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Nyheder2018november05

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Air pollution linked to autism: study

The study of children in Shanghai, from birth to three years, found that exposure to fine particles (PM2.5) from vehicle exhausts, industrial emissions and other sources of outdoor pollution increased the risk of developing autism spectrum disorder (ASD) by up to 78%. The study included 124 ASD children and 1240 healthy children (as control) in stages over a nine-year period, examining the associa

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Nu sidder der forstærkere, så du har bedre mobildækning i de fleste DSB-tog

DSB har allerede installeret de signalforstærkere, som sender mobilkommunikationen videre og sikrer dækning inden i hovedparten af de danske tog. Dermed er der kun 65 sorte huller langs jernbanen tilbage.

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Stroke survivors and those at risk urged to focus on yoga and tai chi

One of Australia's biggest health issues could be checked if more people took up yoga or tai chi and reduced their blood pressure, an Australian study has found.

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Global Health: Dogs Can Detect Malaria. How Useful Is That?

Canine can sniff out the socks worn by children carrying the mosquito-borne parasites, a study finds.

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Promising proteins for diagnostic, prognostic use in ALS

Researchers have identified proteins that may be useful in both earlier diagnosis of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) and in more accurate disease prognosis.

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Timely care key to improving survival rates and racial disparities

Postoperative radiotherapy is needed within six weeks of surgery in patients with head and neck cancer, but delays are common. Researchers at MUSC and Hollings Cancer Center report that 56 percent of African American patients experienced a delay in care while only 43 percent of white patients did. Small changes to the way that cancer care is delivered can decrease these delays, but more research i

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Adolescent brain development impacts mental health, substance use

Advances in understanding adolescent brain development may aid future treatments of mental illness and alcohol and substance use disorders. The findings were presented at Neuroscience 2018, the annual meeting of the Society for Neuroscience and the world's largest source of emerging news about brain science and health.

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Coping with errors in the quantum age

Quantum systems can be manipulated with extremely high, but not with perfect precision. Researchers have now demonstrated how errors that occur during such operations can be monitored and corrected on the fly.

31min

Breast cancer cells become invasive by changing their identity

Researchers have identified a protein that determines the identity and invasive properties of breast cancer cells. The finding could lead to the development of new therapeutic and diagnostic strategies to target breast cancer invasion and metastasis.

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MEGAPIXELS: This strange creature isn’t a spider or a dog, but it sure looks like both

Animals My dear, you have… THE GRIM. There is an arachnid in the rainforests of Ecuador that looks like a big black dog’s head sitting on eight super-long yellow legs.

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Capitalism is killing the world’s wildlife populations, not ‘humanity’

The latest Living Planet report from the WWF makes for grim reading: a 60% decline in wild animal populations since 1970, collapsing ecosystems, and a distinct possibility that the human species will not be far behind . The report repeatedly stresses that humanity's consumption is to blame for this mass extinction, and journalists have been quick to amplify the message. The Guardian headline read

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Large hydropower dams 'not sustainable' in the developing world

A new study says that big hydro electricity projects in Europe and the US have been disastrous for the environment.

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TVA announces solar installations being built for Facebook

Tennessee and Alabama will get their largest solar power projects yet, to supply a Facebook data center with 100 percent renewable energy.

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Michelin closes Scottish plant with 845 workers

French tyre manufacturer Michelin announced plans Monday to close a Scottish manufacturing plant with 845 employees due to growing competition from cheeper products in Asia.

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Oldest evidence of dairying on the East Asian Steppe

Although dairy pastoralism once made Mongolian steppe herders successful enough to conquer most of Asia and Europe, the origins of this way of life on the East Asian steppe are still unclear. Now an international team of researchers has uncovered evidence that dairying arrived in Mongolia as early as 1300 BC through a process of cultural transmission rather than population replacement or migration

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Shorter sleep can lead to dehydration

Adults who sleep just six hours per night — as opposed to eight — may have a higher chance of being dehydrated, according to a study by Penn State.

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Pitt researcher uses video games to unlock new levels of A.I.

Dr. Jiang designs algorithms that learn decision strategies in complex and uncertain environments like video games. By testing algorithms in simulated environments, they can learn from their mistakes while discovering and reinforcing strategies for success. To perfect this process, Dr. Jiang and many researchers in his field require simulations that mirror the real world.

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Cattle Herding | Alaska: The Last Frontier

The Kilchers herd cattle towards a new summer grazing area to protect them from bears. Catch an all-new ALASKA: THE LAST FRONTIER Sundays 9p on Discovery. Stream Full Episodes of Alaska: The Last Frontier: https://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/alaska-the-last-frontier/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/AlaskaTLF/ https://www.facebo

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Study: At-risk mothers receive less support, information on breastfeeding

University of Illinois postdoctoral research associate Carolyn Sutter found in a recent study that women who are at greater risk of breastfeeding cessation — including single mothers, those with less education and mothers enrolled in the WIC program — may have less access to resources that could provide helpful information and assistance.

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Scientists find potential path for countering oxidative stress in a range of diseases

Scientists at Scripps Research have made a surprising discovery in their mission to understand how cells stay healthy, uncovering an important connection between a cell's sugar metabolism and its antioxidant response.

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Drinking coffee may reduce your chances of developing Alzheimer's, Parkinson's

A new study out of the Krembil Brain Institute, part of the Krembil Research Institute, suggests drinking coffee may protect you against developing both Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease.

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Study could help explain how childhood stress contributes to anxiety, depression

New research could help explain why stress early in life can create vulnerabilities to mood and anxiety disorders later on.

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Memories of your parents may have long-term health effects

Your perceptions of your parents directly affects your physical health and wellness, according to new research. And regardless if they are true, you might be stuck with them for life. “There are things that happen to us in life that can alter our perceptions of the past, but it’s not always the objective—or what actually happened—that really affects us,” says lead author William Chopik, psycholog

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Hydropower, innovations and avoiding international dam shame

For sweeping drama, it's hard to beat hydropower from dams — a renewable source of electricity that helped build much of the developed world. Yet five scientists say that behind roaring cascades is a legacy of underestimated costs and overestimated value.

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Elusive star has origins close to Big Bang

Astronomers have found what could be one of the universe's oldest stars, made almost entirely of materials spewed from the Big Bang.

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‘Nanostraws’ safely deliver molecules to human cells in seconds

Minuscule nanostraws—tiny glass-like protrusions that poke equally tiny holes in cell walls—could offer a way to deliver precise doses of molecules directly into many cells at once. Researchers can design the perfect molecule to edit a gene, treat cancer, or guide the development of a stem cell, but none of that matters in the end if they can’t get the molecule into the human cells they want to m

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Under fire tech sector gathers in Portugal

Europe's largest tech event, the Web Summit, gets underway in Lisbon on Monday amid a backlash over internet firms' role in spreading "fake news" and how they use consumer data.

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Researchers identify promising proteins for diagnostic, prognostic use in ALS

Researchers from North Carolina State University have identified proteins that may be useful in both earlier diagnosis of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) and in more accurate disease prognosis.

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Web pioneer wants new 'contract' for internet

The inventor of the worldwide web, Tim Berners-Lee, on Monday announced plans for a "contract" to ensure the internet remains "safe and accessible" for all.

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Turning marginal farmlands into a win for farmers and ecosystems

Many farms have areas where the ground either floods or does not retain enough water or fertilizer for crops to thrive. Such marginal lands could become useful and potentially profitable if they are planted with perennial bioenergy crops such as shrub willow and switchgrass, report researchers this week at the annual meeting of The Geological Society of America in Indianapolis.

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Cancer Society Executive Resigns Amid Upset Over Corporate Partnerships

The American Cancer Society’s fund-raising alliances with Herbalife and others have stirred concerns, and influenced the departure of its chief medical officer.

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Fire ant colonies could inspire molecular machines, swarming robots

Think of it as mathematics with a bite: Researchers at CU Boulder have uncovered the statistical rules that govern how gigantic colonies of fire ants form bridges, ladders and floating rafts.

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Villagers follow the geology to safer water in Bangladesh

Water researchers have found a way to fight the "king of poisons" that accounts for one of every 20 deaths in Bangladesh.

1h

Scientist finds elusive star with origins close to Big Bang

Astronomers have found what could be one of the universe's oldest stars, a body almost entirely made of materials spewed from the Big Bang.

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Detecting E. coli strains using molecular electronics

Finding a fast and inexpensive way to detect specific strains of bacteria and viruses is critical to food safety, water quality, environmental protection and human health. However, current methods for detecting illness-causing strains of bacteria such as E. coli require either time-intensive biological cell cultures or DNA amplification approaches that rely on expensive laboratory equipment.

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The surprising benefits of coming in second place

Everyone loves the rewarding feeling of achieving a goal, but as it turns out, coming up short may not be such a bad alternative. In fact, it may even help you live longer. According to a University of Virginia study published in the Journal of Health Economics, Olympic silver medalists tend to live longer and earn more than gold medalists, which has prompted researchers to investigate what happe

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Coping with errors in the quantum age

Nowadays, quantum systems can be manipulated with extremely high, but not with perfect precision. Researchers in the Department of Physics at ETH Zurich have now demonstrated how errors that occur during such operations can be monitored and corrected on the fly.

2h

Turning marginal farmlands into a win for farmers and ecosystems

Many farms have areas where the ground either floods or does not retain enough water or fertilizer for crops to thrive. Such marginal lands could become useful and potentially profitable if they are planted with perennial bioenergy crops such as shrub willow and switchgrass, report researchers this week at the annual meeting of The Geological Society of America in Indianapolis.

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Meditation: An effective new therapy to reduce eye pressure in primary open-angle glaucoma

A new era in the management of glaucoma is ushered in by a landmark study published in the Journal of Glaucoma, Official Journal of the World Glaucoma Association. Patients with primary open angle glaucoma (POAG) showed significant improvements of both ocular and general health after participating in a program of mindful meditation focused on breathing compared to the control group that did not pa

2h

Fire ant colonies could inspire molecular machines, swarming robots

Researchers at CU Boulder have uncovered the statistical rules that govern how gigantic colonies of fire ants form bridges, ladders and floating rafts.

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From asexuality to heteroflexibility: New openness about intimate relationships

The 21st century has ushered in a "quiet revolution" in the diversity of intimate relationships, and a leading scholar says the scale and pace of this social transformation warrants a "reboot" of relationship studies.

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Dana-Farber scientists find new drug targets in aggressive cancers

Scientists have discovered a previously unknown molecular vulnerability in two rare, aggressive, and hard-to-treat types of cancer, and say it may be possible to attack this weakness with targeted drugs.

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Drug design: Clues for drugging the 'undruggable'

Scientists have shown how thalidomide analogs mediate degradation of many more proteins than previously anticipated. These proteins — zinc finger transcription factors — play a role in cancer and developmental diseases but are difficult drug targets. The new study suggests that thalidomide analogs can be rationally designed to target this challenging class of proteins.

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Teachers and Trump: Response to 2016 election

Teachers felt immense pressure from school leaders and families to respond in a certain way — or not at all — in their classrooms following the 2016 presidential election, according to new research.

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*The Walking Dead*'s Rick Grimes Gets a New Movie Series

The fan-favorite zombie-killer is getting a series of feature-length films.

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Scientists want to put 'speed bumps' in hurricane alley to slow down storms

Nexus Media News Wind farms could absorb some of the energy from hurricanes before they hit land. Wind turbines churn out clean, renewable energy. But one day they could do even more by reducing the rain brought by powerful hurricanes.

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Growing magnetic fields in deep space: Just wiggle the plasma

Contrary to what many people believe, outer space is not empty. In addition to an electrically charged soup of ions and electrons known as plasma, space is permeated by magnetic fields with a wide range of strengths. Astrophysicists have long wondered how those fields are produced, sustained, and magnified. Now, scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Princeton Plasma Physics Laborator

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Scientists develop method to quickly enhance immune-system proteins

Rice University scientists develop the simple pClick technique to attach drugs or other substances to antibodies, the powerful proteins that are central to the body's immune system.

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Johns Hopkins scientist finds elusive star with origins close to Big Bang

Astronomers have found what could be one of the universe's oldest stars, made almost entirely of materials spewed from the Big Bang.

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Team studying rare disorder discovers novel way to target melanoma

While studying a rare genetic disorder called NGLY1 deficiency, UNT Health Science Center researchers discovered a new targeted treatment for combating melanoma, a skin cancer that kills about 9,000 people in the United States each year.

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What can a tau mouse model reveal about the effects of repetitive brain injury?

Researchers have developed a mouse model expressing the human tau protein and subjected it to repeated injury-producing impacts and rotational acceleration to be able to study the effects on social behavior, anxiety, spatial learning and memory, and depressive behavior.

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WEIRD science

For decades, consensus among psychologists has held that a cluster of five personality traits — or a slight variation thereof — universally defines the structure of human personality.

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Is there a universal hierarchy of human senses?

Research at the University of York has shown that the accepted hierarchy of human senses — sight, hearing, touch, taste and smell — is not universally true across all cultures.

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Hydropower, innovations and avoiding international dam shame

For sweeping drama, it's hard to beat hydropower from dams — a renewable source of electricity that helped build much of the developed world. Yet five scientists from Michigan State University say that behind roaring cascades is a legacy of underestimated costs and overestimated value.

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Changing temperatures are helping corn production in US — for now

Increased production of corn in the US has largely been credited to advances in farming technology but new research shows that changing temperatures play a significant role in crop yield.

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Nutrient-recycling microbes may feel the heat

While microbial communities are the engines driving the breakdown of dead plants and animals, little is known about whether they are equipped to handle big changes in climate. In a paper published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Sydney Glassman at UC Riverside and colleagues examine what happens after microbial communities move into new climate conditions. The study is a fi

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Disrupted circadian rhythms may drive anxiety and exacerbate brain disorders

Sleep disruptions are associated with many brain disorders, including anxiety, dementias, and traumatic brain injury. While these disruptions are sometimes viewed as a side effect of brain disorders, new findings suggest that aberrant sleep-wake cycles can also drive brain pathology. The studies were presented at Neuroscience 2018, the annual meeting of the Society for Neuroscience and the world's

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Despite government claims, orangutan populations have not increased

Orangutan populations are still declining rapidly, despite claims by the Indonesian Government that things are looking better for the red apes. Scientists criticize the use of inappropriate methods for assessing management impacts on wildlife trends. The researchers call for scientifically sound measures to be employed in order to ensure that wildlife monitoring provides reliable numbers.

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Changing temperatures are helping corn production in US—for now

The past 70 years have been good for corn production in the midwestern United States, with yields increasing fivefold since the 1940s. Much of this improvement has been credited to advances in farming technology but researchers at Harvard University are asking if changes in climate and local temperature may be playing a bigger role than previously thought.

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Oldest evidence of dairying on the East Asian Steppe

Although dairy pastoralism once made Mongolian steppe herders successful enough to conquer most of Asia and Europe, the origins of this way of life on the East Asian steppe are still unclear. Now an international team of researchers led by the Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History has uncovered evidence that dairying arrived in Mongolia as early as 1300 BC through a process of cult

2h

Hydropower, innovations and avoiding international dam shame

For sweeping drama, it's hard to beat hydropower from dams—a renewable source of electricity that helped build much of the developed world. Yet five scientists from Michigan State University (MSU) say that behind roaring cascades is a legacy of underestimated costs and overestimated value.

2h

Nutrient-recycling microbes may feel the heat

Bacteria and fungi might conjure up images of diseases and spoiled food, but they also do a lot of good. The billions of microbes in a handful of dead leaves, for example, act as nature's recyclers and regenerate nutrients needed for the next generation of plants to grow.

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Dam problems, win-win solutions

Decisions about whether to build, remove or modify dams involve complex trade-offs that are often accompanied by social and political conflict. A group of researchers from the natural and social sciences, engineering, arts and humanities has joined forces to show how, where and when it may be possible to achieve a more efficient balance among these trade-offs. Their work is featured in a paper pub

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Hot temperatures can trigger an RNA response in plants

The stress of hotter temperatures may trigger a response in a plant's RNA, or ribonucleic acid—part of a cell's genetic messaging system—to help manage this change in its environment, according to a team of Penn State researchers.

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Social scientists' methods don't always translate well between cultures

There is a problem with the set of tools social scientists use to study human behavior.

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Nonfiction: A History of the Heart, That Most Vital of Organs

Sandeep Jauhar’s “Heart” recounts the scientific discoveries that have given us a better understanding of our most critical piece of plumbing.

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Rick's Failed First Attempt at Starting His Washplant | Gold Rush

Disaster strikes when Rick fires up his washplant for the first time. Stream Full Episodes of Gold Rush: https://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/gold-rush/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/GoldRush/ https://www.facebook.com/Discovery Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/Gold_Rush https://twitter.com/Discovery We're on Instagram

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Financial education could ease student loan stress

Student loan borrowers are not receiving adequate education to manage their debt, according to new research. Estimates indicate that a quarter of American adults currently have student loans to pay off, and most don’t have the financial literacy to manage their debt successfully. The average student in the Class of 2016 has $37,172 in student loan debt. More needs to be done to educate borrowers

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Is Our Love of True Crime Shows Really About Social Justice?

Networks and streaming services are placing viewers at the scene of the crime, but what's keeping them there?

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Growing magnetic fields in deep space: Just wiggle the plasma

Astrophysicists have long wondered how cosmic magnetic fields fields are produced, sustained, and magnified. Scientists have shown that plasma turbulence might be responsible, providing a possible answer to what has been called one of the most important unsolved problems in plasma astrophysics.

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More than intelligence needed for success in life

Research has examined long-held beliefs that success in school and careers is due to more than just high intelligence. Non-cognitive skills are also important.

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The reasons for hemispheric dominance in the brain

The left and the right hemispheres specialize in different tasks. However, it has not yet been fully understood how one hemisphere assumes dominance over the other when it comes to controlling specific functions. Biopsychologists have demonstrated in pigeons that the dominance is caused by slight differences in temporal activity patterns in both hemispheres.

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Small genetic differences turn plants into better teams

Diverse communities of plants and animals typically perform better than monocultures. However, the mechanisms that are responsible for this have so far been a mystery to science. Biologists have now been able to identify the genetic cause of these effects. Their findings might help to improve crop yield.

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Olive oil and fungus protect wood from wood rot

A fungus that does not attack wood, but preserves it. It sounds strange, but it is possible. A new study shows that black fungi on oiled wood can behave like a 'biofinish'. This layer colors the wood and protects it from wood rot and degradation by sunlight. An additional advantage: the fungus automatically repairs damage in the protective layer.

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How to reduce the impact of shipping vessel noise on fish? Slow them down

One concern with the increase vessel transits in the western Canadian Arctic is how noise pollution can detrimentally affect marine animals. Researchers have found that the negative impact of noise from shipping vessels can be mitigated by reducing the ship's speed.

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Two NASA spacecraft died in one week—and there's a connection

Space Kepler and Dawn guzzled through their precious gas for similar reasons. The asteroid-hopping Dawn spacecraft lived a very different life from the exoplanet-hunting Kepler telescope, but they shared similar struggles.

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What Candidates Are Talking About in Online Ads

Sometimes it seems like Democrats and Republicans aren’t even speaking the same language. But when it comes to online advertising, there are some surprising similarities between the big topics for both parties. The topic mentioned most often in Democratic ads on Google, according to an Atlantic analysis, is health care—which lags well down among the Republican topics. But the next two leading Dem

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Detecting E. coli strains using molecular electronics

Electrical engineers have adapted a molecular electronic device called a single-molecule break junction to detect RNA from strains of E. coli known for causing illness.

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Organisms with small genomes, cells found thriving in hot soils

As our planet warms, what life will survive and thrive? If the coal fire-fueled soils around Centralia, Pennsylvania, are any indication, organisms with smaller genomes and cells may do well in the future.

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Tethered antibodies present a potential new approach to prevent influenza virus infections

Scientists have discovered that tethering four antibodies together may be an effective strategy for neutralizing all types of influenza virus known to infect humans.

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'Master key' gene has links to both ASD and schizophrenia

Researchers analyzed mice partially lacking MIR-137.

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New efficiency record set for perovskite LEDs

Researchers have set a new efficiency record for LEDs based on perovskite semiconductors, rivalling that of the best organic LEDs (OLEDs).

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Chemical synthesis could produce more potent antibiotics

Researchers have shown that they can modify antibiotics in a way that could potentially make them more effective against drug-resistant infections.

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More affordable and effective conservation of species

No one had reported seeing the strange creature — a cross between a bear and a monkey — since before the Great Depression. Then, this past summer, an amateur biologist stumbled upon the presumed-extinct Wondiwoi tree kangaroo while trekking through Papua New Guinea. The revelation underscored how little we still know about the natural world — a major obstacle to conservation.

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Researchers Analyze Genomes of 81 Parasitic Worm Species

The new data could help identify treatments for diseases ranging from river blindness to schistosomiasis.

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Our Top 10 Stories on the Science of Leadership, Partisanship and Voting

The midterm elections will test whether science can transcend politics in the U.S. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Silicon Valley's Breakthrough Prizes Have Money, but They Need Diversity Too

The tech-funded science awards are attempting to bring glory to basic research, but so far they have done little to challenge the status quo.

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Turbulence in space might solve astrophysical mystery

Astrophysicists have long wondered how cosmic magnetic fields fields are produced, sustained, and magnified. PPPL scientists have shown that plasma turbulence might be responsible, providing a possible answer to what has been called one of the most important unsolved problems in plasma astrophysics.

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Extracellular vesicles help pass information between cells and onto offspring

New studies reveal that small, membrane-bound particles transported between cells have wide-ranging and long-term effects in the brain and throughout the body, from helping neurons communicate to passing the effects of stress onto the next generation. Such extracellular vesicles released from the brain into the blood can also provide a window into brain pathology to help with disease diagnosis.

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Luxuriate in This Mechanic's Teardown of a 1974 Harley Davidson

The premier episode of WIRED's *[De]Constructed* takes a gleaming looking into the guts of a vintage Harley Davidson Shovelhead.

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Virtual avatars learned cartwheels and other stunts from videos of people

A new computer system that lets animated characters learn acrobatic skills from videos could be a cheaper alternative to traditional motion capture.

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Toulouse Becomes a Labyrinth for La Machine’s Giant Spider and Minotaur

For the first four days of November, the streets of Toulouse, France, were transformed into a performance space for the massive robotic puppets Ariane and Asterion. The giant spider and 50-ton Minotaur were featured in the French street-theater company La Machine’s multiday show Le Gardien du Temple . Live music accompanied the giants as La Machine performers guided them through the “labyrinth” f

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Why the Long Face, Extinct Dolphin?

In the fall of 2015, while rummaging through the fossil collection of the Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History, Matthew McCurry came across a very strange skull. It belonged to an extinct dolphin named Eurhinodelphis, and it was incredibly long. The braincase was only slightly bigger than McCurry’s outstretched hand, but the snout stretched farther than his entire arm. “I was amazed tha

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Giant Magnetoresistance, Which Makes Your Laptop Possible, Turns 30

Giant Magnetoresistance, Which Makes Your Laptop Possible, Turns 30 The revolutionary discovery allowed engineers to build cheaper hard drives with higher storage capacity. laptop_topNteaser.jpg Image credits: Best Picko Rights information: CC BY 2.0 Physics Monday, November 5, 2018 – 12:30 Yuen Yiu, Staff Writer (Inside Science) — Thirty years ago this month, scientists published their discover

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Physicists name and codify new field in nanotechnology: 'electron quantum metamaterials'

New materials are being synthesized by twisting and stacking atomically thin layers. To bring it all under one roof, physicists propose this field of research be called "electron quantum metamaterials.'

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New technique to understand biology at the nanoscale

Researchers for the first time have shown that they can use electrical fields to gain valuable information about the tiny, floating vesicles that move around in animals and plants and are critically important to many biological functions.

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Evidence of outburst flooding indicates plentiful water on early Mars

The presence of water on Mars has been theorized for centuries. Early telescopes revealed ice caps, and early astronomers noted channels that were hypothesized to be natural rivers or creature-created canals.

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Evidence of restored vision in rats following cell transplant

Researchers have discovered that neurons located in the vision centers of the brains of blind rats functioned normally following fetal retina cell transplants, indicating the successful restoration of vision.

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Laser tech could be fashioned into Earth's 'porch light' to attract alien astronomers

If extraterrestrial intelligence exists somewhere in our galaxy, a new study proposes that laser technology on Earth could, in principle, be fashioned into something of a planetary porch light — a beacon strong enough to attract attention from as far as 20,000 light years away.

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Physicists create new, simpler-than-ever quantum 'hard drive for light'

Physicists have developed a new way to build quantum memories, a method for storing delicate quantum information encoded into pulses of light.

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A Ramp Contraption May Have Been Used to Build Egypt's Great Pyramid

The finding could help answer a longstanding question of how massive stone blocks were hauled into place — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Breast milk and formula mold gut bacteria differently

Formula and breast milk both encourage the growth of bacteria in babies’ guts, just not in the same way, according to new research. What that means for infant health is unclear, scientists say. Infant formula makers design it to mimic human breast milk not only in nutrients but also by nurturing a similar set of microbes in the digestive tract. Such microbes are indispensable in keeping us health

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Last week in tech: New Apple devices, Amazon’s free shipping play, and Blizzcon’s big gaming news

Technology It's about time we got that new MacBook Air A new episode of the podcast and new Apple stuff to gawk at? What a week.

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Children's sleep not significantly affected by screen time, new study finds

As young people spend an increasing amount of time on electronic devices, the effects of these digital activities has become a prevalent concern among parents, caregivers, and policy-makers. Research indicating that between 50 percent to 90 percent of school-age children might not be getting enough sleep has prompted calls that technology use may be to blame. However, new research has shown that s

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The Inca Empire

Many ancient Inca traditions continue to be appreciated and are carried out today by their decedents.

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Noam Chomsky says Trump and allies are "criminally insane"

Chomsky said climate change and nuclear war are the two main existential threats facing humanity. The Republican Party and Trump are not only failing to address climate change, but also are choosing to make it worse, according to Chomsky. Polling data show that American Republicans seem to be growing slightly more skeptical about climate change and climate science. None In 2016, renowned linguist

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New attacks on graphics processors endanger user privacy

Web browsers use GPUs to render graphics on desktops, laptops, and smart phones. GPUs are also used to accelerate applications on the cloud and data centers. GPUs are usually programmed using application programming interfaces, or APIs, such as OpenGL. OpenGL is accessible by any application on a desktop with user-level privileges. Since desktop or laptop machines by default come with the graphics

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Villagers follow the geology to safer water in Bangladesh

Water researchers have found a way to fight the 'king of poisons' that accounts for one of every 20 deaths in Bangladesh.

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New research links foods high in anthocyanins to a lower risk of cardiovascular disease

Wearing red has become a popular way to support the prevention of heart disease, the #1 killer of women. Now new research suggests eating red may be one of the best ways to keep your heart healthy.

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New study is a smoking gun, shows vaping is no deterrent to teen tobacco use

E-cigarettes don't mitigate the use of combustible cigarettes among teens.

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The Candidates Embracing Their Black-College Roots

Donald Trump has a habit of taking to Twitter first thing in the morning. So when he fired off a slew of tweets early one late-October morning, it wasn’t much of a surprise. “In Florida there is a choice between a Harvard/Yale educated man,” Ron DeSantis, he wrote , before vilifying DeSantis’s opponent, Andrew Gillum, who is vying to become the state’s first black governor, and just the fifth bla

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How to think like a Renaissance man (or woman)

Some of the greatest scientists and artists were polymaths. Renaissance men or polymaths are people who have mastered multiple disciplines and pursuits. The path towards becoming one doesn't always require some divine genius. Interest in varied subjects and disciplines is the first path towards thinking like a polymath. It's not easy branching into different subjects today and mastering them. The

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How diets ruin dating

A recent Reddit post discusses the challenges of dating while on a ketogenic diet. Entire websites and tutorial videos for "dating while vegan" feature a range of advice. Perhaps having too much choice with food decisions has paralyzed our ability to dialogue with one another. None My wife really loves me. When we met over four years ago, I was vegan. For context, she is the unpickiest eater I've

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A New Supercomputer Is the World's Fastest Brain-Mimicking Machine

The computer has one million processors and 1,200 interconnected circuit boards — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Transforming Robot Changes Shape at Will

Researchers have created a 'modular' robot which can analyze its environment and reconfigure itself to overcome obstacles and achieve tasks. This video was reproduced with permission and was first… — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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4 keto diet variations: Do they work?

The traditional ketogenic diet requires only 5% carbohydrate intake per day. Alternatives considered "less restrictive" are gaining in popularity. What you get out of each diet depends on what you're trying to accomplish. None Twenty years ago, while I was working as a reporter in Princeton, I met a vegetarian butcher. She was a hearty Russian grandmother, very reminiscent of my own. Day after da

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Tiny device bends light to create radiation

A new device the size of a match head can bend light inside a crystal to generate synchrotron radiation in a lab. When physicists bend very intense beams of charged particles in circular orbits near the speed of light, this bending throws off bits of light, or X-rays, called synchrotron radiation. The researchers used the device to bend visible light to produce light with a wavelength in the tera

4h

Detecting E. coli strains using molecular electronics

Electrical engineers at UC Davis, the University of Washington and TOBB University of Economics and Technology in Ankara, Turkey have adapted a molecular electronic device called a single-molecule break junction to detect RNA from strains of E. coli known for causing illness.

4h

Proton therapy for pediatric brain tumors has favorable cognitive outcomes

Proton therapy treatment for pediatric brain tumor patients is associated with better neurocognitive outcomes compared to x-ray radiation therapy according to a study by Northwestern Medicine.

4h

UCI researchers uncover evidence of restored vision in rats following cell transplant

Researchers from the University of California, Irvine School of Medicine, have discovered that neurons located in the vision centers of the brains of blind rats functioned normally following fetal retina cell transplants, indicating the successful restoration of vision. The research was published today in JNeurosci, the Journal of Neuroscience.

4h

Cell transplant restores vision in rats

Sheets of fetal cells integrate into the retina and generate nearly normal visual activity in the brains of blind rats, reports new research published in JNeurosci.

4h

Ariana Grande Conquers the Breakup Song

Carly Simon summed up the musical subgenre of tunes about famous lovers with her 1972 riddle of a chorus : “You’re so vain, you probably think this song is about you.” When singers of breakup songs drop hints but don’t drop names, what is the listener to do but speculate? As tabloid media and the internet have intensified such guessing games, the art of the subtweet has only become more important

4h

Why Dorothy Hodgkin should be pictured on the UK’s new £50 note

Dorothy Hodgkin should be on the new £50 note, says Alice Bell. She discovered the structure of vitamin B12 and is the only British woman to have won a science Nobel

4h

The quirky ways AI researchers gather data to feed their algorithms

Here are four of the most creative data collection methods used by experts at the leading annual conference on natural-language processing.

4h

NASA sees Tropical Storm Xavier affecting Western Mexico

Visible from NASA's Aqua satellite revealed the extent of Tropical Storm Xavier into western Mexico from its position just off-shore from Mexico's Jalisco state.

4h

NASA sees Tropical Storm Xavier affecting Western Mexico

Visible from NASA's Aqua satellite revealed the extent of Tropical Storm Xavier into western Mexico from its position just off-shore from Mexico's Jalisco state.

4h

In tune with the heart of a copper atom

Our team at IBM Research developed a new technique to control the magnetism of a single copper atom, a technology that could one day allow individual atomic nuclei to store and process information.

4h

Letters: 'Each Pitch … Was Its Own Enthralling Odyssey'

The 2018 World Series Was Good for the Red Sox—And Bad for Baseball “Major League Baseball has long been losing its grip on the title of America’s pastime,” Hayley Glatter wrote after the Red Sox won the 114th World Series. The game, she argued, is too long, lacks star power, and has been cannibalized by its crushing quest for metrics. As a die-hard baseball fan, I think this is a great article.

4h

Physicists create new, simpler-than-ever quantum 'hard drive for light'

Physicists at the University of Alberta in Canada have developed a new way to build quantum memories, a method for storing delicate quantum information encoded into pulses of light.

4h

Physicists name and codify new field in nanotechnology: 'electron quantum metamaterials'

When two atomically thin two-dimensional layers are stacked on top of each other and one layer is made to rotate against the second layer, they begin to produce patterns—the familiar moiré patterns—that neither layer can generate on its own and that facilitate the passage of light and electrons, allowing for materials that exhibit unusual phenomena. For example, when two graphene layers are overla

4h

Ride-share companies embrace election frenzy

Ride-share companies are capitalizing on voter enthusiasm ahead of Tuesday's midterm elections by offering free or discounted rides to the polls in shared cars, bikes and scooters.

4h

Researchers develop new technique to understand biology at the nanoscale

Washington State University researchers for the first time have shown that they can use electrical fields to gain valuable information about the tiny, floating vesicles that move around in animals and plants and are critically important to many biological functions.

4h

Organisms with small genomes, cells found thriving in hot soils

As our planet warms, what life will survive and thrive? If the coal fire-fueled soils around Centralia, Pennsylvania, are any indication, organisms with smaller genomes and cells may do well in the future.

4h

Twitter users spreading sexual violence prevention strategies

In the wake of #MeToo, the hashtag #HowIWillChange asked men to come forward on Twitter to discuss ways in which they would change their own behavior to prevent sexual violence and mitigate harm for victims.

4h

Researchers develop new technique to understand biology at the nanoscale

Washington State University researchers for the first time have shown that they can use electrical fields to gain valuable information about the tiny, floating vesicles that move around in animals and plants and are critically important to many biological functions.

4h

Tethered antibodies present a potential new approach to prevent influenza virus infections

As co-leaders of an international collaboration, scientists at Scripps Research have discovered that tethering four antibodies together may be an effective strategy for neutralizing all types of influenza virus known to infect humans.

4h

Violence in childhood leads to accelerated aging, study finds

A new study of nearly 250 children and teens led by the University of Washington found that participants who had suffered abuse were developing faster than those who had not.

4h

Physicists name and codify new field in nanotechnology: 'electron quantum metamaterials'

New materials are being synthesized by twisting and stacking atomically thin layers. To bring it all under one roof, physicists Nathaniel Gabor of UC Riverside, and Justin C. W. Song of Nanyang Technological University, Singapore, propose this field of research be called "electron quantum metamaterials." They have just published a perspective article in Nature Nanotechnology, in which they highlig

4h

BU: Twitter users spreading sexual violence prevention strategies

In the wake of #MeToo, the hashtag #HowIWillChange asked men to come forward on Twitter to discuss ways in which they would change their own behavior to prevent sexual violence and mitigate harm for victims.

4h

Organisms with small genomes, cells found thriving in hot soils

As our planet warms, what life will survive and thrive? If the coal fire-fueled soils around Centralia, Pennsylvania, are any indication, organisms with smaller genomes and cells may do well in the future.

4h

Children's sleep not significantly affected by screen time, new study finds

As young people spend an increasing amount of time on electronic devices, the effects of these digital activities has become a prevalent concern among parents, caregivers, and policy-makers. Research indicating that between 50 percent to 90 percent of school-age children might not be getting enough sleep has prompted calls that technology use may be to blame. However, new research from the Oxford

4h

Laser tech could be fashioned into Earth's 'porch light' to attract alien astronomers

If extraterrestrial intelligence exists somewhere in our galaxy, a new MIT study proposes that laser technology on Earth could, in principle, be fashioned into something of a planetary porch light — a beacon strong enough to attract attention from as far as 20,000 light years away.

4h

Physicists create new, simpler-than-ever quantum 'hard drive for light'

Physicists at the University of Alberta in Canada have developed a new way to build quantum memories, a method for storing delicate quantum information encoded into pulses of light.

4h

How non-industrial cultures view mental illness

Many abnormal behaviors that are considered by western psychologists to be mental illnesses that require treatment are seen in a much different and even positive light in non-industrial or "primitive" societies. Things like hearing voices, hallucinations, and other unconventional behaviors are seen as the start of a spiritual awakening. Many of these individuals go on to become spiritual leaders

4h

How the Smiths took over Europe

'Smith' is not just the most common surname in many English-speaking countries In local translations, it's also the most common occupational surname in a large part of Europe Ironically, Smiths are so ubiquitous today because smiths were so special a few centuries ago Although very few people are smiths by profession these days, there are millions of Smiths by surname the world over. It's the mos

4h

'Male' Octopus Hatches 10,000 Teensy Babies in Surprise Birth

Sit back, clear your mind, and let this imagery sink in: "buckets and buckets and buckets full of tiny octopi."

4h

Chemists develop a new way to treat antibiotic-resistant infections

With drug-resistant infections on the rise and the development of new antibiotics on the decline, the world could use a new strategy in the fight against increasingly wily bacteria. Now, Stanford chemists report November 2 in the Journal of the American Chemical Society a possible solution: a small molecular attachment that helps conventional antibiotics penetrate and destroy their targets.

5h

Duncan Hunter Is Running the Most Anti-Muslim Campaign in the Country

SAN DIEGO , Calif.—Congressman Duncan Hunter had a problem. The California Republican was supposed to coast to reelection this year. A square-jawed ex-marine who inherited his father’s House seat in 2008, Hunter had won each of his past five elections by a wide margin. His district, a collection of inland San Diego suburbs, was solid GOP territory, and few campaign watchers expected that to chang

5h

4 States Have Ballot Measures That Could Shape U.S. Climate Policy

Western voters will decide whether to expand renewable energy and implement a carbon tax — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

5h

Tropisk paradis-ø forbyder solcreme for at beskytte koralrev

Mange solcremer indeholder kemikalier, der kan afblege, deformere og ødelægge koralrev. Men der findes koralrev-venlige alternativer.

5h

Stanford chemists develop a new way to treat antibiotic-resistant infections

Chemists have modified a common antibiotic to make it more effective at fighting off one common type of antibiotic-resistant bacterium, known as MRSA.

5h

Laser architecture can create complex structures to probe, control matter

A new laser architecture called the universal light modulator, an intriguing new tool to probe and control matter, will be presented during the Optical Society's (OSA) Laser Congress, Nov. 4-8, in Boston. It was developed by principal investigator Sergio Carbajo and research associate Wei Liu, both with the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory and Stanford University.

5h

Researchers uncover gene that regulates fat accumulation and obesity

A new study from Western University showed that regardless of diet, a protein called Pannexin 1 significantly regulates the accumulation of fat in mice. The study, published today in Scientific Reports, suggests that a deletion of the Panx1 gene in the early stages of development of mouse fat cells increases the amount of fat accumulated, leading to a higher risk for obesity later in life.

5h

New gene therapy reprograms brain glial cells into neurons

A new gene therapy can turn certain brain glial cells into functioning neurons, which in turn could help repair the brain after a stroke or during neurological disorders like Alzheimer's or Parkinson's diseases.

5h

Teachers and Trump

Teachers felt immense pressure from school leaders and families to respond in a certain way — or not at all — in their classrooms following the 2016 presidential election, according to new research from Michigan State University.

5h

Clues for drugging the 'undruggable'

Nicolas Thomä's group at the Friedrich Miescher Institute for Biomedical Research (FMI) has joined forces with the group of Benjamin Ebert at Harvard's Broad Institute to show how thalidomide analogs mediate degradation of many more proteins than previously anticipated. These proteins — zinc finger transcription factors — play a role in cancer and developmental diseases but are difficult drug ta

5h

Disrupted circadian rhythms may drive anxiety and exacerbate brain disorders

Sleep disruptions are associated with many brain disorders, including anxiety, dementias, and traumatic brain injury. While these disruptions are sometimes viewed as a side effect of brain disorders, new findings presented today suggest that aberrant sleep-wake cycles can also drive brain pathology. The studies were presented at Neuroscience 2018, the annual meeting of the Society for Neuroscience

5h

Laser architecture can create complex structures to probe, control matter

Lasers have a unique ability to precisely drive, manipulate, control, and probe matter utilizing an incredible variety of methods. While they often operate behind the scenes, lasers are the backbone of revolutionary science and technology—including research advances that were the basis for the 2018 Nobel Prize in Physics.

5h

Global governance must overcome 'zeitgeist of mistrust' to tackle world's environmental issues

The growing mistrust and hostility towards global intuitions must be overcome if the world is to successfully tackle the environmental challenges it faces, the head of the University of Sussex's global sustainability research centre has warned.

5h

Teachers and Trump

Teachers felt immense pressure from school leaders and families to respond in a certain way—or not at all—in their classrooms following the 2016 presidential election, according to new research from Michigan State University.

5h

Wind farm 'predator' effect hits ecosystems: study

Wind farms act as a top "predator" in some ecosystems, harming birds at the top of the food chain and triggering a knock-on effect overlooked by green energy advocates, scientists said Monday.

5h

Did you solve it? Gunpowder, reason and plot

The solution to today’s puzzle In my puzzle column earlier today I set you the following conundrum, concerning an incident in which six men were arrested during the 1605 Gunpowder Plot. Each of the men were questioned in private about who was a traitor and who was loyal. They made the following remarks. Augustine: Felix is loyal, Erasmus is a traitor. Bartholomew: Augustine is loyal. Continue rea

5h

Icelandair share price soars after deal with rival

Shares in Icelandair shot up more than 40 percent on Monday after it announced it had acquired its fellow Iceland-based low-cost rival WOW Air.

5h

Can I Vote Online? Your Voting Questions, Answered

The Know-It-Alls: Our in-house experts answer questions about your interactions with technology.

5h

Inside job: A new technique to cool a fusion reactor

Fusion offers the potential of near limitless energy by heating a gas trapped in a magnetic field to incredibly high temperatures where atoms are so energetic that they fuse together when they collide. But if that hot gas, called a plasma, breaks free from the magnetic field, it must be safely put back in place to avoid damaging the fusion device — this problem has been one of the great challenge

5h

A stellar achievement: Magnetized space winds in the laboratory

New insights have been gained about stellar winds, streams of high-speed charged particles called plasma that blow through interstellar space. These winds, created by eruptions from stars or stellar explosions, carry with them strong magnetic fields which can interact with or effect other magnetic fields, such as those that surround planets like Earth. To understand these processes, researchers ar

5h

Flying focus: Controlling lasers through time and space

Scientists have produced an extremely bright spot of light that can travel at any speed — including faster than the speed of light. Researchers have found a way to use this concept, called 'flying focus,' to move an intense laser focal point over long distances at any speed. Their technique includes capturing some of the fastest movies ever recorded.

5h

A faster, cheaper path to fusion energy

Scientists are working to dramatically speed up the development of fusion energy in an effort to deliver power to the electric grid soon enough to help mitigate impacts of climate change. The arrival of a breakthrough technology — high-temperature superconductors, which can be used to build magnets that produce stronger magnetic fields than previously possible — could help them achieve this goal

5h

Saber-toothed cats with oral injuries ate softer foods

Saber-toothed cats, the large felid predators that once roamed Southern California, may have eaten softer foods after suffering oral injuries, according to a new study. Microscopic damage patterns on teeth from fossilized cats show the injured predators transitioned to seeking softer prey, like flesh instead of bone, which healthy cats may have provided for them, according to the study.

5h

Sitting is NOT the new smoking, contrary to popular myth

No, sitting is not the new smoking, despite what countless newspaper articles have peddled in recent years.

5h

Air pollution linked to autism

Exposure to toxic air pollutants is linked to an increased risk of developing autism, according to a study of Chinese children during their first three-years of life.

5h

Caterpillar, fungus in cahoots to threaten fruit, nut crops, study finds

New research reveals that Aspergillus flavus, a fungus that produces carcinogenic aflatoxins that can contaminate seeds and nuts, has a multilegged partner in crime: the navel orangeworm caterpillar, which targets some of the same nut and fruit orchards afflicted by the fungus. Scientists report in the Journal of Chemical Ecology that the two pests work in concert to overcome plant defenses and re

5h

How to reduce the impact of shipping vessel noise on fish? Slow them down

The western Canadian Arctic's natural underwater soundscape has been shielded from the din of commercial shipping by the sea ice that covers the area, rendering it mostly inaccessible to shipping vessels. But with large amounts of ice shrinking in the Arctic Ocean, a growing number of ships are gaining access to the area. This trend is expected to accelerate.

5h

More than intelligence needed for success in life

Research carried out at the University of Adelaide and the University of Bristol has examined long-held beliefs that success in school and careers is due to more than just high intelligence. Non-cognitive skills are also important.

5h

The Mysteries of Animal Movement

A scientist’s unfettered curiosity leads him to investigate the physics at work in some very odd corners of the natural world.

5h

Despite government claims, orangutan populations have not increased

Leipzig/Brunei. Orangutan populations are still declining rapidly, despite claims by the Indonesian Government that things are looking better for the red apes. In the journal Current Biology, a team of scientists including Maria Voigt of the German Centre for Integrative Biodiversity Research (iDiv) and the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology criticise the use of inappropriate metho

5h

Alcohol industry health campaigns miss the mark by a longshot

Far from confirming industry claims that they can 'do good' with corporate campaigns, the findings suggest that the public health benefits are likely to be minimal. In fact, 11 percent of the industry actions had the potential for doing harm.

5h

Breast cancer cells become invasive by changing their identity

Researchers from Karolinska Institutet in Sweden have identified a protein that determines the identity and invasive properties of breast cancer cells. The finding could lead to the development of new therapeutic and diagnostic strategies to target breast cancer invasion and metastasis. The study is published in the scientific journal Cancer Research.

5h

First-of-its-kind research models immune responses in cellular immunotherapies

In the Cellular Immunotherapy and Transplantation Program at Virginia Commonwealth University Massey Cancer Center, scientists are pursuing a cross-collaborative effort that could potentially change the way cellular immunotherapies such as stem cell transplantation and CAR T-cell therapies are performed.

5h

Resiliency in NICU parents may be linked to lower depression and anxiety

Parents of vulnerable newborns in neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) who feel less resilient may experience more symptoms of psychological distress, including depression and anxiety. A snapshot from an ongoing cross-sectional study exploring this relationship was presented during the American Academy of Pediatrics National Conference & Exhibition.

5h

Children's vaccinations and development checks prevent hospital admissions in childhood

Children who receive nursery vaccinations and development checks are less likely to be admitted to hospital during childhood years.

5h

Does having muscle weakness and obesity lead to falls for older women?

A team of researchers writing for the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society suggested that it is important to identify people at risk for falls related to obesity and muscle weakness so that healthcare providers can offer appropriate solutions.

5h

Political divide shapes which eBay sellers users prefer

EBay users are wary about buying products online from sellers who might not share their political point of view, according to a new study. An analysis of more than 550 million items sold by individuals on eBay in 2015 and 2016—transactions totaling $22.3 billion—signals that we’re more likely to buy goods from someone we perceive comes from a similar political persuasion. In other words, eBay buy

5h

Mystery Math Whiz and Novelist Advance Permutation Problem

On September 16, 2011, an anime fan posted a math question to the online bulletin board 4chan about the cult classic television series The Melancholy of Haruhi Suzumiya . Season one of the show, which involves time travel, had originally aired in nonchronological order, and a re-broadcast and a DVD version had each further rearranged the episodes. Fans were arguing online about the best order to

5h

Researchers unveil clues that could lead to more affordable and effective conservation of species

No one had reported seeing the strange creature—a cross between a bear and a monkey—since before the Great Depression. Then, this past summer, an amateur biologist stumbled upon the presumed-extinct Wondiwoi tree kangaroo while trekking through Papua New Guinea. The revelation underscored how little we still know about the natural world—a major obstacle to conservation.

5h

Man Dies 8 Years After Swallowing a Live Slug That Left Him Paralyzed

Swallowing a live garden slug led to a serious parasitic infection for an Australian teen.

5h

Netflix Finally Changed Its Biggest Rule

Since launching its original-film division with Beasts of No Nation in 2015, Netflix has had a single hard-and-fast rule about its movies: Subscribers never have to wait an extra second to see them. If a new project received a theatrical release, it would debut on the streaming service at the exact same time. This approach clashed with the fact that most theater chains want to screen their featur

5h

Laser blasting antimatter into existence

Antimatter is an exotic material that vaporizes when it contacts regular matter. If you hit an antimatter baseball with a bat made of regular matter, it would explode in a burst of light. It is rare to find antimatter on Earth, but it is believed to exist in the furthest reaches of the universe. Amazingly, antimatter can be created out of thin air…

5h

Taming plasmas: Improving fusion using microwaves

We all know microwaves are good for cooking popcorn, but scientists have recently shown they can also prevent dangerous waves in plasmas and help produce clean, nearly limitless energy with fusion. Fusion takes place when fast moving atomic particles slam into each other and stick together. The particles need to be so hot that atoms break down, leaving a gas of charged particles called a plasma.

5h

Electrically charged dust in microgravity is surprisingly orderly

In a lab on Earth, electrically charged dust generally lines up either along the downward pull of gravity or across it. Scientists got a surprise when examining data from a similar experiment on the International Space Station orbiting 248 miles above Earth. Rather than the dust bouncing around randomly, the dust often wiggled around in straight lines, even without gravity.

5h

Wealthier people do less in the struggle against climate change

A collective-risk dilemma experiment with members of the public in Barcelona has shown that people are more or less likely to contribute money to fighting climate change depending on their how wealthy they are. And the results indicate that participants with fewer resources were prepared to contribute significantly more to the public good than wealthier people, sometimes up to twice as much.

5h

Breakthrough for treatment of fibrotic diseases

A drug combination has potential to halt a process responsible for large numbers of deaths.

5h

Prejudice against women in power is greater than we think

People are more prejudiced against women leaders than the statistics might indicate. This could be because participants in surveys investigating attitudes towards men and women in leadership positions may not answer honestly unless they are guaranteed confidentiality of their answers.

5h

Enhanced views of Earth tectonics

Scientists have used data from the European Space Agency (ESA), Gravity field and steady-state Ocean Circulation Explorer (GOCE) mission to unveil key geological features of the Earth's lithosphere — the rigid outer layer that includes the crust and the upper mantle.

5h

Could rising CO2 trigger return of eradicated mosquito-related disease?

A new study shows for the first time the impact that climate change is having on the rate in which mosquitoes diversify, and what this might mean for human health in the future.

5h

A hypocaloric Mediterranean diet and daily exercise maintain weight loss

Following a Mediterranean diet low in calories and engaging daily physical activity have been demonstrated to result in reduce body weight and cardiovascular risk in overweight patients and patients with metabolic syndrome, and to maintain these benefits after one year.

5h

Caterpillar, fungus in cahoots to threaten fruit, nut crops, study finds

New research reveals that Aspergillus flavus, a fungus that produces carcinogenic aflatoxins that can contaminate seeds and nuts, has a multilegged partner in crime: the navel orangeworm caterpillar, which targets some of the same nut and fruit orchards afflicted by the fungus. Scientists report in the Journal of Chemical Ecology that the two pests work in concert to overcome plant defenses and re

6h

Can a dog ownership and training program improve symptoms of PTSD among veterans?

The results of a new integrative health study that measures the effects of owning and training a therapy dog on posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in veterans are published in JACM, The Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine.

6h

Phobic anxiety is linked to sexuality issues in women who are breast cancer survivors

A University of Cordoba research project reveals that mental well-being is a determining factor in sexual dysfunction in women affected by this kind of cancer. Psychological variables are determining factors in sexuality development.

6h

Mainz-Paris study: Cost overruns of Olympic Games comparable to other large-scale projects

Sports economists at Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU) in Germany in cooperation with the Université Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne in France have compiled a comprehensive list of expenditures and revenues of the Olympic Games from Sydney 2000 to PyeongChang 2018. The results show that the costs of organizing the Olympic Games (OCOG budget) were always covered by revenues and even led to profit

6h

Standing in for a kidney, MXene materials could give dialysis patients the freedom to move

A type of two-dimensional layered material, created at Drexel University, has emerged as a candidate to assist in replacing the body's waste filtration system in wearable kidneys.

6h

Researchers show that a high-protein diet does not affect kidney function

A widely held and controversial myth that high-protein diets may cause kidney damage in healthy adults has been debunked by scientists at McMaster University, who examined more than two dozen studies involving hundreds of participants.

6h

Could climate change trigger the return of eradicated mosquito-related disease?

The largest ever study of the mosquito evolutionary tree, going back 195 million years, suggests that present-day climate change could result in the spread and return of dangerous mosquito-borne diseases to new places or areas where they had previously been eradicated, scientists are warning.

6h

How to reduce the impact of shipping vessel noise on fish? Slow them down

One concern with the increase vessel transits in the western Canadian Arctic is how noise pollution can detrimentally affect marine animals. Researchers at the University of Victoria, WCS Canada and JASCO Applied Sciences have found that the negative impact of noise from shipping vessels can be mitigated by reducing the ship's speed. They will present their research at the Acoustical Society of Am

6h

Study Finds "Some Evidence" that Cellphone Radiation Linked to Brain Cancer in Male Rats

The results cannot be extrapolated to humans, researchers caution.

6h

Is There a Better Way to Vote?

Is There a Better Way to Vote? Ranked choice voting and vote-by-mail could be used more widely to improve the chances that votes will represent the electorate’s wishes. Voting_top.jpg Image credits: Rob Crandall / Shutterstock.com Culture Monday, November 5, 2018 – 11:30 Peter Gwynne, Contributor (Inside Science) — Counting the votes in this September's Democratic primary in Massachusetts’ third

6h

Peak performance: New stellarator experiments show promising results

Imagine building a machine so advanced and precise you need a supercomputer to help design it. That's exactly what scientists and engineers in Germany did when building the Wendelstein 7-X experiment. The device is a type of fusion device called a stellarator.

6h

Laboratory experiments probe the formation of stars and planets

The cosmos is a void dotted with stars and an ever-increasing number of newly-observed planets beyond our solar system. Yet, how these stars and planets formed out of clouds of interstellar dust and gas remains mysterious. The study of black holes provides clues that could help solve this mystery.

6h

Borexino sheds light on solar neutrinos

For more than ten years, the Borexino Detector located 1,400 meters below surface of the Italian Gran Sasso massif has been exploring the interior of our Sun. During this time, the project has provided amazing insights into how the star at the center of our solar system generates its energy.

6h

Voters' preexisting opinions shift to align with political party positions

The views expressed by political party leaders can change how individual voters feel about an issue, according to findings from a longitudinal study of voters in New Zealand.

6h

Google has enlisted NASA to help it prove quantum supremacy within months

The firm will pit its Bristlecone quantum processor against a classical supercomputer early next year and see which comes out on top.

6h

New stats apps show a virtual reality

Harnessing the power of virtual reality will help to visualize data and improve statistical models.

6h

Physicists designed new antenna for supersensitive magnetometers of a new generation

Scientists from ITMO University and Lebedev Physical Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences proposed a new microwave antenna that creates a uniform magnetic field in large volume. It is capable for uniform and coherent addressing of the electronic spins of an ensemble of nanodiamond structure defects. This can be used to create super-sensitive magnetic field detectors of a new generation for

6h

Small genetic differences turn plants into better teams

Diverse communities of plants and animals typically perform better than monocultures. However, the mechanisms that are responsible for this have so far been a mystery to science. Biologists at the University of Zurich have now been able to identify the genetic cause of these effects. Their findings might help to improve crop yield.

6h

More than intelligence needed for success in life

Research carried out at the University of Adelaide and the University of Bristol has examined long-held beliefs that success in school and careers is due to more than just high intelligence. Non-cognitive skills are also important.

6h

New conservation approach

Findings show strong evidence for unique regions that divide plant and animal communities — a major development in centuries-long debate

6h

Opioid gene variant in adolescents reduces reward, may increase later substance abuse risk

Adolescents with a particular variant of an opioid receptor gene have less response in a part of prefrontal cortex that evaluates rewards, compared to those with the other version of the gene, say researchers at Georgetown University Medical Center.

6h

Largest parasitic worm genetic study hatches novel treatment possibilities

The largest genomic study of parasitic worms to date identified hundreds of thousands of new genes and predicted many new potential drug targets and drugs. Research from the Wellcome Sanger Institute and collaborators will help scientists understand how these parasites invade, evade the immune system and cause disease. Reported in Nature Genetics today (5th November), the study could lead to new d

6h

Study shows movement, evolutionary history of TB in China

A genetic scan of a massive number of samples taken from tuberculosis patients across China has shown a surprising genetic uniformity: just two 'strains' of the tuberculosis bacterium account for 99.4 percent of all cases.

6h

Researchers solve mystery surrounding a form of Batten disease

A team led by researchers at Baylor College of Medicine has uncovered an unexpected mechanism that can explain a form of Batten disease called neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis 8.

6h

Chemical synthesis could produce more potent antibiotics

MIT researchers have shown that they can modify antibiotics in a way that could potentially make them more effective against drug-resistant infections.

6h

New efficiency record set for perovskite LEDs

Researchers have set a new efficiency record for LEDs based on perovskite semiconductors, rivalling that of the best organic LEDs (OLEDs).

6h

New research shows symptom improvement after concussion in children varies

Age and sex must be taken into consideration when looking at children's recovery after a concussion, say researchers at the CHEO Research Institute. In a new article published in the JAMA Pediatrics, authors describe how the common symptoms following concussion improve by both age and sex over time. They found that the length of time for symptom improvement after concussion in children and adolesc

6h

Pulmonary TB can be cured with shorter treatment, study finds

Almost half of the nearly 10 million patients with active tuberculosis each year could potentially be cured with significantly shorter treatments than current guidelines recommend, a new analysis from UC San Francisco has found. The results suggest targeted therapies could be more effective in treating TB, which killed an estimated 1.3 million people around the world last year.

6h

Was general anesthesia for surgery associated with risk of adverse child development in study of siblings?

Surgery under general anesthesia for young children before they started elementary school wasn't associated with increased risk of adverse child development outcomes compared with their biological siblings who didn't have surgery and after accounting for other potential biological and environmental factors. The study of children in Ontario, Canada, included 2,346 sibling pairs where only one sibli

6h

Reanalyzing gene tests prompt new diagnoses in kids

A new study from UT Southwestern quantifies for the first time how quickly these rapid advancements in genomics may benefit patients. Research published in JAMA Pediatrics includes a five-year review of more than 300 epilepsy cases that showed about a third of children had a change in diagnosis based on new data. In some cases, the review helped doctors prescribe a more effective treatment.

6h

'Master key' gene has links to both ASD and schizophrenia

Researchers at Emory and the Chinese Academy of Sciences analyze mice partially lacking MIR-137.

6h

Contrary to government report, orangutans continue to decline

A recent report by the Government of Indonesia claiming an increase in orangutan populations of more than 10 percent from 2015 to 2017 is at odds with many recently published and peer-reviewed scientific studies on the subject, according to a letter in Current Biology on Nov. 5.

6h

Why Eli Manning Is Still a Giant

At the end of October, after the New York Giants had stumbled off to their second consecutive 1–6 start, the freshman general manager Dave Gettleman posted a figurative estate-sale sign on the team’s locker-room door and challenged his fellow GMs to make him an offer he couldn’t refuse. With the October 25 deadline looming on the most hectic mid-season trade period in recent memory, Gettleman shi

6h

Nyt partnerskab leverer plug-and-play-varme til et helt feriecenter

'Nærvarme' skal gøre varmepumpeteknologien nem at have med at gøre som varmekilde også i større bygninger.

6h

Llamas could save us all from the flu

Health Their blood might hold the key to stopping every flu, every year. Llamas may be large and fluffy, but their antibodies sure aren’t. And that could be a huge advantage when it comes to fighting human influenza virus.

6h

New efficiency record set for perovskite LEDs

Researchers have set a new efficiency record for LEDs based on perovskite semiconductors, rivalling that of the best organic LEDs (OLEDs).

6h

Chemical synthesis could produce more potent antibiotics

Using a novel type of chemical reaction, MIT researchers have shown that they can modify antibiotics in a way that could potentially make them more effective against drug-resistant infections.

6h

Contrary to government report, orangutans continue to decline

A recent report by the Government of Indonesia claiming an increase in orangutan populations of more than 10 percent from 2015 to 2017 is at odds with many recently published and peer-reviewed scientific studies on the subject, according to a letter in Current Biology on November 5.

6h

Study shows movement, evolutionary history of tuberculosis in China

A genetic scan of a massive number of samples taken from tuberculosis patients across China has shown a surprising genetic uniformity: just two "strains" of the tuberculosis bacterium account for 99.4 percent of all cases.

6h

Physicists measured Earth’s mass using neutrinos for the first time

Counting tiny particles that can zip straight through the Earth reveals what the planet is like on the inside.

6h

Bitcoin Will Burn the Planet Down. The Question: How Fast?

A new paper concludes that it takes more than four times as much energy to mine $1 of bitcoin as mining $1 of copper.

6h

Why women receive less CPR from bystanders

Separate studies explore why women are less likely to receive bystander CPR. A small survey found that people may worry that chest compressions by bystanders will seem improper or may hurt women. A virtual reality study found that even female avatars were less likely to receive CPR from bystanders in a virtual simulation.

6h

Magnetic pumping pushes plasma particles to high energies

The solar wind is not a calm summer breeze. Instead, it is a roiling, chaotic mess of turbulence and waves. There is a lot of energy stored in this turbulence, so scientists have long thought that it heats the solar wind. However, the heating expected from turbulence is not the heating observed. Scientists now have a new idea about what heats the solar wind, a theory called magnetic pumping.

6h

Lead, mercury exposure raises cholesterol levels

Higher levels of lead and other heavy metals detected in the blood was associated with increased levels of lower density lipoprotein (LDL — bad cholesterol) and total cholesterol, according to preliminary research.

6h

Some heart patients ride roller coasters and other thrill-seeking activities despite warnings

Adults with an inherited thickening of the heart muscle, often don't stop participating in thrill-seeking activities despite recommendations that they should. And while some experienced minor consequences, only a few suffered serious health effects as a result, according to preliminary research.

6h

Recreating the sound of the Islamic past of the Mosque of Cordoba

Faced with the visual homogeneity of the interior of the Islamic mosque, the results obtained in the acoustic study allow us to confirm that the sound perception varies by area. This is due to the successive expansions that the temple has experienced during its history.

6h

Borexino sheds light on solar neutrinos

For more than ten years, the Borexino Detector located 1,400 meters below surface of the Italian Gran Sasso massif has been exploring the interior of our Sun. During this time, the project has provided amazing insights into how the star at the center of our solar system generates its energy. The scientists involved, including physicists from Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz, have now published

6h

Try These 5 Techniques to Make Your Next Political Argument Fruitful

Efforts to identify common ground can shake up deadlocked debates — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

6h

Nanotubes could lead to faster lithium batteries that last

Scientists are counting on carbon nanotube films to make lithium batteries charge faster and last longer. New research shows the thin nanotube films effectively stop dendrites that grow naturally from unprotected lithium metal anodes in batteries. Over time, the tentacle-like dendrites can pierce the battery’s electrolyte core and reach the cathode, causing the battery to fail. That problem has b

6h

Your gut is full of neurons and they are replaced every 2 weeks

A mouse study suggests most neurons in the intestines die every two weeks. An imbalance in the number of neurons could lead to gut diseases or even Parkinson’s

6h

Violent crime raises blood pressure even among those living in safe areas

A spike in Chicago crime was associated with a relative increase in blood pressure among people who lived in safe neighborhoods, according to preliminary research.

6h

Chronic exposure to excess noise may increase risk for heart disease, stroke

Exposure to environmental noise appears to increase the risk of heart attacks and strokes by fueling the activity of a brain region involved in stress response.

6h

Opioid use may increase risk of dangerous heart rhythm disorder

Opioid use appears to increase a person's risk for developing atrial fibrillation, a dangerous heart-rhythm disorder known to cause strokes, according to preliminary research.

6h

Nuts for nuts? Daily serving may help control weight and benefit health

Eating Brazil nuts and other varieties of nuts daily may prevent weight gain and provide other cardiovascular benefits, according to two separate preliminary studies.

6h

Just one energy drink may hurt blood vessel function

Young, healthy adults experienced notably diminished blood vessel function soon after consuming one energy drink.

6h

Daily weighing may be key to losing weight

Daily weighing may help with weight loss goals. People who don't weigh themselves at all or rarely were less likely to lose weight than those who weighed themselves often, according to new research.

6h

The case for curiosity-driven research | Suzie Sheehy

Seemingly pointless scientific research can lead to extraordinary discoveries, says physicist Suzie Sheehy. In a talk and tech demo, she shows how many of our modern technologies are tied to centuries-old, curiosity-driven experiments — and makes the case for investing in more to arrive at a deeper understanding of the world.

6h

Griffith precision measurement takes it to the limit

Griffith University researchers have demonstrated a procedure for making precise measurements of speed, acceleration, material properties and even gravity waves possible, approaching the ultimate sensitivity allowed by laws of quantum physics.

6h

Prejudice against women in power is greater than we think

People are more prejudiced against women leaders than the statistics might indicate. This could be because participants in surveys investigating attitudes towards men and women in leadership positions may not answer honestly unless they are guaranteed confidentiality of their answers. These are the findings of a new study by Adrian Hoffmann and Jochen Musch of the Heinrich-Heine-University Düsseld

6h

How 'net neutrality' became a hot-button issueSupreme Court Obama Net

For a fundamentally nerdy subject, net neutrality is pushing a lot of political buttons.

6h

Magnetic pumping pushes plasma particles to high energies

As you walk away from a campfire on a cool autumn night, you quickly feel colder. The same thing happens in outer space. As it spins, the sun continuously flings hot material into space, out to the furthest reaches of our solar system. This material, called the solar wind, is very hot close to the sun, and we expect it to cool quickly as it streams away. Satellite observations, however, show this

6h

'Dust up' on International Space Station hints at sources of structure

Imagine looking under your couch and instead of finding fluffy dust bunnies, you see the dust is arranged in straight lines—you might wonder what caused this order. Scientists are experiencing that same feeling, not with dust under a couch, but with electrically charged dust in the microgravity of space.

6h

Health professionals need support to help children of terminally ill patients

Health professionals require more guidance to prepare and support children when a parent is dying, a new study in the journal Palliative Medicine reports.

6h

New epilepsy warning device could save thousands of lives

A new high-tech bracelet, developed by scientists from the Netherlands detects 85 percent of all severe night-time epilepsy seizures. That is a much better score than any other technology currently available. The researchers involved think that this bracelet, called Nightwatch, can reduce the worldwide number of unexpected night-time fatalities in epilepsy patients. They published the results of a

6h

A hypocaloric Mediterranean diet and daily exercise maintain weight loss

Following a Mediterranean diet low in calories and engaging daily physical activity have proved to reduce body weight and cardiovascular risk in patients with overweight and metabolic syndrome, and to maintain these benefits after one year. These are the main findings of the PREDIMED-Plus trial, which have studied more than 600 patients aged between 55 and 75 years old with obesity or overweight a

6h

Could rising CO2 trigger return of eradicated mosquito-related disease?

A new study shows for the first time the impact that climate change is having on the rate in which mosquitos diversify, and what this might mean for human health in the future.

6h

New genetic cause of liver fat uncovered

New research has uncovered genetic variations that may contribute to the development of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), the leading cause of liver disease.

6h

Griffith precision measurement takes it to the limit

Griffith University researchers have demonstrated a procedure for making precise measurements of speed, acceleration, material properties and even gravity waves possible, approaching the ultimate sensitivity allowed by laws of quantum physics.

6h

Flying focus: Controlling lasers through time and space

Scientists have produced an extremely bright spot of light that can travel at any speed—including faster than the speed of light. Researchers have found a way to use this concept, called "flying focus," to move an intense laser focal point over long distances at any speed. Their technique includes capturing some of the fastest movies ever recorded.

7h

Taming plasmas: Improving fusion using microwaves

We all know microwaves are good for cooking popcorn, but scientists have recently shown they can also prevent dangerous waves in plasmas and help produce clean, nearly limitless energy with fusion. Fusion takes place when fast moving atomic particles slam into each other and stick together. The particles need to be so hot that atoms break down, leaving a gas of charged particles called a plasma. T

7h

Laser blasting antimatter into existence

Antimatter is an exotic material that vaporizes when it contacts regular matter. If you hit an antimatter baseball with a bat made of regular matter, it would explode in a burst of light. It is rare to find antimatter on Earth, but it is believed to exist in the furthest reaches of the universe. Amazingly, antimatter can be created out of thin air—scientists can create blasts of matter and antimat

7h

Inside job: A new technique to cool a fusion reactor

Fusion offers the potential of near limitless energy by heating a gas trapped in a magnetic field to incredibly high temperatures where atoms are so energetic that they fuse together when they collide. But if that hot gas, called a plasma, breaks free from the magnetic field, it must be safely put back in place to avoid damaging the fusion device—this problem has been one of the great challenges o

7h

Peak performance: new stellarator experiments show promising results

Imagine building a machine so advanced and precise you need a supercomputer to help design it. That's exactly what scientists and engineers in Germany did when building the Wendelstein 7-X experiment. The device, funded by the German federal and state governments and the European Union, is a type of fusion device called a stellarator. The new experiment's goal is to contain a super-heated gas, cal

7h

Laboratory experiments probe the formation of stars and planets

The cosmos is a void dotted with stars and an ever-increasing number of newly-observed planets beyond our solar system. Yet, how these stars and planets formed out of clouds of interstellar dust and gas remains mysterious.

7h

A faster, cheaper path to fusion energy

Scientists are working to dramatically speed up the development of fusion energy in an effort to deliver power to the electric grid soon enough to help mitigate impacts of climate change. The arrival of a breakthrough technology—high-temperature superconductors, which can be used to build magnets that produce stronger magnetic fields than previously possible—could help them achieve this goal. Rese

7h

A stellar achievement: Magnetized space winds in the laboratory

New insights have been gained about stellar winds, streams of high-speed charged particles called plasma that blow through interstellar space. These winds, created by eruptions from stars or stellar explosions, carry with them strong magnetic fields which can interact with or effect other magnetic fields, such as those that surround planets like Earth. Our own sun produces such a stellar wind call

7h

Ground-penetrating radar reveals potential mass grave sites from the Holocaust

Researchers recently used ground penetrating radar to locate an unmarked, potential mass grave site in Lithuania, according to a new study. The work aims to amass evidence that points to the likely locations of mass graves from the Holocaust and, in time, award federal distinction to the areas in the form of memorials.

7h

Happy childhood memories linked to better health later in life

People who have fond memories of childhood, specifically their relationships with their parents, tend to have better health, less depression and fewer chronic illnesses as older adults.

7h

A carbon neutral solution for desalination? Maybe so by tapping into geothermal

Water shortages are hitting some areas of the world hard, and with increasing global temperatures, more regions may be experiencing drought conditions.

7h

Enhanced views of Earth tectonics

Scientists from Germany's Kiel University and British Antarctic Survey (BAS) have used data from the European Space Agency (ESA), Gravity field and steady-state Ocean Circulation Explorer (GOCE) mission to unveil key geological features of the Earth's lithosphere — the rigid outer layer that includes the crust and the upper mantle.

7h

Prejudice against women in power is greater than we think

People are more prejudiced against women leaders than the statistics might indicate. This could be because participants in surveys investigating attitudes towards men and women in leadership positions may not answer honestly unless they are guaranteed confidentiality of their answers. These are the findings of a new study by Adrian Hoffmann and Jochen Musch of the Heinrich-Heine-University Düsseld

7h

Peers, student attitudes, and student deviance in Japan and the United States

This study presents evidence on the cross-cultural generalizability of differential association/social learning theory. It does so by testing whether the causal processes of learning attitudes toward deviance, as posited by the theory, are equally applicable, and the causal links, as specified by the theory, are equally strong in Japan and the US. Analyses of comparable survey data from students i

7h

The reasons for hemispheric dominance in the brain

The left and the right hemispheres specialise in different tasks. However, it has not yet been fully understood how one hemisphere assumes dominance over the other when it comes to controlling specific functions. Biopsychologists at Ruhr-Universität Bochum describe their latest findings in the journal Cell Reports, published online on 30 October 2018. They have demonstrated in pigeons that the dom

7h

Air pollution linked to autism: study

Exposure to toxic air pollutants is linked to an increased risk of developing autism, according to a Monash University study of Chinese children during their first three-years of life.

7h

Is foraging behavior regulated the same way in humans and worms?

How does our nervous system motivate us to get off the sofa and walk to the fridge, or even to the supermarket, to get food? A research team led by Alexander Gottschalk from Goethe University investigated this using the threadworm Caenorhabditis elegans. The results indicate how foraging behavior in higher animals might have evolved.

7h

Inside job: A new technique to cool a fusion reactor

Fusion offers the potential of near limitless energy by heating a gas trapped in a magnetic field to incredibly high temperatures where atoms are so energetic that they fuse together when they collide. But if that hot gas, called a plasma, breaks free from the magnetic field, it must be safely put back in place to avoid damaging the fusion device — this problem has been one of the great challenge

7h

A stellar achievement: Magnetized space winds in the laboratory

New insights have been gained about stellar winds, streams of high-speed charged particles called plasma that blow through interstellar space. These winds, created by eruptions from stars or stellar explosions, carry with them strong magnetic fields which can interact with or effect other magnetic fields, such as those that surround planets like Earth. To understand these processes, researchers ar

7h

Flying focus: Controlling lasers through time and space

Scientists have produced an extremely bright spot of light that can travel at any speed — including faster than the speed of light. Researchers have found a way to use this concept, called 'flying focus,' to move an intense laser focal point over long distances at any speed. Their technique includes capturing some of the fastest movies ever recorded.

7h

Taming plasmas: Improving fusion using microwaves

We all know microwaves are good for cooking popcorn, but scientists have recently shown they can also prevent dangerous waves in plasmas and help produce clean, nearly limitless energy with fusion. Fusion takes place when fast moving atomic particles slam into each other and stick together. The particles need to be so hot that atoms break down, leaving a gas of charged particles called a plasma.

7h

Laser blasting antimatter into existence

Antimatter is an exotic material that vaporizes when it contacts regular matter. If you hit an antimatter baseball with a bat made of regular matter, it would explode in a burst of light. It is rare to find antimatter on Earth, but it is believed to exist in the furthest reaches of the universe. Amazingly, antimatter can be created out of thin air…

7h

Laboratory experiments probe the formation of stars and planets

The cosmos is a void dotted with stars and an ever-increasing number of newly-observed planets beyond our solar system. Yet, how these stars and planets formed out of clouds of interstellar dust and gas remains mysterious. The study of black holes provides clues that could help solve this mystery.

7h

A faster, cheaper path to fusion energy

Scientists are working to dramatically speed up the development of fusion energy in an effort to deliver power to the electric grid soon enough to help mitigate impacts of climate change. The arrival of a breakthrough technology — high-temperature superconductors, which can be used to build magnets that produce stronger magnetic fields than previously possible — could help them achieve this goal

7h

Peak performance: new stellarator experiments show promising results

Imagine building a machine so advanced and precise you need a supercomputer to help design it. That's exactly what scientists and engineers in Germany did when building the Wendelstein 7-X experiment. The device, funded by the German federal and state governments and the European Union, is a type of fusion device called a stellarator. The new experiment's goal is to contain a super-heated gas, cal

7h

Magnetic pumping pushes plasma particles to high energies

The solar wind is not a calm summer breeze. Instead, it is a roiling, chaotic mess of turbulence and waves. There is a lot of energy stored in this turbulence, so scientists have long thought that it heats the solar wind. However, the heating expected from turbulence is not the heating observed. Scientists at the University of Wisconsin — Madison have a new idea about what heats the solar wind, a

7h

'Dust up' on International Space Station hints at sources of structure

In a lab on Earth, electrically charged dust generally lines up either along the downward pull of gravity or across it. Scientists at the Center for Astrophysics, Space Physics, and Engineering Research (CASPER), at Baylor University, got a surprise when examining data from a similar experiment on the International Space Station orbiting 248 miles above Earth. Rather than the dust bouncing around

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7h

Læger protesterer imod at bevare akutklinikker

Region Hovedstaden har besluttet, at de mindre akutklinikker skal bevares. Det vækker bekymring hos 21 overlæger, der er sendt et åbent protestbrev.

7h

HPV-debat fik færre til at lade deres børn vaccinere

Debat om sikkerhed ved HPV-vaccine skabte især usikkerhed hos forældre, der normalt gerne vil lade deres børn vaccinere.

7h

Does a collaborative learning approach work for everyone?

There's a good reason why universities have spent the last few years dedicating precious resources and time to fostering a collaborative learning environment. Students who are encouraged to participate in discussions, work cooperatively in small-group settings, and actively engage with their peers are believed to gain not only the cognitive skills needed to survive in the professional workplace, b

7h

Scientists propose panel to guide gene-editing decisions regarding conservation

Scientists say an international oversight panel is needed to guide decisions about whether and when to employ gene-editing technology to solve ecological problems.

7h

Wealthier people do less in the struggle against climate change

A collective-risk dilemma experiment with members of the public in Barcelona has shown that people are more or less likely to contribute money to fighting climate change depending on their how wealthy they are. And the results indicate that participants with fewer resources were prepared to contribute significantly more to the public good than wealthier people, sometimes up to twice as much.

7h

Sitting is NOT the new smoking, contrary to popular myth

No, sitting is not the new smoking, despite what countless newspaper articles have peddled in recent years.

7h

Breakthrough for treatment of fibrotic diseases

A drug combination has potential to halt a process responsible for large numbers of deaths.

7h

Dinosaur world 'more colourful than we thought'

Coloured eggs evolved millions of years ago in the dinosaurs and may have functioned as camouflage.

7h

VRTIGO lets you test your nerves in virtual reality

Why do some people react more strongly than others when faced with the unknown? Researchers at EPFL's Laboratory of Behavioral Genetics, headed by Professor Carmen Sandi, have set out to learn more with a new virtual reality program. Their system evaluates how users' personality traits and prior experience influence their responses to anxiety-inducing situations. Designed to be tested on a large s

7h

Supreme Court rejects net neutrality appeal

The Supreme Court has ended the court fight over repealed Obama-era "net neutrality" rules that required internet providers to treat all online traffic equally.

7h

National Politics Has Taken Over America

F LAGSTAFF, Ariz. —After the 2016 election, Anna French gave up on politics. The 28-year-old had been in the Javits Center in New York City on election night to hear Hillary Clinton give her victory speech. She was deeply involved in nonprofit circles focused on women’s rights and international development; she and her friends had spent the months leading up to the election trading updates about

7h

Viruses may not be as symmetrical as scientists thought

New research may overturn long-held assumptions about the structure of viruses like dengue and Zika. Determining the structure of a virus is an important step in understanding and treating viral disease. For decades, structural biologists have been using cryo-electron microscopy to create increasingly accurate pictures of biomolecules. Scientists assumed that flaviviruses were symmetrical icosahe

7h

Could rising carbon dioxide levels trigger return of eradicated mosquito-related disease?

Research mapping the evolution of mosquitos against rising CO2 levels over millions of years, has suggested that more mosquito-related diseases could have consequences for future human health, as the climate continues to change.

7h

Forsker og kok: Vi skal spise flere blæksprutter her nordpå

I jagten på proteinkilder til fremtiden er blæksprutten et udmærket bud. Vi skal blot ind i vanen, heroppe i Nordeuropa, lyder det fra dansk professor og kok.

7h

I Took 9 Different Commercial DNA Tests and Got 6 Different Results

Experts explained that the companies aren't really doing science, so it's not surprising that they produce different results.

7h

Saber-toothed cats with oral injuries ate softer foods

Saber-toothed cats, the large felid predators that once roamed Southern California, may have eaten softer foods after suffering oral injuries, according to a new study. Microscopic damage patterns on teeth from fossilized cats show the injured predators transitioned to seeking softer prey, like flesh instead of bone, which healthy cats may have provided for them, according to the study.

7h

Evidence of outburst flooding indicates plentiful water on early Mars

The presence of water on Mars has been theorized for centuries. Early telescopes revealed ice caps, and early astronomers noted channels that were hypothesized to be natural rivers or creature-created canals.

7h

Want to tackle climate change? Tackle your food waste first

What do Australians love more than food? Wasting it. Here's how we can change.

7h

What's the secret to the perfect Italian pizza?

It's settled. A new study has found out what the special something is that makes a perfect pizza.

7h

Verizon reorganizes structure under new CEO to prep for 5G

Verizon is undergoing a significant restructuring under new CEO Hans Vestberg, including its dominant wireless division, as it prepares to roll out its 5G technology.

7h

Aarhus Universitet henter adjungeret professor i neuropsykiatri

Andrew Harkin bliver fast tilknyttet Institut for Klinisk Medicin på Aarhus Universitet.

8h

Strict Amazon protections made Brazilian farmers more productive, new research shows

Jair Bolsonaro, Brazil's new president, will make many decisions during his four-year term, from combating violence to stimulating a stagnant economy.

8h

No Evidence Russian Engineer Stabbed Antarctica Colleague for Spoiling Book Endings

However, tension at the isolated research station did erupt in violence, landing one man in the hospital and the other in police custody.

8h

How to prevent carbon monoxide poisoning, winter's odorless killer

DIY When the furnace turns on, the risk increases. Carbon monoxide poisonings happen most commonly in winter, when we seal up our homes and burn extra fuel for warmth. Here’s how to keep the deadly gas out of your…

8h

Fern plant infusion keeps the doctor away in Medieval Europe

The remains of a medieval skeleton has shown the first physical evidence that a fern plant could have been used for medicinal purposes in cases such as alopecia, dandruff and kidney stones.

8h

Development of a new fungal production platform C1 for vaccines and therapeutic proteins

VTT and Dyadic International, Inc. today announced that VTT scientists will present the excellent results in their collaboration over the past two years at two international conferences: AAPS PharmSci on November 7th in Washington, D.C., and PEGS Europe on November 14th in Lisbon.

8h

Alcohols as carbon radical precursors

Alcohols play a pivotal role in organic synthesis because they are ubiquitous and can be used in a variety of well-established transformations. However, in C-C bond formation reactions, despite being central to organic synthesis, alcohols are mostly employed in an indirect fashion. Many alcohol-based reactions necessitate tedious pre-transformation of the hydroxy group (C-OH) to other functional g

8h

An extremely large hole has been dug for the Extremely Large Telescope

All over the world, some truly groundbreaking telescopes are being built that will usher in a new age of astronomy. Sites include the mountain of Mauna Kea in Hawaii, Australia, South Africa, southwestern China, and the Atacama Desert – a remote plateau in the Chilean Andes. In this extremely dry environment, multiple arrays are being built that will allow astronomers to see farther into the cosmo

8h

Even a few bots can shift public opinion in big waysDonald Trump H. Clinton

Nearly two-thirds of the social media bots with political activity on Twitter before the 2016 U.S. presidential election supported Donald Trump. But all those Trump bots were far less effective at shifting people's opinions than the smaller proportion of bots backing Hillary Clinton. As my recent research shows, a small number of highly active bots can significantly change people's political opini

8h

Ready for its close-up—a bacterium's electron transport pathway

In a recent study conducted by Hongri Gong and colleagues, a respiratory supercomplex was isolated from the bacterium Mycobacterium smegmatis, and its structure was visualized at a resolution of 3.5 Å using cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM). The bacterium is a close relative to M. tuberculosis and a popular model used to study many other bacterial species. The detailed structure revealed how elec

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Most women with incontinence skip the doctor

Nearly half of women older than 50 say they are sometimes incontinent—a problem that can range from a minor nuisance to a major issue, according to a new poll. Yet two-thirds of these women have not talked to a doctor about the sometimes embarrassing, little-discussed issue. And only 38 percent said they do exercises that can strengthen the muscles that can help. Of more than 1,000 women between

8h

Skin gel allows wounds to heal without leaving a scar

A team of researchers at Huazhong University of Science and Technology has developed a silk protein-based gel that they claim allows for skin healing without scarring. In their paper published in the journal Biomaterials Science, the group describes their gel and how well it works.

8h

Enhanced views of Earth tectonics

Scientists from Germany's Kiel University and British Antarctic Survey (BAS) have used data from the European Space Agency (ESA), Gravity field and steady-state Ocean Circulation Explorer (GOCE) mission to unveil key geological features of the Earth's lithosphere – the rigid outer layer that includes the crust and the upper mantle.

8h

Red-hued yeasts hold clues to producing better biofuels

A compound that has scientists seeing red may hold the key to engineering yeasts that produce better biofuels.

8h

Happy childhood memories linked to better health later in life

People who have fond memories of childhood, specifically their relationships with their parents, tend to have better health, less depression and fewer chronic illnesses as older adults, according to research published by the American Psychological Association.

8h

A carbon neutral solution for desalination? Maybe so by tapping into geothermal

Water shortages are hitting some areas of the world hard, and with increasing global temperatures, more regions may be experiencing drought conditions.

8h

The reasons for hemispheric dominance in the brain

The left and the right hemispheres specialise in different tasks. However, it has not yet been fully understood how one hemisphere assumes dominance over the other when it comes to controlling specific functions. Biopsychologists at Ruhr-Universität Bochum describe their latest findings in the journal Cell Reports, published online on 30 October 2018. Dr. Qian Xiao and Professor Onur Güntürkün hav

8h

How to certify a quantum computer

Quantum computers are being developed by teams working not only at universities but also at Google, IBM, Microsoft and D-Wave, a start-up company. And things are evolving quickly, says Nicolas Sangouard, SNSF Professor at the University of Basel. "In a few years at most, I expect the computing power of quantum computers to significantly outstrip the computing power of ordinary computers. We call t

8h

Researchers observe unique interlayer state in a bilayer heterostructure

Scientists at the U.S. Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) have fabricated a bilayer structure comprised of two different monolayer materials, and observed a unique electronic state formed by the interaction between these two layers.

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Nanoplatelets improve LCD and LED screens

Researchers at the Physical and Analytical Chemistry department of the Universitat Jaume I (UJI) of Castellón, Spain, have taken part in the design of semiconductor nanoplatelets with a broadened range of colours to improve LCD and LED screens, thanks to an international collaboration headed by the University of Ghent. The results of this research, in which the ICFO-Barcelona and the Italian Techn

8h

How life could help atmospheric tides slow a planet's rotation

Resonating oscillations of a planet's atmosphere caused by gravitational tides and heating from its star could prevent a planet's rotation from steadily slowing over time, according to new research by Caleb Scharf, who is the Director of Astrobiology at Columbia University. His findings suggest that the effect is enhanced for a planet with an atmosphere that has been oxygenated by life, and the re

8h

Remedy against superbacteria found in crowberry

Researchers in Oulu have found small fragments of an antibacterial protein, also known as peptides, in a microbe living in crowberry. The peptide is able to destroy bacteria that cause infections. Based on the peptide, a protective coating for medical instruments used at hospitals is now being developed as part of the war against the spreading of antibiotic resistance.

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Removing multi-resistant bacteria from sewage

Multi-resistant bacteria have learned to survive treatments with antibiotics by developing defense mechanisms. Not all of them are dangerous for human beings. Still, these bacteria are able to transmit their resistance genes to disease-causing pathogens. In this way, the number of resistant germs increases in the environment. "When the bacteria spread, people have contact with them more often. If

8h

Study shows that mothers prefer daughters and fathers prefer sons

Finnish and American researchers in evolutionary biology conducted an online experiment and survey revealing that women prefer and are more likely to invest in their daughters and men in their sons. The study was designed to test the impact of parental resources on offspring sex preferences.

8h

Terrorism studies and the struggle for primary data

From the 1980s to the present day, many of the field's most influential scholars have lamented that a majority of articles rely on literature review-based methodologies and do not present any new, first-hand insights. Instead of authors talking with (former) terrorists, perusing the archives of counterterrorism agencies, administering psychological tests to extremists, or engaging in fieldwork, th

8h

More protection: UN says Earth's ozone layer is healing

Earth's protective ozone layer is finally healing from damage caused by aerosol sprays and coolants, a new United Nations report said.

8h

'Total disaster' as Italy storms kill at least 30

Floods killed 12 people on the island of Sicily, including nine members of a single family, pushing Italy's week-long storm toll beyond 30, rescuers said Sunday.

8h

Fagforeninger vil mindske masseafskedigelser i Region Sjælland

21 faglige organisationer i Region Sjælland forsøger i fælles erklæring at mindske antallet af fyringer i Region Sjælland.

8h

46 praksislæger fortsætter trods varslet ophør

46 praksislæger, der grundet akkreditering havde meldt ophør ved udgangen af august 2019, gør brug af en politisk særaftale og fortsætter. Det viser en opgørelse fra Danske Regioner. Resultatet vækker glæde hos PLO og RLTN, der står bag aftalen, men betyder samtidig, at almen praksis mister i omegnen af et halvt hundrede læger i løbet af de næste ti måneder.

8h

Galaxy NGC 3319 may host an active intermediate-mass black hole, study finds

Chinese astronomers report new findings regarding the central region of a nearby galaxy known as NGC 3319. The researchers found an active intermediate-mass black hole candidate residing in the center of this galaxy. The discovery is detailed in a paper published October 24 on the arXiv pre-print server.

8h

Ground-penetrating radar reveals potential mass grave sites from the Holocaust

Researchers recently used ground penetrating radar to locate an unmarked, potential mass grave site in Lithuania, according to a new study that will be presented at The Geological Society of America's 2018 Annual Meeting in Indianapolis, Indiana, on Sunday, 4 November. The work aims to amass evidence that points to the likely locations of mass graves from the Holocaust and, in time, award federal

8h

Scientists propose panel to guide gene-editing decisions regarding conservation

Scientists from 10 universities say an international oversight panel is needed to guide decisions about whether and when to employ gene-editing technology to solve ecological problems.

8h

Fern plant infusion keeps the doctor away in Medieval Europe

The remains of a medieval skeleton has shown the first physical evidence that a fern plant could have been used for medicinal purposes in cases such as alopecia, dandruff and kidney stones.

8h

Star Wars News: Boba Fett Is Dead (Again)

And apparently, the Mandalorian is taking his place. Kind of.

8h

Algorithms Designed to Fight Poverty Can Actually Make It Worse

How algorithms designed to alleviate poverty can perpetuate it instead — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

8h

People in Canada have good health, are living longer: Global Burden of Disease Study trends

Data from the Global Burden of Disease Study shows that the overall health of Canadians is good and is consistent with other similar countries, and people are living longer with diseases.

8h

New device improves balance in veterans with Gulf War Illness

Gulf War veterans with unexplained illnesses that cause fatigue, headaches, respiratory disorders and memory problems can improve their balance with a new device.

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Advance stem cell therapy with biodegradable scaffold

Scientists have created a tiny, biodegradable scaffold to transplant stem cells and deliver drugs, which may help treat Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases, aging brain degeneration, spinal cord injuries and traumatic brain injuries. Stem cell transplantation, which shows promise as a treatment for central nervous system diseases, has been hampered by low cell survival rates, incomplete different

8h

Music improves social communication in autistic children

Improved communication skills may be linked to increased connectivity between auditory and motor regions of the brain, researchers find.

8h

New material cleans and splits water

Researchers have developed a photocatalytic system based on a material in the class of metal-organic frameworks. The system can be used to degrade pollutants present in water while simultaneously producing hydrogen that can be captured and used further.

8h

Corals produce molecules that can help resist disease

Scientists report that corals, though they are stationary organisms, can alter their surroundings by producing unique molecules that can help recruit healthy microbiomes and fight parasitic microbes.

8h

Ancient quarry ramp system may have helped workers build Egypt's Great Pyramids

University of Liverpool academics have discovered what may be the remains of a 4,500 year old ramp system to transport the huge alabaster blocks used in the construction of Egypt's Great Pyramids.

8h

Shortening the rare-earth supply chain via recycling

Modern technology depends on a set of 17 elements at the foot of the periodic table. Known as rare earths (REs), many of these metals are highly magnetic, and find use in computing, green power and other technologies. However, because of rising prices, legal issues and the difficulty of mining, safeguarding their supply is a major scientific and political challenge.

9h

Exploring the structure and properties of new graphene-like polymers

A team of scientists from Siberian Federal University (SibFU), together with foreign colleagues, described the structural and physical properties of a group of two-dimensional materials based on polycyclic molecules called circulenes. The possibility of flexible design and variable properties of these materials make them suitable for nanoelectronics. The results are published in the Journal of Phy

9h

Saber-toothed cats with oral injuries ate softer foods than their uninjured counterparts

Saber-toothed cats, the large felid predators that once roamed Southern California, may have eaten softer foods after suffering oral injuries, according to a new study. Microscopic damage patterns on teeth from fossilized cats show the injured predators transitioned to seeking softer prey, like flesh instead of bone, which healthy cats may have provided for them, according to the study.

9h

Does dietary restriction protect against age-related leaky gut?

Flies on dietary restriction are protected from leaky gut and systemic inflammation as they age. Conversely, flies on a rich diet are more prone to intestinal permeability, developing gaps in the intestinal barrier which are caused by an age-related increase in the death of intestinal epithelial cells. Researchers also looked at dysbiosis as a contributor to leaky gut and concluded that diet may u

9h

Existing laser technology could be fashioned into Earth's 'porch light' to attract alien astronomers

If extraterrestrial intelligence exists somewhere in our galaxy, a new MIT study proposes that laser technology on Earth could, in principle, be fashioned into something of a planetary porch light—a beacon strong enough to attract attention from as far as 20,000 light years away.

9h

Zebrafish identify virtual shoal partners based on motion patterns typical of their species

What does it take for a fish to recognise another fish? Scientists from the Max Planck Institute of Neurobiology in Martinsried show, that a simple dot, animated in specific way, is sufficient to trigger shoaling.

9h

Image: Polar lights on Uranus

On the first day of the 15th annual European Space Weather Week, this image from the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope fittingly shows a striking occurrence of celestial weather in the outer reaches of the Solar System: an aurora on Uranus.

9h

Dust production in evolved exoplanetary systems

Stellar variability has long offered insights into stars' physical properties. The star Mira (Omicron Ceti), for example, was so-named in 1596 by Dutch astronomers who were amazed by its miraculous brightening because of what we now know to be due to periodic changes in its size and temperature. Much less dramatic variability can also be caused when a star has a disk of dust that occasionally bloc

9h

Nanorobots propel through the eye

Researchers of the Micro, Nano and Molecular Systems Lab at the Max Planck Institute for Intelligent Systems in Stuttgart, together with an international team of scientists, have developed propeller-shaped nanorobots that, for the first time, are able to drill through dense tissue as is prevalent in an eye. They applied a non-stick coating to the nanopropellers, which are only 500 nm wide – exactl

9h

Children in foster care at educational disadvantage

Many of the 48,000 Australian children in foster care may struggle to reach national literacy and numeracy benchmarks, could be at higher risk than their peers of becoming disengaged with schooling, being suspended or expelled, and may struggle long-term with social and economic disadvantage, a QUT study has revealed.

9h

New material cleans and splits water

Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) are among the most useful and versatile materials today, demonstrating structural versatility, high porosity, and fascinating optical and electronic properties. These characteristics make them promising candidates for a variety of applications, including gas capture and separation, sensors and photocatalysts.

9h

One step closer to complex quantum teleportation

The experimental mastery of complex quantum systems is required for future technologies like quantum computers and quantum encryption. Scientists from the University of Vienna and the Austrian Academy of Sciences have broken new ground. They sought to use more complex quantum systems than two-dimensionally entangled qubits and thus can increase the information capacity with the same number of part

9h

A new report shows the ozone hole is healing, but it's not all good news

Environment Despite mostly positive changes, a scientific assessment of the Montreal Protocol shows how we still need to do better. A three decades old international treaty to phase out chemicals that deplete the ozone layer protecting our planet from harmful solar radiation is paying off. Thanks to…

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9h

Genome-wide rules of nucleosome phasing in drosophila

LMU researchers have, for the first time, systematically determined the positioning of the packing units of the fruit fly genome and discovered a new protein that defines their relationship to the DNA sequence.

9h

Training with states of matter search algorithm enables neuron model pruning

Artificial neural networks are machine learning systems composed of a large number of connected nodes called artificial neurons. Similar to the neurons in a biological brain, these artificial neurons are the primary basic units that are used to perform neural computations and solve problems. Advances in neurobiology have illustrated the important role played by dendritic cell structures in neural

9h

The Ghosts of the 1960s Haunt the Georgia Governor’s Race

ATLANTA—Virtually every inch of the Forbes Arena at Morehouse College here was filled on Friday night when former President Barack Obama headlined a raucous campaign rally for Stacey Abrams, the Democrat who’s bidding to become Georgia’s first black governor. But amid the mass of supporters, who filled the place to the rafters in every direction, the crowded hall still had room for a flock of gho

9h

Jack Reacher Still Won’t Quit, 23 Books Later

You’re on a plane. You’re on a train. You’re wheeling through American space, and you’re feeling it: the hum of the void, the up-for-grabs-ness of it all. Out here there’s no protection. Good customer service, if you’re lucky, but no protection. Out here there is only the crackling feral mind: dominance, appetite, predation, pitiless allegiance to the pack. Who are you going to read, in this cond

9h

Fern plant infusion may have kept the doctor away in Medieval Europe

The remains of a medieval skeleton has shown the first physical evidence that a fern plant could have been used for medicinal purposes in cases such as alopecia, dandruff and kidney stones.

9h

Image: Hubble finds smiling face in a hunt for newborn stars

This image, taken with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope's Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3), shows a patch of space filled with galaxies of all shapes, colors and sizes, many of which belong to the galaxy cluster SDSS J0952+3434.

9h

Ground-penetrating radar reveals potential mass grave sites from the Holocaust in Lithuania

Researchers recently used ground penetrating radar to locate an unmarked, potential mass grave site in Lithuania, according to a new study that will be presented at The Geological Society of America's 2018 Annual Meeting in Indianapolis, Indiana, on Sunday, 4 November. The work aims to amass evidence that points to the likely locations of mass graves from the Holocaust and, in time, award federal

9h

Carbon neutral solution for desalination: Tapping into geothermal sources

Water shortages are hitting some areas of the world hard, and with increasing global temperatures, more regions may be experiencing drought conditions.

9h

Evidence of outburst flooding indicates plentiful water on early Mars

The presence of water on Mars has been theorized for centuries. Early telescopes revealed ice caps, and early astronomers noted channels that were hypothesized to be natural rivers or creature-created canals.

9h

What the Boston School Bus Schedule Can Teach Us About AI

An MIT team built an algorithm to optimize bell times and bus routes. The furor around the plan offers lessons in how we talk to people when we talk to them about artificial intelligence.

9h

Image of the Day: Bright Idea

Researchers flipped light-sensitive proteins upside down for a new twist on optogenetics.

9h

Spørg Fagfolket: Hvorfor skifter trafiklyset mellem rød og grøn, når der ikke er nogen biler?

En læser undrer sig over, at trafiklyset pludselig skifter til rødt i kort tid med jævne mellemrum. Hvorfor er der ikke bare grønt, hvis der ikke kommer nogen fra den anden side? Det svarer Teknik og Miljø i Aarhus på.

9h

NICE should change antibiotic guidelines for dental patients — study shows

New research has revealed the impact a change in US guidelines had on the prescribing of antibiotic prophylaxis (AP) to prevent a life-threatening heart condition infective endocarditis (IE) in patients before undergoing invasive dental treatment.

9h

Don’t teach kids – I’ve shown their hive mind can learn on its own

Educationalist Sugata Mitra's pioneering experiments suggest teaching facts doesn't work in the internet age – fostering creativity and collaboration is the key

10h

New Supercomputer with 1 Million Processors Is World's Fastest Brain-Mimicking Machine

A supercomputer that "thinks" like a brain can simulate neural activity in real time.

10h

The Problem With Being Perfect

When the psychologist Jessica Pryor lived near an internationally renowned university, she once saw a student walking into a library holding a sleeping bag and a coffee maker. She’s heard of grad students spending 12 to 18 hours at a time in the lab. Their schedules are meant to be literally punishing: If they’re scientists-in-training, they won’t allow themselves to watch Netflix until their exp

10h

Dear Therapist: I Don’t Talk to My Dad Anymore, but I’m Afraid to Tell My Family Why

Editor’s Note: Every Monday, Lori Gottlieb answers questions from readers about their problems, big and small. Have a question? Email her at dear.therapist@theatlantic.com . Dear Therapist, My parents divorced when I was very young, and afterward my father began sexually abusing me, which went on for years. I never told anyone in my family, and once I moved away from home I cut all contact with m

10h

Dogma-free meditation for calming your mind

Damien Echols was wrongfully imprisoned and put on death row for 18 years. He credits dogma-free meditation with helping him stay sane during that difficult time. Keeping your mind in the present moment requires practice, but mastering meditation of any kind can show clear medical benefits like lowered blood pressure and better sleep. Damien's meditation technique of choice was Magick, or what he

10h

'Broken-Heart' Syndrome Is Real. This Complication Makes It Deadly.

People who experience a rare condition known as "broken-heart syndrome" need immediate medical attention, but often make a quick recovery.

10h

The Seafloor Is Dissolving Away. And Humans Are to Blame.

Climate change reaches all the way to the bottom of the sea.

10h

After a Zombie Apocalypse, Here Are 9 Keys to Rebuilding a Civilization

Do you know what it takes to rebuild a civilization, after the undead have wreaked havoc?

10h

How Antivax PACs Helped Shape Midterm Ballots

With political action committees, the modern antivaccine movement is taking its fight for medical freedoms to the campaign trail. And that has public health experts worried.

10h

MoveOn Is Trying to Sway the Midterms With Facebook Ads

The progressive group wants to swing the 2018 elections with a strategy that bears some resemblance to Cambridge Analytica's.

10h

Keeping Kids with Developmental Differences Safe

Many families don’t realize how many resources are available to help them — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

10h

Testing Our Assumptions

It’s crucial to measure what we believe against reality, whether we’re talking about climate models or presidents. Now it's time to vote. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

10h

3D-printteknologi rykker – men ikke som eksperterne troede

Hjemmeprintet legetøj og økonomisk opsving er udeblevet. Til gengæld bliver der 3D-printet ude i rummet og på byggepladserne.

10h

States Put Science and Health on Election Day Ballots

Statewide proposals on ways to tackle greenhouse gases, renewable energy and Medicaid expansion will be voted up or down on Tuesday — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

10h

Iran fandt CIA's kommunikationsnetværk med Google-søgning

Iran var i 2009 i stand til at optrevle sider, som CIA benyttede til at kommunikere med kilder, ved at søge på Google. Teknikken blev delt med andre lande og fik fatale følger for 30 amerikanske agenter.

10h

Shakespeares samlede værker gemt i Twitter-profilbillede

Metoden har ingen sikkerhedsmæssig betydning, men kan bruges til hemmelig distribution, mener sikkerhedsforsker.

10h

Does dietary restriction protect against age-related leaky gut?

Flies on dietary restriction are protected from leaky gut and systemic inflammation as they age. Conversely, flies on a rich diet are more prone to intestinal permeability, developing gaps in the intestinal barrier which are caused by an age-related increase in the death of intestinal epithelial cells. Researchers also looked at dysbiosis as a contributor to leaky gut and concluded that diet may u

11h

New material cleans and splits water

Researchers at EPFL's Institute of Chemical Sciences and Engineering have developed a photocatalytic system based on a material in the class of metal-organic frameworks. The system can be used to degrade pollutants present in water while simultaneously producing hydrogen that can be captured and used further.

11h

New NYU Abu Dhabi research suggests corals produce molecules that can help resist disease

In a new study published in Communications Biology, NYU Abu Dhabi Assistant Professor of Biology Shady Amin, along with Philippe Schmitt-Kopplin from the Helmholtz Center Munich, report that corals, though they are stationary organisms, can alter their surroundings by producing unique molecules that can help recruit healthy microbiomes and fight parasitic microbes.

11h

Norge vil fodre laks med sukkertang i stedet for sojaprotein fra Sydamerika

Ligesom Danmark lægger Norges sojaimport beslag på et enormt landområde i Sydamerika. Sukkertang kan blive løsningen, men kræver nytænkning.

11h

Techtopia #77: Din mavesæk er fuld af data

Du har hørt om big data, men et af de største datasæt ligger i din mavesæk. Bakterier lever overalt i og på vores krop, men hvordan lærer vi vores gæster at kende?

11h

The President’s Lies

President Trump’s low regard for the truth is, by now, well established. Yet his penchant for lying, about matters large and small, seems to be intensifying on the eve of a crucial election. The Washington Post’s fact-checkers published their latest compilation two days ago, tallying 6,420 false or misleading claims in 649 days in office. That works out to almost 10 falsehoods a day. The presiden

11h

Something’s Happening in Texas

This year I voted in Texas for the first time. It was complicated. Registering to vote was simple enough. The post office had a form I could print out with my personal information and change of address. Because I don’t own a car, I had to Lyft to the Bexar County Elections Department and turn in my registration. Although I was more than a week ahead of the deadline, the sheer number of new regist

11h

San Francisco’s Mayor Opposes Proposition C for the Homeless

San Francisco voters will decide in Tuesday’s election the fate of Proposition C, a measure that could generate $300 million in additional services for the homeless by increasing corporate taxes on the largest companies in the city. Contrary to expectations in one of the country’s most liberal cities, some progressive leaders are urging residents to vote no. Historically, San Francisco has been a

11h

How Far Have the Democrats Moved to the Left?

The future of the Democratic Party looks a lot like Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez. Once it was the party of patrician liberals like Franklin Roosevelt; now women, people of color, and voters in big cities are the demographics at the heart of the party. The question is whether the future of the Democratic Party votes like Ocasio-Cortez, a self-described Democratic socialist. Her June victory over incum

11h

The Witches of Baltimore

“We may not be Christian here, but we still pray,” said a woman dressed entirely in white as she addressed a large audience of African American women. Standing behind a lectern, speaking in the cadences of a preacher, she added, “I understand God more now, doing what I’m doing, than I ever did in the Church.” The call and response that followed (“No one’s going to protect us but who?” “Us!”) was

11h

The Blackfeet Brain Drain

I grew up on the high-elevation plains of northwest Montana, on the Blackfeet Indian Reservation, in a culture in which English did not become the dominant language until the middle part of the 20th century. Leaving to attend the University of Montana in the mid-1990s, after receiving a tuition waiver the summer following my senior year of high school, marked my first time living away from our re

11h

iPad Pro (2018) Review: Almost a Laptop Killer

Apple's new tablet gets closer to a PC than ever before.

11h

A mashup of yeast and E. coli shows how mitochondria might have evolved

An engineered partnership between yeast and E. coli suggests one way mitochondria may have evolved.

11h

Q&A: In Ports Everywhere, It’s Push Versus Pull

It’s more efficient for tugboats to nudge barges along, but some conditions require that the loads be towed.

11h

The New Health Care: Peer Review: The Worst Way to Judge Research, Except for All the Others

A look at the system’s weaknesses, and possible ways to combat them.

11h

New research suggests corals produce molecules that can help resist disease

Corals' resistance to disease is highly dependent on their ability to maintain healthy surface microbiomes, a community of microorganisms, such as bacteria and fungi. For several years, it has been shown that corals harbor unique microbes at their surfaces, but the mechanisms of how this community is recruited and maintained were not known. In a new study published in Communications Biology, NYU A

11h

Ambitiøse sundhedsprojekter overser familiers travle hverdag

Der bliver søsat mange sundhedsprojekter, som skal hjælpe børnefamilier med at få…

11h

Pionercentre skal føre Danmark helt til tops i forskning

Med fordelingen af forskningsreserven er afsat 180 mio. kr. til såkaldte pionercentre. Forhandlinger med private fonde skal løfte dette beløb markant. Helt afgørende bliver at finde den rette leder.

11h

Feeling the need for speed, neutrons study fluid flow for hypersonic flight

One of the grand challenges in aerospace engineering is the development of hypersonic vehicles capable of traveling at or above Mach 5—about 4,000 miles per hour or faster. However, liquid fuel combustion at those speeds and atmospheric conditions is not well understood.

11h

Bioeconomies aim to become a beating heart of local communities, both rural and urban

As the EU aims to head towards a sustainable, low-carbon future, experts in bio-based industries at the forefront of this transition are turning food waste and waste-water sludge into bioplastics and converting decommissioned factories into new biorefineries by working with local populations.

11h

Music improves social communication in autistic children

Improved communication skills may be linked to increased connectivity between auditory and motor regions of the brain, researchers at Université de Montreal and McGill University find.

12h

Cardiac arrest survival higher in states with required high school CPR training

Required CPR education in high school may lead to higher bystander CPR and cardiac arrest survival rates, according to preliminary research to be presented in Chicago at the American Heart Association's Resuscitation Science Symposium 2018 — an international conference highlighting the best in cardiovascular resuscitation research.

12h

PTSD linked to increased complications and death a year after cardiac arrest

Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms may significantly increase cardiac arrest survivors' risk of major cardiovascular events and death up to a year after the initial medical crisis, according to preliminary research to be presented in Chicago at the American Heart Association's Resuscitation Science Symposium 2018 — an international conference highlighting the best in cardiovascular re

12h

Public AEDs cost-effective for saving lives, improving cardiac arrest outcomes

Automated external defibrillators (AEDs) accessible in public places are cost-effective health tools for saving lives and improving cardiac arrest survival, according to two separate research studies to be presented in Chicago at the American Heart Association's Resuscitation Science Symposium 2018, an international conference highlighting the best in cardiovascular resuscitation research.

12h

Two novel studies explore why women receive less CPR from bystanders

Separate studies explore why women are less likely to receive bystander CPR. A small survey found that people may worry that chest compressions by bystanders will seem improper or may hurt women A virtual reality study found that even female avatars were less likely to receive CPR from bystanders in a virtual simulation.

12h

Black infants may have higher cardiac arrest rates

Black infants were significantly more likely to suffer cardiac arrest than White or Hispanic children in a review of emergency response records in the Houston area.

12h

If you smoke, now is a very good time to quit

For former smokers it took more than 15 years for cardiovascular disease risk to return to the level of those who never smoked, according to preliminary research to be presented in Chicago at the American Heart Association's Scientific Sessions 2018, a premier global exchange of the latest advances in cardiovascular science for researchers and clinicians.

12h

Fewer cardiac arrest victims get bystander CPR in Latino neighborhoods

Bystander CPR is provided less frequently in Latino neighborhoods compared to other areas. Cardiac arrest victims in the most heavily Latino-populated neighborhoods were almost 40 percent less likely to survive until discharge from the hospital.

12h

Abuse and neglect associated with increased cardiovascular disease risk for lesbian and bisexual women

Trauma, including abuse and neglect, is associated with higher cardiovascular disease risk for lesbian and bisexual women, according to preliminary research to be presented in Chicago at the American Heart Association’s Scientific Sessions 2018, a premier global exchange of the latest advances in cardiovascular science for researchers and clinicians.

12h

Blood vessel function takes harmful hit from hookah tobacco smoking

Smoking hookah tobacco acutely impairs blood vessels' ability to function, according to preliminary research to be presented in Chicago at the American Heart Association's Scientific Sessions 2018, a premier global exchange of the latest advances in cardiovascular science for researchers and clinicians.

12h

Hospital admissions for AFib rise with daylight saving time transition

Hospital admissions for atrial fibrillation (AFib), the most common type of irregular heartbeat, rise in the days following the spring transition of daylight saving time, according to preliminary research to be presented in Chicago at the American Heart Association's Scientific Sessions 2018, a premier global exchange of the latest advances in cardiovascular science for researchers and clinicians.

12h

Some heart patients ride roller coasters and other thrill-seeking activities despite warnings

Adults with an inherited thickening of the heart muscle, often don't stop participating in thrill-seeking activities despite recommendations that they should. And while some experienced minor consequences, only a few suffered serious health effects as a result, according to preliminary research from an online survey to be presented in Chicago at the American Heart Association's Scientific Sessions

12h

Just one energy drink may hurt blood vessel function

Young, healthy adults experienced notably diminished blood vessel function soon after consuming one energy drink, according to preliminary research from a small study to be presented in Chicago at the American Heart Association's Scientific Sessions 2018, a premier global exchange of the latest advances in cardiovascular science for researchers and clinicians.

12h

Big, high-calorie meals after 6 p.m. may increase heart disease risk for Hispanics

A big evening dinner shouldn't be on the menu. Eating the majority of a person's daily calories in the evening may lead to an increased risk of developing prediabetes and high blood pressure among Hispanic/Latino individuals, according to preliminary research to be presented in Chicago at the American Heart Association's Scientific Sessions 2018, a premier global exchange of the latest advances in

12h

Lead, mercury exposure raises cholesterol levels

Higher levels of lead and other heavy metals detected in the blood was associated with increased levels of lower density lipoprotein (LDL — bad cholesterol) and total cholesterol, according to preliminary research to be presented in Chicago at the American Heart Association's Scientific Sessions 2018, a premier global exchange of the latest advances in cardiovascular science for researchers and c

12h

Nuts for nuts? Daily serving may help control weight and benefit health

Eating Brazil nuts and other varieties of nuts daily may prevent weight gain and provide other cardiovascular benefits, according to two separate preliminary studies to be presented at the American Heart Association's Scientific Sessions 2018 in Chicago, a premier global exchange of the latest advances in cardiovascular science for researchers and clinicians.

12h

Overweight kids often left in the dark about their high blood pressure

Pediatricians generally don't address elevated blood pressures in overweight children during well-child visits. When they do broach the subject, their communication is often unclear, according to preliminary research presented at the American Heart Association's Scientific Sessions 2018, a premier global exchange of the latest advances in cardiovascular science for researchers and clinicians.

12h

Opioid use may increase risk of dangerous heart rhythm disorder

Opioid use appears to increase a person's risk for developing atrial fibrillation, a dangerous heart-rhythm disorder known to cause strokes, according to preliminary research to be presented in Chicago at the American Heart Association's Scientific Sessions 2018, a premier global exchange of the latest advances in cardiovascular science for researchers and clinicians.

12h

Chronic exposure to excess noise may increase risk for heart disease, stroke

Exposure to environmental noise appears to increase the risk of heart attacks and strokes by fueling the activity of a brain region involved in stress response.

12h

Daily weighing may be key to losing weight

Daily weighing may help with weight loss goals. People who don't weigh themselves at all or rarely were less likely to lose weight than those who weighed themselves often, according to research to be presented in Chicago at the American Heart Association's Scientific Sessions 2018, a premier global exchange of the latest advances in cardiovascular science for researchers and clinicians.

12h

Violent crime raises blood pressure even among those living in safe areas

A spike in Chicago crime was associated with a relative increase in blood pressure among people who lived in safe neighborhoods, according to preliminary research to be presented in Chicago at the American Heart Association's Scientific Sessions 2018, a premier global exchange of the latest advances in cardiovascular science for researchers and clinicians.

12h

Complication of broken heart syndrome associated with both short- and long-term risk of death

When patients with broken heart syndrome survive a life-threatening complication that renders the heart suddenly unable to pump enough blood, they remain at greater risk of death for years afterwards, according to research to be presented in Chicago at the American Heart Association's Scientific Sessions 2018, a premier global exchange of the latest advances in cardiovascular science for researche

12h

The Ballot Question That Could Transform U.S. Climate Politics

On Tuesday, residents of Washington State will vote on whether to adopt a carbon fee, an ambitious policy that aims to combat climate change by charging oil companies and other polluters for the right to emit greenhouse-gas pollution. If the measure passes, Washington would immediately have one of the most aggressive climate policies in the country. The proposal— known as Ballot Initiative 1631 —

12h

Can't Stop Worrying? Try Tetris To Ease Your Mind

There could be an upside to your phone addiction. Games like Tetris can reduce anxiety, according to new research. So if you've got Election Day jitters, go ahead and launch that app. (Image credit: Mary Mathis/NPR)

12h

Revealed: The secret of the poet's daffodil

The DNA secrets of a flower thought to have inspired a Greek legend have been cracked by scientists.

12h

Søgang forvirrer flydende vindmøller

Forskere fra DTU og Siemens-Gamesa er gået sammen med vindmøllepioneren Henrik Stiesdal om et projekt, der skal udvikle beregningsmodeller for fremtidige flydende vindmøllefundamenter.

12h

Review of The First: A gripping and gritty tale of Mars exploration

Creating The First, a gritty new TV space epic about the complexities of getting a crew to Mars, was an enormously detailed – and soul-searching – job

13h

Why Super Typhoon Haiyan was so deadly

When Super Typhoon Haiyan struck in 2013 it was the disaster-prone Philippines' worst storm on record, with 7,350 people dead or missing.

13h

SoftBank posts eight-fold jump in first-half net profit

Japan's SoftBank Group said Monday it logged an eight-fold jump in net profit in the six months to September thanks to strong returns from its investment funds.

13h

Five years after Typhoon Haiyan, scores still in harm's way

Diofel Llamado fled for his life when Super Typhoon Haiyan devastated the Philippines in 2013, yet today he is back living in the same coastal area—even if it puts him in the crosshairs of a future killer storm.

13h

Polluted Delhi air akin to death sentence, say doctors

Yogesh Kumar wheezes after life-saving surgery to remove a diseased lung, but his doctors wonder how long he can last outside hospital breathing some of the world's dirtiest air.

13h

Chile to ask British Museum to return extinct mammal remains

Chile announced on Sunday that it will ask the British Museum in London to return the remains of a mylodon, an extinct mammal that lived in Patagonia about 10,000 years ago.

13h

Researchers advance stem cell therapy with biodegradable scaffold

Rutgers scientists have created a tiny, biodegradable scaffold to transplant stem cells and deliver drugs, which may help treat Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases, aging brain degeneration, spinal cord injuries and traumatic brain injuries.

14h

More, please! A victim of cancer quack Robert O. Young wins a $105 million settlement

Robert O. Young is a cancer quack who claims to be a naturopath who promotes what he calls "pH Miracle Living." He claims that cancer is caused by excess acid and that the way to prevent and cure cancer is to "alkalinize the blood." Two and a half years ago, he was convicted of practicing medicine without a license. Last week, a woman whose breast cancer progressed to incurable while being treated

14h

Can you solve it? Gunpowder, reason and plot

A puzzling episode from the early seventeenth century UPDATE: To read the solution click here Hi guzzlers, Today’s puzzle concerns the Gunpowder Plot, in which Guy Fawkes and pals attempted to burn down the Houses of Parliament on this day in 1605. In an incident as yet unreported by historians, six men were rounded up by the authorities on suspicion of being traitors. Continue reading…

15h

New device improves balance in veterans with Gulf War Illness

Gulf War veterans with unexplained illnesses that cause fatigue, headaches, respiratory disorders and memory problems can improve their balance with a device developed by Rutgers University researchers.

16h

Nu er det endelig slut med teleselskabernes masseovervågning af danskernes færden

Telia og Telenor afviser begge, at de lagrer oplysninger om, hvor de danske mobilkunder står og går døgnet rundt, sådan som TDC gjorde indtil for nylig.

16h

Iran Will Continue to Try to Evade U.S. Sanctions

Front companies, barter deals, oil transfers on the high seas: These are just some of the methods that Iran could employ to keep its economy limping on after American sanctions targeting the country’s oil industry went into effect at midnight on Monday. Iran has plenty of experience here, having already been subject to stringent international sanctions over its nuclear industry, which choked its

16h

Sygdoms-sæsonen er over os: Få styr på, hvornår dit barn har brug for antibiotika

Sverige har nedbragt antibiotikaforbruget til børn med 74 procent, men i Danmark halter vi gevaldigt efter.

16h

Country diary: only the adolescent seals still hang out here

Hilbre Islands, Wirral: Visitors hoping to glimpse grey seals will find only a few stragglers. The rest are off to their breeding grounds The Hilbre Islands may be small but they demand attention. The diminutive archipelago encompassing Little Eye, Middle Eye and Hilbre (pronounced locally like a mound of soft French cheese) sits a mile or so from the shore of West Kirby and Red Rocks. But anyone

17h

Rutgers researchers advance stem cell therapy with biodegradable scaffold

Rutgers scientists have created a tiny, biodegradable scaffold to transplant stem cells and deliver drugs, which may help treat Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases, aging brain degeneration, spinal cord injuries and traumatic brain injuries. Stem cell transplantation, which shows promise as a treatment for central nervous system diseases, has been hampered by low cell survival rates, incomplete d

17h

Youth TBI laws promote head injury evaluation in emergency department

A new study from researchers in the Center for Injury Research and Policy at Nationwide Children's Hospital examined the effectiveness of state youth TBI laws by looking at sports and recreation mild TBI (mTBI)-related emergency department (ED) visits for children ages 5 to 18 years before and after TBI legislation was enacted in each state.

17h

College education aids in proper use of dietary supplements among young adults

Young adults who are educated about dietary supplements in college are more likely to use them appropriately, according to new research from Binghamton University, State University at New York.

17h

Researchers use genetics to predict response to antipsychotic medications

Genetics can be used to predict a patient's response to antipsychotic drug treatment for schizophrenia, according to a recent study by investigators at The Feinstein Institute for Medical Research. The findings were published online today in the American Journal of Psychiatry.

17h

Among college students, mental health diagnosis and treatment are up, stigma is down

Mental health diagnoses and treatment of college students increased substantially between 2007 and 2017. More than one-third of students reported a diagnosed condition in 2016-2017, according to a study published online today in Psychiatric Services in Advance. The comprehensive nationwide study draws on 10 years of data from the Healthy Minds Study, an annual web-based survey involving more than

17h

Barriers to using stroke-preventing anticoagulants in Canada hinder appropriate management of patients with atrial fibrillation

International guidelines recommend direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs) over warfarin to prevent stroke for most patients with atrial fibrillation (AF). However, a substantial portion of patients in Canada, who would benefit from anticoagulation, do not receive it adequately or at all. Experts review the evidence for the use of DOACs in the Canadian Journal of Cardiology, discuss reasons for the lar

17h

People in Canada have good health, are living longer: Global Burden of Disease Study trends

Data from the Global Burden of Disease Study shows that the overall health of Canadians is good and is consistent with other similar countries, and people are living longer with diseases, according to a study in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal).

17h

Fetal Marijuana Exposure Stunts Rat Cognitive Performance

Offspring of rats exposed to vaporized cannabis had difficulty switching strategies to get a sugar reward, according to a study presented at the Society for Neuroscience conference.

18h

The Problem With HBO’s The Deuce

This article contains spoilers through the Season 2 finale of The Deuce. “Heaven,” the Talking Heads informed us on their seminal 1979 album, Fear of Music , is “a place where nothing, nothing ever happens.” Not even the most dedicated fan of HBO’s The Deuce would likely describe the show as heaven . But up until Sunday night’s finale, the second season of the prestige drama—about sex work and th

19h

Morbid exhibits of UCL's Pathology Museum

Christa Larwood visits the UCL Pathology Museum usually reserved for the eyes of medical students.

21h

Scottish researchers create 'crystal maze' for light

A team at Heriot-Watt University in Edinburgh create a "crystal maze" to control how light spreads.

21h

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