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Nyheder2018november06

 

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Midterm Elections 2018: Georgia Voting Machine Issues Heighten Scrutiny on Brian Kemp

Voting machines in one polling place had no power cords. The problems follow a big purge of voter rolls by the secretary of state, who is running for governor.

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Forskere finder nye veje til batterier i elektriske fly

Med ny forskning i materialeteknologi er forskere kommet nærmere et batteri, der kan anvendes i elektriske fly. Batterierne boostes med magnetiske nanopartikler, kombineret med magnetfelter, der letter ionernes passage gennem batteriet og gør det stærkt nok til at bringe et fly i luften.

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Tiny thorn snail discovered in Panama's backyard

Five years after one particular tiny thorn snail from Panama was identified as new to science, it is described in a scientific article in the open-access journal ZooKeys. The official discovery only became possible after earlier this year glassy shells were collected from the La Amistad International Park, Chiriquí, Panama. Successfully recognised thanks to modern computed tomographic scans, the s

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Preschool children show awake responses to naptime nonsense words

Hearing has long been suspected as being 'on' all the time — even in our sleep. Now scientists are reporting results on what is heard and not heard during sleep and what that might mean for a developing brain. At the Acoustical Society of America's 176th Meeting, Nov. 5-9, researchers from Vanderbilt University will present preliminary results from a study in which preschool children showed memor

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’Oumuamua is not the alien probe you’re looking forOumuamua Harvard Alien

Space Despite what Harvard scientists say. Three things are certain in this world: death, taxes, and people going bananas over aliens.

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How our definition of freedom has changed

Philosopher Ben Constant explains how democracy today is nothing like what it used to be. His arguments show us that debates around what freedom actually is can go in very strange directions. Remember how busy the Athenian citizens were next time you think there are too many questions on the ballot. When people talk about freedom and democracy, they often trace the lineage of both back 2,000 year

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HQ2 Finalists Aren’t Giving Up Hope

Arlington, Virginia and New York City are doing a victory lap after The New York Times reported Monday that Amazon is planning to split its second headquarters, called HQ2, between the two cities, bringing high-paying jobs to both locations. The report comes after hundreds of cities across the country went through a more-than-yearlong bidding process for the headquarters, which Amazon originally

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Two Big Funders Join Open-Access Movement

The Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation and the Wellcome Trust agree not to cover the fees that some hybrid open-access journals charge authors to make their work freely available.

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Moths survive bat predation through acoustic camouflage fur

Moths are a mainstay food source for bats, which use echolocation to hunt their prey. Scientists are studying how moths have evolved passive defenses over millions of years to resist their primary predators. While some moths have evolved ears that detect the ultrasonic calls of bats, many types of moths remain deaf. In those moths, researchers have found that the insects developed types of 'stealt

42min

Bioreactor device helps frogs regenerate their legs

Scientists havedesigned a device that can induce partial hindlimb regeneration in adult aquatic African clawed frogs (Xenopus laevis) by 'kick-starting' tissue repair at the amputation site. Their findings introduce a new model for testing 'electroceuticals,' or cell-stimulating therapies.

42min

Bats vs. Dolphins: Ultimate battle of sonar systems

To find ways to improve human-made active sensing, scientists worldwide study the sonar systems of bats and dolphins.

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Rat models of opioid use and addiction explore risk of abuse

New research revealed today highlights the power of animal studies to explore mechanisms of opioid addiction, withdrawal, and relapse to inform new prevention strategies and treatments for people.

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Scattered Thunderstorms, With a Chance of Republicans

O, election day! In the ruddy twilight of each year, as autumn incarnadines the republic’s plump pastures and luxuriant hills, its people gather for that most felicitous and humbling of civic offices: to choose our elect, to decide who will rule. With renewed revolutionary vigor this mighty tide sweeps the continent, intermingling the wise Delaware and the ferocious Klamath, making so strong a to

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Rat models of opioid use and addiction explore risk of abuse

New research revealed today highlights the power of animal studies to explore mechanisms of opioid addiction, withdrawal, and relapse to inform new prevention strategies and treatments for people. The findings were presented at Neuroscience 2018, the annual meeting of the Society for Neuroscience and the world's largest source of emerging news about brain science and health.

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For adults, the terrible twos are a confusing earful

Here's another reason you might be exhausted after that preschool birthday party: Your brain had to work to figure out who actually asked for more ice cream. 'What we found with two-and-a-half-year-olds is that it's amazingly hard for adults to identify who's talking,' said Angela Cooper, a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Toronto. Cooper's co-authored research will be presented at the

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Bats vs. dolphins — the ultimate battle of sonar systems

To find ways to improve man-made active sensing, scientists worldwide study the sonar systems of bats and dolphins. During the Acoustical Society of America's 176th Meeting, Nov. 5-9, Laura Kloepper will compare bat and dolphin sonar systems, describing her work on how the two animals cope with acoustic interference. She'll use her findings to argue why bats have the superior system.

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New deep knowledge AI system could resolve bottlenecks in drug research

Researchers at the University of Waterloo have developed a new system that could significantly speed up the discovery of new drugs and reduce the need for costly and time-consuming laboratory tests.

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The United States of Optimism

Today is Election Day, and it’s hard to believe that anyone feels cheerful about it. Relieved? Maybe. But positive? Democrats are riven with anxiety about whether they can win back the House. Republicans are riven with anxiety about whether they can hold it. President Donald Trump has chosen a closing argument for the campaign that’s rooted in racist fearmongering and lies . The nation is still r

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Fumiko Hoeft Receives SfN Science Educator Award

Fumiko Hoeft (photo by Peter Morenus/UConn) Each year, the Society for Neuroscience recognizes outstanding neuroscientists who have strongly added to public education and awareness about the field. The Dana Foundation sponsors these awards. This year’s award was presented to Fumiko Hoeft , M.D., Ph.D., professor of psychology and director of the Brain Imaging Research Center (BIRC) at the Univers

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Fox scolds Sean Hannity for taking stage at Trump rally

Fox News says it doesn't condone "any talent participating in campaign events." It's not the first time Hannity has been rebuked by network executives for his political activism. Still, it's not clear whether the network plans to penalize Hannity, partly because he's the most-watched host in cable news. None On the morning of President Donald Trump's last rally before the midterm elections, Sean

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Fox scolds Sean Hannity for taking stage at Trump rally

Fox News says it doesn't condone "any talent participating in campaign events." It's not the first time Hannity has been rebuked by network executives for his political activism. Still, it's not clear whether the network plans to penalize Hannity, partly because he's the most-watched host in cable news. None On the morning of President Donald Trump's last rally before the midterm elections, Sean

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Soda can metal may solve hydrogen fuel cell problem

Manganese is known for making stainless steel and aluminum soda cans. Now, researchers say the metal could advance one of the most promising sources of renewable energy: hydrogen fuel cells. As reported in Nature Catalysis , the discovery could eventually help solve hydrogen fuel cells’ most frustrating problem: they’re not affordable because most catalysts are made with platinum, which is both r

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Cancer: Brain-derived compounds show surprising benefits

In a Veterans Affairs study, a humanmade compound based on a brain hormone spurred the growth of cancer in Petri dishes but enigmatically had the opposite effect in mice. The compound and others like it are being looked at not only for their effect on cancer, but for their ability to regrow healthy tissue to heal damaged hearts and other organs.

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New immunotherapy technique can specifically target tumor cells

A new immunotherapy screening prototype can quickly create individualized cancer treatments that will allow physicians to effectively target tumors without the side effects of standard cancer drugs.

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Meth, similar drug overdoses growing rapidly

The number of overdose deaths involving methamphetamines and amphetamines in the state of Ohio increased more than 5,000 percent over the course of eight years, according to new data.

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Why some Wikipedia disputes go unresolved

Study identifies reasons for unsettled editing disagreements and offers predictive tools that could improve deliberation.

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Americans Can't Escape Long-Disproven Body Stereotypes

Imagine preparing for a job interview or a promising first date. You probably consider your outfit and general grooming—a fresh shower, plus hair products and makeup, if you use them. Glasses or contacts? Hair up or down? Various decisions signal different levels of erudition or sexual appeal, and people spend considerable time and money trying to use them to their advantage in high-stakes situat

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Immune system and postpartum depression linked?

The immune system might play an important role in the development of postpartum depression after a stressful pregnancy, new research suggests.

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Orcasound: A citizen science tool for whale research

Computer algorithms are playing a growing role in analyzing hydrophone audio data when monitoring marine life, but human listeners can complement and enhance these algorithms. A project known as Orcasound has produced a web application that will enable citizen scientists to listen to livestreaming audio from hydrophones near the San Juan Islands.

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Earth's Smallest Ape Weighed 8 lbs., Lived 12.5 Million Years Ago

The remains of the smallest ape ever known to walk the Earth may have been discovered in the hills of Kenya, scientists say.

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Study uncovers possible link between immune system and postpartum depression

The immune system might play an important role in the development of postpartum depression after a stressful pregnancy, new research suggests.

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Orcasound: A citizen science tool for whale research

Computer algorithms are playing a growing role in analyzing hydrophone audio data when monitoring marine life, but human listeners can complement and enhance these algorithms. A project known as Orcasound has produced a web application that will enable citizen scientists to listen to livestreaming audio from hydrophones near the San Juan Islands. Researchers will describe the new web app and the v

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Midterm Elections 2018: Extreme Gerrymandering Could Still Stymie the Blue Wave

If Democrats take back the House on Tuesday, it will have been against all odds thanks to gerrymandering that has skewed so heavily toward Republicans.

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Orcasound: A citizen science tool for whale research

A crucial part of studying southern resident killer whales is finding them and quickly alerting experts to send boats out to collect fecal samples or prey fragments to better understand what the whales are eating.

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Scientists Resurrect Ancient Versions of Life's Molecular Machinery

Scientists Resurrect Ancient Versions of Life's Molecular Machinery Heat-tolerant prehistoric enzymes might help produce valuable chemicals and biofuels. AncientEarth_topNteaser.jpg Artist's conception of an early Earth. Image credits: NASA Technology Tuesday, November 6, 2018 – 15:45 Catherine Meyers, Editor (Inside Science) — In the 1990 Michael Crichton novel "Jurassic Park," scientists resur

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Bacteria in giant aquarium mirror natural ocean microbes

Researchers have discovered that the bacteria in the water in a large exhibit at Georgia Aquarium are similar to those that exist naturally in the ocean. Sea creatures need to go to the bathroom, too, and in aquariums, that creates the task of cleaning the water of waste like ammonia, nitrites, and nitrates. Good bacteria break down nitrogen compounds at aquariums, and the new study shows that so

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‘Resting zone’ skeletal stem cells are actually hard at work

Researchers have identified a type of skeletal stem cell in the “resting zone” of the epiphyseal growth plate—a special cartilaginous tissue and an important driver for bone growth. Skeletal stem cells are valuable because it’s thought they can heal many types of bone injury, but they’re difficult to find because researchers don’t know exactly what they look like or where they live. Locating skel

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Your future smartphone could fix its broken screen by pulling carbon from the air

Nexus Media News Scientists are getting closer to making self-healing materials a commercial reality. Plants self-repair and regenerate naturally. Your devices could soon do the same.

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Peter Gøtzsche er fritaget for tjeneste

Rigshospitalet vil arbejde for, at det Nordiske Cochrane Center fortsætter som en del af det internationale Cochrane-samarbejde

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New immunotherapy technique can specifically target tumor cells, study reports

A new immunotherapy screening prototype developed by University of California, Irvine researchers can quickly create individualized cancer treatments that will allow physicians to effectively target tumors without the side effects of standard cancer drugs.

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Midterm Elections 2018: Every Celeb and Brand That Told Me to Vote, Ranked

Tinder, Ariana Grande, The Rock, and many more are exhorting the masses to cast their ballots.

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Why a stream of plasma makes chemical reactions more efficient

A whiff of plasma, when combined with a nanosized catalyst, can cause chemical reactions to proceed faster, more selectively, at lower temperatures, or at lower voltages than without plasma. Using computer modeling, researchers investigated the interactions between plasmas and metal catalysts embedded into ceramic beads in a packed bed reactor. They discovered that together, the metals, beads and

2h

White line of algae deaths marks uplift in 2016 Chilean earthquake

A bleached fringe of dead marine algae, strung along the coastlines of two islands off the coast of Chile, offers a unique glimpse at how the land rose during the 2016 magnitude 7.6 Chiloé earthquake, according to a new study.

2h

New gene for hair loss

Hypotrichosis simplex leads to progressive hair loss starting in childhood. Geneticists have now deciphered a new gene that is responsible for this rare form of hair loss. Changes in the LSS gene lead to impairment of an important enzyme that has a crucial function in cholesterol metabolism.

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How the 'speed gene' works in thoroughbred racehorses

Scientists have discovered the inner workings of a known 'speed gene', which directly affects skeletal muscle growth and, in turn, race distance aptitude in thoroughbred racehorses. Their findings have important implications for a multi-billion dollar industry.

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Ohio researchers, partners find meth, similar drug overdoses growing rapidly

The number of overdose deaths involving methamphetamines and amphetamines in the state of Ohio increased more than 5,000 percent over the course of eight years, according to data collected by the Ohio Alliance for Innovation in Population Health.

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New immunotherapy technique can specifically target tumor cells, UCI study reports

A new immunotherapy screening prototype developed by University of California, Irvine researchers can quickly create individualized cancer treatments that will allow physicians to effectively target tumors without the side effects of standard cancer drugs.

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Adolescent cannabis use alters development of planning, self-control brain areas

Adolescent marijuana use may alter how neurons function in brain areas engaged in decision-making, planning and self-control, according to researchers.

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How ideas go viral in academia: Where idea starts is key

How ideas move through academia may depend on where those ideas come from as much as their quality, a new study suggests.

2h

Punctuated earthquakes for New Madrid area, Missouri, U.S.

In 1811 and 1812, the region around New Madrid, Missouri, experienced a number of major earthquakes. The final and largest earthquake in this sequence occurred on the Reelfoot fault, and temporarily changed the course of the Mississippi River.

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Plasma-based system provides radical new path for water purification

Many of today's methods of purifying water rely on filters and chemicals that need regular replenishing or maintenance. Millions of people, however, live in areas with limited access to such materials, leading the research community to explore new options of purifying water in using plasmas. Many plasma-based approaches are expensive, but a new class of plasma devices may change that. Researchers

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Face the music: Explicit anti-piracy warnings are best deterrent

STOP! This is illegal. You may be monitored and fined. Did that get your attention? Good. Because according to a new study, this phrasing coupled with a graphic of a computer and download symbol with a prohibitive slash is the most effective way to stop music piracy.

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Experimental plasma generator offers path forward for better use of landfill gas as energy

Landfill gases contain numerous contaminants, but one group has demonstrated a promising new application of plasma technology capable of removing such compounds. Researchers have demonstrated an experimental plasma device capable of cleaning gas samples of D4, one of the most common siloxanes. Drawing on a technique for creating plasma called dielectric barrier discharge, the group was able to sig

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New insights into the neural risks and benefits of marijuana use

Research released today underscores both the dangers and the therapeutic promise of marijuana, revealing different effects across the lifespan. Marijuana exposure in the womb or during adolescence may disrupt learning and memory, damage communication between brain regions, and disturb levels of key neurotransmitters and metabolites in the brain. In Alzheimer's disease, however, compounds found in

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First study of Humpback whale survivors of orca attacks in the Southeastern Pacific

Scars left by orca attacks indicate that most victims are young whales on the first trip from breeding to feeding grounds. Increasing numbers of scars may mean that there are more orcas in the Southern Pacific, researchers say.

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Oceanographers produce first-ever images of entire cod shoals

A team of oceanographers has journeyed to Norway — one of the last remaining regions of the world where cod still thrive — and used a synoptic acoustic system to, for the first time, illuminate entire shoals of cod almost instantaneously, during the height of the spawning season.

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Haywire immune protein kickstarts rare genetic disease

Researchers have singled out a protein called TIM-3 as a new potential target for immunotherapy treatments for patients with cancer and other diseases. Following the 2018 Nobel Prize for Medicine, global attention is now more than ever turned toward the promise of immunotherapy in oncology. The new study sheds light on a molecule that might play a key role in the regulation of the immune response

3h

Brain-derived compounds show surprising — and beneficial — results for cancer in lab studies

In a Veterans Affairs study, a manmade compound based on a brain hormone spurred the growth of cancer in Petri dishes but enigmatically had the opposite effect in mice. The compound and others like it are being looked at not only for their effect on cancer, but for their ability to regrow healthy tissue to heal damaged hearts and other organs.

3h

Oceanographers produce first-ever images of entire cod shoals

For the most part, the mature Atlantic cod is a solitary creature that spends most of its time far below the ocean's surface, grazing on bony fish, squid, crab, shrimp, and lobster—unless it's spawning season, when the fish flock to each other by the millions, forming enormous shoals that resemble frenzied, teeming islands in the sea.

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First study of Humpback whale survivors of orca attacks in the Southeastern Pacific

Humpback whales bear stark battle scars from violent encounters with orcas, also known as killer whales. Analysis of rake marks on more than 3000 humpback whale tails or flukes suggest that attacks on these undersea giants may be on the rise, according to a new study in Endangered Species Research.

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Weakening Tropical Storm Xavier observed By NASA

As Tropical Storm Xavier continued to rain on western Mexico, the Global Precipitation Measurement mission or GPM core satellite analyzed the rate in which rain was falling. The next day, Nov, 6, Xavier had weakened to a remnant low pressure area.

3h

Moths survive bat predation through acoustic camouflage fur

Moths are a mainstay food source for bats, which use echolocation (biological sonar) to hunt their prey. Scientists such as Thomas Neil, from the University of Bristol in the U.K., are studying how moths have evolved passive defenses over millions of years to resist their primary predators.

3h

White line of algae deaths marks uplift in 2016 Chilean earthquake

A bleached fringe of dead marine algae, strung along the coastlines of two islands off the coast of Chile, offers a unique glimpse at how the land rose during the 2016 magnitude 7.6 Chiloé earthquake, according to a new study in the Bulletin of the Seismological Society of America.

3h

Oceanographers produce first-ever images of entire cod shoals

A team of oceanographers at MIT has journeyed to Norway — one of the last remaining regions of the world where cod still thrive — and used a synoptic acoustic system to, for the first time, illuminate entire shoals of cod almost instantaneously, during the height of the spawning season.

3h

Low calorie sweeteners can help in sugar reduction recommendations, according to experts

The latest research on low calorie sweeteners' use, benefits and role in the diet were discussed today at the 3rd International Sweeteners Association Conference.

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First study of humpback whale survivors of orca attacks in the Southeastern Pacific

Scars left by orca attacks indicate that most victims are young whales on the first trip from breeding to feeding grounds. Increasing numbers of scars may mean that there are more orcas in the Southern Pacific, researchers say.

3h

Weakening Tropical Storm Xavier observed by NASA

As Tropical Storm Xavier continued to rain on western Mexico, the Global Precipitation Measurement mission or GPM core satellite analyzed the rate in which rain was falling. The next day, Nov. 6, Xavier had weakened to a remnant low pressure area.

3h

Adolescent cannabis use alters development of planning, self-control brain areas

Adolescent marijuana use may alter how neurons function in brain areas engaged in decision-making, planning and self-control, according to researchers at the University of Illinois at Chicago.

3h

Plasma-based system provides radical new path for water purification

Many of today's methods of purifying water rely on filters and chemicals that need regular replenishing or maintenance. Millions of people, however, live in areas with limited access to such materials, leading the research community to explore new options of purifying water in using plasmas. Many plasma-based approaches are expensive, but a new class of plasma devices may change that.

3h

Report finds palm oil companies' commitments lacking

Zero-deforestation commitments within the palm oil industry risk being undermined by a lack of monitoring within production landscapes—meaning the deforestation of tropical forests home to Critically Endangered wildlife such as Sumatran tigers (Panthera tigris sumatrae) and orangutans (Pongo abelii) could be going unreported. This is just one finding of an in-depth evaluation of palm oil companies

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Updated book compiles 45 years of changes in Pacific Northwest flora

Botanists at the University of Washington's Burke Museum of Natural History & Culture have created a much-needed second edition of the "Flora of the Pacific Northwest." Published by the UW Press, the new edition took five years to complete and is the first update on Pacific Northwest vascular plant diversity and distributions since the book was first published in 1973. In the past 45 years, much h

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How ideas go viral in academia

How ideas move through academia may depend on where those ideas come from—whether from big-name universities or less prestigious institutions—as much as their quality, a recent study from the University of Colorado Boulder suggests.

3h

Face the music: Explicit anti-piracy warnings are best deterrent

STOP! This is illegal. You may be monitored and fined.

3h

Experimental plasma generator offers path forward for better use of landfill gas as energy

Methane gas released from landfills has long been a topic of interest for alternative energy. One issue, however, is that landfill gases contain numerous contaminants, such as volatile methyl siloxanes, whose silica deposits put extra wear and tear on the natural gas generators when they combust. One group has demonstrated a promising new application of plasma technology capable of removing such c

3h

Punctuated earthquakes for New Madrid area: New research uncovers cluster of past events

In 1811 and 1812, the region around New Madrid, Missouri, experienced a number of major earthquakes. The final and largest earthquake in this sequence occurred on the Reelfoot fault, and temporarily changed the course of the Mississippi River. These earthquakes are estimated to be just shy of magnitude 8.0 and devastated towns along the Mississippi River—soil liquefied, houses collapsed, and chimn

3h

Why a stream of plasma makes chemical reactions more efficient

A whiff of plasma, when combined with a nanosized catalyst, can cause chemical reactions to proceed faster, more selectively, at lower temperatures, or at lower voltages than without plasma—and nobody really knows why.

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Scientists can now bottle solar energy, turn it into liquid fuel

Researchers have invented a liquid isomer that can store and release solar energy. The team has solved problems other researchers have previously encountered. The discovery could lead to more widespread use of solar energy. In the last year, a team from Chalmers University of Technology , Sweden, essentially figured out how to bottle solar energy . They developed a liquid fuel containing the comp

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Disease status affects the association between rs4813620 and the expression of Alzheimer’s disease susceptibility gene TRIB3 [Biological Sciences]

Lorenzi et al. (1) recently applied a functional prioritization method to the Alzheimer’s Disease Neuroimaging Initiative dataset and successfully identified a link between tribbles pseudokinase 3 (TRIB3) and the stereotypical pattern of gray matter loss in Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Lorenzi et al. conducted an expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL) analysis…

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The preregistration revolution needs to distinguish between predictions and analyses [Social Sciences]

Nosek et al. (1) recently joined others in advocating for “widespread adoption of preregistration” as a tool for advancing science. The language they use in making this important argument, however, creates unnecessary confusion: Like many others discussing these issues, they seem to conflate the goal of theory falsification with the…

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Reply to Ledgerwood: Predictions without analysis plans are inert [Social Sciences]

Ledgerwood (1) argues that there are two independent uses of preregistration that are conflated in Nosek et al. (2) and elsewhere: “Preregistering theoretical predictions enables theory falsifiability. Preregistering analysis plans enables type I error control.” We appreciate that the comment elevates the complementary roles of prediction and analysis plans in…

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Critical computational analysis illuminates the reductive-elimination mechanism that activates nitrogenase for N2 reduction [Chemistry]

Recent spectroscopic, kinetic, photophysical, and thermodynamic measurements show activation of nitrogenase for N2 → 2NH3 reduction involves the reductive elimination (re) of H2 from two [Fe–H–Fe] bridging hydrides bound to the catalytic [7Fe–9S–Mo–C–homocitrate] FeMo-cofactor (FeMo-co). These studies rationalize the Lowe–Thorneley kinetic scheme’s proposal of mechanistically obligatory formation

3h

Nonequilibrium associative retrieval of multiple stored self-assembly targets [Chemistry]

Many biological systems rely on the ability to self-assemble different target structures using the same set of components. Equilibrium self-assembly suffers from a limited capacity in such cases, due to an increasing number of decoy states that grows rapidly with the number of targets encoded. Moreover, improving the kinetic stability…

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Intestinal barrier dysfunction orchestrates the onset of inflammatory host-microbiome cross-talk in a human gut inflammation-on-a-chip [Applied Biological Sciences]

The initiation of intestinal inflammation involves complex intercellular cross-talk of inflammatory cells, including the epithelial and immune cells, and the gut microbiome. This multicellular complexity has hampered the identification of the trigger that orchestrates the onset of intestinal inflammation. To identify the initiator of inflammatory host–microbiome cross-talk, we leveraged a…

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Structural and mechanistic insights into the function of the unconventional class XIV myosin MyoA from Toxoplasma gondii [Biochemistry]

Parasites of the phylum Apicomplexa are responsible for significant morbidity and mortality on a global scale. Central to the virulence of these pathogens are the phylum-specific, unconventional class XIV myosins that power the essential processes of parasite motility and host cell invasion. Notably, class XIV myosins differ from human myosins…

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Arrhythmia mutations in calmodulin cause conformational changes that affect interactions with the cardiac voltage-gated calcium channel [Biochemistry]

Calmodulin (CaM) represents one of the most conserved proteins among eukaryotes and is known to bind and modulate more than a 100 targets. Recently, several disease-associated mutations have been identified in the CALM genes that are causative of severe cardiac arrhythmia syndromes. Although several mutations have been shown to affect…

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Small-molecule CaV{alpha}1⋅CaV{beta} antagonist suppresses neuronal voltage-gated calcium-channel trafficking [Biochemistry]

Extracellular calcium flow through neuronal voltage-gated CaV2.2 calcium channels converts action potential-encoded information to the release of pronociceptive neurotransmitters in the dorsal horn of the spinal cord, culminating in excitation of the postsynaptic central nociceptive neurons. The CaV2.2 channel is composed of a pore-forming α1 subunit (CaVα1) that is engaged…

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SHOC2-MRAS-PP1 complex positively regulates RAF activity and contributes to Noonan syndrome pathogenesis [Biochemistry]

Dephosphorylation of the inhibitory “S259” site on RAF kinases (S259 on CRAF, S365 on BRAF) plays a key role in RAF activation. The MRAS GTPase, a close relative of RAS oncoproteins, interacts with SHOC2 and protein phosphatase 1 (PP1) to form a heterotrimeric holoenzyme that dephosphorylates this S259 RAF site….

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Specificity landscapes unmask submaximal binding site preferences of transcription factors [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

We have developed Differential Specificity and Energy Landscape (DiSEL) analysis to comprehensively compare DNA–protein interactomes (DPIs) obtained by high-throughput experimental platforms and cutting edge computational methods. While high-affinity DNA binding sites are identified by most methods, DiSEL uncovered nuanced sequence preferences displayed by homologous transcription factors. Pairwis

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Noncanonical role for the binding protein in substrate uptake by the MetNI methionine ATP Binding Cassette (ABC) transporter [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

The Escherichia coli methionine ABC transporter MetNI exhibits both high-affinity transport toward l-methionine and broad specificity toward methionine derivatives, including d-methionine. In this work, we characterize the transport of d-methionine derivatives by the MetNI transporter. Unexpectedly, the N229A substrate-binding deficient variant of the cognate binding protein MetQ was found to…

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Hox5 genes direct elastin network formation during alveologenesis by regulating myofibroblast adhesion [Developmental Biology]

Hox5 genes (Hoxa5, Hoxb5, Hoxc5) are exclusively expressed in the lung mesenchyme during embryogenesis, and the most severe phenotypes result from constitutive loss of function of all three genes. Because Hox5 triple null mutants exhibit perinatal lethality, the contribution of this paralogous group to postembryonic lung development is unknown. Intriguingly,…

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Evolutionarily conserved Tbx5-Wnt2/2b pathway orchestrates cardiopulmonary development [Developmental Biology]

Codevelopment of the lungs and heart underlies key evolutionary innovations in the transition to terrestrial life. Cardiac specializations that support pulmonary circulation, including the atrial septum, are generated by second heart field (SHF) cardiopulmonary progenitors (CPPs). It has been presumed that transcription factors required in the SHF for cardiac septation,…

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Epidemiology of the silent polio outbreak in Rahat, Israel, based on modeling of environmental surveillance data [Environmental Sciences]

Israel experienced an outbreak of wild poliovirus type 1 (WPV1) in 2013–2014, detected through environmental surveillance of the sewage system. No cases of acute flaccid paralysis were reported, and the epidemic subsided after a bivalent oral polio vaccination (bOPV) campaign. As we approach global eradication, polio will increasingly be detected…

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Species groups distributed across elevational gradients reveal convergent and continuous genetic adaptation to high elevations [Evolution]

Although many cases of genetic adaptations to high elevations have been reported, the processes driving these modifications and the pace of their evolution remain unclear. Many high-elevation adaptations (HEAs) are thought to have arisen in situ as populations rose with growing mountains. In contrast, most high-elevation lineages of the Qinghai-Tibetan…

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BRCA1 ensures genome integrity by eliminating estrogen-induced pathological topoisomerase II-DNA complexes [Genetics]

Women having BRCA1 germ-line mutations develop cancer in breast and ovary, estrogen-regulated tissues, with high penetrance. Binding of estrogens to the estrogen receptor (ER) transiently induces DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) by topoisomerase II (TOP2) and controls gene transcription. TOP2 resolves catenated DNA by transiently generating DSBs, TOP2-cleavage complexes (TOP2ccs), where…

3h

RNA polymerase II CTD interactome with 3' processing and termination factors in fission yeast and its impact on phosphate homeostasis [Genetics]

The carboxy-terminal domain (CTD) code encrypted within the Y1S2P3T4S5P6S7 heptad repeats of RNA polymerase II (Pol2) is deeply rooted in eukaryal biology. Key steps to deciphering the code are identifying the events in gene expression that are governed by individual “letters” and then defining a vocabulary of multiletter “words” and…

3h

Lipoteichoic acid anchor triggers Mincle to drive protective immunity against invasive group A Streptococcus infection [Immunology and Inflammation]

Group A Streptococcus (GAS) is a Gram-positive bacterial pathogen that causes a range of diseases, including fatal invasive infections. However, the mechanisms by which the innate immune system recognizes GAS are not well understood. We herein report that the C-type lectin receptor macrophage inducible C-type lectin (Mincle) recognizes GAS and…

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Identification and validation of a tumor-infiltrating Treg transcriptional signature conserved across species and tumor types [Immunology and Inflammation]

FoxP3+ T regulatory (Treg) cells are central elements of immunologic tolerance. They are abundant in many tumors, where they restrict potentially favorable antitumor responses. We used a three-pronged strategy to identify genes related to the presence and function of Tregs in the tumor microenvironment. Gene expression profiles were generated from…

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Akt-mediated platelet apoptosis and its therapeutic implications in immune thrombocytopenia [Medical Sciences]

Immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) is an autoimmune disorder characterized by low platelet count which can cause fatal hemorrhage. ITP patients with antiplatelet glycoprotein (GP) Ib-IX autoantibodies appear refractory to conventional treatments, and the mechanism remains elusive. Here we show that the platelets undergo apoptosis in ITP patients with anti-GPIbα autoantibodies. Consistent…

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Mastocytosis-derived extracellular vesicles exhibit a mast cell signature, transfer KIT to stellate cells, and promote their activation [Medical Sciences]

Extracellular vesicles (EVs) have been implicated in the development and progression of hematological malignancies. We thus examined serum samples from patients with systemic mastocytosis (SM) and found EVs with a mast cell signature including the presence of tryptase, FcεRI, MRGX2, and KIT. The concentration of these EVs correlated with parameters…

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Isolation and characterization of NY-ESO-1-specific T cell receptors restricted on various MHC molecules [Medical Sciences]

Tumor-specific T cell receptor (TCR) gene transfer enables specific and potent immune targeting of tumor antigens. Due to the prevalence of the HLA-A2 MHC class I supertype in most human populations, the majority of TCR gene therapy trials targeting public antigens have employed HLA-A2–restricted TCRs, limiting this approach to those…

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Redox, amino acid, and fatty acid metabolism intersect with bacterial virulence in the gut [Microbiology]

The gut metabolic landscape is complex and is influenced by the microbiota, host physiology, and enteric pathogens. Pathogens have to exquisitely monitor the biogeography of the gastrointestinal tract to find a suitable niche for colonization. To dissect the important metabolic pathways that influence virulence of enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC), we…

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Median nerve stimulation induces analgesia via orexin-initiated endocannabinoid disinhibition in the periaqueductal gray [Neuroscience]

Adequate pain management remains an unmet medical need. We previously revealed an opioid-independent analgesic mechanism mediated by orexin 1 receptor (OX1R)-initiated 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG) signaling in the ventrolateral periaqueductal gray (vlPAG). Here, we found that low-frequency median nerve stimulation (MNS) through acupuncture needles at the PC6 (Neiguan) acupoint (MNS-PC6) induced a

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Dopamine D2 receptor-mediated circuit from the central amygdala to the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis regulates impulsive behavior [Neuroscience]

Impulsivity is closely associated with addictive disorders, and changes in the brain dopamine system have been proposed to affect impulse control in reward-related behaviors. However, the central neural pathways through which the dopamine system controls impulsive behavior are still unclear. We found that the absence of the D2 dopamine receptor…

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Activation of orexin system facilitates anesthesia emergence and pain control [Neuroscience]

Orexin (also known as hypocretin) neurons in the hypothalamus play an essential role in sleep–wake control, feeding, reward, and energy homeostasis. The likelihood of anesthesia and sleep sharing common pathways notwithstanding, it is important to understand the processes underlying emergence from anesthesia. In this study, we investigated the role of…

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Coiled-coil structure-dependent interactions between polyQ proteins and Foxo lead to dendrite pathology and behavioral defects [Neuroscience]

Neurodegenerative disorders, such as Huntington’s diseases and spinocerebellar ataxias (SCAs), are driven by proteins with expanded polyglutamine (polyQ) tracts. Recently, coiled-coil structures in polyQ regions of such proteins were shown to facilitate aggregate formation and ultimately lead to cell death. However, the molecular mechanism linking these structural domains to neuronal…

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Metabolic regulation of female puberty via hypothalamic AMPK-kisspeptin signaling [Physiology]

Conditions of metabolic distress, from malnutrition to obesity, impact, via as yet ill-defined mechanisms, the timing of puberty, whose alterations can hamper later cardiometabolic health and even life expectancy. AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), the master cellular energy sensor activated in conditions of energy insufficiency, has a major central role in…

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JAZ repressors of metabolic defense promote growth and reproductive fitness in Arabidopsis [Plant Biology]

Plant immune responses mediated by the hormone jasmonoyl-l-isoleucine (JA-Ile) are metabolically costly and often linked to reduced growth. Although it is known that JA-Ile activates defense responses by triggering the degradation of JASMONATE ZIM DOMAIN (JAZ) transcriptional repressor proteins, expansion of the JAZ gene family in vascular plants has hampered…

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ATP compartmentation in plastids and cytosol of Arabidopsis thaliana revealed by fluorescent protein sensing [Plant Biology]

Matching ATP:NADPH provision and consumption in the chloroplast is a prerequisite for efficient photosynthesis. In terms of ATP:NADPH ratio, the amount of ATP generated from the linear electron flow does not meet the demand of the Calvin–Benson–Bassham (CBB) cycle. Several different mechanisms to increase ATP availability have evolved, including cyclic…

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More than $1 billion needed annually to secure Africa’s protected areas with lions [Sustainability Science]

Protected areas (PAs) play an important role in conserving biodiversity and providing ecosystem services, yet their effectiveness is undermined by funding shortfalls. Using lions (Panthera leo) as a proxy for PA health, we assessed available funding relative to budget requirements for PAs in Africa’s savannahs. We compiled a dataset of…

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Multiscale effects of heating and cooling on genes and gene networks [Systems Biology]

Most organisms must cope with temperature changes. This involves genes and gene networks both as subjects and agents of cellular protection, creating difficulties in understanding. Here, we study how heating and cooling affect expression of single genes and synthetic gene circuits in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We discovered that nonoptimal temperatures induce…

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Dynamic regulation of HIV-1 capsid interaction with the restriction factor TRIM5{alpha} identified by magic-angle spinning NMR and molecular dynamics simulations [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

The host factor protein TRIM5α plays an important role in restricting the host range of HIV-1, interfering with the integrity of the HIV-1 capsid. TRIM5 triggers an antiviral innate immune response by functioning as a capsid pattern recognition receptor, although the precise mechanism by which the restriction is imposed is…

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Conformational entropy of a single peptide controlled under force governs protease recognition and catalysis [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

An immense repertoire of protein chemical modifications catalyzed by enzymes is available as proteomics data. Quantifying the impact of the conformational dynamics of the modified peptide remains challenging to understand the decisive kinetics and amino acid sequence specificity of these enzymatic reactions in vivo, because the target peptide must be…

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Mechanisms underlying contrast-dependent orientation selectivity in mouse V1 [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

Recent experiments have shown that mouse primary visual cortex (V1) is very different from that of cat or monkey, including response properties—one of which is that contrast invariance in the orientation selectivity (OS) of the neurons’ firing rates is replaced in mouse with contrast-dependent sharpening (broadening) of OS in excitatory…

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TRAF4 binds to the juxtamembrane region of EGFR directly and promotes kinase activation [Cell Biology]

The activation of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is crucial for triggering diverse cellular functions, including cell proliferation, migration, and differentiation, and up-regulation of EGFR expression or activity is a key factor in triggering the development of cancer. Here we show that overexpression of a scaffold protein, tumor necrosis…

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Forces drive basement membrane invasion in Caenorhabditis elegans [Cell Biology]

During invasion, cells breach basement membrane (BM) barriers with actin-rich protrusions. It remains unclear, however, whether actin polymerization applies pushing forces to help break through BM, or whether actin filaments play a passive role as scaffolding for targeting invasive machinery. Here, using the developmental event of anchor cell (AC) invasion…

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Deep neural network improves fracture detection by clinicians [Computer Sciences]

Suspected fractures are among the most common reasons for patients to visit emergency departments (EDs), and X-ray imaging is the primary diagnostic tool used by clinicians to assess patients for fractures. Missing a fracture in a radiograph often has severe consequences for patients, resulting in delayed treatment and poor recovery…

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Nonnative plants reduce population growth of an insectivorous bird [Ecology]

Human-dominated landscapes represent one of the most rapidly expanding and least-understood ecosystems on earth. Yet, we know little about which features in these landscapes promote sustainable wildlife populations. Historically, in urban areas, landowners have converted native plant communities into habitats dominated by nonnative species that are not susceptible to pest…

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Poleward migration of the destructive effects of tropical cyclones during the 20th century [Environmental Sciences]

Determination of long-term tropical cyclone (TC) variability is of enormous importance to society; however, changes in TC activity are poorly understood owing to discrepancies among various datasets and limited span of instrumental records. While the increasing intensity and frequency of TCs have been previously documented on a long-term scale using…

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Archaeorhynchus preserving significant soft tissue including probable fossilized lungs [Evolution]

We describe a specimen of the basal ornithuromorph Archaeorhynchus spathula from the Lower Cretaceous Jiufotang Formation with extensive soft tissue preservation. Although it is the fifth specimen to be described, unlike the others it preserves significant traces of the plumage, revealing a pintail morphology previously unrecognized among Mesozoic birds, but…

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Intersexual conflict over seed size is stronger in more outcrossed populations of a mixed-mating plant [Evolution]

In polyandrous species, fathers benefit from attracting greater maternal investment toward their offspring at the expense of the offspring of other males, while mothers should usually allocate resources equally among offspring. This conflict can lead to an evolutionary arms race between the sexes, manifested through antagonistic genes whose expression in…

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Coding mutations in NUS1 contribute to Parkinson’s disease [Genetics]

Whole-exome sequencing has been successful in identifying genetic factors contributing to familial or sporadic Parkinson’s disease (PD). However, this approach has not been applied to explore the impact of de novo mutations on PD pathogenesis. Here, we sequenced the exomes of 39 early onset patients, their parents, and 20 unaffected…

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Association mapping, transcriptomics, and transient expression identify candidate genes mediating plant-pathogen interactions in a tree [Genetics]

Invasive microbes causing diseases such as sudden oak death negatively affect ecosystems and economies around the world. The deployment of resistant genotypes for combating introduced diseases typically relies on breeding programs that can take decades to complete. To demonstrate how this process can be accelerated, we employed a genome-wide association…

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Critical role for the Ly49 family of class I MHC receptors in adaptive natural killer cell responses [Immunology and Inflammation]

Adaptive natural killer (NK) cell memory represents a new frontier in immunology. Work over the last decade has discovered and confirmed the existence of NK cells with antigen-specific memories, which had previously been considered a unique property of T and B cells. These findings have shown that antigen-specific NK cells…

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Paracrine costimulation of IFN-{gamma} signaling by integrins modulates CD8 T cell differentiation [Immunology and Inflammation]

The cytokine IFN-γ is a critical regulator of immune system development and function. Almost all leukocytes express the receptor for IFN-γ, yet each cell type elicits a different response to this cytokine. Cell type-specific effects of IFN-γ make it difficult to predict the outcomes of the systemic IFN-γ blockade and…

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Cocaine reward is reduced by decreased expression of receptor-type protein tyrosine phosphatase D (PTPRD) and by a novel PTPRD antagonist [Medical Sciences]

Receptor-type protein tyrosine phosphatase D (PTPRD) is a neuronal cell-adhesion molecule/synaptic specifier that has been implicated in addiction vulnerability and stimulant reward by human genomewide association and mouse cocaine-conditioned place-preference data. However, there have been no reports of effects of reduced expression on cocaine self-administration. There have been no reports…

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Unraveling the role of B cells in the pathogenesis of an oncogenic avian herpesvirus [Microbiology]

Marek’s disease virus (MDV) is a highly oncogenic alphaherpesvirus that causes immunosuppression, paralysis, and deadly lymphomas in chickens. In infected animals, B cells are efficiently infected and are thought to amplify the virus and transfer it to T cells. MDV subsequently establishes latency in T cells and transforms CD4+ T…

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Flaviviruses have imperfect icosahedral symmetry [Microbiology]

Flaviviruses assemble initially in an immature, noninfectious state and undergo extensive conformational rearrangements to generate mature virus. Previous cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) structural studies of flaviviruses assumed icosahedral symmetry and showed the concentric organization of the external glycoprotein shell, the lipid membrane, and the internal nucleocapsid core. We show here th

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The mechanism of resistance to favipiravir in influenza [Microbiology]

Favipiravir is a broad-spectrum antiviral that has shown promise in treatment of influenza virus infections. While emergence of resistance has been observed for many antiinfluenza drugs, to date, clinical trials and laboratory studies of favipiravir have not yielded resistant viruses. Here we show evolution of resistance to favipiravir in the…

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Noggin rescues age-related stem cell loss in the brain of senescent mice with neurodegenerative pathology [Neuroscience]

Increasing age is the greatest known risk factor for the sporadic late-onset forms of neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer’s disease (AD). One of the brain regions most severely affected in AD is the hippocampus, a privileged structure that contains adult neural stem cells (NSCs) with neurogenic capacity. Hippocampal neurogenesis decreases…

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COP1 SUPPRESSOR 4 promotes seedling photomorphogenesis by repressing CCA1 and PIF4 expression in Arabidopsis [Plant Biology]

CONSTITUTIVELY PHOTOMORPHOGENIC 1 (COP1) and DE-ETIOLATED 1 (DET1) are founding components of two central repressor complexes of photomorphogenesis that trigger the degradation of a larger number of photomorphogenic-promoting factors in darkness. Here, we identify COP1 SUPPRESSOR 4 (CSU4) as a genetic suppressor of the cop1-6 mutation. Mutations in CSU4 largely…

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Specific recognition of two MAX effectors by integrated HMA domains in plant immune receptors involves distinct binding surfaces [Plant Biology]

The structurally conserved but sequence-unrelated MAX (Magnaporthe oryzae avirulence and ToxB-like) effectors AVR1-CO39 and AVR-PikD from the blast fungus M. oryzae are recognized by the rice nucleotide-binding domain and leucine-rich repeat proteins (NLRs) RGA5 and Pikp-1, respectively. This involves, in both cases, direct interaction of the effector with a heavy…

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Computational and experimental insights into the circadian effects of SIRT1 [Systems Biology]

The circadian clock orchestrates 24-h rhythms in physiology in most living organisms. At the molecular level, the dogma is that circadian oscillations are based on a negative transcriptional feedback loop. Recent studies found the NAD+-dependent histone deacetylase, SIRT1, directly regulates acetylation status of clock components and influences circadian amplitude in…

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Correction for Bang et al., Biophysical and functional characterization of Norrin signaling through Frizzled4 [Corrections]

BIOPHYSICS AND COMPUTATIONAL BIOLOGY Correction for “Biophysical and functional characterization of Norrin signaling through Frizzled4,” by Injin Bang, Hee Ryung Kim, Andrew H. Beaven, Jinuk Kim, Seung-Bum Ko, Gyu Rie Lee, Hasup Lee, Wonpil Im, Chaok Seok, Ka Young Chung, and Hee-Jung Choi, which was first published August 13, 2018;…

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In This Issue [This Week in PNAS]

Shifting tropical cyclone hazards Uprooted trees in Hallasan National Park, South Korea, after Typhoon Bolaven struck in August 2012. The long-term variability of tropical cyclone (TC) activity is unclear, largely due to discrepancies among data sets and brief instrumental records. Jan Altman et al. (pp. 11543–11548) estimated the long-term variability…

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Young children flexibly attribute mental states to others [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]

Developmental social psychology has been in turmoil since 2005, when the first study using implicit, nonverbal measures with preverbal infants appeared to show that they could attribute false beliefs to other agents, forming expectations about an agent’s behavior on that basis (1). This was an exciting finding, suggesting that core…

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Outbreeders pull harder in a parental tug-of-war [Evolution]

During development, seeds compete, directly or indirectly, for access to resources supplied by the maternal plant. This competition is expected to be more intense when embryos (and associated endosperms) are less related to each other because they are fertilized by less-related pollen (1). Imprinted genes of paternal origin in offspring…

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Natural killer cells might adapt their inhibitory receptors for memory [Immunology and Inflammation]

Traditional teaching in immunology tells us that antigen-specific recall responses are the realm of adaptive immunity. However, over the past decade, there has been increasing evidence and interest in the concept of innate immune memory. Natural killer (NK) cells are the founding member of the innate lymphocyte family, initially recognized…

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Global trends in infectious diseases of swine [Agricultural Sciences]

Pork accounts for more than one-third of meat produced worldwide and is an important component of global food security, agricultural economies, and trade. Infectious diseases are among the primary constraints to swine production, and the globalization of the swine industry has contributed to the emergence and spread of pathogens. Despite…

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Universality claim of attachment theory: Children’s socioemotional development across cultures [Colloquium Paper]

The first part of this paper reviews the basic tenets of attachment theory with respect to differences in cultural socialization strategies. In one strategy infants have the lead, and the social environment is responsive to the infant’s wishes and preferences. In another strategy the caregivers—children or adults—are experts who know…

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Learning from failures of protocol in cross-cultural research [Colloquium Paper]

The many tools that social and behavioral scientists use to gather data from their fellow humans have, in most cases, been honed on a rarefied subset of humanity: highly educated participants with unique capacities, experiences, motivations, and social expectations. Through this honing process, researchers have developed protocols that extract information…

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Hominoid intraspecific cranial variation mirrors neutral genetic diversity [Anthropology]

Natural selection, developmental constraint, and plasticity have all been invoked as explanations for intraspecific cranial variation in humans and apes. However, global patterns of human cranial variation are congruent with patterns of genetic variation, demonstrating that population history has influenced cranial variation in humans. Here we show that this finding…

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Self-assembling supramolecular dendrimer nanosystem for PET imaging of tumors [Applied Biological Sciences]

Bioimaging plays an important role in cancer diagnosis and treatment. However, imaging sensitivity and specificity still constitute key challenges. Nanotechnology-based imaging is particularly promising for overcoming these limitations because nanosized imaging agents can specifically home in on tumors via the “enhanced permeation and retention” (EPR) effect, thus resulting in enhanced…

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Extensile motor activity drives coherent motions in a model of interphase chromatin [Applied Physical Sciences]

The 3D spatiotemporal organization of the human genome inside the cell nucleus remains a major open question in cellular biology. In the time between two cell divisions, chromatin—the functional form of DNA in cells—fills the nucleus in its uncondensed polymeric form. Recent in vivo imaging experiments reveal that the chromatin…

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Pervasive tertiary structure in the dengue virus RNA genome [Biochemistry]

RNA virus genomes are efficient and compact carriers of biological information, encoding information required for replication both in their primary sequences and in higher-order RNA structures. However, the ubiquity of RNA elements with higher-order folds—in which helices pack together to form complex 3D structures—and the extent to which these elements…

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Hierarchical spidroin micellar nanoparticles as the fundamental precursors of spider silks [Chemistry]

Many natural silks produced by spiders and insects are unique materials in their exceptional toughness and tensile strength, while being lightweight and biodegradable–properties that are currently unparalleled in synthetic materials. Myriad approaches have been attempted to prepare artificial silks from recombinant spider silk spidroins but have each failed to achieve…

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Inner Workings: Hunting for microbial life throughout the solar system [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]

A robotic lander surveys a frosty landscape near the northern pole of Mars sometime in the 2020s. Revving up a powerful 1-meter drill, it bores into the polar subsurface, extracts a sample, and runs it through a battery of cleverly designed instruments. Maybe, just maybe, it uncovers the chemical residues…

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Remote subsurface ocean temperature as a predictor of Atlantic hurricane activity [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]

Predicting North Atlantic hurricane activity months in advance is of great potential societal significance. The ocean temperature, both in terms of North Atlantic/tropical averages and upper ocean heat content, is demonstrated to be a significant predictor. To investigate the relationship between the thermal state of the Atlantic Ocean and the…

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Mean precipitation change from a deepening troposphere [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]

Global climate models robustly predict that global mean precipitation should increase at roughly 2–3% K−1, but the origin of these values is not well understood. Here we develop a simple theory to help explain these values. This theory combines the well-known radiative constraint on precipitation, which says that condensation heating…

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The demise of caterpillar fungus in the Himalayan region due to climate change and overharvesting [Ecology]

Demand for traditional medicine ingredients is causing species declines globally. Due to this trade, Himalayan caterpillar fungus (Ophiocordyceps sinensis) has become one of the world’s most valuable biological commodities, providing a crucial source of income for hundreds of thousands of collectors. However, the resulting harvesting boom has generated widespread concern…

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Cultural impediments to learning to cooperate: An experimental study of high- and low-caste men in rural India [Colloquium Paper]

We report experimental findings on how individuals from different cultures solve a repeated coordination game of common interest. The results overturn earlier findings that fixed pairs are almost assured to coordinate on an efficient and cooperative equilibrium. Subjects in the prior experiments were US university students, whereas the subjects in…

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An experimental investigation of preference misrepresentation in the residency match [Economic Sciences]

The development and deployment of matching procedures that incentivize truthful preference reporting is considered one of the major successes of market design research. In this study, we test the degree to which these procedures succeed in eliminating preference misrepresentation. We administered an online experiment to 1,714 medical students immediately after…

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Physical interactions reduce the power of natural selection in growing yeast colonies [Evolution]

Microbial populations often assemble in dense populations in which proliferating individuals exert mechanical forces on the nearby cells. Here, we use yeast strains whose doubling times depend differently on temperature to show that physical interactions among cells affect the competition between different genotypes in growing yeast colonies. Our experiments demonstrate…

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Population-specific social dynamics in chimpanzees [Colloquium Paper]

Understanding intraspecific variation in sociality is essential for characterizing the flexibility and evolution of social systems, yet its study in nonhuman animals is rare. Here, we investigated whether chimpanzees exhibit population-level differences in sociality that cannot be easily explained by differences in genetics or ecology. We compared social proximity and…

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Broadening horizons: Sample diversity and socioecological theory are essential to the future of psychological science [Colloquium Paper]

The present lack of sample diversity and ecological theory in psychological science fundamentally limits generalizability and obstructs scientific progress. A focus on the role of socioecology in shaping the evolution of morphology, physiology, and behavior has not yet been widely applied toward psychology. To date, evolutionary approaches to psychology have…

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Pressing questions in the study of psychological and behavioral diversity [Social Sciences]

Extreme biased sampling of research participants and the neglect of their cultural context are increasingly recognized as threats to the generalizability of much of what we know about human thought and behavior (1, 2). In addition to reinforcing narrow views of what it means to be human, these parochial research…

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Differential coding of perception in the world’s languages [Colloquium Paper]

Is there a universal hierarchy of the senses, such that some senses (e.g., vision) are more accessible to consciousness and linguistic description than others (e.g., smell)? The long-standing presumption in Western thought has been that vision and audition are more objective than the other senses, serving as the basis of…

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Sophisticated collaboration is common among Mexican-heritage US children [Colloquium Paper]

In light of calls for improving people’s skill in collaboration, this paper examines strengths in processes of collaboration of Mexican immigrant children. Sibling pairs (6–10 years old) in California were asked to collaborate in planning the shortest route through a model grocery store. On average, 14 sibling pairs with Mexican…

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Toward a psychology of Homo sapiens: Making psychological science more representative of the human population [Colloquium Paper]

Two primary goals of psychological science should be to understand what aspects of human psychology are universal and the way that context and culture produce variability. This requires that we take into account the importance of culture and context in the way that we write our papers and in the…

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Expanding the interpretive power of psychological science by attending to culture [Colloquium Paper]

A lack of interpretive power (i.e., the ability to understand individuals’ experiences and behaviors in relation to their cultural contexts) undermines psychology’s understanding of diverse psychological phenomena. Building interpretive power requires attending to cultural influences in research. We describe three characteristics of research that lacks interpretive power: normalizing and overgener

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Should social scientists be distanced from or engaged with the people they study? [Colloquium Paper]

This commentary focuses on two important contrasts in the behavioral sciences: (i) default versus nondefault study populations, where default samples have been used disproportionately (for psychology, the default is undergraduates at major research universities), and (ii) the adoption of a distant versus close (engaged) attitude toward study samples. Previous research…

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Retrospective attribution of false beliefs in 3-year-old children [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]

A current debate in psychology and cognitive science concerns the nature of young children’s ability to attribute and track others’ beliefs. Beliefs can be attributed in at least two different ways: prospectively, during the observation of belief-inducing situations, and in a retrospective manner, based on episodic retrieval of the details…

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Multidimensional measure of immigrant integration [Social Sciences]

The successful integration of immigrants into a host country’s society, economy, and polity has become a major issue for policymakers in recent decades. Scientific progress in the study of immigrant integration has been hampered by the lack of a common measure of integration, which would allow for the accumulation of…

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Scientists keep finding new ways energy drinks are terrible for you

Health Nothing about the combination of stimulants inside Monster and Red Bull is healthy, and some of it is actively harmful. Energy drinks aren’t food. They’re classified as supplements, which means they’re unregulated and free to have as much caffeine as manufacturers want to shove inside a…

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Russia reports computer bug on International Space Station

Russia's space agency says that one of the International Space Station's computers has malfunctioned, but the glitch doesn't pose any risks to the crew.

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Senegal launches African 'cyber-security' school

Senegal on Tuesday inaugurated a cyber-security school to strengthen West Africa's defences against computer hackers and use of the internet for terror funding and propaganda.

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A meat tax may save thousands of lives and millions of dollars

A study suggests that a special tax could reduce meat consumption and prevent 220,000 deaths a year worldwide

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Harvard scientists suggest 'Oumuamua is an alien deviceOumuamua Harvard Alien

'Oumuamua is an oddly shaped, puzzling celestial object because it doesn't act like anything naturally occurring. The issue? The unexpected way it accelerated near the Sun. Is this our first sign of extraterrestrials? It's pronounced: oh MOO-uh MOO-uh. That odd-shaped visitor from beyond our solar system, 'Oumuamua (Hawaiian for "scout"), has been fascinating from the moment it arrived: It's a sp

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New insights into the neural risks and benefits of marijuana use

Research released today underscores both the dangers and the therapeutic promise of marijuana, revealing different effects across the lifespan. Marijuana exposure in the womb or during adolescence may disrupt learning and memory, damage communication between brain regions, and disturb levels of key neurotransmitters and metabolites in the brain. In Alzheimer's disease, however, compounds found in

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Artificial intelligence may fall short when analyzing data across multiple health systems

Study shows deep learning models must be carefully tested across multiple environments before being put into clinical practice.

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Experimental plasma generator offers path forward for better use of landfill gas as energy

Landfill gases contain numerous contaminants, but one group has demonstrated a promising new application of plasma technology capable of removing such compounds. Researchers have demonstrated an experimental plasma device capable of cleaning gas samples of D4, one of the most common siloxanes. Drawing on a technique for creating plasma called dielectric barrier discharge, the group was able to sig

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Plasma-based system provides radical new path for water purification

Many of today's methods of purifying water rely on filters and chemicals that need regular replenishing or maintenance. Millions of people, however, live in areas with limited access to such materials, leading the research community to explore new options of purifying water in using plasmas. Many plasma-based approaches are expensive, but a new class of plasma devices may change that. Researchers

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Societies publish new guidance for the treatment of slow, irregular heartbeats

The American College of Cardiology, the American Heart Association and the Heart Rhythm Society today released a guideline for the evaluation and treatment of patients with bradycardia, or a slow heartbeat, and cardiac conduction disorders.

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Moths survive bat predation through acoustic camouflage fur

Moths are a mainstay food source for bats, which use echolocation to hunt their prey. Scientists are studying how moths have evolved passive defenses over millions of years to resist their primary predators. While some moths have evolved ears that detect the ultrasonic calls of bats, many types of moths remain deaf. In those moths, researchers have found that the insects developed types of 'stealt

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Neural nets to interpret chest X-rays; a random forest model to predict severe nearsightedness

This week, PLOS Medicine launches our Special Issue on Machine Learning in Health and Biomedicine, Guest Edited by Atul Butte of the Institute for Computational Health Sciences at UCSF, Suchi Saria of the Department of Computer Science, Statistics, and Health Policy at Johns Hopkins University and the Malone Center for Engineering in Healthcare, and Aziz Sheikh of the Usher Institute of Population

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How ideas go viral in academia

How ideas move through academia may depend on where those ideas come from as much as their quality, a new study suggests.

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Face the music: Explicit anti-piracy warnings are best deterrent

STOP! This is illegal. You may be monitored and fined. Did that get your attention? Good. Because according to a new UNLV study, this phrasing coupled with a graphic of a computer and download symbol with a prohibitive slash is the most effective way to stop music piracy.

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Why Americans Don’t Vote

TUCSON, Ariz.—The great myth of America’s participatory democracy is that people actually participate. In the 2016 election—the controversial, generation-defining 2016 election—61 percent of voting-age citizens cast a ballot, according to census data. And that was a presidential year. The last time America held midterm elections, 42 percent of voting-age citizens participated. This has been the t

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The Georgia Governor’s Race Has Brought Voter Suppression Into Full View

The Georgia governor’s race is balanced on a knife’s edge. Local polls have the Democratic nominee Stacey Abrams and her GOP opponent, Georgia Secretary of State Brian Kemp, virtually tied . Abrams’s team in particular will scramble to make sure every provisional ballot is completed, that every person who faced challenges to registration is able to participate, that all absentee and vote-by-mail

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To Keep Pace With Moore's Law, Chipmakers Turn to 'Chiplets'

AMD and Intel are combining modular pieces of silicon into a single chip, like assembling Lego blocks.

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Human activity is dissolving the ocean floor

High levels of human-made CO 2 causes ocean acidification that is rapidly dissolving the seafloor, a new study warns. Normally the deep sea bottom is a chalky white. It’s composed, to a large extent, of the mineral calcite (CaCO 3 ) formed from the skeletons and shells of many planktonic organisms and corals. The seafloor plays a crucial role in controlling the degree of ocean acidification. The

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Largely unrecognized role of youth caregivers illuminated in new study

Researchers studied 28 middle school and high school students 12 to 19 years old who are youth caregivers for sick family members. The study is the first of its kind to take a comprehensive look at this population.

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Most patients with cystic fibrosis may receive insufficient antibiotics to fight lung infections

The majority of patients with cystic fibrosis may not achieve blood concentrations of antibiotics sufficiently high enough to effectively fight bacteria responsible for pulmonary exacerbations, leading to worsening pulmonary function, a new study indicates.

4h

Simulating hypersonic flow transitions from smooth to turbulent

To break out of Earth's lower orbit, hypersonic vehicles must reach speeds greater than Mach 5. At these hypersonic speeds, the air particles and gases that flow around the vehicle and interact with the surfaces generate heat and create shock waves that disturb the flow's equilibrium. Researchers created a model to simulate and better understand flow transitions.

4h

Opioid overdose reversal products chemically stable past expiration date, study indicates

A widely used naloxone nasal spray (NNS) and naloxone injection (NIJ), otherwise known as Narcan® and Evzio®, which are administered to prevent opioid overdose deaths, were found to be chemically stable up for at least ten months and beyond one year of the expiration date, respectively.

4h

Novel anti-inflammatory bacterial protein discovered

Researchers have identified a novel protein secreted by a common gut bacterium in zebrafish that reduces inflammation in the gut and delays death by septic shock.

4h

Brain-computer interface advances improve prosthetics, therapies

Advances in connecting neural stimulation to physical control of the body are transforming the development of prosthetics and therapeutic training for people with disabilities, according to new research.

4h

How invasive earthworm feces is altering US soils

Asian jumping earthworms are carving out territory all over the US Midwest and East Coast, leaving in their wake changed soils that are just beginning to be studied.

4h

New measure for the wellbeing of populations could replace Human Development Index

Researchers have introduced a new, simple measure for human wellbeing across countries, called the Human Life Indicator (HLI), that takes inequality into account and could replace the commonly used but error-prone Human Development Index (HDI).

4h

Punctuated earthquakes for New Madrid area: New research uncovers cluster of past events

In 1811 and 1812, the region around New Madrid, Mo., experienced a number of major earthquakes. The final and largest earthquake in this sequence occurred on the Reelfoot fault, and temporarily changed the course of the Mississippi River.

4h

Did a Conspiracy Rob These Treasure Hunters of Millions of Dollars' Worth of Florida Shipwreck Artifacts?

A legal battle between a maritime salvage company and the state of Florida could have implications for some of the oldest European artifacts in the U.S.

4h

NAD can restore mitochondrial function and energy production in MTDPS liver-like cells

A drug screen using the SPECTRUM library identified candidates that restore energy production in DGUOK-deficient liver-like cells, offering the first potential treatment for MTDPS.

4h

High blood pressure poses heart/stroke event risk for people under age 40

People younger than age 40 who have high blood pressure are at increased risk of heart failure, strokes and blood vessel blockages as they age, according to a new study.

4h

Subtle visual cues nudge users to reveal more in online forum

Pictures may be worth a thousand words, but icons may be even more powerful in nudging people to disclose more information online, according to an interdisciplinary team.

4h

Back pain shows significant association with mortality among older women

Researchers found that frequent, persistent back pain is associated with earlier death in a study of more than 8,000 older women who were followed for an average of 14 years.

4h

Nobody wins in a landslide

Researchers are adding specific details on landslides to the Nevada map of known hazards.

4h

RNA microchips: A new chapter in ribonucleic acid synthesis

Ribonucleic acid (RNA) is, along with DNA and protein, one of the three primary biological macromolecules and was probably the first to arise in early life forms. Chemists have developed a new synthetic approach that allows RNA to be chemically synthesized about a million times more efficiently than previously possible.

4h

Warming oceans lead to more fur seal deaths from hookworm infection

Rising ocean temperatures are putting fur seal pups at greater risk of death from hookworm infections, according to new findings.

4h

How melanoma evades targeted therapies

New research shows how metastatic melanoma becomes resistant to a common class of targeted therapy.

4h

Tropical mountain species in the crosshairs of climate change

Lack of varied seasons and temperatures in tropical mountains have led to species that are highly adapted to their narrow niches, creating the right conditions for new species to arise in these areas, according to a new study. Still, the same traits that make tropical mountains among the most biodiverse ecosystems on Earth also make the species that live there more vulnerable to rapid climate chan

4h

Tracking down microRNA candidates that can contribute to disease

A novel computational tool called ADmiRE extensively annotates human microRNA variants to determine which ones are likely to contribute to or cause diseases.

4h

Impact of opioid epidemic on children varies by state

Each state takes a different approach on how it tries to stem the impact of opioid abuse, resulting in significant variation between opioid prescription rates and the number of children placed into foster care.

4h

Tiny thorn snail discovered in Panama's backyard

Five years after one particular tiny thorn snail from Panama was identified as new to science, it is described in a scientific article. The official discovery only became possible after earlier this year glassy shells were collected from the La Amistad International Park, Chiriquí, Panama. Successfully recognized thanks to modern computed tomographic scans, the species adds to the few snails ever

4h

Artificial intelligence predicts Alzheimer's years before diagnosis

Artificial intelligence (AI) technology improves the ability of brain imaging to predict Alzheimer's disease, according to a new study.

4h

Emotional vulnerabilities shape complex behavioral arrangement of toddlers with ASD

Emerging evidence suggests that emotional vulnerabilities in autism spectrum disorder are already present in the second year of life and are independent of autism symptoms.

4h

Why a stream of plasma makes chemical reactions more efficient

A whiff of plasma, when combined with a nanosized catalyst, can cause chemical reactions to proceed faster, more selectively, at lower temperatures, or at lower voltages than without plasma. Using computer modeling, researchers investigated the interactions between plasmas and metal catalysts embedded into ceramic beads in a packed bed reactor. They discovered that together, the metals, beads and

5h

The Other Press Secretary

On Monday morning, Sean Hannity, the talk-radio host and the star of the Fox News Channel’s angriest and most watched prime-time show, defended himself in a tweet. “In spite of reports,” Hannity insisted, “I will be doing a live show from Cape Girardeau and interviewing President Trump before the rally. To be clear, I will not be on stage campaigning with the President. I am covering final rally

5h

Novel mutation affecting YARS causes multisystem disease

Researchers have identified a novel missense mutation in tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase (YARS c.499C>A, p.Pro167Thr) that causes a severe recessive disorder in affected individuals. The report includes detailed clinical characterization of seven related Amish children who were homozygous for the variant. The children all exhibited poor growth, developmental delay, abnormal brain white matter, hearing los

5h

Risk factors of type 2 diabetes and CVD accumulate in children with poor aerobic fitness

Risk factors of type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease accumulate in children who have poor aerobic fitness, a new study from the University of Eastern Finland shows. The study also found that the traditional way of expressing aerobic fitness in proportion to total body mass overestimates the role of aerobic fitness in identifying children at an increased risk of these diseases.

5h

Commercial airliners reveal three-dimensional distribution of atmospheric CO2 over Asia Pacific

Ten years of commercial airliner-based measurements uniquely revealed three-dimensional distribution of atmospheric CO2 and its seasonality over Asia Pacific. Asia has been only sparsely monitored for atmospheric CO2, despite the growing importance of the region in the global carbon cycle. The remarkable feature of CO2 over Asia is depleted CO2 concentrations confined in the Asian summer monsoon a

5h

Making cheese and yogurt taste better

Researchers have developed a new methodical approach. It allows for the faster identification of flavor-giving protein fragments in foods such as cheese or yogurt, thus optimizing production processes.

5h

Sign language reveals the hidden logical structure, and limitations, of spoken language

Sign languages can help reveal hidden aspects of the logical structure of spoken language, but they also highlight its limitations because speech lacks the rich iconic resources that sign language uses on top of its sophisticated grammar.

5h

A changing climate necessitates rethinking tropical marine conservation, researchers say

In a new article, researchers are calling for a rethink on tropical marine conservation efforts, as people who previously relied on coral reefs for food and income are increasingly looking to alternative habitats which is putting pressure on the animals that inhabit seagrass meadows.

5h

A new piece to the puzzle sheds light on how UHRF1 regulates gene activity

Scientists have discovered new details about the UHRF1 protein. UHRF1 catalyses particular steps that are required for marking DNA with epigenetic modifications that suppress parts of the genome. The molecule may serve as a target for drug therapies because it is produced at elevated levels in cancer cells.

5h

33,000 people die every year due to infections with antibiotic-resistant bacteria

An new study estimates the burden of five types of infections caused by antibiotic-resistant bacteria of public health concern in the European Union and in the European Economic Area (EU/EEA). The burden of disease is measured in number of cases, attributable deaths and disability-adjusted life years (DALYs). These estimates are based on data from the European Antimicrobial Resistance Surveillance

5h

Study illuminates the largely unrecognized role of youth caregivers

Julia Belkowitz, M.D., M.P.H., a University of Miami Miller School of Medicine physician-researcher and pediatrician, and colleagues studied 28 middle school and high school students 12 to 19 years old who are youth caregivers for sick family members. The study is the first of its kind to take a comprehensive look at this population; they reported their findings online in the Journal of Adolescenc

5h

White line of algae deaths marks uplift in 2016 Chilean earthquake

A bleached fringe of dead marine algae, strung along the coastlines of two islands off the coast of Chile, offers a unique glimpse at how the land rose during the 2016 magnitude 7.6 Chiloé earthquake, according to a new study in the Bulletin of the Seismological Society of America.

5h

Small tech firm beats Samsung to release world's first folding smartphone

The phone, called FlexPai, features three screens when folded and it costs $1,318. FlexPai runs Royole's custom Water OS, which will likely be a downside for consumers. Samsung, which has reportedly spent years developing a flexible smartphone, is expected to release a new device this week. A Chinese tech company unveiled the world's first foldable phone to journalists on Monday, a move that come

5h

Check Your Cake Mix: Duncan Hines Recalls Several Products Because They May Contain Salmonella

Some varieties of Duncan Hines instant cake mix are being recalled because they may contain a not-so-tasty ingredient: Salmonella.

5h

Simulating hypersonic flow transitions from smooth to turbulent

To break out of Earth's lower orbit, hypersonic vehicles must reach speeds greater than Mach 5. At these hypersonic speeds, the air particles and gases that flow around the vehicle and interact with the surfaces generate heat and create shock waves that disturb the flow's equilibrium. New research at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign created a model to simulate and better understand f

5h

Women who give birth to boys much more likely to have postnatal depression

A new study into postnatal depression (PND) found the odds of developing this condition increased by 79 percent when mothers had baby boys compared to baby girls. Overall the researchers identified that women who give birth to males are 71-79% more likely to develop PND. Furthermore, women whose births had complications were 174% more likely to experience PND compared to those women who had no com

5h

Ultrathin, ultralight 'nanocardboard'

Engineers have demonstrated a new material they call 'nanocardboard,' an ultrathin equivalent of corrugated paper cardboard. A square centimeter of nanocardboard weighs less than a thousandth of a gram and can spring back into shape after being bent in half. Nanocardboard's stiffness-to-weight ratio makes it ideal for aerospace and microrobotic applications, where every gram counts.

5h

Cambridge Analytica whistleblower calls for online regulation

A whistleblower who claimed data consultancy Cambridge Analytica played a role in obtaining data from Facebook users called Tuesday for greater government regulation of social media and online advertising.

5h

Simulating hypersonic flow transitions from smooth to turbulent

To break out of Earth's lower orbit, hypersonic vehicles must reach speeds greater than Mach 5. At these hypersonic speeds, the air particles and gases that flow around the vehicle and interact with the surfaces generate heat and create shock waves that disturb the flow's equilibrium. New research at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign created a model to simulate and better understand f

5h

Study indicates opioid overdose reversal products chemically stable past expiration date

A widely used naloxone nasal spray (NNS) and naloxone injection (NIJ), otherwise known as Narcan® and Evzio®, which are administered to prevent opioid overdose deaths, were found to be chemically stable up for at least ten months and beyond one year of the expiration date, respectively. The research, Evaluation of Chemical Stability of Naloxone Products Beyond Their Labeled Expiration Dates, was p

5h

VIDEO Se vesten du kan fjernstyre din vovse med

Ved at udnytte, at hunde elsker at jagte lysprikker rundt i stuen, har japanske forskere opfundet en vest, så de kan styre en hund fra mobilen.

5h

NASA's Parker spacecraft makes first close approach to sun

A NASA spacecraft has made its first close approach to the sun, just 2 1/2 months after liftoff.

5h

French hotels sue Airbnb claiming 'unfair competition'

The main trade group for French hotels has sued the home-sharing giant Airbnb, accusing it of unfair competition by "knowingly violating" rules imposed as part of a crackdown in one of the US giant's biggest markets.

5h

Niger turns to drones to protect precious wildlife

Niger is turning to drone technology to help protect a Saharan antelope and other endangered species in Africa's largest terrestrial park.

5h

How invasive earthworm feces is altering US soils

Asian jumping earthworms are carving out territory all over the U.S. Midwest and East Coast, leaving in their wake changed soils that are just beginning to be studied.

5h

Researchers discover novel anti-inflammatory bacterial protein

Researchers at the University of Oregon have identified a novel protein secreted by a common gut bacterium in zebrafish that reduces inflammation in the gut and delays death by septic shock.

5h

Harvard Scientists Say Aliens May Explain Bizarre Interstellar Object 'Oumuamua (But Probably Not)

Does oddball space object 'Oumuamua's weird acceleration hint at alien origins?

6h

NASA team to fly first-ever coronagraph to determine the formation of the solar wind

An observational technique first proposed more than four decades ago to measure the physical parameters of the corona that determine the formation of the solar wind—the source of disturbances in Earth's upper atmosphere—will be demonstrated for the first time next year. These parameters are the density, temperature, and speed of electrons in the corona.

6h

Europeans Are Obsessed With the U.S. Midterms

“The very character of our nation is on the ballot on Tuesday,” Joe Biden, the former vice president, said in his final pitch to voters Monday ahead of the U.S. midterm elections. “The rest of the world is looking.” And the rest of the world is looking. Though the midterms are usually shrugged off by international audiences, who tend to focus more on U.S. presidential contests, this year is diffe

6h

Most patients with cystic fibrosis may receive insufficient antibiotics to fight lung infections

The majority of patients with cystic fibrosis may not achieve blood concentrations of antibiotics sufficiently high enough to effectively fight bacteria responsible for pulmonary exacerbations, leading to worsening pulmonary function, indicates a study led by researchers at Children's National Health System.

6h

How invasive earthworm feces is altering US soils

Asian jumping earthworms are carving out territory all over the US Midwest and East Coast, leaving in their wake changed soils that are just beginning to be studied.

6h

Brain-computer interface advances improve prosthetics, therapies

Advances in connecting neural stimulation to physical control of the body are transforming the development of prosthetics and therapeutic training for people with disabilities, according to new research. The findings were presented at Neuroscience 2018, the annual meeting of the Society for Neuroscience and the world's largest source of emerging news about brain science and health.

6h

Family tree of 400 million people shows genetics has limited influence on longevity

Although long life tends to run in families, genetics has far less influence on life span than previously thought, according to a new analysis of more than 400 million people. The results suggest that the heritability of life span is well below past estimates, which failed to account for our tendency to select partners with similar traits to our own.

6h

Mothers prefer daughters and fathers prefer sons

A research group has studied whether parents' gender preferences and investment in offspring are affected by their status, wealth, education or childhood environment. Instead, parental preferences were best predicted by their sex. These results help to make sense of the often contradictory findings on offspring sex preferences.

6h

Trying to understand cells' interior design

Scientists have explained how liquid-like droplets made of proteins and DNA form in vitro. Currently, there is a huge interest in understanding the molecular mechanisms behind the creation of such droplets, as it is linked to some human diseases, such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). The results showed how much the sequence of DNA matters in the formation of such droplets.

6h

Researchers develop new test to objectively measure pain, test medications

The electroencephalography-based test could improve patient pain assessments and reduce the over-prescription of opioids, the researchers say.

6h

Regeneration in the digestive tract

The human gut is teeming with billions of beneficial bacteria. Therapies that use antibiotics often destroy most of them. Whether and how the intestinal flora will subsequently recover has been investigated by a research team.

6h

Cosmic fountain offers clues to how galaxies evolve

Galaxy evolution can be chaotic and messy, but it seems that streams of cold gas spraying out from the region around supermassive black holes may act to calm the storm.

6h

Platypus eating a normal insect diet could ingest at least 69 drugs, research reveals

Insects near waste water could give a platypus or trout half a human dose of antidepressants A platypus living in a creek or stream with waste water could be exposed to 50% of a human daily dose of antidepressants just by eating its normal diet of insects, according to new research. A team of scientists, led by researchers at Monash University, has analysed insects and riparian spiders found in s

6h

Illumina to Buy Pacific Biosciences for $1.2 Billion

The purchase adds long-read sequencing to Illumina's portfolio.

6h

T. Rex Turned Like a Ballerina from a Slow-Motion Nightmare

Most people don't think of the mighty Tyrannosaurus rex as having the grace of a pirouetting ballerina or the poise of a spinning figure skater, but new research indicates that the dinosaur king was quite good at turning to pounce on prey.

6h

MRI shows how zap could cure stomach woes

A new method uses an MRI to show how sending an electric impulse to the vagus nerve could successfully correct stomach complications. The technique could lead to more precise treatment that drugs and dietary changes have not been able to accomplish. More than 60 million people in the US suffer from disorders in the gastrointestinal tract that electrical stimulation could cure. “Eventually, by ask

6h

Researchers discover new gene for hair loss

Hypotrichosis simplex leads to progressive hair loss already in childhood. A team of researchers led by human geneticists at the University Hospital of Bonn has now deciphered a new gene that is responsible for this rare form of hair loss. Changes in the LSS gene lead to impairment of an important enzyme that has a crucial function in cholesterol metabolism. The scientists now present their findin

6h

Oregon researchers discover novel anti-inflammatory bacterial protein

Researchers at the University of Oregon have identified a novel protein secreted by a common gut bacterium in zebrafish that reduces inflammation in the gut and delays death by septic shock.

6h

Election Day 2018 Takes Absentee Ballots to the Extreme in Space

Even on the International Space Station, American astronauts manage to vote — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

6h

A lack of sleep can induce anxiety

Pulling an all-nighter induced anxiety in healthy people, a recent study finds.

6h

Four rhinos die after Chad conservation effort

Four out of six South African rhinos that were transferred to a park in southeast Chad in a bid to revive the endangered species have died, but not from poaching, conservationists say.

6h

Satellite finds Tropical Cyclone 03S developing in Southern Indian Ocean

Tropical Cyclone 03S formed in the Southern Indian Ocean and the NOAA-20 satellite passed overhead and captured a visible image of the storm.

6h

Women who give birth to boys much more likely to have postnatal depression

A University of Kent study into postnatal depression (PND) found the odds of developing this condition increased by 79 percent when mothers had baby boys compared to baby girls. Overall the researchers identified that women who give birth to males are 71-79 percent more likely to develop PND. Furthermore, women whose births had complications were 174 percent more likely to experience PND compared

6h

EU approves Disney's deal to buy Fox entertainment assets

European Union authorities say they have cleared Disney's acquisition of Fox's entertainment assets, provided Disney sells off some TV channels it controls in Europe to maintain competition.

6h

Satellite finds Tropical Cyclone 03S developing in Southern Indian Ocean

Tropical Cyclone 03S formed in the Southern Indian Ocean and the NOAA-20 satellite passed overhead and captured a visible image of the storm.

6h

UK regulator calls for tougher rules on personal data use

Britain's data commissioner on Tuesday called for tougher rules governing the use of personal data by political campaigns around the world, declaring that recent investigations have shown a disturbing disregard for voters and their privacy.

6h

Amazon considering New York amid reports HQ will be split

New York is one of the finalists in Amazon's search to build another headquarters, according to a person familiar with the talks.

6h

Subtle visual cues nudge users to reveal more in online forum

Pictures may be worth a thousand words, but icons may be even more powerful in nudging people to disclose more information online, according to an interdisciplinary team of Penn State researchers.

6h

Tropical mountain species in the crosshairs of climate change

Lack of varied seasons and temperatures in tropical mountains have led to species that are highly adapted to their narrow niches, creating the right conditions for new species to arise in these areas, according to a new study published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

6h

China unveils new 'Heavenly Palace' space station as ISS days numbered

China unveiled on Tuesday a replica of its first permanently crewed space station, which would replace the international community's orbiting laboratory and symbolises the country's major ambitions beyond Earth.

6h

France races to save EU digital tax proposal

France said Tuesday it is prepared to delay an EU-wide tax on high-tech giants in order to save a proposal that faces opposition from Ireland and Nordic countries.

6h

With poo on a pedestal, Bill Gates talks toilet technology

Placing a jar of feces on a pedestal next to him, billionaire philanthropist Bill Gates made a plea Tuesday for the safe disposal of human waste as he kicked off a "Reinvented Toilet" Expo in China.

6h

New measure for the wellbeing of populations could replace Human Development Index

IIASA researchers have introduced a new, simple measure for human wellbeing across countries, called the Human Life Indicator (HLI), that takes inequality into account and could replace the commonly used but error-prone Human Development Index (HDI).

6h

If Elected, Democratic Governors Could Adopt California's Car Rules

Illinois and New Mexico are among the states that could defy the Trump administration with stricter tailpipe emissions standards — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

7h

Generalized Anxiety Disorder: Causes, Symptoms & Treatment

People who experience generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) exhibit excessive anxiety and worry about multiple events or activities most days of the week.

7h

Scientists pinpoint how the 'speed gene' works in thoroughbred racehorses

Scientists have pinpointed the genetic basis that explains why some thoroughbred racehorses are better equipped to race over sprint distances and others over longer distances. The Irish scientists, from Trinity College Dublin and UCD, have discovered the inner workings of a known "speed gene", which directly affects skeletal muscle growth and, in turn, race distance aptitude.

7h

Warming oceans lead to more fur seal deaths from hookworm infection

Rising ocean temperatures are putting fur seal pups at greater risk of death from hookworm infections, according to new findings published in eLife.

7h

Engineers develop ultrathin, ultralight 'nanocardboard'

When choosing materials to make something, trade-offs need to be made between a host of properties, such as thickness, stiffness and weight. Depending on the application in question, finding just the right balance is the difference between success and failure

7h

UC lesson: Nobody wins in a landslide

A University of Cincinnati geologist is studying one of the lesser-known hazards of life in the West: landslides.

7h

Norges nye ubåde kan drives af nyudviklede lithium-ion-batterier

I modsætning til traditionelle blybatterier kan ubåde udstyret med de nye batterier sejle maksimal hastighed uafhængigt af ladetilstanden.

7h

Tracking down microRNA candidates that can contribute to disease

A novel computational tool called ADmiRE extensively annotates human microRNA variants to determine which ones are likely to contribute to or cause diseases.

7h

ALMA and MUSE detect galactic fountain

Observations by ALMA and data from the MUSE spectrograph on ESO's VLT have revealed a colossal fountain of molecular gas powered by a black hole in the brightest galaxy of the Abell 2597 cluster — the full galactic cycle of inflow and outflow powering this vast cosmic fountain has never before been observed in one system.

7h

Tropical mountain species in the crosshairs of climate change

Lack of varied seasons and temperatures in tropical mountains have led to species that are highly adapted to their narrow niches, creating the right conditions for new species to arise in these areas, according to a new study published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. Still, the same traits that make tropical mountains among the most biodiverse ecosystems on Earth also make

7h

Elevated blood pressure in people under 40 poses hazard of developing CVD prematurely

High blood pressure or hypertension is a major health problem that affects more than 100 million people in the US (using the current 130 systolic or 80 diastolic) and over one billion worldwide. Despite being considered a disease of older adults two new studies in the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) are reporting the association of high blood pressure with the risk of premature

7h

Regeneration science takes a leap forward

Researchers led by Tufts University biologists and engineers have found that delivering progesterone to an amputation injury site can induce the regeneration of limbs in otherwise non-regenerative adult frogs — a discovery that furthers understanding of regeneration and could help advance treatment of amputation injuries.

7h

Long noncoding RNA identified as a key regulator of inflammation

Scientists have identified an RNA molecule with broad powers to regulate the body's inflammatory response to infection and injury. Called lincRNA-Cox2, it belongs to a recently discovered, highly abundant class of RNAs whose functions are only beginning to be understood.

7h

Subtle visual cues nudge users to reveal more in online forum

Pictures may be worth a thousand words, but icons may be even more powerful in nudging people to disclose more information online, according to an interdisciplinary team of Penn State researchers.

7h

High blood pressure poses heart/stroke event risk for people under age 40

People younger than age 40 who have high blood pressure are at increased risk of heart failure, strokes and blood vessel blockages as they age, according to a study in JAMA led by Duke Health.

7h

Drug pollution concentrates in stream bugs, passes to predators in water and on land

Sixty-nine pharmaceutical compounds have been detected in stream insects, some at concentrations that may threaten animals that feed on them, such as trout and platypus.

7h

Bioreactor device helps frogs regenerate their legs

A team of scientists designed a device that can induce partial hindlimb regeneration in adult aquatic African clawed frogs (Xenopus laevis) by 'kick-starting' tissue repair at the amputation site. Their findings, appearing Nov. 6 in the journal Cell Reports, introduce a new model for testing 'electroceuticals,' or cell-stimulating therapies.

7h

NAD can restore mitochondrial function and energy production in MTDPS liver-like cells

Mitochondrial DNA depletion syndrome (MTDPS) is a group of genetic disorders that cause a significant reduction in mitochondrial DNA and ATP production. These syndromes are typically fatal during infancy. Currently, there are no treatment options; however, researchers at the Medical University of South Carolina have identified several drug candidates, including nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (N

7h

Mount Sinai develops nanotechnology-based immunotherapy promoting transplant acceptance

Study could transform care for organ transplant recipients.

7h

How melanoma evades targeted therapies

New research shows how metastatic melanoma becomes resistant to a common class of targeted therapy.

7h

More than 60 prescription drugs are getting into river foodchains

Dozens of common pharmaceuticals have been detected in Australian aquatic wildlife, suggesting an urgent need for improved wastewater purification processes

7h

Hormone helps regrow frog legs and may one day lead to a human therapy

Frogs partly regrew their hind legs after a dose of the female sex hormone progesterone was applied to the wound site for just one day

7h

Physicists design new antenna for next-generation super-sensitive magnetometers

Scientists from ITMO University and Lebedev Physical Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences have proposed a new microwave antenna that creates a uniform magnetic field in large volume. It is capable of uniform, coherent addressing of the electronic spins of an ensemble of nanodiamond structure defects. This can be used to create super-sensitive magnetic field detectors for magnetoencephalogr

7h

Galaxy-scale fountain seen in full glory

A billion light-years from Earth lies one of the universe's most massive structures, a giant elliptical galaxy surrounded by a sprawling cluster of other galaxies known as Abell 2597. At the core of the central galaxy, a supermassive black hole is powering the cosmic equivalent of a monumental fountain, drawing in vast stores of cold molecular gas and spraying them back out again in an ongoing cyc

7h

Midterm Elections 2018: All the Hoaxes and Viral Misinformation

WIRED is looking out for the biggest stories, the most common hoaxes, and the likeliest sources of confusion as they emerge throughout the day.

7h

Efter skoletid

Frede Olesen – stop mobberiet af kommunernes sundhedsvæsen, som fint står sig i sammenligningen med det regionale sundhedsvæsen – og lad os i stedet sammen løse de virkelige udfordringer i fremtidens sundhedsvæsen.

7h

The Dawn of the Intra-Family Political Attack Ad

Like many Americans, David Glosser has a lot of opinions about politics. When I spoke with him on the phone, he paused his diatribe against the Trump administration only to cough. But unlike most Americans, Glosser—a retired physician who lives in Yardley, Pennsylvania, which hugs the state’s border with New Jersey—is closely related to one of President Donald Trump’s most influential aides. His

7h

The Surprising Good News About Voting Security

The hacking attempts haven’t slowed. The disinformation campaigns are ongoing. And the warning lights have been “blinking red” for a potential foreign operation aimed at disrupting the U.S. 2018 midterm elections, according to the country’s top intelligence official. But if there is anything positive to take away from Russia’s election interference in 2016, it’s this: America’s election infrastru

7h

The Facebook Election That Wasn’t

In 2016, Donald Trump steamrolled to victory, and Facebook was a major reason why . Trump the candidate was immensely popular on the social network, and his team of digital campaigners spun up a complex voter-targeting scheme that seemed to work, aided by a powerful right-wing-media ecosystem , a gentle shove from Russian operatives , and maybe even Cambridge Analytica . It might have stood to re

7h

The Controversial Art of Relationship Tagging

An unspoken truth about the internet is that all social-media platforms eventually devolve into dating platforms , and Twitter is no different . This is the platform that invented the concept of sliding into someone’s DMs ; lurking and flirting are common among singles. But despite the fact that so many users are looking for love , actually acknowledging that you’ve found it—by tagging your signi

7h

More experiments may help explore what works in conservation

All over the world, countless conservation projects are taking place, attempting to achieve aims from reducing habitat loss, to restoring populations of threatened species. However there is growing awareness that conservationists have not always done a good enough job at evaluating whether the things they do really work.

7h

Being fit boosts your tolerance for cold weather

A new study on mice shows that exercise helps them shiver longer. Brown fat did not seem to be the deciding factor in the mice's ability to combat the cold. The combination of exercise and brown fat is a more likely reason why we can endure extreme temperatures. None Scott Carney was skeptical when he first visited Wim Hof. Ice baths, hyperventilation, long breath holds, and scaling world-class m

7h

Scientists create the 5th form of matter for 6 minutes

It was the first Bose-Einstein condensate made in space Creating the condensate in low gravity allows it to hold longer Scientists hope Bose-Einstein condensate will allow finer detection of subtle quantum phenomena For six minutes, 150 miles above Kiruna, Sweden on January 23, 2017 floated the coldest known spot in the universe. As far as we know, the coldest anything in nature can be is absolut

7h

Why are planets all the same shape?

Space Gravity makes the Earth round. The answer has a lot to do with gravity.

7h

Is political neutrality in classrooms actually neutral?

Teachers felt immense pressure from school leaders and families to respond in a certain way—or not at all—in their classrooms following the 2016 presidential election, according to new research. The study, which appears in the American Educational Research Journal , addresses the widespread but often unspoken idea of political neutrality in the classroom, and how that’s not an effective teaching

7h

Foxconn may import workers for US plant: report

Taiwan-based electronics manufacturer Foxconn is struggling to find enough skilled workers for its planned facility in Wisconsin and may bring in personnel from China, the Wall Street Journal reported Tuesday.

7h

Ryanair shuts down Dutch base despite court ruling

Irish budget airline Ryanair announced Tuesday it had shut down its Eindhoven base for winter, despite a Dutch court decision stopping it from forcing pilots there to transfer abroad.

7h

Exoplanets will need both continents and oceans to form complex life

When it comes to the search for extra-terrestrial life, scientists have a tendency to be a bit geocentric – i.e. they look for planets that resemble our own. This is understandable, seeing as how Earth is the only planet that we know of that supports life. As result, those searching for extra-terrestrial life have been looking for planets that are terrestrial (rocky) in nature, orbit within their

7h

Drug pollution concentrates in stream bugs, passes to predators in water and on land

Sixty-nine pharmaceutical compounds have been detected in stream insects, some at concentrations that may threaten animals that feed on them, such as trout and platypus. When these insects emerge as flying adults, they can pass drugs to spiders, birds, bats, and other streamside foragers. These findings by an international team of researchers were published today in Nature Communications.

7h

Bioreactor device helps frogs regenerate their legs

A team of scientists designed a device that can induce partial hindlimb regeneration in adult aquatic African clawed frogs (Xenopus laevis) by "kick-starting" tissue repair at the amputation site. Their findings, appearing November 6 in the journal Cell Reports, introduce a new model for testing "electroceuticals," or cell-stimulating therapies.

7h

New measure for the wellbeing of populations could replace Human Development Index

IIASA researchers have introduced a new, simple measure for human wellbeing across countries, called the Human Life Indicator (HLI), that takes inequality into account and could replace the commonly used but error-prone Human Development Index (HDI).

7h

Scientists pinpoint how the 'speed gene' works in thoroughbred racehorses

Scientists have discovered the inner workings of a known 'speed gene', which directly affects skeletal muscle growth and, in turn, race distance aptitude in thoroughbred racehorses. Their findings have important implications for a multi-billion dollar industry.

7h

Back pain shows significant association with mortality among older women

Researchers at Boston Medical Center found that frequent, persistent back pain is associated with earlier death in a study of more than 8,000 older women who were followed for an average of 14 years.

7h

Warming oceans lead to more fur seal deaths from hookworm infection

Rising ocean temperatures are putting fur seal pups at greater risk of death from hookworm infections, according to new findings published in eLife.

7h

NASA’s new podcast series takes you to Mars

NASA's new 8-episode podcast series, On a Mission , is a ride-along for its InSight mission to Mars. InSight will look beneath the Martian surface for a deeper understanding of its composition and history. Each episode makes for a compelling half hour of listening. None It's called " InSight ," and it's NASA's latest spacecraft headed to Mars, scheduled to arrive there on November 29. As always,

7h

In the Nucleus, Genes’ Activity Might Depend on Their Location

The nucleus of a cell has something in common with a cardboard box full of kittens: People get so fascinated by the contents that they overlook the container. The nucleus itself is often treated as no more than a featureless membranous bag for holding the vitally dynamic genetic material. Yet in fact it has specialized parts and an internal architecture of its own, and scientists have long specul

7h

Sign language reveals the hidden logical structure, and limitations, of spoken language

Sign languages can help reveal hidden aspects of the logical structure of spoken language, but they also highlight its limitations because speech lacks the rich iconic resources that sign language uses on top of its sophisticated grammar.

7h

CO2 emissions in Russia go up in line with economic growth up until a certain point

Pollution in Russia increases along with economic growth, but only until it reaches a certain threshold, from where it starts to decrease, demonstrates a recent study conducted by Prof. Natalya Ketenci, Yeditepe University, Turkey.

7h

Challenges to developing sustainable animal agriculture in western Pennsylvania

To comply with nutrient-reduction goals in the Chesapeake Bay watershed, Pennsylvania may want to consider the establishment of animal agriculture operations in the western part of the state, according to a team of Penn State researchers.

7h

The secret behind coral reef diversity? Lots of time.

Strap on a diving mask and fins and slip under the crystal-clear water near a coral reef in Indonesia, Papua-New Guinea or the Philippines, and you'll immediately see why divers and snorkelers from across the world flock to the area. Known as the Coral Triangle, the region is famous for its unmatched diversity of reef fish and other marine creatures.

7h

Tiny thorn snail discovered in Panama's backyard

Discoveries of biodiversity at the Lilliputian scale are more tedious than it is for larger animals like elephants, for example. Furthermore, an analysis producing a DNA barcode—a taxonomic method using a short snippet of an organism's DNA—is not enough to adequately identify it to the species level.

7h

RNA microchips

Ribonucleic acid (RNA) is, along with DNA and protein, one of the three primary biological macromolecules and was probably the first to arise in early life forms. Chemists at the Faculty of Chemistry of the University of Vienna and at McGill University have developed a new synthetic approach that allows RNA to be chemically synthesized about a million times more efficiently than previously possibl

7h

Penn engineers develop ultrathin, ultralight 'nanocardboard'

A team of Penn Engineers has demonstrated a new material they call 'nanocardboard,' an ultrathin equivalent of corrugated paper cardboard. A square centimeter of nanocardboard weighs less than a thousandth of a gram and can spring back into shape after being bent in half. Nanocardboard's stiffness-to-weight ratio makes it ideal for aerospace and microrobotic applications, where every gram counts.

7h

Nobody wins in a landslide

The University of Cincinnati is working with the Nevada Bureau of Mines and Geology to add specific details on landslides to the state's map of known hazards.

7h

Researchers find novel mutation affecting YARS causes multisystem disease

Researchers have identified a novel missense mutation in tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase (YARS c.499C>A, p.Pro167Thr) that causes a severe recessive disorder in affected individuals. The report includes detailed clinical characterization of seven related Amish children who were homozygous for the variant. The children all exhibited poor growth, developmental delay, abnormal brain white matter, hearing los

7h

Cosmic fountain offers clues to how galaxies evolve

Galaxy evolution can be chaotic and messy, but it seems that streams of cold gas spraying out from the region around supermassive black holes may act to calm the storm.

7h

Galaxy-scale fountain seen in full glory

ALMA observations of Abell 2597 show the first clear and compelling evidence for the simultaneous infalling and outflow of gas driven by a supermassive black hole.

7h

Impact of opioid epidemic on children varies by state

Each state takes a different approach on how it tries to stem the impact of opioid abuse, resulting in significant variation between opioid prescription rates and the number of children placed into foster care.

7h

Do sexual minority women receive appropriate sexual and reproductive health counseling?

According to a new study that used data from the National Survey of Family Growth 2006-2015, lesbian women were less likely to report receiving a birth control prescription or birth control counseling compared with heterosexual women.

7h

From lotion to ocean liner

More than 20 million people board cruise ships each year to enjoy a little rest and relaxation. The lucky travelers liberally apply sunscreen before sunning themselves on deck, while the ship's intricate machinery chugs forward, propelling the vessel toward unknown destinations.

7h

Water, water not quite everywhere

Are environmental changes in the Mediterranean region influencing human mobility in the West Asia and North Africa (WANA) region? That is the question that Bruno Venditto of the Institute of Studies on Mediterranean Societies, at the Italian National Council of Research, in Naples, Italy, sets out to answer in the International Journal of Migration and Residential Mobility.

7h

How function may abruptly emerge or disappear in physical and biological systems

In physical, biological and technological systems, the time that a system's components take to influence each other can affect the transition to synchronization, an important finding that improves understanding of how these systems function, according to a study led by Georgia State University.

7h

Lifespan Less Heritable than Previously Thought

Some of the longevity that appears to run in families can instead be attributed to people choosing life partners with similar characteristics.

7h

Kentucky Is Turning to Drones to Fix Its Unsolved-Murder Crisis

Keith Allen Bledsoe, the sixth teenage homicide victim in Lexington, Kentucky, this year, died as the other five had: by gunshot . On June 26, Lexington police found the 17-year-old Bledsoe’s body in the streets of Harris Court, a cul-de-sac near I-64. If confrontation or argument had preceded Bledsoe’s murder, none of the neighbors reported hearing it to police. If they heard gunshots, seemingly

7h

Fox News to stop airing Trump's controversial immigration ad

The 30-second ad shows Luis Bracamontes, an illegal immigrant who killed two policemen, and footage of the migrant caravan. Critics say the ad is racially charged and is meant to conjure fear before the midterm elections. Fox News, typically the most pro-Trump news channel, took some by surprise when it announced it would no longer air the commercial. Fox News will no longer air an immigration ad

7h

Why I have coffee with people who send me hate mail | Özlem Cekic

Özlem Cekic's email inbox has been full of hate mail since 2007, when she won a seat in the Danish Parliament — becoming the first female Muslim to do so. At first she just deleted the emails, dismissing them as the work of fanatics, until one day a friend made an unexpected suggestion: to reach out to the hate mail writers and invite them to meet for coffee. Hundreds of "dialogue coffee" meeting

7h

RNAi: The secret to making our food better

Bad apples may be a thing of the past. Scientists can now improve crops without genetic modification.

7h

Upgraded computational tool boosts search for cancer vulnerabilities

Researchers on the Broad Institute's Cancer Dependency Map (DepMap) team have released DEMETER2, an upgraded version of an open source software tool that identifies cancer cells' genetic dependencies (genes they need in order to survive).

7h

Scientists use 'hydrogen blisters' to lower the cost of electronic devices

In cooperation with French and Greek researchers, scientists from the National Research Nuclear University MEPhI have found a simple way to lower the production costs of nano-electronics through controlled deformation of nanotubes and other tiny objects. Their findings were published in Nanotechnology.

7h

Dominant bird species found to be more successful than weaker species in economically advanced cities

A pair of researchers with Queen's University in Canada has found that dominant species of birds in economically advanced cities have higher numbers than weaker species. In their paper published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Paul Martin and Frances Bonier describe their study of hundreds of bird species living in cities around the globe and what they found.

7h

Being fit boosts your tolerance for cold weather

A new study on mice shows that exercise helps them shiver longer. Brown fat did not seem to be the deciding factor in the mice's ability to combat the cold. The combination of exercise and brown fat is a more likely reason why we can endure extreme temperatures. None Scott Carney was skeptical when he first visited Wim Hof. Ice baths, hyperventilation, long breath holds, and scaling world-class m

7h

Egypt says archaeologists found more artifacts at Cairo dig

Egypt says archaeologists working at a dig in Cairo have found several fragments of stone slabs with inscriptions dating back up to 4,000 years.

7h

A new piece to the puzzle sheds light on how UHRF1 regulates gene activity

Scientists at Helmholtz Zentrum München have discovered new details about the UHRF1 protein. UHRF1 catalyses particular steps that are required for marking DNA with epigenetic modifications that suppress parts of the genome. As reported in Molecular Cell, the molecule may serve as a target for drug therapies because it is produced at elevated levels in cancer cells.

8h

Sarcopenic obesity: The ignored phenotype that need more studies for a better understanding

A new condition, that occurs in the presence of both sarcopenia and obesity and termed as '[sarcopenic obesity', and that describes under the same phenotype the increase in body fat mass deposition, and the reduction in lean mass and muscle strength.

8h

Research calls for new approach to tropical marine conservation

A new article by a Swansea University researcher has called for a rethink on tropical marine conservation efforts, as people who previously relied on coral reefs for food and income are increasingly looking to alternative habitats which is putting pressure on the animals that inhabit seagrass meadows.

8h

33,000 people die every year due to infections with antibiotic-resistant bacteria

An ECDC study estimates the burden of five types of infections caused by antibiotic-resistant bacteria of public health concern in the European Union and in the European Economic Area (EU/EEA). The burden of disease is measured in number of cases, attributable deaths and disability-adjusted life years (DALYs). These estimates are based on data from the European Antimicrobial Resistance Surveillanc

8h

Sign language reveals the hidden logical structure, and limitations, of spoken language

Sign languages can help reveal hidden aspects of the logical structure of spoken language, but they also highlight its limitations because speech lacks the rich iconic resources that sign language uses on top of its sophisticated grammar.

8h

CO2 emissions in Russia go up in line with economic growth up until a certain point

Environmental pollution in Russia increases along with economic growth, but only until it reaches a certain threshold, from where it starts to decrease, demonstrates a recent study published in the open-access Russian Journal of Economics by Prof. Natalya Ketenci, Yeditepe University. Using data from 1991-2016, she also looks into the impact and causality of key determinants for CO2 emissions. As

8h

Brown researchers develop new test to objectively measure pain, test medications

The electroencephalography-based test could improve patient pain assessments and reduce the over-prescription of opioids, the researchers say.

8h

Making cheese & co. taste better

Researchers at the Technical University of Munich (TUM), the Leibniz-Institute for Food Systems Biology, and the University of Hohenheim have developed a new methodical approach. It allows for the faster identification of flavor-giving protein fragments in foods such as cheese or yogurt, thus optimizing production processes.

8h

Regeneration in the digestive tract

The human gut is teeming with billions of beneficial bacteria. Therapies that use antibiotics often destroy most of them. Whether and how the intestinal flora will subsequently recover has been investigated by a research team that included scientists from the MDC. The results have been published in the scientific journal Nature Microbiology.

8h

Family tree of 400 million people shows genetics has limited influence on longevity

Although long life tends to run in families, genetics has far less influence on life span than previously thought, according to a new analysis of more than 400 million people. The results suggest that the heritability of life span is well below past estimates, which failed to account for our tendency to select partners with similar traits to our own. The research was published in GENETICS, a journ

8h

Artificial intelligence predicts Alzheimer's years before diagnosis

Artificial intelligence (AI) technology improves the ability of brain imaging to predict Alzheimer's disease, according to a new study.

8h

Inside the Alternative Universe of the Trump Rallies

K im Moore clapped, pulled out her smartphone, and zoomed in to snap a picture of President Donald Trump just a few hundred feet away on the stage Sunday night in Chattanooga. She and her husband listened as Trump talked about how one of the women who’d accused Brett Kavanaugh of sexual misconduct had recanted. They hadn’t heard of this before, quite possibly because it wasn’t true. The woman in

8h

Vince Staples’s Sunny, Somber Love Letter to the West Coast

Vince Staples is always on the move, but his heart stays in the LBC. The North Long Beach–bred 25-year-old has spent much of his dizzying rap career joining the ranks of musicians who put on for their city before he was even born. Before Staples, there were Snoop Dogg, Warren G, and Daz Dillinger. There were Nate Dogg, Knoc-Turn’al, and RBX. Staples is a remarkable talent, and the booms and bounc

8h

Fejl og mangler i artikel om hjerte-CT

Misvisende og usikre validerede tal, og en overskrift, der peger i øst og en diskussionen i artiklen, der peger i vest.

8h

Fælles tilbud fra region og kommuner til børn og unge

Nyt tilbud i Region Sjælland skal koordinere indsats over for børn og unge med psykiske problemer.

8h

Metop weather satellite prepares for lift-off

Europe is sending up a front-line weather satellite containing components made over a decade ago.

8h

Gene therapy injection into spinal cord halts ALS in adult mice

A new way to deliver DNA to spinal nerve cells brings us a step closer to a gene therapy for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

8h

The Key to a Long Life Has Little to Do With ‘Good Genes’

Alphabet's longevity lab Calico trawled through Ancestry's massive genealogy database to study human longevity—and found that DNA matters less than people have long believed.

8h

The Problem Behind a Viral Video of a Persistent Baby Bear

For many people, a two-and-a-half-minute video of a baby brown bear trying to scale a snow-covered mountain was a life-affirming testament to the power of persistence. As it begins, the cub is standing with its mother on the side of a perilously steep ridge. The mother begins walking across, and despite slipping a few times on the loose snow, she soon reaches the top. Her cub, following tentative

8h

A Longer Life May Not Be in Your Genes

Long life spans tend to run in families, a phenomenon that's often attributed to people's genes. But a new, large study questions that.

8h

A changing climate necessitates rethinking tropical marine conservation

A new article by a Swansea University researcher has called for a rethink on tropical marine conservation efforts, as people who previously relied on coral reefs for food and income are increasingly looking to alternative habitats which is putting pressure on the animals that inhabit seagrass meadows.

8h

Staring at stardust

Dust particles in space form the basis for new stars and planets. But what do these particles consist of and how do they behave? Sascha Zeegers studied this. Ph.D. defence 1 November.

8h

Patienter med ødelagt ryg lærer at gå med elektrisk stimulering

Tre patienter har genvundet evnen til at gå med assistance efter fem måneders behandling med målrettet elektrisk stimulering.

8h

External structure can affect the function of enzymes

As biocatalysts, enzymes are involved in many metabolic processes. They bind to a particular substance, i.e. the substrate, and convert it. Generally, the substrate-binding pocket inside the enzyme determines which type of substrate it processes.

8h

Novel tracer developed for precision targeting of non-small cell lung cancer

Researchers have developed a new nuclear medicine tracer that could improve diagnosis and treatment of non-small cell lung cancer. Research published in the November issue of The Journal of Nuclear Medicine found that the new tracer, 99mTc-HYNIC-cMBP, produced clearer images in less time than currently used tracers and was more rapidly eliminated from the body, reducing radiation exposure.

8h

Emotional vulnerabilities shape complex behavioral arrangement of toddlers with ASD

At the time when autism spectrum disorder (ASD) can be first reliably diagnosed, toddlers affected by ASD are already displaying emotional vulnerabilities potentially foreshadowing the emergence of co-morbid affective and behavioral conditions highly prevalent in older children, reports a study published in the Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry (JAACAP).

8h

Pathway to resolve allergic asthma is discovered

Researchers identify the function of a protein that controls allergic diseases. Study could lead to development of medications for autoimmune disorders and other diseases, such as certain types of cancer.

8h

Colonizing Mars means contaminating Mars – and never knowing for sure if it had its own native life

The closest place in the universe where extraterrestrial life might exist is Mars, and human beings are poised to attempt to colonize this planetary neighbor within the next decade. Before that happens, we need to recognize that a very real possibility exists that the first human steps on the Martian surface will lead to a collision between terrestrial life and biota native to Mars.

8h

First trials of innovative, non-invasive mineral exploration technologies

In its recently published action plan for batteries which identifies EU sources for the minerals required to produce batteries, the European Commission has highlighted the essential role mineral raw materials will play to transform Europe into a low-carbon and circular economy, while strengthening simultaneously Europe's production and value chains. The 36-months project INFACT, funded under the E

8h

Device improves balance in 100% of vets with Gulf War illness

A new device can improve balance for Gulf War veterans with unexplained illnesses that cause fatigue, headaches, respiratory disorders, and memory problems. The study is the first to examine how Gulf War illnesses affect veterans’ vestibular systems, which are integral for balance, memory, and brain blood flow. The condition, which affects Gulf War veterans includes a cluster of medically unexpla

8h

I deliberately sent myself to prison in Iceland – they didn't even lock the cell doors there

Iceland is a small country tucked away on the edge of Europe. It has a population of only about 340,000 people. Iceland's prisons are small too. There are only five, altogether housing fewer than 200 prisoners. Of these five, two are open prisons. I had visited them both before, and they left me intrigued. I wanted to get to know them better.

8h

Spanking Is Still Really Common and Still Really Bad for Kids

The good news about spanking is that parents today are less likely to do it to their children than parents in the past. The bad news is that parents today still spank their kids—a lot. “Some estimates are that by the time a child reaches the fifth grade [in the United States], 80 percent of children have been spanked,” says George Holden, a professor of psychology at Southern Methodist University

8h

These Three Races Could Flip the Senate

What would it take for Democrats to win the Senate? Until now, it’s a question most strategists have brushed off. Republicans may hold a one-seat majority in the Senate, but their members on the ballot on Tuesday include a litany of popular incumbents. Moreover, with 10 Democrats up for reelection in states Donald Trump carried in 2016, Republicans have concerned themselves not so much with maint

8h

New antenna concept developed for cars

Telecommunications is becoming ever more important for vehicles. At TU Wien, a new antenna concept has now been developed for cars.

8h

Researchers decode the toxin complex of the plague bacterium and other germs

Bacteria have established various strategies to infect organisms and use them as sources of nutrients. Many microbes use toxins that break down membranes by simply piercing through the outer shell of the cells. Human-pathogenic bacteria such as the plague bacterium Yersinia pestis or other bacteria from the salmonella family developed a much more subtle mechanism: they inject their poison by apply

8h

Forget the 'cloud', soon we'll be on the 'edge' when it comes to smart tech

Time travel to the UK in 2025: Harry is a teenager with a smartphone and Pauline is a senior citizen with Alzheimer's who relies on smart glasses for independent living. Harry is frustrated his favourite online game is slow, and Pauline is anxious since her healthcare app is unresponsive.

9h

How ‘stealth’ leukemia sneaks back after remission

A new study offers a potential explanation for why many patients with acute myeloid leukemia experience a relapse after a stem cell transplant, and suggests a therapeutic approach that may help them back into remission. Patients with AML, an aggressive cancer of the blood, often receive treatment in the form of stem cell transplantation, in which a compatible donor’s blood-forming cells are trans

9h

New study shows that mothers prefer daughters and fathers prefer sons

Finnish-American research group has studied whether parents' gender preferences and investment in offspring are affected by their status, wealth, education or childhood environment. Instead, parental preferences were best predicted by their sex. These results help to make sense of the often contradictory findings on offspring sex preferences.

9h

Risk factors of type 2 diabetes and CVD accumulate in children with poor aerobic fitness

Risk factors of type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease accumulate in children who have poor aerobic fitness, a new study from the University of Eastern Finland shows. The study also found that the traditional way of expressing aerobic fitness in proportion to total body mass overestimates the role of aerobic fitness in identifying children at an increased risk of these diseases.

9h

Scientists to track the reaction of crystals to the electric field

The international scientific team developed a new method for measuring the response of crystals on the electric field.The results a collaborative research done at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF) were published in the Journal of Applied Crystallography and appeared on the cover of the October issue.

9h

Trying to understand cells' interior design

IBS Scientists have explained how liquid-like droplets made of proteins and DNA form in vitro. Currently, there is a huge interest in understanding the molecular mechanisms behind the creation of such droplets, as it is linked to some human diseases, such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). The results showed how much the sequence of DNA matters in the formation of such droplets.

9h

Making steps toward improved data storage

Researchers created the world's most powerful electromagnetic pulses to control a data-storage material's physical form, leading to a potential way to scale down memory devices and revolutionize how computers handle information.

9h

Commercial airliners reveal three-dimensional distribution of atmospheric CO2 over Asia Pacific

Ten years of commercial airliner-based measurements uniquely revealed three-dimensional distribution of atmospheric CO2 and its seasonality over Asia Pacific. Asia has been only sparsely monitored for atmospheric CO2, despite the growing importance of the region in the global carbon cycle. The remarkable feature of CO2 over Asia is depleted CO2 concentrations confined in the Asian summer monsoon a

9h

Electroanatomical mapping with non-thrombogenic, stretchable and active multielectrode arrays (MEAs)

To evaluate in vivo physiological functions, electrophysiological signals must be monitored with high precision and high spatial or temporal resolution. Ultraflexible, multielectrode arrays (MEAs) were recently fabricated to establish conformal contact on the surfaces of organs and to measure electrophysiological signal propagation at high spatial-temporal resolution. However, plastic substrates w

9h

Veterinary experts warn cannabis can be a fatal poison to dogs and cats

Ingesting cannabis can be a pleasant experience for people but for dogs and cats, it will almost certainly require a visit to the vet.

9h

RNA microchips

Ribonucleic acid (RNA) is, along with DNA and protein, one of the three primary biological macromolecules and was probably the first to arise in early life forms. In the "RNA world" hypothesis, RNA is able to support life on its own because it can both store information and catalyze biochemical reactions. Even in modern life, the most complex molecular machines in all cells, the ribosomes, are mad

9h

Region Sjælland afskediger 198 medarbejdere i dag

Over halvdelen af fyringerne i Region Sjælland rammer ikke medarbejdere i fronten men derimod i administrationen, siger regionsrådsformand Heino Knudsen.

9h

Astronomers discover new luminous high-redshift quasar

An international team of astronomers has detected a new luminous quasar at a redshift of 7.02. The newly found quasi-stellar object (QSO), designated DELS J003836.10–152723.6, is the most luminous quasar known at a redshift of over 7.0. The discovery is reported in a paper published October 29 on the arXiv pre-print repository.

9h

Learning Chinese-specific encoding for phonetic similarity

Performing the mental gymnastics of making the phoenetic distinction between words and phrases such as "I'm hear" to "I'm here" or "I can't so but tons" to "I can't sew buttons," is familiar to anyone who has encountered autocorrected text messages, punny social media posts and the like. Although at first glance it may seem that phonetic similarity can only be quantified for audible words, this pr

9h

Hurricanes and water wars threaten the Gulf Coast's new high-end oyster industry

For Cainnon Gregg, 2018 started out as a great year. After leaving his job as an installation artist to become a full-time oyster farmer in Wakulla County, Florida in 2017, Gregg began raising small oysters in baskets or bags suspended in the shallow, productive coastal waters of Apalachicola Bay.

9h

Using neutrinos detected by IceCube to measure mass of the Earth

A trio of researchers from CSIC-Universitat de València and Universitat de Barcelona has used data from the IceCube detector in Antarctica to measure Earth's mass. In their paper published in the journal Nature Physics, Andrea Donini, Sergio Palomares-Ruiz and Jordi Salvado describe using data describing neutrinos passing through the Earth to learn more about the interior of the planet. Véronique

9h

Best iPhone for 2018: Which Model Should You Actually Buy?

Picking the right iPhone has become an increasingly difficult choice, but this breakdown may help.

9h

Audi's A8 Sedan Rolls With the Punches to Make T-Bone Crashes Safer

The $84,000 luxury sedan can sense an impending crash and adjust its suspension to protect its occupants in under a second.

9h

New technique enables spatial separation of peptide structures

A team of scientists at DESY and Universität Hamburg has reached another milestone towards the direct imaging of individual biomolecules: the group led by Jochen Küpper from the Center for Free-Electron Laser Science developed a new experimental technique which enables the separation of different peptide structures in order to analyze and image them separately. The scientists report their method,

9h

‘End of the Megafauna’ examines why so many giant Ice Age animals went extinct

‘End of the Megafauna’ ponders the mystery of what killed off so many of Earth’s big animals over the last 50,000 years.

9h

Researchers map daffodil's chloroplast genome for the first time

Gardeners might end up never planting the wrong bulb again after the Royal Horticultural Society (RHS) and Reading University successfully mapped a daffodil's chloroplast genome for the first time.

9h

Tropical marine conservation needs to change as coral reefs decline

The world's tropical oceans are suffering turbulent times. Dire predictions of yet more disastrous coral bleaching episodes have been released, placing the very future of wonders like the Great Barrier Reef in danger. Without global action to prevent runaway climate change, we as individuals are largely powerless to stop such loss.

9h

Why Cities Need Chief Exploration Officers

Mayors need CXOs to lead the search for solutions to issues of health and sustainability — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

9h

The Search for the Most Distant Galaxies in the Universe

Astronomers have found some of the most distant galaxies in the universe, opening a window on a previously unknown period of cosmic history — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

9h

Illicit Nuclear Bomb Tests Get Pinned Down

Illicit nuclear detonations are anything but secret — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

9h

Study advocates psychological screening for the carers of child burn victims

A new study published in the Journal of Pediatric Psychology highlights the need for psychological screening for families/primary caregivers after a child sustains a burn injury.

9h

First-in-class YEATS inhibitors that show promise for leukemia treatment

A research team led by Dr. Xiang David Li from the Department of Chemistry at The University of Hong Kong, in collaboration with scientists from China and the United States, developed the first chemical inhibitors against a novel therapeutic target for treatment of acute myeloid leukemia (AML), a fast-growing cancer of bone marrow and blood cells. The findings were recently published in a top-clas

9h

Olive oil and fungus protect wood from wood rot

Elke van Nieuwenhuijzen will be receiving her doctorate next Wednesday, 7 November, at Eindhoven University of Technology for her study of black fungus on oiled wood that behaves like a 'biofinish.' This layer colors the wood and actually protects it from wood rot and degradation by sunlight. An additional advantage: the fungus automatically repairs damage in the protective layer.

9h

Study shows potential to develop brain tumour liquid biopsies

Scientists are making strides in developing liquid biopsies for brain tumours by detecting tumour DNA in the fluid from around the brain and spine.

9h

Recreating the sound of the Islamic past of the Mosque of Cordoba

How did sound propagate inside the Mosque of Cordoba in the time of Abd al-Rahman I? Today, thanks to virtual simulation tools, it is possible to know the sound fields of spaces that no longer exist. This field of work is known as acoustic archaeology by some researchers. Working in this field, researchers from the Higher Technical School of Architecture at the University of Seville have carried o

9h

Anthropologist finds high number of developmental anomalies in Pleistocene people

Erik Trinkaus, an anthropologist at Washington University, has found what he describes as "an abundance of developmental anomalies" in people that lived during the Pleistocene. In his paper published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, he describes his study of fossils recovered from several sites in the Middle East and Eurasia, and what he found.

9h

Peers, student attitudes, and student deviance in Japan and the United States

In American criminology, crime and other forms of deviance have often been attributed to individuals' definitions or internalized attitudes toward deviance. In previous studies, however, empirical tests of the causal processes of learning attitudes toward deviance have been relatively rare. Moreover, studies examining the mediating effect of a person's attitudes on the relationship of both peer re

9h

In materials hit with light, individual atoms and vibrations take disorderly paths

Hitting a material with laser light sends vibrations rippling through its latticework of atoms, and at the same time can nudge the lattice into a new configuration with potentially useful properties – turning an insulator into a metal, for instance.

10h

Super-strong, bio-compatible material may make broken fillings a thing of the past

Soon you may no longer have to worry about how long your dental repairs will last. A new dental reconstruction material developed in Sweden offers unprecedented improvements over existing acrylate-based fillers.

10h

Study shows potential to develop brain tumor liquid biopsies

Scientists are making strides in developing liquid biopsies for brain tumors by detecting tumor DNA in the fluid from around the brain and spine.

10h

The Final Judgment of Freddie Mercury

At a 1978 launch party for Queen’s album Jazz , Freddie Mercury furnished a New Orleans hotel with nude waiters, snake charmers, and—according to rumor—trays of cocaine. For Mercury’s birthday in 1987, the singer drew 700 friends to Ibiza for a soiree that’s still commemorated annually on the island. At another birthday, in 1985 at a bar in Munich, he asked his guests to dress in black-and-white

10h

Do we need an opioid 1,000 times more powerful than morphine? The FDA thinks so.

Health Dsuvia should be available early next year. A new, super-powerful opioid drug just received a stamp of approval from the Federal Drug Administration (FDA).

10h

Mystery particle spotted? Discovery would require physics so weird that nobody has even thought of it

There was a huge amount of excitement when the Higgs boson was first spotted back in 2012 – a discovery that bagged the Nobel Prize for Physics in 2013. The particle completed the so-called standard model, our current best theory of understanding nature at the level of particles.

10h

Hvidovres patologiafdeling får ny ledende overlæge

Det er et detektivarbejde at være patolog, mener Bettina Filtenborg-Barnkob, der er ny ledende overlæge på Patologiafdelingen på Hvidovre Hospital.

10h

Computer model identifies sources of foodborne illnesses more accurately

A new computer model that uses machine learning and de-identified and aggregated search and location data from logged-in Google users was significantly more accurate in identifying potentially unsafe restaurants when compared with existing methods of consumer complaints and routine inspections, according to new research.

10h

Supermarket produce harbors antibiotic-resistance genes

Researchers have found that produce is a reservoir for transferable antibiotic resistance genes that often escape traditional molecular detection methods. These antibiotic resistance genes might escape cultivation-independent detection, but could still be transferred to human pathogens or commensals. The results highlight the importance of the rare microbiome of produce as a source of antibiotic r

10h

A new semiconductor nanofibre could greatly increase the effectiveness of solar cells

A team from The Hong Kong Polytechnic University (PolyU) developed a novel nanostructure embedded into a semiconductor nanofibre that results in superb conductivity. The nanocomposite addresses a key inhibitor to conductivity, with the potential to improve a wide range of applications, from batteries and solar cells, to air purification devices.

10h

Image of the Day: See Through

A zebrafish model of the birth defect craniosynostosis provides insights into how the condition develops.

10h

You Can Make Your Own Scale With a Rubber Band and a Ruler

Take some simple measurements, add a dash of algebra, and you basically have a way to measure an unknown mass.

10h

Milking Scooters for Cash Helps Cities Build for the Future

Cities are experimenting with fees for scooter companies desperate to leave their electric mobiles on their sidewalks. And that money could help them keep up with the evolving world of mobility.

10h

The rich variety in the meteorological phenomena at Jupiter's Great Red Spot revealed

A study conducted by an international team of researchers led by Agustín Sánchez-Lavega, professor of Physics at the UPV/EHU, reveals the existence of a rich diversity in the atmospheric phenomena confined inside Jupiter's spot as a result of the intense hurricane winds blowing around its periphery at speeds of about 450 km/hour.

10h

The Mars InSight landing site is just plain perfect

No doubt about it, NASA explores some of the most awe-inspiring locations in our solar system and beyond. Once seen, who can forget the majesty of astronaut Jim Irwin standing before the stark beauty of the Moon's Hadley Apennine mountain range, of the Hubble Space Telescope's gorgeous "Pillars of Creation" or Cassini's magnificent mosaic of Saturn?

10h

An ice age lasting 115,000 years in two minutes

An international research team used a computer model to reconstruct the history of glaciation in the Alps, visualising it in a two-minute computer animation. The simulation aims to enable a better understanding of the mechanisms of glaciation.

10h

10h

GRACE-FO resumes data collection

The Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment Follow-On (GRACE-FO) mission has resumed collecting science-quality data and planned in-orbit checks after successfully completing a switchover to a backup system in the microwave instrument (MWI) on one of the mission's twin spacecraft. The in-orbit checks include calibrations and other system tests, and are expected to continue until January, when GRAC

10h

New stats apps show a virtual reality

The latest advances in computing and virtual reality (VR) have enabled researchers at KAUST to develop a suite of apps that allow users to visualize and interpret large and complex datasets in three dimensions.

10h

Eat your vegetables (and fish): Another reason why they may promote heart health

Elevated levels of trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO) — a compound linked with the consumption of fish, seafood and a primarily vegetarian diet — may reduce hypertension-related heart disease symptoms. New research in rats finds that low-dose treatment with TMAO reduced heart thickening (cardiac fibrosis) and markers of heart failure in an animal model of hypertension.

10h

Mandibular movement monitoring may help improve oral sleep apnea devices

While continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) continues to be the gold standard for treatment of sleep apnea, the cumbersome machines are often not well tolerated by patients. Because of this, less obtrusive oral appliances that thrust the jaw forward during sleep are becoming more popular. Mandibular protrusion enlarges the pharynx and stabilizes the upper airway. A new study demonstrates that

10h

Stalking the drones

Drones are becoming ubiquitous—they help bridge inspectors examine otherwise inaccessible spaces, monitor crop health for farmers, and assist search and rescue teams. They are also a boon to bad guys, from drug runners to terrorists. That's where David Kovar, F17, comes in. He's formed a company to glean data from drones, to understand how they and other autonomous systems work—and who is operatin

10h

Social media use increases Latino political participation

Usually, researchers study the effect communications have on the target of a message, says Alcides Velasquez, University of Kansas assistant professor of communication studies. But in the case of a new study on social media and Latino political participation, Velasquez and his co-author looked at the effect on the ones pushing out the message.

10h

A call for the cold

As the Northern hemisphere starts to feel the cold winter approaching, research stations in Antarctica are emerging from their long dark winter and awaiting the arrival of fresh supplies after living months in isolation.

10h

New mobile device identifies airborne allergens using deep learning

UCLA researchers invented a portable device that uses holograms and machine learning to identify and measure airborne biological particles, or bioaerosols, that originate from living organisms such as plants or fungi. Trained to recognize five common allergens—pollen from Bermuda grass, oak, ragweed and spores from two types of mold—the system classified samples with an accuracy of 94 percent usin

10h

When corporate insiders sell stock at a loss, watch out

When considering whether to buy stock in a company, investors often look to the trading activity of the company's top executives. If the CEO or CFO has recently made large purchases of company stock, investors tend to assume the stock price is about to go up; if they are selling stock, on the other hand, the meaning is less clear.

10h

Models show natural swings in the Earth's climate contribute to Arctic sea ice loss

Arctic sea ice loss in the last 37 year is not due to humans alone.

10h

Education not a factor for when women in Africa marry

Women in Africa with little formal education are delaying marriage—much like their better-educated peers, a new University of Michigan study indicates.

10h

Elections forensics can enhance, challenge legitimacy of election outcome

Voters will have their voices heard during Tuesday's midterm elections. Walter Mebane, professor of political science and statistics at the University of Michigan, is an expert on election forensics, a field devoted to using statistical methods to determine whether the results of an election accurately reflect the intentions of the electors.

10h

Italian Physicists Wrote a 'Perfect Pizza' Equation, Because Not All Heroes Wear Capes

Italian physicists wrote a "perfect pizza" equation, because we all need this right now.

11h

Scientists Want to Use Lasers to Guide Aliens to Earth. What Could Go Wrong??

Researchers at MIT just found that humanity could build a laser that could signal an extraterrestrial intelligence.

11h

Remains of Nazi 'Flying Bombs' Uncovered in British Woods

Archaeologists have excavated the exploded remains of a German V1 "flying bomb" that crashed in a forest near London in 1944.

11h

Photos: The Flying Bombs of Nazi Germany

Near the end of World War II, Germany launched thousands of what it called "retaliation weapons" or flying bombs at London. Here's a look at the buzz bombs and the destruction they wrought.

11h

American Meritocracy Is Killing Youth Sports

The state of youth sports in America is either booming or suffering, depending on which box score you’re checking. You could follow the money. Kids’ sports is a nearly $17 billion industry, which makes it larger than the business of professional baseball and approximately the same size as the National Football League. Or you could follow the kids. The share of children ages 6 to 12 who play a tea

11h

Why the language of fear won’t help us stop climate change

Climate change is a linguistic challenge, as well as a technical one. Rather than fearmongering, talking about saving the environment like it is a series of achievable goals is something that people tend to respond to better. What's the biggest contributor to climate change? If you guess car exhaust, you're wrong. It's cooling chemicals, like the ones found in air conditioners and refrigerators.

11h

Midterm Elections 2018 Will Test a Blue Wave of Activist Apps

Startups like Swing Left and Crush the Midterms seek to maximize volunteers’ impact. On Election Day, they'll find out if it worked.

11h

'Homecoming' Discussion: We Need to Talk About That Ending

Surely we weren't the only ones holding our breath throughout Amazon's new series, right?

11h

The Entourage Effect: How THC and Other Weed Compounds Mix

Some call it the entourage effect: THC achieves its full effects only when it rolls with a crew of other compounds.

11h

To Curb Fake News and Hate, We Need a Little Less Speech

Speech on the internet must flow a little less freely if we care about harm or truth.

11h

Midterms 2018: The Unprecedented Effort to Secure Election Day

Ninety-four district election officers. Thirteen hundred electoral jurisdictions. Multiple law enforcement agencies. The fight to keep the midterms safe has an unimaginable scope.

11h

Small genetic differences turn plants into better teams

Diverse communities of plants and animals typically perform better than monocultures. However, the mechanisms that are responsible for this have so far been a mystery to science. Biologists at the University of Zurich have now been able to identify the genetic cause of these effects. Their findings might help to improve crop yield.

11h

Fluorescent 'breathalyzer' makes optimisation of catalysts much easier

A new test for industrial catalysts developed by chemists at Utrecht University uses fluorescent molecules to show which of three catalysts works better than the others. This makes it much easier to work on improving the catalysts, while also making production processes in the chemical industry more sustainable. The researchers, under the leadership of Prof. Bert Weckhuysen, will publish their res

11h

Wealthier people do less in the struggle against climate change

A collective-risk dilemma experiment with members of the public in Barcelona shows that people are more or less likely to contribute money to fight climate change depending on their wealth. And the results indicate that participants with fewer resources were prepared to contribute significantly more to the public good than wealthier people, sometimes up to twice as much.

11h

Scientists discover gene regulator that allows plant rehydration after drought

Scientists at the RIKEN Center for Sustainable Resource Science in Japan have found that the protein NGA1 is critical for plants to have normal responses to dehydration. Published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the study shows how NGA1 controls transcription of a key gene that ultimately allows plants to survive after periods of drought.

11h

Coping with errors in the quantum age

Quantum systems can be manipulated with extremely high precision, but not perfectly. Researchers in the Department of Physics at ETH Zurich have now demonstrated how to monitor and correct errors that occur during such operations.

11h

GPS-fejl førte til menneskejagt: Politiets forklaring om fynsk landsby åbner ladeport af spørgsmål

Politiet oplyser, at defekt antenne påvirkede en mistænkt Volvos GPS-udstyr. Men hvordan kan en antennefejl placere en bil i en forkert landsdel?

11h

Will NASA's Next Mission to Venus Be a Balloon?

Airships or solar-powered airplanes may be next in line for a return to Earth’s “evil twin” — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

11h

Supermarket produce harbors antibiotic-resistance genes

Researchers from the Julius Kühn Institut, Germany have found that produce is a reservoir for transferable antibiotic resistance genes that often escape traditional molecular detection methods. These antibiotic resistance genes might escape cultivation-independent detection, but could still be transferred to human pathogens or commensals. The results, which highlight the importance of the rare mic

12h

Trump Already Won the Midterms

Regardless of how the midterm elections turn out Tuesday night, President Donald Trump will have at least one thing to celebrate: His mission to remake the Republican Party in his own image has been an unequivocal success. The MAGA- fication of the GOP that Trump first set in motion three years ago has continued apace this campaign season—with disloyal Republicans getting primaried and purged, fo

12h

An Existential Day for Democrats

“There are more of us,” said Democratic Congressman Mark Pocan of Wisconsin. “We are America, and they are not.” Tuesday’s midterm elections will show whether he’s right. For two years, Democrats have been chasing explanations for how Donald Trump won—the Russians, that last-minute letter from Jim Comey, Hillary Clinton’s inept campaign, economic pain and backlash across the country that was deep

12h

Loneliness is bad for brains

Social isolation shrinks nerve cells in the brains of mice, a new study shows.

12h

Apple MacBook Air 2018: A Worthy UpgradeApple Retina MacBook Air

Despite its resemblance to past MacBooks, Apple’s new ultra-thin laptop has enough improved features to warrant replacing your old one.

12h

Midterm Elections 2018: How to Find and Watch Results

Plus, how Siri, Alexa, and even Snapchat can keep you informed throughout the day.

12h

Supermarket produce harbors antibiotic-resistance genes

Researchers from the Julius Kühn Institut, Germany have found that produce is a reservoir for transferable antibiotic resistance genes that often escape traditional molecular detection methods. These antibiotic resistance genes might escape cultivation-independent detection, but could still be transferred to human pathogens or commensals.

12h

Opladning med 400 kW giver 280 km på ti minutter

Over de næste tre år skal en række amerikanske virksomheder og forskningsinstitutioner udvikle en ny type oplader til elbiler. Den skal kunne levere 400 kW direkte fra højspændingsnettet med bedre virkningsgrad end i dag. Både E.ON og Clever ser positivt på den nye teknologi.

12h

Apotekere skal kunne genordinere 28 lægemidler

Sundhedsministeriet har offentliggjort listen over de lægemidler, man tiltænker at lade farmaceuter på danske apoteker genordinere til patienter, som led i et lovforslag fra sundhedsminister, Ellen Trane Nørby (V).

12h

Computer model more accurate at identifying sources of foodborne illnesses than traditional

A new computer model that uses machine learning and de-identified and aggregated search and location data from logged-in Google users was significantly more accurate in identifying potentially unsafe restaurants when compared with existing methods of consumer complaints and routine inspections, according to new research led by Google and Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health.

13h

Mandibular movement monitoring may help improve oral sleep apnea devices

While continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) continues to be the gold standard for treatment of sleep apnea, the cumbersome machines are often not well tolerated by patients. Because of this, less obtrusive oral appliances that thrust the jaw forward during sleep are becoming more popular. Mandibular protrusion enlarges the pharynx and stabilizes the upper airway. A new study in CHEST® demonst

13h

A Smart City Is an Accessible City

A group gathers on a Nashville street corner, some rolling in wheelchairs and others walking. They have arrived holding their smartphones and make friendly chatter while a coordinator helps them log in to an app. Dispersing in small groups, they examine restaurants, cafes, and shops, looking for features signaling that disability is welcome there: a parking sign with the International Symbol of A

13h

Being a Big Brother contestant was life-changing. But so was watching it | Jon Tickle

In exposing audiences to people who didn’t look, sound or behave like them, the show had a positive effect on society In the film adaptation of The Lord of the Rings , Bilbo asks Frodo: “Any chance of seeing that old ring of mine again? I should like to have held it one last time.” Like the ring, Big Brother – which had its final episode last night – was a drug. Who wouldn’t want more? But the ad

13h

These Flatworms Can Regrow A Body From A Fragment. How Do They Do It And Could We?

Biologists are keen to understand how a type of flatworm known as a planarian uses powerful stem cells to regenerate an entire body from a headless sliver of itself. (Image credit: Deep Look/Youtube)

13h

ScienceTake: How the Jumping Spider Sees Its Prey

Researchers looked deep into the eyes of a predatory spider to learn what it was looking at.

14h

How to Give a Spider an Eye Test

Jumping spiders have excellent vision. To test it, scientists use a special machine of which there are only two in the world.

14h

Backlog hos Kriminalforsorgen: 17 år gammelt it-system kan ikke følge med loven

Kriminalforsorgen har alvorligt brug for et nye klientsystem, som lige nu er i udbud. Det gamle system kan ikke implementere lovændringer hurtigt nok, og de ansatte må ty til manuelle løsninger.

15h

Gartner: Privacy har indtaget toppen af hvad der optager forbrugerne mest

Forbrugerne er stadigt mere bekymrede for håndteringen af persondata i virksomhederne. Nu vægter vi privacy højere end nemme løsninger. Forbrugermistillid er så magtfuld, at det kan koste en virksomhed livet, påpeger Gartner.

15h

HPV-virus gav Claus kræft i mandlerne

Flere mænd får kræft i mund, hals og mandler på grund af HPV-virus.

15h

Man killed in third shark attack in weeks on Great Barrier Reef

A man has died after being mauled by a shark in the third such attack in two months at a popular tourist site on Australia's Great Barrier Reef, authorities said Tuesday.

15h

Amazon mum on reports it will split new headquarters

Online leader Amazon Inc. refused comment Tuesday on reports that it plans to split its new headquarters between two locations, possibly in New York City and Arlington, Virginia.

15h

Toyota quarterly profit rises on growing sales, cost cuts

Toyota Motor Corp. reported a 28 percent surge in the last quarter on growing sales in Europe, Asia and the Americas and cost cutting. It raised its profit forecast for the full year.

15h

Identifying a piranha by its bark

A piranha's bite is definitely worse than its bark, but the bark has uses too. A new study of the sounds made by piranhas in the Amazon finds that their underwater "barks" are an effective tool for identifying different species in murky waters.

15h

Ny rapport: Resistente bakterier slår flere europæere ihjel end nogensinde før

Problemet er størst i Italien og Grækenland. Og det er især spædbørn og ældre, der bliver ramt, viser ny undersøgelse.

17h

Eat your vegetables (and fish): Another reason why they may promote heart health

Elevated levels of trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO) — a compound linked with the consumption of fish, seafood and a primarily vegetarian diet — may reduce hypertension-related heart disease symptoms. New research in rats finds that low-dose treatment with TMAO reduced heart thickening (cardiac fibrosis) and markers of heart failure in an animal model of hypertension.

18h

Ringsted Station: Konsulenter advarede om huller i planen

Rambøll advarede allerede i 2016 om adskillige usikkerheder i stationsombygningen, der endte med at blive voldsomt fordyret. Men konsulenterne blev bedt om at gennemgå alt andet end lige præcis det hjørne af budgettet, hvor de største problemer gemte sig.

19h

5 of the strangest psychology cases in history

Psychologists are faced with many patient mysteries. The cases reveal the complexity of humans. Neurologist Oliver Sacks wrote about a number of very strange cases. None As billions of people fade in and out of history on this dusty rock, there are bound to be many strange ones. With the advent of psychology, the study of those who don't fit the norm have provided many invaluable clues about who

20h

Ruth Gates, Who Made Saving Coral Reefs Her Mission, Is Dead at 56

A marine biologist, Dr. Gates worked to develop a “super coral” to resist the deadening effects of warming ocean waters.

21h

How Right-Wing Social Media Site Gab Got Back Online

A company called Epik, whose CEO defended Gab, offered domain-hosting services, while Cloudflare continues to protect Gab from denial-of-service attacks.

21h

How clear speech equates to clear memory

Some conversations are forgotten as soon as they are over, while other exchanges may leave lasting imprints. Researchers want to understand why and how listeners remember some spoken utterances more clearly than others. They're specifically looking at ways in which clarity of speaking style can affect memory.

22h

Women who are 'larks' have a lower risk of developing breast cancer

Women who are 'larks', functioning better at the beginning of the day than the end of the day, have a lower of risk breast cancer, according to new research.

22h

Deconstructing crowd noise at college basketball games

With thousands of fans, college basketball games can be almost deafening. Some arenas have decibel meters, which can provide some indication of the noise generated. Researchers wanted to see whether machine learning algorithms could pick out patterns within the raw acoustical data that indicated the crowd's mood, thereby providing clues as to what was happening in the game itself.

22h

Seven in 8 children's tonsillectomies are unnecessary

A new study has found that seven in every eight children who have their tonsils removed are unlikely to benefit from the operation.

22h

Adolescent brain development impacts mental health, substance use

Advances in understanding adolescent brain development may aid future treatments of mental illness and alcohol and substance use disorders, according to new research.

22h

Extracellular vesicles help pass information between cells and onto offspring

New studies reveal that small, membrane-bound particles transported between cells have wide-ranging and long-term effects in the brain and throughout the body, from helping neurons communicate to passing the effects of stress onto the next generation. Such extracellular vesicles released from the brain into the blood can also provide a window into brain pathology to help with disease diagnosis.

22h

First Blockchain-based Genomic Data Marketplace Launches

EncrypGen will enable individuals to sell their deidentified data for research.

22h

The Atlantic Daily: The Lonely Middle

What We’re Following To the Left?: Democrats think they can pick up governor’s seats in these states this midterm election. Meanwhile in New England, popular Republican governors of solidly blue states seem to be holding on to their leads. In Texas, strategies like strict voter-ID laws and redistricting have kept the GOP in power, Adam Serwer argues, detailing his own laborious process of registe

22h

Largest parasitic worm genetic study hatches novel treatment possibilities

The largest genomic study of parasitic worms to date identified hundreds of thousands of new genes and predicted many new potential drug targets and drugs. Research will help scientists understand how these parasites invade, evade the immune system and cause disease.

22h

Standing in for a kidney, MXene materials can be used to filter urea, could give dialysis patients the freedom to move

A type of two-dimensional layered material has emerged as a candidate to assist in replacing the body's waste filtration system in wearable kidneys.

22h

Does having muscle weakness and obesity lead to falls for older women?

New research suggests that it is important to identify people at risk for falls related to obesity and muscle weakness so that healthcare providers can offer appropriate solutions.

22h

First-of-its-kind research models immune responses in cellular immunotherapies

Scientists are pursuing a cross-collaborative effort that could potentially change the way cellular immunotherapies such as stem cell transplantation and CAR T-cell therapies are performed.

22h

Caterpillar, fungus in cahoots to threaten fruit, nut crops, study finds

New research reveals that Aspergillus flavus, a fungus that produces carcinogenic aflatoxins that can contaminate seeds and nuts, has a multilegged partner in crime: the navel orangeworm caterpillar, which targets some of the same nut and fruit orchards afflicted by the fungus. Scientists report that the two pests work in concert to overcome plant defenses and resist pesticides.

22h

Trump’s ‘Racist’ Midterms Ad Backs Facebook Into a CornerFacebook US Instagram

Facebook took down Donald Trump’s ad for violating its policies, but you can still watch the video on his profile.

22h

Concussions May Stunt Recovery from Sleep Deprivation

People who have suffered traumatic brain injury had slower reaction times and more false starts after disrupted sleep than well-rested controls, according to a study presented at the Society for Neuroscience meeting.

22h

How childhood stress contributes to anxiety, depression

New research could help explain why stress early in life can create vulnerabilities to mood and anxiety disorders later on.

23h

Patient safety in hospitals still a concern

Two decades ago, a landmark study highlighted the prevalence of medical errors and called for a national commitment to reduce patient harm. Despite substantial investment by government and private institutions to increase patient safety, progress has been slow and uneven. A new study sheds light on what more can be done.

23h

Drinking coffee may reduce your chances of developing Alzheimer's, Parkinson's

A new study suggests drinking coffee may protect you against developing both Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease.

23h

New attacks on graphics processors endanger user privacy

Web browsers use GPUs to render graphics on desktops, laptops, and smart phones. GPUs are also used to accelerate applications on the cloud and data centers. GPUs are usually programmed using application programming interfaces, or APIs, such as OpenGL. OpenGL is accessible by any application on a desktop with user-level privileges. Since desktop or laptop machines by default come with the graphics

23h

Nine in 10 operations to remove children's tonsils 'unnecessary'

Most of those undergoing procedure in England did not appear to need it, report shows More than 88% of surgeries to remove children’s tonsils are unnecessary, according to new research, with experts warning the procedure could do more harm than good. According to researchers, about 37,000 tonsillectomies were performed on children in England by the NHS between April 2016 and March 2017, carrying

23h

23h

Deconstructing crowd noise at college basketball games

With thousands of fans clapping, chanting, shouting and jeering, college basketball games can be almost deafeningly loud. Some arenas have decibel meters, which, accurately or not, provide some indication of the noise volume generated by the spectators and the sound systems. However, crowd noise is rarely the focus of scientific inquiry.

23h

Women are less likely to receive CPR—but why?

Health Virtual reality might help solve the problem. Picture it: you’re in the street and the person standing beside you collapses. What do you do? If you step in, you’re more likely to end up performing CPR on a man than…

23h

Nutrient-recycling microbes may feel the heat

While microbial communities are the engines driving the breakdown of dead plants and animals, little is known about whether they are equipped to handle big changes in climate. In a new study, researchers examine what happens after microbial communities move into new climate conditions. The study is a first step toward understanding the vulnerability of these ecosystems to climate change.

23h

Shorter sleep can lead to dehydration

Adults who sleep just six hours per night — as opposed to eight — may have a higher chance of being dehydrated, according to a new study.

23h

Movement, evolutionary history of tuberculosis in China

A genetic scan of a massive number of samples taken from tuberculosis patients across China has shown a surprising genetic uniformity: just two 'strains' of the tuberculosis bacterium account for 99.4 percent of all cases.

23h

Alcohol industry health campaigns miss the mark by a longshot, study finds

Alcohol industry social responsibility schemes strengthen their own commercial interests while failing to reduce harmful alcohol use, according to a new worldwide study. Far from confirming industry claims that they can 'do good' with corporate campaigns, the findings suggest that the public health benefits are likely to be minimal. In fact, 11 percent of the industry actions had the potential for

23h

New gene therapy reprograms brain glial cells into neurons

A new gene therapy can turn certain brain glial cells into functioning neurons, which in turn could help repair the brain after a stroke or during neurological disorders like Alzheimer's or Parkinson's diseases.

23h

Helpline to tackle bullying in chemistry

Bullying and harassment helpline could help people working in the sciences.

23h

Ron Howard: Creating vision of a Mars colony

Hollywood director Ron Howard talked to the BBC about creating a realistic depiction of the first human colonies on Mars.

23h

Potential path for countering oxidative stress in a range of diseases

Scientists have made a surprising discovery in their mission to understand how cells stay healthy, uncovering an important connection between a cell's sugar metabolism and its antioxidant response.

23h

New drug targets in aggressive cancers

Scientists have discovered a previously unknown molecular vulnerability in two rare, aggressive, and hard-to-treat types of cancer, and say it may be possible to attack this weakness with targeted drugs.

23h

Dam problems, win-win solutions

Decisions about whether to build, remove or modify dams involve complex trade-offs that are often accompanied by social and political conflict. A group of researchers from the natural and social sciences, engineering, arts and humanities has joined forces to show how, where and when it may be possible to achieve a more efficient balance among these trade-offs.

23h

Turning marginal farmlands into a win for farmers and ecosystems

Many farms have areas where the ground either floods or does not retain enough water or fertilizer for crops to thrive. Such marginal lands could become useful and potentially profitable if they are planted with perennial bioenergy crops such as shrub willow and switchgrass, researchers report.

23h

Changing temperatures are helping corn production in US — for now

Increased production of corn in the United States has largely been credited to advances in farming technology but new research shows that changing temperatures play a significant role in crop yield.

23h

Is there a universal hierarchy of human senses?

The accepted hierarchy of human senses — sight, hearing, touch, taste and smell — is not universally true across all cultures, new research shows.

23h

Villagers follow the geology to safer water in Bangladesh

Water researchers have found a way to fight the 'king of poisons' that accounts for one of every 20 deaths in Bangladesh.

23h

Gene that regulates fat accumulation and obesity

A new study showed that regardless of diet, a protein called Pannexin 1 significantly regulates the accumulation of fat in mice. The study suggests that a deletion of the Panx1 gene in the early stages of development of mouse fat cells increases the amount of fat accumulated, leading to a higher risk for obesity later in life.

23h

Laser architecture can create complex structures to probe, control matter

A new laser architecture called the universal light modulator is an intriguing new tool to probe and control matter.

23h

Stroke survivors and those at risk urged to focus on yoga and tai chi

One of Australia's biggest health issues could be checked if more people took up yoga or tai chi and reduced their blood pressure, an Australian study has found.

23h

The link between dementia and cardiovascular disease

Studies that link breakdowns in the brain's blood vessels to Alzheimer's disease and vascular dementia were presented today at Neuroscience 2018, the annual meeting of the Society for Neuroscience and the world's largest source of emerging news about brain science and health. Molecules that signal damage in these systems could aid in earlier detection of these diseases and inform more effective in

23h

Trilobites: Tiniest Ape Ever Discovered Hints at the Rise of the Monkeys

The newly identified extinct primate weighed slightly less than an average house cat.

23h

Einride's Electric, Driverless Truck Is Moving Stuff and Making Money

Einride, the startup now running a small robo-trucking service in Sweden, says that self-driving tech is a key enabler for electric propulsion.

23h

Gene regulator that allows plant rehydration after drought

Scientists have found that the protein NGA1 is critical for plants to have normal responses to dehydration. The study shows how NGA1 controls transcription of a key gene that ultimately allows plants to survive after periods of drought.

1d

Fire ant colonies could inspire molecular machines, swarming robots

Researchers have uncovered the statistical rules that govern how gigantic colonies of fire ants form bridges, ladders and floating rafts.

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Reanalyzing gene tests prompt new diagnoses in kids

A new study quantifies for the first time how quickly rapid advancements in genomics may benefit patients. The research includes a five-year review of more than 300 epilepsy cases that showed about a third of children had a change in diagnosis based on new data. In some cases, the review helped doctors prescribe a more effective treatment.

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New genetic cause of liver fat uncovered

New research has uncovered genetic variations that may contribute to the development of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), the leading cause of liver disease.

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Is foraging behaviour regulated the same way in humans and worms?

How does our nervous system motivate us to get off the sofa and walk to the fridge, or even to the supermarket, to get food? A research team investigated this using the threadworm Caenorhabditis elegans. The results indicate how foraging behavior in higher animals might have evolved.

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#SfN18 Celebrates Brain Awareness

With this year’s Society for Neuroscience (SfN) annual meeting now in full swing, downtown San Diego couldn’t be more bustling. Everywhere you turn, street signs, store windows, and flyers read “Neuroscience 2018” to encourage visitors to check out at least one of the many events happening at the San Diego Convention Center. Helping to kick off the meeting on Saturday was the Brain Awareness Camp

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The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: ‘Twas the Night Before Midterms

Written by Elaine Godfrey ( @elainejgodfrey ) Today in 5 Lines The U.S. renewed the sanctions against Iran that were lifted under the 2015 nuclear deal, but issued “temporary” waivers to eight countries, allowing those nations to continue buying oil from Iran without penalty. NBC and Fox News said they will no longer air an immigration ad from President Donald Trump that has been widely criticize

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Smart speakers make tricky gifts, no matter how cheap they get

Gadgets Google Home Minis and Echo Dots are really cheap this holiday, but they're complicated gifts. A smart speaker is fun to unwrap, but things get complicated once its set up.

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