’s grundlæggelse i anledning af 100 års jubilæet i 1992.

16h

Does being a doctor make me a better parent?

It’s bizarre to think that doctors make good parents – in fact, the opposite may well be true I was standing in the check-in queue, sunburned, exhausted and very late for a seven-hour flight from Toronto to London. My wife had, sensibly, returned from the holiday a day earlier. In one arm I held my screaming one-year-old daughter, Lyra. Her folded pram was slung over the other shoulder. I was clu

16h

A cure for cancer: how to kill a killer

Revolutionary work on the body’s immune system and a host of new drug trials mean that beating cancer may be achievable Last month, the Nobel prize in medicine was awarded for two breakthrough scientific discoveries heralded as having “revolutionised cancer treatment”, and “fundamentally changed the way we view how cancer can be managed”. One of them went to a charismatic, harmonica-playing Texan

17h

Diseases that dogs can detect

Scientists are investigating canines’ extraordinary sense of smell, hoping that it will prove a more reliable predictor of illnesses than conventional testing Last week, researchers presented evidence that dogs could tell from sniffing someone’s socks whether they had malaria. After several months of training, a labrador and a labrador-retriever could tell if a child had the disease even if they

18h

The secret of Viking success? A good coat of tar…

Industrial pits led to waterproofed ships for epic pillaging raids Vikings conquered Europe thanks to an unexpected technological innovation. They learned how to make tar on an industrial scale and used it to waterproof their longships so that they could undertake large-scale, lengthy pillaging trips around Europe – and across the Atlantic, say archaeologists. Norse raiders were the original Boys

19h

Hvordan bruger man ankler? 2-årig sætter videnskabsfolk på prøve

Uden ankler ville vi ikke kunne gå, siger professor.

19h

Brain cancer: drink that makes tumours glow could make surgery more effective

Fluorescent marker accumulates in the fastest-growing cells, helping surgeons pinpoint tumours and leave healthy tissue alone Surgeons have tested the use of a fluorescent marker that can help them remove dangerous brain tumour cells from patients more accurately. The research was carried out on people who had suspected glioblastoma, the disease that killed British politician Dame Tessa Jowell in

23h

More Evidence Points to China as Source of Ozone-Depleting Gas

Delegates from nearly 200 countries are gathering in Ecuador to discuss efforts to repair the ozone layer, and the return of a banned chemical will be on the agenda.

23h

Genetic risk factor for CTE detected

Researchers have identified a genetic variation that may influence chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) disease severity.TMEM106B is one of the first genes to be implicated in CTE. It may partially explain why some athletes present with severe CTE symptoms while others are less affected despite similar levels of head trauma.

23h

The Neuroethics of Advertising

When you hear the term “neuromarketing,” do you envision corporate mind control directing you to purchase products? You are not alone. The good news is, no mind-controlling “buy button” exists. The bad news is, as neuroscience areas such as decision-making and reward processing advance, and our personal data accumulates online, there’s no guarantee it will never exist in the future. But this is e

1d

Fluorescent marker can help guide surgeons to remove dangerous brain tumor cells more accurately

A chemical that highlights tumor cells has been used by surgeons to help spot and safely remove brain cancer in a trial presented at the 2018 NCRI Cancer Conference.

1d

Bombshell Gets Nuked | BattleBots: Resurrection

Team Bombshell loses control and bursts into flames in the Battlebox. As they race to repair before their next fight, Monsoon has a massive battery fire that leaves them rebuilding from the ground up. Stream Full Episodes of BattleBots: Resurrection: https://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/battlebots-resurrection/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://ww

1d

Vietnam could give tech companies one year to obey cyberlaw

Vietnam may give internet companies like Google and Facebook one year to comply with a controversial cybersecurity law, according to a draft decree that outlines how the draconian bill could be implemented.

1d

Ahead of vote, Twitter says accounts removed over 'disinformation'

Twitter on Saturday said it deleted a "series of accounts" that attempted to share disinformation, ahead of crucial midterm elections, as media reports said thousands of accounts were axed.

1d

Social media's misinformation battle: No winners, so far

Facebook and other social platforms have been fighting online misinformation and hate speech for two years. With the U.S. midterm elections just a few days away, there are signs that they're making some headway, although they're still a very long way from winning the war.

1d

FN advarer mod tab af dyrearter og naturområder: Kan udrydde menneskeheden

Verden har to år til at gå sammen og stoppe udviklingen, lyder det fra FN-chef.

1d

How my £10,000 therapy inspired a new TV comedy

An ex-Observer journalist on her battle with depression, and the creation of a celebration of women with complicated lives Not long after my 30th birthday – which I spent cry-dancing in a random club with baffled strangers – I went to my GP and was diagnosed with depression. In some ways it was a relief. The feelings of hopelessness, inadequacy, unworthiness and loneliness with which I’d struggle

1d

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