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Nyheder2018november07

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Scientists Win First-Time Runs for Congress, Senate

The midterm elections flip several House seats in favor of Democratic candidates with STEM backgrounds.

4h

AAU kåres igen som Europas bedste ingeniøruniversitet

Aalborg Universitet blander sig igen-igen med verdens bedste tekniske universiteter som nummer et i Europa og nummer fire på verdensplan, fremgår det af ranglisten Best Global Universities.

7h

Brian Kemp’s Lead in Georgia Needs an Asterisk

The Democrat Stacey Abrams, a black woman, made a valiant effort to win the governor’s race in Georgia, one of the original 13 states, whose commitment to human bondage ensured that the U.S. Constitution would treat slavery with kid gloves. A state that was part of the Confederacy. A state scorched by Union General William Tecumseh Sherman in the Civil War. A state that refused to accept the outc

6h

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Endorsing Dead People Is a Shrewd Political Strategy

On Tuesday night, a man dubbed “America’s most famous pimp” was elected to Nevada’s state assembly, despite owning several brothels, facing an investigation into rape allegations , and also being dead . In the lead-up to the election, Dennis Hof explicitly fashioned himself after President Trump. He vowed to “ make Nevada Nevada again ,” and beat a three-term incumbent in a June primary with an o

9min

Matter: In an Indonesian Jungle, Scientists Find the Oldest Figurative Art in the World

A cave drawing in Borneo is at least 40,000 years old, raising intriguing questions about creativity in ancient societies.

10min

Tales From The Bering Sea: Sig’s Finger Story | Deadliest Catch

This story will make you think Captain Sig Hansen is making this all up. Stream Full Episodes of Deadliest Catch: https://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/deadliest-catch/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/DeadliestCatch https://www.facebook.com/Discovery Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/DeadliestCatch https://twitter.com/Dis

18min

Two women worthy of gracing the new £50 note | Letters

Mary Somerville and Caroline Herschel would both be fitting choices, writes Gerard Gilligan With regard to the suggestion of who should appear on the new £50 note ( Editorial , 6 November), may I suggest Mary Somerville (1780-1872), a self-taught mathematician and polymath, an early campaigner for women’s rights and the vote. Her book On the Connexion of the Physical Sciences became one of the bes

19min

Antibiotic resistant superbugs 'will kill 90,000 Britons by 2050'

OECD says superbugs could kill 1.3m people in Europe unless more is done to tackle issue More than 90,000 people in Britain will die over the next three decades unless action is taken to halt the rise in antibiotic-resistant superbug infections, a report has warned. The Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) estimates resistant infections could kill about 2.4 million people

19min

Tiny molecule has big effect in childhood brain tumor studies

A very small molecule under study at UT Health San Antonio is able to kill a childhood brain cancer, and the lead researcher said it may be possible to reduce by 90 percent the amount of chemotherapy and radiation required to kill such tumors.

26min

Researchers capture in-action images of photosynthetic protein complex splitting water

In a new article published in Nature an international research team presents high-resolution images of photosystem II, the protein complex that splits water into hydrogen ions and oxygen during photosynthesis. The images will help researchers better understand this complex mechanism, possibly opening up the door to developing cheap and efficient solar fuel devices.

26min

Quantum systems: Same, but different

Remarkable rules have been detected in the apparent chaos of disequilibrium processes. Different systems behave identically in many ways, if they belong to the same 'universality class'. This means that experiments can be carried out with quantum systems that are easy to handle, in order to obtain precise information about other systems that cannot be directly studied in the experiment — such as

26min

Machine-learning algorithm predicts how cells repair broken DNA

By creating a machine-learning algorithm that predicts how human and mouse cells respond to CRISPR-induced breaks in DNA, a team of researchers discovered that cells often repair broken genes in ways that are precise and predictable, sometimes even returning mutated genes back to their healthy version. In addition, the researchers put this predictive power to the test and successfully corrected mu

26min

Finding a rhyme and reason to CRISPR-Cas9's mutations

Investigators at Brigham and Women's Hospital, in collaboration with colleagues at the Broad Institute and MIT, have discovered that template-free Cas9 editing is predictable, and they have developed a machine learning model that can predict insertions and deletions with high accuracy.

26min

Astronomers find pairs of black holes at the centers of merging galaxies

For the first time, a team of astronomers has observed several pairs of galaxies in the final stages of merging together into single, larger galaxies. Peering through thick walls of gas and dust surrounding the merging galaxies' messy cores, the research team captured pairs of supermassive black holes — each of which once occupied the center of one of the two original smaller galaxies — drawing

26min

Researchers create most complete high-res atomic movie of photosynthesis to date

An international collaboration between scientists at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and several other institutions is working to change that. The researchers used SLAC's Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) X-ray laser to capture the most complete and highest resolution picture to date of Photosystem II, a key protein complex in plants, algae and cyanobac

26min

The Question Facing Celebrities After the Midterms

“TAYLOR SWIFT FAILS TO ELECT DEMOCRAT,” blares a Drudge Report headline, voicing one common reaction to Marsha Blackburn’s win for Tennessee’s Senate seat over Phil Bredesen, whom Swift endorsed. Another viral—if gross—line, tweeted by The Federalist ’s Sean Davis : “Taylor Swift’s streak of terrible choices in men continues.” There it is, the tangible evidence of the risks that come for celebrit

28min

Here’s how Americans voted on key 2018 ballot measures

Alabama and West Virginia passed amendments that would effectively outlaw abortion if the Supreme Court overturns Roe . Medical marijuana is now legal in Missouri and Utah, while Michigan legalized recreational marijuana. Missouri and Arkansas will raise the minimum wage significantly over the next several years. The 2018 midterm elections were marked by massive voter turnout, a record number of

32min

'Oldest animal painting' discovered in Borneo

The earliest known painting of an animal has been identified in a cave on the island of Borneo.

34min

South Africa's Invasive Species Guzzle Water and Hurt the Economy

The country’s pioneering first report on its biological invaders paints a dire picture for resources and biodiversity — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

37min

World's 'oldest figurative painting' discovered in Borneo cave

New analysis suggests the animal drawings are at least 40,000 years old, say scientists A patchy, weathered painting of a beast daubed on the wall of a limestone cave in Borneo may be the oldest known example of figurative rock art, say researchers who dated the work. Faded and fractured, the reddish-orange image depicts a plump but slender-legged animal, probably a species of wild cattle that st

37min

Oldest known animal drawing found in remote Indonesian cave

Scientists have found the oldest known example of an animal drawing: a red silhouette of a bull-like beast on the wall of a remote Indonesian cave.

37min

Brussels backs efforts to save EU digital tax proposal

The European Commission on Wednesday urged backers of an EU-wide tax on high-tech giants to keep pushing the proposal, which has stalled due to opposition from Ireland and Nordic countries.

37min

After a bad winter in the ocean, female Magellanic penguins suffer most, study shows

Every autumn in the Southern Hemisphere, Magellanic penguins leave their coastal nesting sites in South America. For adults, their summer task—breeding, or at least trying to—is complete. Newly fledged chicks and adults gradually head out to sea to spend the winter feeding. They won't return to land until spring.

37min

Chlamydia attacks with Frankenstein protein

When Chlamydia trachomatis, the bacterium that causes one of the most common sexually transmitted infections worldwide, infects a human cell, it hijacks parts of the host to build protective layers around itself.

43min

'Bargaining while black' may lead to lower salaries

African-American job candidates are more likely to receive lower salaries in hiring negotiations when racially biased evaluators believe they have negotiated too much, according to research published by the American Psychological Association.

43min

A new hope: GEDI to yield 3-D forest carbon map

A new NASA laser instrument set to launch to the International Space Station in December will help scientists create the first three-dimensional map of the world's temperate and tropical forests. The Global Ecosystem Dynamics Investigation, or GEDI, is scheduled to launch on SpaceX's Falcon 9 rocket. From the station, GEDI's advanced laser technology will reveal the three-dimensional structure of

43min

Machine-learning algorithm predicts how cells repair broken DNA

The human genome has its own proofreaders and editors, and their handiwork is not as haphazard as once thought.

43min

Researchers create most complete high-resolution atomic movie of photosynthesis to date

Despite its role in shaping life as we know it, many aspects of photosynthesis remain a mystery. An international collaboration between scientists at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and several other institutions is working to change that. The researchers used SLAC's Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) X-ray laser to capture the most complete and highest

43min

Astronomers find pairs of black holes at the centers of merging galaxies

For the first time, a team of astronomers has observed several pairs of galaxies in the final stages of merging together into single, larger galaxies. Peering through thick walls of gas and dust surrounding the merging galaxies' messy cores, the research team captured pairs of supermassive black holes—each of which once occupied the center of one of the two original smaller galaxies—drawing closer

43min

Your boss is now more likely to train you up, thanks to a dwindling talent pool

In a tight labor market, employers are investing in their existing workforce.

44min

Embalmed Heads Hanging Around a Horse's Neck: That's How Ancient Celts Showed Off

The ancient Celts took boasting of their conquests to an extreme.

45min

45min

15 'Disgusting' Foods Will Have Your Taste Buds Begging for Mercy

What are the most revolting foods on the planet? You'll find 80 of them at the Disgusting Food Museum in Sweden.

45min

Like Europe, Borneo hosted Stone Age cave artists

Rock art may have spread from Borneo across Southeast Asia starting 40,000 years ago or more.

45min

Tumour immune cells could aid cancer therapies, study shows

A pioneering technique designed to spot differences between immune cells in tumours could speed the development of cancer treatments, research suggests.

48min

Long-term study shows that HIV-2 is deadlier than previously thought

A study published in The Lancet HIV shows that HIV-2 is more pathogenic than previously demonstrated. The new findings indicate that early treatment should be applied to all patients with HIV, not only to those with HIV-1.

48min

Study finds 'dual mobility' hip replacement implant reduces risk of dislocation

A study conducted at Hospital for Special Surgery and other joint replacement centers indicates that a newer type of artificial hip known as a 'modular dual mobility' implant could reduce the risk of dislocation in patients who need a revision surgery.

48min

Chlamydia attacks with Frankenstein protein

When Chlamydia trachomatis, the bacterium that causes one of the most common sexually transmitted infections worldwide, enters a human cell, it hijacks parts of the host to build protective layers around itself. Inside this makeshift fortress, the bug grows and reproduces, eventually bursting out in search of a new target and killing the host cell. While scientists have known for years that Chlamy

48min

Climate change: Bug covered 'bionic mushroom' generates clean energy

Mushrooms for lunch inspire scientists to try to generate electricity from a fungus covered in bacteria.

1h

Taller people may be more prone to skin cancer

A new study is out suggesting that the taller you are, the more at risk you are of certain types of cancers. The reason for this is a surprisingly simple one: you have more cells. 18 of 23 studied cancers saw a relation between height and cancer risk. None A recent Big Think piece noted that more cancers occur by random chance than for any other reason . This said, given the apparent complexity o

1h

What Is Salmonella?

Salmonella causes an unpleasant bacterial infection that usually occurs after the person consumes a contaminated food or beverage. Although the symptoms are miserable, most people recover quickly with hydration and rest.

1h

NASA sees Tropical Cyclone Alcide reach hurricane strength

NASA's Terra satellite provided a visible image of a more organized Tropical Cyclone Alcide in the Southern Indian Ocean after it reached hurricane-force.

1h

Dansk forsker gemmer solens varme til om vinteren i en særlig væske

Processen genererer ingen CO2 og væsken kan opbevare varmeenergien i op til 18 år – uden isolering. Teknologien kan måske tages i brug indenfor fem år.

1h

Nutrition educators identify barriers to physical activity and propose strategies to overcome them

Throughout its fifty years of publication, the Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior (JNEB) has recognized the importance of physical activity as a key behavior helpful to achieving a healthy lifestyle. The November/December issue's theme of physical activity highlights recent research on designing, delivering, and measuring physical activity programs for different audiences.

1h

Will tarloxotinib finally break the HER2 barrier in lung cancer?

By pairing a potent HER2/EGFR inhibitor with a targeting mechanism specific to tumors, researchers show that tarloxotinib is far more active against HER2 lung cancer cell lines than even the most successful existing HER2/EGFR inhibitors.

1h

After a bad winter in the ocean, female Magellanic penguins suffer most, study shows

Research from the University of Washington is showing how Magellanic penguins fare during the winter months when they spend months at sea feeding. They have discovered that oceanographic features are more likely to negatively impact the body conditions of Magellanic penguin females, but not males, when the penguins return to their nesting grounds in spring.

1h

Low health literacy associated with early death for cardiovascular patients

Patients hospitalized with a cardiovascular event are more likely to die within one year if they have low health literacy, according to a Vanderbilt University Medical Center study released today in Mayo Clinic Proceedings.

1h

UMN researchers study the impact of insurance coverage on transferred patients

University of Minnesota Medical School researchers seek to identify the relationship between insurance coverage and the mortality rate of patients transferred between hospitals.

1h

Colon removal linked to higher diabetes risk

People who have had their colon removed have an increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes, according to a new study. The research suggests the organ may play a role in regulating blood sugar levels. The study, which researchers based on data from more than 46,000 patients who have had part or all of their colon removed, may pave the way for new ways of preventing and treating the disease. Mode

1h

The public “deserve to know” that there is an overlooked subset of people who thrive after major depression

Depression is a chronic, recurrent, lifelong condition. Well, that's the current orthodox view – but it is overstated, argues a team of psychologists led by Jonathan Rottenberg at the University of South Florida. "A significant subset of people recover and thrive after depression, yet research on such individuals has been rare," they write in their recent paper in Perspectives on Psychological Sc

1h

Beto’s Loss Was a Blessing in Disguise for Democrats

The midterm elections delivered a less than fully satisfying result for Democratic voters, but an ideal outcome for the Democratic Party. For Democrats, election night must have felt like the world’s slowest championship baseball game. Runner on base; runner on base; strike out; runner on base; run scored; fly out—and so through the night. Almost every candidate in whom Democrats at the national

1h

Scientists theorize new origin story for Earth's water

Earth's water may have originated from both asteroidal material and gas left over from the formation of the Sun, according to new research. The new finding could give scientists important insights about the development of other planets and their potential to support life.

1h

NASA sees Tropical Cyclone Alcide reach hurricane strength

NASA's Terra satellite provided a visible image of a more organized Tropical Cyclone Alcide in the Southern Indian Ocean after it reached hurricane-force.

1h

'Bargaining while black' may lead to lower salaries

African-American job candidates are more likely to receive lower salaries in hiring negotiations when racially biased evaluators believe they have negotiated too much, according to research published by the American Psychological Association.

1h

Are there geographic disparities in death due to traumatic brain injury for US veterans?

There are known racial and ethnic disparities in death due to traumatic brain injury (TBI) and a new study has now examined if there is an association between TBI mortality and where a US veteran lives.

1h

Traumatic Brain Injury Model Systems Centers mark 30 years of research

Over the past three decades, the Traumatic Brain Injury Model Systems Center (TBIMSC) program has served as a critical source of research to improve care and outcomes for patients and families affected by traumatic brain injury (TBI). The history and research achievements of the TBIMSC are reviewed in the November/December issue of the Journal of Head Trauma Rehabilitation (JHTR). The official jou

1h

How do babies laugh? Like chimps!

Few things can delight an adult more easily than the uninhibited, effervescent laughter of a baby. Yet baby laughter, a new study shows, differs from adult laughter in a key way: Babies laugh as they both exhale and inhale, in a manner that is remarkably similar to nonhuman primates. The research will be described by Disa Sauter during a talk at the Acoustical Society of America's 176th Meeting, N

1h

The 8 best science images, videos, and visualizations of the year

Science These are the 2018 winners of the Vizzies Challenge. Check out the 8 winners of this year's Vizzies awards for science visualizations…

1h

Former Intel boss Brian Krzanich to lead CDK Global

The former CEO of Intel is being named as the top executive at CDK Global, a company that provides technology to auto dealers.

1h

Microbiome implicated in sea star wasting disease

The culprit might be many microbes. Since 2013, a gruesome and mysterious disease has killed millions of sea stars along the West Coast from Mexico to Alaska—making the animals turn to goo, lose their legs, and pull their own bodies into pieces. For years, ocean scientists have searched in vain for the cause.

1h

Chimpanzees make helpful choices faster than selfish ones

Chimpanzees often make decisions that benefit others faster than they make decisions to help themselves, according to a new study. For decades, social scientists and biologists have sought to study primates because they are humans’ closest living relatives. Chimpanzees can also be very cooperative in the wild—forming alliances with friends or hunting together in groups. “Chimpanzees are an import

1h

We Should Teach Media Literacy in Elementary School

Helping children distinguish fake from real news will give them a lifelong benefit — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

1h

Geoscientists discover an overlooked source for Earth's water

Where did Earth's global ocean come from? A team of Arizona State University geoscientists led by Peter Buseck, Regents' Professor in ASU's School of Earth and Space Exploration (SESE) and School of Molecular Sciences, has found an answer in a previously neglected source. The team has also discovered that our planet contains considerably more hydrogen, a proxy for water, than scientists previously

1h

Researchers have unlocked secrets about engineered protein receptor, CAR

Cancer remains the second-leading cause of death in the United States. This year, an estimated 1.7 million new cases will be diagnosed, with nearly 610,000 people expected to die from the disease, according to the National Cancer Institute.

1h

Stacey Abrams Is Still Waiting for a Miracle

ATLANTA—Late on Election Night, in a ballroom at the Hyatt Regency hotel, Red Bull cans clinked against shoes on the floor. Journalists in a tight media pen scrambled to refresh pages and shared snacks, teen organizers smuggled in pizza, and some exhausted veterans rested their joints on couches outside. A DJ played R&B and hip-hop, and the songs lifted people up—until they didn’t. Even Cameo’s “

1h

America's Problem Isn't Tribalism—It's Racism

It’s fashionable in the Donald Trump era to decry political “tribalism,” especially if you’re a conservative attempting to criticize Trump without incurring the wrath of his supporters. House Speaker Paul Ryan has lamented the “tribalism” of American politics. Arizona Senator Jeff Flake has said that “tribalism is ruining us.” Nebraska Senator Ben Sasse has written a book warning that “partisan t

1h

Study shows how vultures evesdrop to gather vital flight information

A new study has shown vultures use their very own social networks to take advantage of thermal updrafts which help them fly vast distances. A team from Swansea University examined how the vultures seemed to make risky but efficient choices when it came to their flight patterns by observing other birds in the network.

1h

Microbiome implicated in sea star wasting disease

A first-of-its-kind study shows that the sea star microbiome is critically important to the progression of the wasting disease that is killing these animals from Mexico to Alaska — and that an imbalance of microbes might be the culprit.

1h

Immune cells could hold key to therapies for spinal cord injuries

Fresh insights into how zebrafish repair their damaged nerve connections could aid the development of therapies for people with spinal cord injuries. Scientists at the University of Edinburgh have found the immune system plays a key role in helping zebrafish nerve cells to regenerate after injury.

1h

Promising new targeted therapy for acceleration of bone fracture repair

New research highlights a novel bone anabolic agent that, when injected, intravenously reduces femur fracture healing time by 60 percent without impacting the surrounding healthy tissue.

2h

Doing the wave: How stretchy fluids react to wavy surfaces

Scientists investigate the strange behavior of viscoelastic fluids in a series of specially designed experiments.

2h

White wine, lemon juice combo prevents unwanted discoloration of pastry dough

No matter if it's grandma's cookies or commercially produced rolls, pastry lovers expect their baked goods to have a certain 'golden brown' allure — but only after baking. A white dough that changes hue during storage, however, can negatively affect the appearance and perception of the final baked product. Scientists report that they have now developed a natural way to prevent discoloration durin

2h

Huge fall in prevalence of FGM/genital cutting among girls across Africa

The prevalence of female genital mutilation/cutting among girls up to the age of 14 has fallen sharply in most regions of Africa over the past three decades, reveals a new analysis.

2h

Yearly screening doesn’t reduce chlamydia in young people

Annual offers to test young patients for chlamydia are unlikely to eliminate this sexually transmitted infection (STI), according to a new landmark study. Instead, researchers recommend focusing on better management of the common infection. Chlamydia is hard to control because many people are unaware they have it. If left untreated, it can cause serious infections of the uterus or fallopian tubes

2h

Modern slavery promotes overfishing

Labour abuses, including modern slavery, are 'hidden subsidies' that allow distant-water fishing fleets to remain profitable and promote overfishing, new research from the University of Western Australia and the Sea Around Us initiative at the University of British Columbia has found.

2h

Disrupting communication in infectious bacteria

Chemists in Konstanz inhibit the biosynthesis of a bacterial signal and, as a result, block the infectious properties of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, the most common germ found in health care facilities.

2h

Nasal delivery of weight-loss hormone eases breathing problems in sleeping mice

Experimenting with mice, Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers have added to evidence that a hormone best known for helping regulate hunger and body weight might also ease breathing problems experienced during sleep more effectively when given through the nose.

2h

Clearing up information about corneal dystrophies

Jayne Weiss, MD, Associate Dean of Clinical Affairs, Professor and Chair of Ophthalmology at LSU Health New Orleans School of Medicine, is the lead author of an editorial about inaccuracies in the medical literature that medical professionals rely upon to diagnose corneal dystrophies, as well as a free resource that provides correct information.

2h

New hope for world's most endangered mammal

New genetic analysis of white rhino populations suggests it could be possible to rescue the critically endangered northern white rhinoceros from extinction, using the genes of its less threatened southern cousin.

2h

Mailed HPV tests can help find women at-risk for cervical cancer, study finds

n the journal Obstetrics & Gynecology, researchers published the results of mailing at-home, HPV self-collection kits to 193 low-income women in North Carolina who were overdue for screening according to national guidelines.

2h

‘Gammon’ is a playground insult, not something to be celebrated | Poppy Noor

An epithet for angry old white men has been named one of the words of 2018. That doesn’t say much for our political discourse Gammon has been named one of the Collins dictionary’s words of the year . Not because we’re finally celebrating the underdog of all Christmas meats , but because of its place in the politically charged debate around Brexit, in which it is used to describe angry, middle-age

2h

The Democrats’ Most Radical Election Victory Was in the States

The Democrats won a majority in the United States House of Representatives on Tuesday, setting up two long years of all-but-assured confrontation with President Donald Trump. The party also pulled out big victories across state legislatures, flipping six chambers , turning others purple, and shoring up its supermajorities in still more. Under President Barack Obama, the Democratic Party largely n

2h

Keeping health data under lock and key

Researchers from the Collaborative Research Center CROSSING at Technische Universität Darmstadt (Germany) have developed a solution that will ensure decades of safe storage for sensitive health data in a joint project with Japanese and Canadian partners. An initial prototype was presented during a recent conference in Beijing, China. The system will go into trial operation in Japan in the coming w

2h

50 years ago, atomic testing created otter refugees

Nuclear testing on the island of Amchitka caused hundreds of otters to be rehomed 50 years ago. Those hundreds have grown into thousands.

2h

An overlooked giant: Useful and abundant, African 'Zam' palm newly described for science

Common sight along road sides in south Cameroon and western Gabon, and growing in hard-to-be-missed dense colonies, it remains a mystery how this locally useful new palm species Raphia zamiana (locally known as "Zam") has been missed by botanists until now, with its first collection dating to 2012. The overlooked giant has been recently described in the open access journal PhytoKeys, alongside a s

2h

Need to mail mosquitoes? Pack them up nice and snug

In the global effort to prevent diseases transmitted by mosquitoes, several promising new techniques for reducing their populations are all based on a single concept: fighting mosquitoes with mosquitoes.

2h

Discovery: Rare three-species hybrid warbler

Scientists have shown that a bird found in Pennsylvania is the offspring of a hybrid warbler mother and a warbler father from an entirely different genus—a combination never recorded before now and which resulted in a three-species hybrid bird. This finding has just been published in the journal Biology Letters.

2h

VIDEO: Vi besøger dyr fup-konference i Danmark

Hovedtalere var fraværende og deltagerne yderst utilfredse, da klodens største udgiver af Open Access-tidsskrifter afviklede to såkaldt videnskabelige konferencer på Amager.

2h

Voters Reject Several Climate-Related Ballot Initiatives

Washington’s effort to impose a carbon tax was one of the climate proposals defeated at the polls — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

2h

Bullying 'follows' LGB people from school to work

Around one in three lesbian, gay and bisexual individuals who are bullied at school will have similar experiences in the workplace later in life, according to new research by Anglia Ruskin University.

2h

Bitcoin's high energy consumption is a concern – but it may be a price worth paying

Bitcoin recently turned 10 years old. In that time, it has proved revolutionary because it ignores the need for modern money's institutions to verify payments. Instead, Bitcoin relies on cryptographic techniques to prove identity and authenticity.

2h

A 'male' octopus surprised its keepers with a cloud of 10,000 babies

Animals And now it's going to die. When the University of Georgia’s Marine Education Center and Aquarium acquired a common octopus recently, they got somewhat more than they bargained for.

2h

Researchers have unlocked secrets about engineered protein receptor, CAR

Three USC Viterbi School of Engineering researchers — Assistant Professor Stacey Finley, Professor Pin Wang and Assistant Professor Nick Graham — have just published a paper in 'Biophysical Journal' that sheds light on Chimeric Antigen Receptor (CAR) T cell therapy, information that could one day result in better cancer therapies with fewer side effects.

2h

Autonomous vehicles could shape the future of urban tourism

In the first study of its kind, published in the Annals of Tourism Research, academics from the University of Surrey and the University of Oxford have examined how Autonomous Vehicles (AVs) may have a substantial impact on the future of urban tourism.

2h

ASU geoscientists discover an overlooked source for Earth's water

When planet Earth formed, it grabbed a lot of hydrogen, a precursor to water, from the gas surrounding the newborn Sun. This source has long been neglected for geochemical reasons now shown to be incorrect.

2h

Quantity of opioids prescribed after surgery associated with higher patient use

Changing how opioids are prescribed after surgery requires understanding the factors associated with patients' use of the pain-relieving medications. This study describes opioid prescribing and use after surgery among almost 2,400 patients in Michigan who underwent one of 12 surgical procedures in 2017. Overall, more opioids were prescribed than used, with patients using about 27 percent of the op

2h

Surgery patients use only 1/4 of prescribed opioids, and prescription size matters

Many surgeons write prescriptions for opioid pain medications four times larger than what patients will actually use after common operations, a study shows. And the size of that prescription may be the most important factor in how many opioid pills the patient takes — outweighing pain scores, the intensity of their operation and more. The study highlights the importance of using actual opioid use

2h

Bacteria use different strategies to divide and survive under stress

A new study by scientists from the University of Chicago shows how cyanobacteria, or bacteria that produce energy through photosynthesis like plants, change the way they grow and divide in response to different levels of light.

2h

Singing may reduce stress, improve motor function for people with Parkinson's disease

Singing may provide benefits beyond improving respiratory and swallow control in people with Parkinson's disease, according to new data from Iowa State University researchers. The results from the pilot study revealed improvements in mood and motor symptoms, as well as reduced physiological indicators of stress.

2h

Ultrasound releases drug to alter activity in targeted brain areas in rats

Stanford University School of Medicine scientists have developed a noninvasive way of delivering drugs to within a few millimeters of a desired point in the brain.The method, tested in rats, uses focused ultrasound to jiggle drug molecules loose from nanoparticle 'cages' that have been injected into the bloodstream.

2h

Research leads to first nationwide sunscreen chemicals ban in Palau

The Republic of Palau, a South Pacific island nation, became the world's first country to ban sunscreen products containing environmentally harmful ingredients last Wednesday, based in part on research conducted by Ben-Gurion University of the Negev Prof. Ariel Kushmaro.

2h

Using diamonds to recharge civilian drones in flight

A small lab-grown diamond measuring a few millimeters per side could one day enable civilian drones to be recharged in mid-flight through a laser. Thanks to the diamond, the laser beam can remain strong enough over a long distance to recharge photovoltaic cells on the drones' surface. This system, which poses no threat to human health, is being developed by EPFL spin-off LakeDiamond. It could also

2h

Analysis suggests economic losses due to Amazonian dieback more than mitigation efforts

A team of analysts from Brazil, Europe and the U.S. has conducted an analysis of the economic losses likely to be incurred by Brazil if global warming results in Amazonian forest dieback, as is predicted. They have presented their results in a Perspective piece in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

2h

Scientists reveal spring cold spells that reduce crop yields

North China (35 degrees -40 degrees N, 110 degrees -120 degrees E) is a major region in China for winter wheat agriculture. The reviving, jointing and booting stages of winter wheat mainly happen in the spring. Spring cold spells in North China, hereafter referred to as "extreme spring cold spells" (ESCSs), have significant influence on crop yields in this region, though little attention has been

2h

Financial giants can have a pivotal role for climate stability

Financial institutions, such as banks and pension funds, have a key role to play in efforts to avoid dangerous climate change. And it is not only about redirecting investments to renewable energy and low-carbon businesses, but also to bolster the resilience and stability of the Brazilian Amazon and boreal forests in Russia and Canada, two known 'tipping elements' in the Earth system. Such tipping

2h

Aluminium oxide found in an ultra-hot Jupiter

An international team led by the astrophysicist Carolina von Essen, has used the OSIRIS spectrograph on the Gran Telescopio Canarias (GTC) to study the chemical composition of a planet whose equilibrium temperature is around 3,200 °C.

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This star killed its companion and is now escaping the Milky Way

Our universe is capable of some truly frightening scenarios, and in this case we have an apparent tragedy: two stars, lifelong companions, decide to move away from the Milky Way galaxy together. But after millions of years of adventure into intergalactic space, one star murders and consumes the other. It now continues its journey through the universe alone, much brighter than before, surrounded by

2h

What's behind the dramatic rise in three-generation households?

In a recent study, I discovered that the number of kids living with their parents and grandparents – in what demographers call a three-generation household – has nearly doubled over the past two decades.

2h

Study shows oil and gas rigs could help protect corals

Scientists have found that man-made structures in the North Sea could play a crucial role in holding coral populations together and increasing their resilience.

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Experiments with optical tweezers race to test the laws of quantum mechanics

One might think that the optical tweezer – a focused laser beam that can trap small particles – is old hat by now. After all, the tweezer was invented by Arthur Ashkin in 1970. And he received the Nobel Prize for it this year—presumably after its main implications had been realized during the last half-century.

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Autonomous vehicles could shape the future of urban tourism

In the first study of its kind, published in the Annals of Tourism Research, academics from the University of Surrey and the University of Oxford have examined how Autonomous Vehicles (AVs) may have a substantial impact on the future of urban tourism.

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Disrupting communication in infectious bacteria

Chemists in Konstanz have inhibited the biosynthesis of a bacterial signal and, as a result, blocked the infectious properties of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, the most common germ found in health care facilities.

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Research shows how vultures evesdrop to gather vital flight information

A new study has revealed how vultures use their very own social networks to work out the best way to use thermal updrafts to help them fly vast distances.

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Photo Gallery: Capturing Scotland in the Midst of Its Green Renewal

Forget haggis, whisky, and 'Braveheart.' This photo gallery shows the real Scotland—a country in eco-transition.

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The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: Midterms Aftermath

Democrats woke up to a lukewarm victory. Buoyed by the suburban vote, they retook the House and won victories in Rust-Belt states that helped send Donald Trump to the White House in 2016. They also saw important wins in Pennsylvania, Wisconsin, and Michigan, all states key to Trump’s 2016 victory. But Republicans won at least three close races in the Senate, setting up a majority that will allow

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Trump Is About to Get a Rude Awakening

Updated on November 7 at 1:36 p.m. In the lead-up to the midterm elections, President Donald Trump tried to have it both ways. “I’m not on the ballot, but in a certain way, I’m on the ballot,” he told supporters, yet he also made clear that he wouldn’t take the blame if Republicans did poorly. And in the end, he sort of got it both ways. Democrats handily won the House of Representatives , pickin

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Bacteria use different strategies to divide and survive under stress

Under laboratory conditions, many common bacteria reproduce and divide into symmetrical halves. In the real world with limited resources, however, conditions aren't always ideal for this kind of carefully planned growth.

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How I accidentally changed the way movies get made | Franklin Leonard

How does Hollywood choose what stories get told on-screen? Too often, it's groupthink informed by a narrow set of ideas about what sells at the box office. As a producer, Franklin Leonard saw too many great screenplays never get made because they didn't fit the mold. So he started the Black List, an anonymous email that shared his favorite screenplays and asked: Why aren't we making these movies?

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CFCS: Danske virksomheder kan stadig være ramt af WannaCry

Flere danske organisationer kan stadig have ransomwaren Wannacry, oplyser Center for Cybersikkerhed.

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Genetic study clarifies the causes of the most severe heart muscle diseases of children

Researchers have collected a globally unique KidCMP cohort of children with severe cardiomyopathies from the past 21 years, and characterized them genetically. The researchers discovered that the genetic knowledge had direct implications for predicting the disease course and treatment decisions.

3h

Machine-learning system could aid critical decisions in sepsis care

Researchers have developed a predictive model that could guide clinicians in deciding when to give potentially life-saving drugs to patients being treated for sepsis in the emergency room.

3h

New prosthetic hand system allows user to 'feel' again

Researchers have developed a new prosthetic hand system with a fully implanted, wirelessly controlled neurostimulator that has restored 'feeling' to a person with a hand amputation.

3h

New Proof Shows Infinite Curves Come in Two Types

Elliptic curves seem to admit infinite variety, but they really only come in two flavors. That is the upshot of a new proof from a graduate student at Harvard University. Elliptic curves may sound exotic, but they’re unspectacular geometric objects, as ordinary as lines, parabolas or ellipses. In a paper first posted online last year , Alexander Smith proved a four-decade-old conjecture that conc

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Clinical and environmental factors impact absorption of common sunscreen ingredient

New research, Evaluation of Reapplication and Controlled Heat Exposure on Oxybenzone Permeation from Commercial Sunscreen Using Excised Human Abdominal Skin, presented today at the 2018 American Association of Pharmaceutical Scientists (AAPS) PharmSci 360 Meeting demonstrates that heat and reapplication influences different sunscreen products containing the same amount of a key ingredient, oxybenz

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Promising new targeted therapy for acceleration of bone fracture repair

New research, Bone Fracture-Targeted Dasatinib Conjugate Potently Enhances Fracture Repair In Vivo, presented today at the 2018 American Association of Pharmaceutical Scientists (AAPS) PharmSci 360 Meeting highlights a novel bone anabolic agent that, when injected, intravenously reduces femur fracture healing time by 60 percent without impacting the surrounding healthy tissue.

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Watching nanoparticle photoreactions

When Michal Vadai's experiment worked for the first time, she jumped out of her seat.

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What is CBD really good for?

Cannabidiol (CBD) is the most well-known of the 113 cannabinoids found in the cannabis plant. There is strong evidence that CBD might help in an array of problems, including anxiety and pain management. But numerous companies are marketing low doses of CBD with no proven efficacy and charging a premium. None I began noticing a new beverage in Los Angeles. The first thing you notice is the cheap w

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Do scientists really think ‘Oumuamua is an alien spaceship?

Harvard professors suggest the cigar-shaped interstellar object that whizzed past the sun last year could be an alien probe Name: 1I/2017 U1 ‘Oumuamua. Meaning: “A messenger that reaches out from the distant past” (in Hawaiian). Continue reading…

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There's real skill in fantasy sports

If you've ever taken part in the armchair sport of fantasy football and found yourself at the top of your league's standings at the end of the season, a new study suggests your performance — however far removed from any actual playing field — was likely based on skill rather than luck.

3h

Financial giants can have a pivotal role for climate stability

Banks, pension funds and other institutional investors have a key role to play in efforts to avoid dangerous climate change. A limited number of these investors have considerable influence over the Amazon rainforest and boreal forests that are known 'tipping elements' in the climate system. Protecting these 'tipping elements' should be a priority for investors to help reduce both climate change an

3h

Modern slavery promotes overfishing

Labour abuses, including modern slavery, are 'hidden subsidies' that allow distant-water fishing fleets to remain profitable and promote overfishing.

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New analysis about synchronization transitions improves knowledge of physical, biological systems

In physical, biological and technological systems, the time that a system's components take to influence each other can affect the transition to synchronization, an important finding that improves understanding of how these systems function, according to a new study.

3h

Patentkontor ophæver Monsanto-patent: Jeres broccoli er ikke GMO

Det europæiske patentkontor har besluttet, at Monsanto ikke længere kan have patent på en højere broccoliplante, fordi den er traditionelt forædlet.

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Discovery: Rare three-species hybrid warbler

Scientists have shown that a bird found in Pennsylvania is the offspring of a hybrid warbler mother and a warbler father from an entirely different genus — a combination never recorded before now and which resulted in a three-species hybrid bird.

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Bullying 'follows' LGB people from school to work

New study finds bullying against minorities is more likely to persist over several years.

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A molecular switch links a Scottish mouse, a Finnish patient and Parkinson's disease

Researchers at the Faculty of Medicine, University of Helsinki, make an unexpected and vital contribution to an international collaborative effort in Parkinson's disease research.

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Far fewer lakes below the East Antarctic Ice Sheet than previously believed

But if that's the case, what is the source of the East Antarctic Ice Sheet's massive ice streams?In the course of an extensive Antarctic expedition, researchers from the Alfred Wegener Institute Helmholtz Centre for Polar and Marine Research (AWI) recently investigated several lakes beneath Recovery Glacier that had been previously detected by satellite remote sensing.

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Graphene takes a step towards renewable fuel

Researchers at Linköping University, Sweden, are working to develop a method to convert water and carbon dioxide to the renewable energy of the future, using the energy from the sun and graphene applied to the surface of cubic silicon carbide. They have now taken an important step towards this goal, and developed a method that makes it possible to produce graphene with several layers in a tightly

3h

Hunt for interesting metabolites with the antiSMASH database

Scientists who treasure hunt for interesting bacterial metabolites using the online tool antiSMASH now have the opportunity to use an antiSMASH database with pre-calculated results of nearly 25,000 bacterial genomes. This database will ease the discovery of antibiotics, pesticides, and anti-cancer drugs.

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Need to mail mosquitoes? Pack them up nice and snug

Several emerging mosquito-management methods require the transport of mosquitoes to precise locations. There, lab-reared mosquitoes — for instance, sterilized males — mix with wild mosquitoes and hinder the population's ability to reproduce or transmit disease. But, getting mosquitoes from lab to wild presents logistical challenges. A team led by researchers at New Mexico State University are ta

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Destroying a type of cloud may help stabilise climate change

Wiping out high-altitude cirrus clouds might be the best way to artificially cool the climate by geoengineering the planet

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EEG test measures pain better than ‘smiley face’ scale

A new electroencephalography-based test could offer a better way for patients to rate their pain and could also ease the over-prescription of opioids, a new study shows. If you’ve ever visited the emergency department with appendicitis, or you’re one of the 100 million US adults who suffer from chronic pain, you’re probably familiar with a row of numbered faces, with expressions from smiling to g

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Gøtzsche: Jeg har ikke fået en plausibel grund for fritagelse for tjeneste

Peter Gøtzsche er blevet fritaget for tjeneste af Rigshospital indtil videre og må ikke vise sig på sin nu tidligere arbejdsplads.

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Sundhedsminister vil regulere medicinpriser ved lov

Står det til sundhedsministeren skal medicinalvirksomheder, der ikke har tilsluttet sig prisloftsaftalen, fremover prisreguleres ved lov gennem et eksternt referenceprissystem.

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Nyt studie: Småbørnsforældre vil have naturlighed i indkøbskurven

I en verden med mange forbrugsmuligheder, uforståelige varedeklarationer og selvudnævnte…

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Protecting adult female north atlantic right whales from injury and death key to recovery

Why is the endangered western North Atlantic right whale population growing far more slowly than those of southern right whales, a sister species also recovering from near extinction by commercial whaling? NOAA Fisheries researchers and colleagues looked more closely at the question and have concluded that preserving the lives of adult females in the population is by far the most effective way to

3h

An overlooked giant: Useful and abundant, African 'Zam' palm newly described for science

It might have been it's extremely large size, or maybe confusion with a similar species, that has previously discouraged botanists from collecting and describing a fairly common palm, now named Raphia zamiana. Locally known and widely used in Cameroon and Gabon, the "Zam" has now been officially described in the open access journal PhytoKeys, alongside a less common Gabonese endemic species from t

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Thermo Fisher Scientific: Freezers for Biological Samples

Fluctuations in temperature can reduce the efficacy, decompose, or shorten the shelf life of biologics. Therefore, it is important to store biologics at the right temperature using standardized protocols.

3h

Lisbeth Salander, Superhero

Superheroes are inescapable at the box office these days. But I confess that I never expected Lisbeth Salander, the moody Swedish hacker of Stieg Larsson’s Millennium novels, to join their ranks. Yes, Salander is a fearsome opponent of predatory men, and in earlier Larsson works such as The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo , she’s a valuable asset in solving a decades-old murder mystery. But she has a

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Woodland hawks flock to urban buffet

Researchers document that woodland hawks — once in precipitous decline due to pollution, persecution and habitat loss — have become firmly established in even the starkest urban environments, thriving primarily on a diet of backyard birds attracted to feeders.

3h

Powered by windows: enhanced power factor in transparent thermoelectric nanowire materials

A research group led by Professor Yoshiaki Nakamura of Osaka University successfully developed a methodology for enhancing thermoelectric power factor while decreasing thermal conductivity. By introducing ZnO nanowires into ZnO films, the thermoelectric power factor became 3 times larger than that of ZnO film without ZnO nanowires. The success of this research will lead to the realization of high-

4h

Artificial sensor mimics human sense of touch

A new tactile sensor can detect surface shapes and structures, showing advantages over existing sensors, according to new research in IEEE/ASME Transactions on Mechatronics.

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Ben-Gurion University research leads to first nationwide sunscreen chemicals ban in Palau

'We are pleased to see that governments are using scientific research conducted at Ben-Gurion University to protect the delicate coral reef systems and ocean wildlife that are already under significant stress from climate change,' says Prof. Kushmaro.

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Interdisciplinary interactions inspire new discovery

Researchers in Japan have found new good catalysts using unique 'Heusler' alloys, following an interdisciplinary approach.Most studies on catalysts have been conducted by researchers in chemistry. However, catalysts also relate to other research fields. For example, materials science including metallurgy is effective for making and analyzing catalysts, and solid state physics is necessary to under

4h

Study findings show promise in preventing heart disease in cancer survivors

A new study by Washington State University researchers suggests that a protein called CDK2 plays a critical role in heart damage caused by doxorubicin, a commonly used chemotherapy drug. Published in the Journal of Biological Chemistry, their finding could be used as the basis for future development of treatment strategies and drugs to reduce heart disease risk in cancer survivors, especially thos

4h

Open source machine learning tool could help choose cancer drugs

Using machine learning techniques, a new open source decision support tool could help clinicians choose cancer therapy drugs by analyzing RNA expression tied to information about patient outcomes with specific drugs.

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'The Martian' author Andy Weir answers your questions about Mars

Space His favorite astronaut, his most beloved fictional space explorer, and the discoveries that would have changed the plot of 'The Martian.' Andy Weir's favorite real astronaut, his most beloved fictional space explorer, and the scientific discoveries that would have changed the plot of 'The Martian.'…

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Ghostly Orange Light Envelopes Earth During Rare Airglow

An eerie, marmalade-colored light show made Earth look like a gigantic orange lollipop early this morning (Nov. 7), prompting an astronaut aboard the International Space Station to snap a photo of it to share with Earthlings down below.

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Study finds paternity leave improves relationships for dual-income couples

Relationships for couples often improve when fathers take parental leave during the first nine months of a child's life, says a new study from Ball State University.

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Why "Getting Away" in Nature Is Good for Your Mental Health

Savvy Psychologist Dr. Ellen Hendriksen dives into why our minds love to go green — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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The Lab of the Future: Alinity Poised to Reinvent Clinical Diagnostic Testing and Help Improve Healthcare

Every minute counts when waiting for accurate diagnostic test results to guide critical care decisions, making today's clinical lab more important than ever. In fact, nearly 70 percent of critical care decisions are driven by a diagnostic test.

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Mutant protein tackles DNA guardian to promote cancer development

Scientists have discovered how tumor development is driven by mutations in the most important gene in preventing cancer, p53.

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Compound derived from marijuana may benefit children with epilepsy

In recent years, cannabinoids — the active chemicals in medical marijuana — have been increasingly touted as a potential treatment for a range of neurological and psychiatric disorders. Investigators have now compared their efficacy with antiepileptic drugs for children with epilepsy.

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Selective amnesia: How rats and humans are able to forget distracting memories

Our ability to selectively forget distracting memories is shared with other mammals, suggests new research. The discovery that rats and humans share a common active forgetting ability — and in similar brain regions — suggests that the capacity to forget plays a vital role in adapting mammalian species to their environments, and that its evolution may date back at least to the time of our common

4h

Doing the wave: how stretchy fluids react to wavy surfaces

Scientists investigate the strange behavior of viscoelastic fluids in a series of specially designed experiments.

4h

Modern slavery promotes overfishing

Labour abuses, including modern slavery, are 'hidden subsidies' that allow distant-water fishing fleets to remain profitable and promote overfishing.

4h

ASU researcher helps develop prosthetic hand system, allowing user to 'feel' again

Arizona State University researcher James Abbas is part of a multi-institutional research team that has developed a new prosthetic hand system with a fully implanted, wirelessly controlled neurostimulator that has restored 'feeling' to a person with a hand amputation.

4h

Machine-learning system could aid critical decisions in sepsis care

Researchers from MIT and Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) have developed a predictive model that could guide clinicians in deciding when to give potentially life-saving drugs to patients being treated for sepsis in the emergency room.

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Flow units: Dynamic defects in metallic glasses

Metallic glass is promising and advanced metallic material with many unique properties. It is also considered as a model system to study fundamental issues of amorphous materials. Recently, experiments and simulation results support the existence of so-called flow units in metallic glasses. As dynamic defects, flow units are closely related with deformation, dynamics, relaxations and the glass tra

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New analysis about synchronization transitions improves knowledge of physical, biological systems

In physical, biological and technological systems, the time that a system's components take to influence each other can affect the transition to synchronization, an important finding that improves understanding of how these systems function, according to a study led by Georgia State University.

4h

Tuesday Showed the Drawbacks of Trump's Electoral Bargain

On Tuesday, a divided America returned a divided verdict on the tumultuous first two years of Donald Trump’s presidency. Rather than delivering a “blue wave” or a “red wall,” the election produced a much more divergent result than usual in a midterm. Democrats made sweeping gains in the House, ousting Republicans in urban and suburban seats across every region of the country to convincingly retak

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Threats remain to US voting system–and voters' perceptions of reality

As the 2018 midterms proceed, there are still significant risks to the integrity of the voting system – and information warfare continues to try to influence the American public's choices when they cast their ballots.

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Wind tunnel and lasers provide hypersonic proving ground at Sandia National Laboratories

It's about speed, and Sandia National Laboratories, with a hypersonic wind tunnel and advanced laser diagnostic technology, is in an excellent position to help U.S. defense agencies understand the physics associated with aircraft flying five times the speed of sound.

4h

Kindle Paperwhite Review (2018): Our Favorite E-Reader Gets Better

The new device has a sleeker design, more storage, an updated processor—and now it’s waterproof.

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Finland’s long, hard road to creating a circular economy

A visit to a state of the art rubbish dump serving Helsinki shows that even in the greenest of nations, tackling waste is a complex problem

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The Kepler spacecraft is dead but its planet-hunting legacy lives on

On 30 October, NASA announced that the Kepler planet-hunting spacecraft is being shut down. Over almost a decade, it changed our views on our place in the universe

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15 Incredible Places on Earth That Are Frozen in Time

These are places where time stands still.

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How stretchy fluids react to wavy surfaces

Viscoelastic fluids are everywhere, whether racing through your veins or through 1,300 kilometers of pipe in the Trans-Alaska Pipeline. Unlike Newtonian fluids, such as oil or water, viscoelastic fluids stretch like a sticky strand of saliva. Chains of molecules inside the fluids grant them this superpower, and scientists are still working to understand how it affects their behavior. Researchers a

4h

The limits of hematite

Hematite and other transition metal oxides are used in the renewable production of hydrogen. Researchers at the TU Darmstadt have discovered why the materials reached their limits doing so. Their results have now been published in Nature Communications.

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How Cooperating Microbes Shaped Life on Earth

Microbial partnerships turn out to be more common and influential than scientists could have ever imagined — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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How Marijuana Use During Pregnancy Could Harm a Developing Baby's Brain

Three studies in rodents suggest prenatal exposure to the drug may pose risks for infants — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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You Really Can Learn in Your Sleep

Experimental techniques demonstrate how to strengthen memories when our brains are off-line — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Genetic study clarifies the causes of the most severe heart muscle diseases of children

The researchers at the University of Helsinki and Helsinki University Hospital have collected a globally unique KidCMP cohort of children with severe cardiomyopathies from the past 21 years, and characterized them genetically. The researchers discovered that the genetic knowledge had direct implications for predicting the disease course and treatment decisions.

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Filtering liquids with liquids saves electricity

Filtering and treating water accounts for about 13 percent of all electricity consumed in the US every year and releases about 290 million metric tons of CO2 into the atmosphere annually. New research demonstrates that recently developed liquid-gated membranes filter nanoclay particles out of water more efficiently than existing membranes and require less frequent replacement and less energy to op

4h

Does a woman's weight gain during pregnancy affect children's bone health?

A new study has examined whether managing weight during pregnancy might affect children's bone mass. In under/normal weight mothers, weight gain during pregnancy was associated with slightly increased bone mass at seven years of age in children, while in overweight/obese mothers, no beneficial effect of weight gain on bone mass was observed.

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Study explores timing of muscle-related problems of statin use

Statins have been linked with muscle pain and other musculoskeletal adverse events (MAEs) in some patients. A new study has examined the timing of MAEs that develop during statin therapy and determined whether concomitant drugs used concurrently with statin therapy shifts the timing of MAEs.

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World's most comprehensive digital roadmap to unlock male infertility

Millions of couples who have trouble conceiving may get relief from new research. The researchers have developed a high-resolution genetic map showing how men produce sperm cells. Their effort could help address genetically based challenges with male fertility, a major cause of conception problems.

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Can social media lead to labor market discrimination?

A new study investigates whether social media may be used as a source of information for recruiters to discriminate against job applicants.

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Ultra-hot gas around remnants of sun-like stars

Solving a decades-old mystery, an international team of astronomers have discovered an extremely hot magnetosphere around a white dwarf, a remnant of a star like our sun.

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Home cleanliness, residents' tolerance predict where cockroaches take up residence

Poor home sanitation and residents' tolerance regarding German cockroaches were a good predictor of the pest's presence in their apartments, according to a new study.

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Undeterred, Gulf fish spawn despite hurricane

Even a Category 4 hurricane doesn't kill the mood for coastal fish — and that's good news for all species, as well as for a multibillion-dollar recreational fishing industry. As extreme weather patterns threaten to bring more and larger storms to the Gulf Coast, new findings show some important fish species are able to continue spawning even in a severe storm.

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Scientists shuffle the deck to create materials with new quantum behaviors

Layered transition metal dichalcogenides or TMDCs—materials composed of metal nanolayers sandwiched between two other layers of chalcogens— have become extremely attractive to the research community due to their ability to exfoliate into 2-D single layers. Similar to graphene, they not only retain some of the unique properties of the bulk material, but also demonstrate direct-gap semiconducting be

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Dancing atoms in perovskite materials provide insight into how solar cells work

A closer look at materials that make up conventional solar cells reveals a nearly rigid arrangement of atoms with little movement. But in hybrid perovskites, a promising class of solar cell materials, the arrangements are more flexible and atoms dance wildly around, an effect that impacts the performance of the solar cells but has been difficult to measure.

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ESA rocks space weather

This week, to coincide with the fifteenth annual European Space Weather Week, ESA is celebrating the dynamic phenomenon of space weather.

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The curious case of the missing workplace teaspoons

Once upon a time, a group of disheartened scientists found their tearoom bereft of teaspoons. Despite dispatching a research assistant to go purchase more – so sugar could be stirred and coffee dispensed – the newly purchased teaspoons disappeared within a few short months.

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Zuckerberg rebuffs request to appear before UK parliament

Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg has rejected a request to appear before an international parliamentary committee delving into the questions around fake news.

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Netflix to boost production of European series

Netflix said Wednesday it will produce more series in Europe in languages other than English following the global success of Spanish crime caper "Money Heist" and German mystery "Dark".

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Unclear whether digital revolution lowers prices – survey

A new survey suggests the digital technologies sweeping through the corporate world could mean some job losses at big companies, but it's unclear what impact they will have on consumer prices.

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Scientists reveal spring cold spells that reduce crop yields

A new study reveals process of an extreme spring cold spell, which happens over North China. Continuous negative temperature anomalies can have disastrous effects on the wheat yield, inducing yield losses of up to 20% or more.

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Financial giants can have a pivotal role for climate stability

Banks, pension funds and other institutional investors have a key role to play in efforts to avoid dangerous climate change. A limited number of these investors have considerable influence over the Amazon rainforest and boreal forests that are known 'tipping elements' in the climate systemProtecting these 'tipping elements' should be a priority for investors to help reduce both climate change and

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'Bionic mushrooms' fuse nanotech, bacteria and fungi

Researchers have taken an ordinary white button mushroom from a grocery store and made it bionic, supercharging it with 3D-printed clusters of cyanobacteria that generate electricity and swirls of graphene nanoribbons that can collect the current.

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New method rapidly detects trace amounts of small molecule compounds

Russian researchers from Prokhorov General Physics Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences (GPI RAS) and the Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology (MIPT) have developed the world's first ultrasensitive method for rapid detection of small molecules. This method detects trace amounts of toxins, hormones, vitamins and other biologically active molecules that are significant for healthcare a

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Next-generation technology is coming to a self-driving car near you

Typically, navigation systems for autonomous cars use visible light to identify foreign objects. This works most of the time. But in misty, foggy, or rainy conditions, self-driving cars become a deer in headlights, largely unaware of upcoming obstacles. Scattered light confuses the car's system, thus blurring the distinction between real objects and reflections from the scattered light itself. Und

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The Atlantic Daily: Where the Midterms Leave America

Editor’s note : In a midterm election with unprecedented turnout, Democrats regained control of the House, while Republicans extended their margin in the Senate. High-profile candidates like Beto O’Rourke fell just short; others are making a new name for themselves. Voting problems abounded ; some voting rights were restored. The suburban-rural-divide is sharpening. The consequences of these 2018

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ExoMars: Where to send Europe's robot rover?

The joint Europe-Russia mission to the Red Planet in 2020 needs a destination to go do its science.

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Integrating land-atmosphere interactions into climate-predictive models

Ian N. Williams is a research scientist at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), where he is principal investigator in a program called Land-Atmosphere Coupling and Convection in the Water Cycle.

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A possible explanation for why pygmy people in the jungle are so short

A team of researchers from the Institute for Advanced Study in Toulouse, Harvard University, the University of Exeter and the University of California has come up with a new theory to explain the short stature of pygmies living in the jungle. In their paper published in Proceedings of the Royal Society B, the group suggests that shorter steps taken by shorter people are an evolutionary advantage i

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Uber and public transit—friends or foes?

Falling transit ridership across big North American cities has raised concern that Uber, Lyft and other ride-hailing services may be leeching passengers.

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Genetic study shows white rhinos intermixed during ice age offering hope for saving sub-species

An international team of researchers has found genetic evidence of northern and southern white rhinoceros' intermingling during the last ice age. In their paper published in Proceedings of the Royal Society B, the group describes their study and their hopes that the new information may lead to a new population of hybrids.

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Amerikansk marinekorps vil angribe øjne, trommehinder og hud med monteret laser-kanon

Amerikansk forsvar og politi ønsker sig en 'Ultra-Short Pulse Laser', der kan »fremkalde et fuldt spektrum af ikke-dødelige virkninger.«

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'Bionic mushrooms' fuse nanotech, bacteria and fungi

Researchers from Stevens Institute of Technology have taken an ordinary white button mushroom from a grocery store and made it bionic, supercharging it with 3D-printed clusters of cyanobacteria that generate electricity and swirls of graphene nanoribbons that can collect the current.

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A bionic mushroom that generates electricity

In the quest to replace fossil fuels, scientists are always on the lookout for alternative, environmentally friendly sources of energy. But who could have imagined a bionic mushroom that produces electricity? It sounds like something straight out of Alice in Wonderland, but researchers have now generated mushrooms patterned with energy-producing bacteria and an electrode network. They report their

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White wine, lemon juice combo prevents unwanted discoloration of pastry dough

No matter if it's grandma's cookies or commercially produced rolls, pastry lovers expect their baked goods to have a certain 'golden brown' allure — but only after baking. A white dough that changes hue during storage, however, can negatively affect the appearance and perception of the final baked product. Now in a study appearing in ACS' Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, scientists rep

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Florida Votes for Democracy

Last year, writing about the state that disenfranchised more of its voters than any other, I asked, “ Will Florida banish the ghost of Jim Crow ?” On Tuesday its voters did so, amending their state constitution to restore voting rights for convicted felons who’ve served their sentence, except those convicted of murder and some sex offenses. This is a hugely consequential result. The change will e

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Communities with less variety in housing types have higher foreclosure rates, say researchers

Places with more diversity in types of housing are more stable and can weather a housing crisis better, say University of Illinois researchers.

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Worsening water risks on Kafue river could undermine Zambia's development

Faced with soaring demand for water as well as the impact of climate change, the lower Kafue river's has reached its maximum water allocation and urgent action is needed to ensure a sustainable future for the river and all the communities and companies that depend on it, says a new report from WWF in collaboration with Zambian Breweries.

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Age stereotypes a problem for older employees

Older employees may be prematurely exiting the workforce because they feel stereotyped on the basis of their age.

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Cosmic collisions: SOFIA unravels the mysterious formation of star clusters

The sun, like all stars, was born in a giant cold cloud of molecular gas and dust. It may have had dozens or even hundreds of stellar siblings – a star cluster – but these early companions are now scattered throughout our Milky Way galaxy. Although the remnants of this particular creation event have long since dispersed, the process of star birth continues today within our galaxy and beyond. Star

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Update on Low Calorie Sweeteners

An updated review of the science finds that artificial sweeteners are still a safe and effective option for weight management.

5h

New report on gender equality in UK History

Steps must be taken to promote gender equality to ensure more women view history as an academic option and profession, according to a new report published by the Royal Historical Society (RHS) and co-authored by academics at UCL.

5h

How we wiped out the invasive African big-headed ant from Lord Howe Island

The invasive African big-headed ant (Pheidole megacephala) was found on Lord Howe Island in 2003 following complaints from residents about large numbers of ants in buildings.

5h

Unraveling another secret of spider silk—it's a cable

Scientists are spinning out the secrets of one of nature's most intriguing and potentially valuable materials—spider silk.

5h

Danske klynger bør højst bestå af 12-14 læger

Åbenhed om egne data og politisk tålmodighed er afgørende, hvis de nye klynger i almen praksis skal blomstre – og så er flere af de danske klynger for store. Det pointerer Dr. Gregor Smith, der er en af drivkræfterne bag klyngearbejdet i Skotland

5h

Sundhedsstyrelsen kritiserer Hovedstaden for at bevare akutklinikker

Region Hovedstadens beslutning om at bevare mindre akutklinikker går mod Sundhedsstyrelsens anbefalinger.

5h

Structure-ID technique could shift chemistry to warp speed

Work that previously could have taken chemists months can now be done in minutes.

5h

Tiny, ancient fossil shows evidence of the breath of life

An international team of scientists from Leicester, Yale, Oxford and London has discovered a rare and exceptionally well-preserved tiny crustacean in 430 million-years-old rocks in Herefordshire, UK. The fossil is a new species of ostracod, a relative of crabs and shrimps and is just a few millimetres long.

5h

How elite athletes keep their heads in the game

Science A professional athlete's mental game is just as important, if not more so, as their physical one. Though the physicality of professional athletes may be the most visible part of their game, their mental training is just as important—and it can be just as rigorous.

5h

Holy Cow! Astronomers Agog at Mysterious New Supernova

An event known as "Cow" that has rocked astronomy since June likely offers a close look at the birth of a neutron star or black hole — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

5h

Why Claire Underwood Couldn’t Save House of Cards

This article contains spoilers through the Season 6 finale of House of Cards. Doug Stamper is the dog. In the opening moments of Netflix’s House of Cards premiere episode from 2013, Frank Underwood (Kevin Spacey) hunched over a dog that’d been injured by a car. “There are two kinds of pain,” he said into the camera. “The sort of pain that makes you strong, or useless pain, the sort of pain that’s

5h

The Benefits of a Short Attention Span

Luci Gutiérrez O ur supposedly shrinking attention spans are a hot topic these days—as you may have seen on TV or heard on a podcast or read on Twitter or glimpsed on your watch or else just intuited from the antsy melancholy of those few unbearable minutes each morning between when you open your eyes and when you first reach for your phone. Emblematic of the genre is a 2015 Microsoft report that

5h

The Year of the Woman Is Not Enough

Women led the Democratic takeover of the House of Representatives in 2018. They wrestled seats away from men, and Republicans, in crucial swing states such as Florida and Pennsylvania, and they broke a record with the number of seats they’ll occupy in the 116th Congress. Women stormed governors’ mansions this election. At least nine women will now serve as their state’s executive, three more than

5h

Image of the Day: Retinal Transplant

Blind rats are made to see after sheets of cells implanted into their eyes make themselves at home.

5h

New Satellites Will Use Radio Waves to Spy on Ships and Planes

This month, HawkEye360 will send up satellites that monitor the radio transmissions of ships, planes and other things on Earth, allowing them to be tracked by their communications.

5h

White wine, lemon juice combo prevents unwanted discoloration of pastry dough

No matter if it's grandma's cookies or commercially produced rolls, pastry lovers expect their baked goods to have a certain "golden brown" allure—but only after baking. A white dough that changes hue during storage, however, can negatively affect the appearance and perception of the final baked product. Now in a study appearing in ACS' Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, scientists report

5h

'Bionic mushrooms' fuse nanotech, bacteria and fungi

In their latest feat of engineering, researchers at Stevens Institute of Technology have taken an ordinary white button mushroom from a grocery store and made it bionic, supercharging it with 3-D-printed clusters of cyanobacteria that generate electricity and swirls of graphene nanoribbons that can collect the current.

5h

Image: A rare optical phenomenon spotted from orbit

Despite humankind's scientific prowess there are still many phenomena that defy explanation or a common agreement on why something happens. A 'glory' is a rare optical phenomenon that is mostly seen by pilots and mountain climbers looking down at mists or clouds. Forming a miniature circular rainbow, glories are seen when the Sun shines from behind and interacts with water droplets to refract ligh

6h

America Is Divided by Education

O ne of the most striking patterns in yesterday’s election was years in the making: a major partisan divide between white voters with a college degree and those without one. According to exit polls , 61 percent of non-college-educated white voters cast their ballots for Republicans while just 45 percent of college-educated white voters did so. Meanwhile 53 percent of college-educated white voters

6h

The New Metropolitan Majority

To understand what happened on Tuesday, you have to begin by acknowledging that the fight for control of the Senate was a home game for President Donald Trump—and he won it, as expected. The real battlegrounds were the House of Representatives and the gubernatorial contests in states the president won in 2016, including Michigan, Wisconsin, and Pennsylvania. With unemployment at a near-record low

6h

Sundhedsvæsenets julesang

Afdelingslæge skriver julesang om tingenes tilstand i sundhedsvæsenet.

6h

Three Deep Red States Vote to Expand Medicaid

Idaho, Nebraska and Utah are set to join 33 others that have already expanded the program under Obamacare to give free health coverage to most low income residents.

6h

Image: Earth enveloped in airglow

On October 7, 2018, an astronaut aboard the International Space Station (ISS) shot this photograph while orbiting at an altitude of more than 250 miles over Australia.

6h

Tiniest ever fossil ape discovered in Kenya

When Stony Brook University anthropologist James Rossie began sifting through sediment in the Tugen Hills of Kenya during his first day of the dig, he didn't know he'd discover teeth from a previously undiscovered tiny ape species.

6h

Making wind farms more efficient

With energy demands rising, researchers at Penn State Behrend and the University of Tabriz, Iran, have completed an algorithm—or approach—to design more efficient wind farms, helping to generate more revenue for builders and more renewable energy for their customers.

6h

Researchers find most fantasy sports are based on skill, not luck

If you've ever taken part in the armchair sport of fantasy football and found yourself at the top of your league's standings at the end of the season, a new MIT study suggests your performance—however far removed from any actual playing field—was likely based on skill rather than luck.

6h

External structure can affect the function of enzymes

A research team from Ruhr-Universität Bochum (RUB) and from South Africa has analysed two enzymes with identical substrate binding pockets that nevertheless convert different substrates. In the process, it emerged that changes to the enzyme surface affect its substrate specificity by modifying how densely it is packed inside. These findings might pave the way for manipulating the enzyme function.

6h

Booming Model 3 Sales Are Taking Tesla Mainstream

Elon Musk's Model 3 is the 19th best-selling vehicle in the country, as 15-year-old Tesla moves beyond its niche.

6h

Women in physics: Why there’s a problem and how we can solve it

Women are still wildly under-represented in physics – but it doesn't have to be like that. Our special report looks at the steps we can take to improve things

6h

The first detailed look at how Elon Musk’s space internet could work

Elon Musk has revealed little about his plans to provide internet from space, but a new simulation shows how it could work and who will be able to afford it

6h

Scientists to track the reaction of crystals to the electric field

An international scientific team, which included scientists from China, Israel, England and Russia, has developed a new method for measuring the response of crystals on the electric field. The study, performed at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF), were published in the Journal of Applied Crystallography and appeared on the cover of the October issue. This method will help to imple

6h

Making steps toward improved data storage

A team of scientists has created the world's most powerful electromagnetic pulses in the terahertz range to control in fine detail how a data-storage material switches physical form. This discovery could contribute to scaled-down memory devices, eventually revolutionizing how computers handle information.

6h

Team breaks world record for fast, accurate AI training

Researchers at Hong Kong Baptist University (HKBU) have partnered with a team from Tencent Machine Learning to create a new technique for training artificial intelligence (AI) machines faster than ever before while maintaining accuracy.

6h

Trying to understand cells' interior design

How do you imagine the interior of our cells? Often compared to tiny factories, cells found smart and sophisticated ways to organize their interiors. Most biological processes require cells to bring together structures such as proteins and nucleic acids (like DNA) at the right time. Scientists at the Center for Soft and Living Matter, within the Institute for Basic Science (IBS, South Korea), have

6h

A new piece to the puzzle sheds light on how UHRF1 regulates gene activity

Epigenetic changes often play an important role in cancer, because they cause the genetic material to be read incorrectly at certain locations. Genes that are especially critical are those that control the growth and death of cells. Scientists at Helmholtz Zentrum München have now discovered new details about the UHRF1 protein. UHRF1 catalyses particular steps that are required for marking DNA wit

6h

Ancient Ceremonial Complexes Revealed in World's Driest Desert

Infant burials and stone monuments were found at these ceremonial complexes in the Atacama Desert.

6h

Oversight Is the Biggest Winner of the Midterm Elections

Oversight is the winner of the 2018 midterms. For two years, as the press documented suspicious activity in all realms of President Donald Trump’s life, many Americans wondered, “How corrupt is the president? How about his political allies, his business associates, his appointees, and the people who run his nonprofit foundation? Are they profiting off taxpayers or selling out the public interest?

6h

America, Now More Divided Than (Almost) Ever

The realignment is consolidating. Republicans won in solid Donald Trump states. Democrats won in solid Hillary Clinton states. There were exceptions: Senator Joe Manchin won another term in West Virginia despite being a Democrat. But the states where the presidential election of 2016 was the tightest are the ones still figuring out who and what they are. There’s Ohio, which easily reelected Sherr

6h

Why I Hire Scientists, and Why You Should, Too

They they add to your business, regardless of what industry you’re in — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

6h

Turbine maker Vestas turns in record order book

Vestas, the world's largest wind turbine manufacturer, said Wednesday its order book had reached an all-time high, but falling prices took the gust out of the company's sales figures.

6h

"Ghost Gear" Haunts the Oceans in a Growing Threat

Tons of dumped nets and other fishing equipment are strangling animals and habitats — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

7h

Making fermented dairy products taste better

Researchers at the Technical University of Munich (TUM), the Leibniz-Institute for Food Systems Biology, and the University of Hohenheim have developed a new methodical approach for the faster identification of flavor-giving protein fragments in foods such as cheese or yogurt, thus optimizing production processes.

7h

First-in-class YEATS inhibitors that show promise for leukemia treatment

A research team led by Dr. Xiang David Li from the Department of Chemistry at The University of Hong Kong (HKU), in collaboration with scientists from Tsinghua University in China, the Rockefeller University, and the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center in the United States, has developed the first chemical inhibitors against a novel therapeutic target for treatment of acute myeloid leuke

7h

Washington State Likely Rejects a Historic Carbon Tax

If Democrats ever want to fight climate change at the national level, they’ll need help from state-level progressives first. Blue states will need to function as “laboratories of democracy,” trying out creative new climate policies and finding their faults before their debut on the national stage. On Tuesday, Democrats didn’t get that help. Though progressives cruised to victory in Washington Sta

7h

Gråsæler vender stærkt tilbage til Danmark: Nu har de lært at jage marsvin

DNA-beviser fra marsvin-kadavere afslører, at gråsæler er begyndt at jage langt større byttedyr end normalt.

7h

Boeing issues advice over sensors after Indonesia crash

Boeing issued a special bulletin Wednesday addressing a sensor problem flagged by Indonesian safety officials investigating the crash of a Lion Air 737 that killed 189 people last week.

7h

How to make your car's safety features work for you

Drivers are used to traditional passive safety features, such as airbags and seat belts, that help limit injury in case of an accident. But vehicle safety is changing dramatically. The latest vehicles have safety features that can help prevent an accident in the first place. A potential problem, however, is that drivers aren't fully ready for them.

7h

Home cleanliness, residents' tolerance predict where cockroaches take up residence

Poor home sanitation and residents' tolerance regarding German cockroaches were a good predictor of the pest's presence in their apartments, according to a Rutgers study in Paterson and Irvington, New Jersey.

7h

Utah's Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument home to rich bee diversity

Utah State University researchers say one out of every four bee species in the United States is found In Utah and the arid, western state is home to more bee species than most states in the nation. About half of those species dwell within the original boundaries of the newly reduced Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument.

7h

Where might we find aliens? Ice moons, methane oceans, and the red planet

Want to place a bet on when we'll discover alien life? NASA's Michelle Thaller thinks it'll be within the next 50 years. "I actually have a bottle of champagne chilling because I think it could happen almost any day, when some of our rovers or some of our satellites around other planets come back with really interesting data," says Thaller. What will our first proof of alien life be like? Most li

7h

Bizarre metals may help unlock mysteries of how Earth’s magnetic field forms

Weyl metals could simulate the dynamo effect that generates the planet’s magnetism, a new study suggests.

7h

Feature: What if the Placebo Effect Isn’t a Trick?

New research is zeroing in on a biochemical basis for the placebo effect — possibly opening a Pandora’s box for Western medicine.

7h

The Harsh Truth Exposed by the Midterm Elections

The story line coming out of Tuesday’s midterm elections will be: The two Americas drift further apart. Republicans expanded their majority in the Senate by cleaning out Democrats in states that voted for Donald Trump. Democrats won the House by cleaning out Republicans in districts that voted for Hillary Clinton. In the next Congress, Democrats will be even more liberal. Republicans will be even

7h

The Fate of Trumpism Rests on the TIGRs

President Donald Trump says he has come to regret the harshness of his rhetoric. In a Monday interview with Sinclair Broadcasting, a decidedly friendly outfit, he said, “I would like to have a much softer tone,” and then, by way of explanation, added, “I feel to a certain extent I have no choice, but maybe I do and maybe I could have been softer from that standpoint.” Having vilified his politica

7h

Capturing Europe’s Refugee Crisis Through Comics

Ali Fitzgerald’s new graphic memoir takes on sprawling subjects: a city and the refugees who’ve tried to adopt it as their own, as well as the medium of comics as a tool for self-knowledge. At its root, though, Drawn to Berlin is a tale about faith. “I sort of believe in the gospel of comics,” Fitzgerald told me. “Which is nice, because I don’t believe in that much.” This conviction is in part wh

7h

LeVar Burton on Pursuing the Priesthood Before Acting

At the age of 17, LeVar Burton was on a path to the priesthood, having entered seminary three years earlier. But Burton began questioning the Catholic point of view, and he did not receive satisfying answers from his elders. He decided to change his trajectory, and landed on acting. Two years later, as an undergraduate at the University of Southern California, Burton got a role acting alongside C

7h

Utah's Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument home to rich bee diversity

The state of Utah's nickname is "The Beehive State," and the moniker couldn't be more apt, say Utah State University scientists. One out of every four bee species in the United States is found In Utah and the arid, western state is home to more bee species than most states in the nation. About half of those species dwell within the original boundaries of the newly reduced Grand Staircase-Escalante

7h

Forsvarsminister: Danske virksomheder griber hacker-angreb helt forkert an

Talrige cybertrusler mod Danmark har sendt alarmberedskabet op på højeste niveau siden Den Kolde Krig. Her giver forsvarsminister Claus Hjort Frederiksen (V) sit bud på, hvordan de danske it-sikkerhedsventiler skal strammes.

7h

Håndholdt scanner afslører fusk med fisk

Omfattende snyd i fiskeriet vildleder forbrugerne og truer dyreliv og økosystemer i havene.

8h

Home cleanliness, residents' tolerance predict where cockroaches take up residence

Poor home sanitation and residents' tolerance regarding German cockroaches were a good predictor of the pest's presence in their apartments, according to a Rutgers study in Paterson and Irvington, New Jersey.

8h

Selective amnesia: How rats and humans are able to forget distracting memories

Our ability to selectively forget distracting memories is shared with other mammals, suggests new research from the University of Cambridge. The discovery that rats and humans share a common active forgetting ability — and in similar brain regions — suggests that the capacity to forget plays a vital role in adapting mammalian species to their environments, and that its evolution may date back at

8h

Research team constructs world's most comprehensive digital roadmap to unlock male infertility

Millions of couples who have trouble conceiving may get relief from new research led by scientists at The University of Texas at San Antonio. The researchers have developed a high-resolution genetic map showing how men produce sperm cells. Their effort could help address genetically based challenges with male fertility, a major cause of conception problems.

8h

Boeing braces for trade war headwinds in China

At China's biggest air show, a top Boeing executive voiced hope that the US and China would resume trade talks. He has reason to worry: The US aerospace giant could fly into turbulence in a protracted commercial conflict.

8h

Is The Pentagon Modifying Viruses To Save Crops — Or To Wage Biological Warfare?

The Pentagon wants university researchers to find ways to protect crops in the field using infectious viruses carried by insects. Critics think it looks like bioweapons research. (Image credit: Dan Charles/NPR)

8h

Rapport: Solceller øger brandfare i el-installationer

Elektriske anlæg er mere brandfarlige, hvis de indeholder solceller. Samtidig kan det være vanskeligt for brandfolk at vide, hvor solcellerne befinder sig, viser en ny undersøgelse.

8h

Tre vinkler på reduktion af tvang

Hvordan kommer vi væk fra det åg, som fysisk tvang i psykiatrien er for både ansatte og patienter? Vores top tre-ønsker er investeringer og omprioriteringer, en stærk, visionær og anerkendende lægefaglig dialog om tvang, og en topmoderne specialiseret retspsykiatrisk akutfunktion.

9h

Ozone: The Earth's protective shield is repairing

The ozone layer is finally healing from damage humans have caused, according to the United Nations.

9h

UTSA constructs world's most comprehensive digital roadmap to unlock male infertility

Millions of couples who have trouble conceiving may get relief from new research led by scientists at The University of Texas at San Antonio. The researchers have developed a high-resolution genetic map showing how men produce sperm cells. Their effort could help address genetically based challenges with male fertility, a major cause of conception problems.

9h

Millionpris går til KU-forsker for revolutionerende opdagelse af hjernens rengøringssystem

Professor Maiken Nedergaard, Københavns Universitet, er udvalgt som årets modtager af den…

9h

Ministerium efter budget-fejl på 118 pct: »Det er svært at se grundlaget for en fundamental kritik«

Ombygningen af Ringsted Station er blevet fordyret med 118 procent. For at finansiere fordyrelsen må jernbaneprojekter for 325 millioner droppes. Men Transportministeriet afviser, at der er grundlag for »en fundamental kritik af projektets anlægsbudget«.

9h

Adidas lifts profit outlook after 'strong' quarter

German sporting goods maker Adidas on Wednesday lifted its profit expectations for 2018 after a "strong" third quarter that saw brisk global demand for its sportswear and sneakers.

10h

BMW profit dips in 'volatile' times

German high-end carmaker BMW on Wednesday posted a steep drop in quarterly profit as new EU emissions tests, global trade tensions and costly recalls weighed on the bottom line.

11h

Recovery of endangered whales hampered by humans long after hunting

When an endangered female North Atlantic right whale spends months, even years, disentangling itself from cast-off fishing nets, there's not much energy left over for mating and nursing calves.

11h

Google touts progress in fight against piracy

Google said Wednesday it is making strides in helping internet users legitimately get songs, films and apps while choking off revenue to websites with stolen digital content.

11h

Making grad school possible for minorities

Eze Ahanonu was first introduced to engineering in middle school, when he attended Summer Engineering Academy at the University of Arizona. Somewhere in between designing aerodynamic car bodies in SolidWorks, 3-D printing them, and testing them in a miniature wind tunnel, he realized he wanted to pursue a degree in engineering. But it wasn't until his senior year at the UA that he realized he want

11h

Can social media lead to labor market discrimination?

A new Journal of Economics & Management Strategy study investigates whether social media may be used as a source of information for recruiters to discriminate against job applicants.

11h

Filtering liquids with liquids saves electricity

Filtering and treating water, both for human consumption and to clean industrial and municipal wastewater, accounts for about 13% of all electricity consumed in the US every year and releases about 290 million metric tons of CO2 into the atmosphere annually—roughly equivalent to the combined weight of every human on Earth.

11h

Runaway mining train travels 90 kilometres without driver

A huge runaway train laden with iron ore had to be derailed remotely after speeding through the Australian outback for almost an hour.

11h

Scientists push back against Harvard 'alien spacecraft' theoryOumuamua Harvard Alien

A scientific paper led by two researchers at Harvard University made a splash this week by claiming that a cigar-shaped rock zooming through our solar system may have been sent by aliens.

11h

How Senate Republicans Will Use Their New Power

Updated on November 7 at 11:37 a.m. ET Republicans may have lost the House on Tuesday night, but they secured a valuable consolation prize: a larger Senate majority. With help from Donald Trump, the GOP advantage in the upper chamber will grow by at least two seats and by as many as four, giving the party a crucial buffer as it tries to extend a conservative imprint on the federal judiciary over

12h

The Democrats Are Back, and Ready to Take On Trump

Democrats recaptured control of the House of Representatives Tuesday, ending eight years of Republican control and dealing President Donald Trump a stiff rebuke. With most results in, Democratic candidates either had won or were leading in enough districts to win the 23 seats needed to capture the chamber and then some—perhaps ending up with as much as a 20-seat edge. The question now is how big

12h

Midterm Elections 2018: What the Election Results Mean for Big Tech

The tech industry faces a notably less cozy environment in the Senate after election night, but the biggest changes could come under a Democratic House.

12h

The Gauls really did embalm the severed heads of enemies, research shows

New chemical analysis of iron age skulls confirms the grisly practice, referred to in ancient texts They were fearsome warriors who cut off the heads of their enemies and displayed them for all to see, bringing them back from battle hanging around their horses’ necks. But now research has confirmed that the Gauls did not merely sever the heads of their foes, they appear to have embalmed them to b

12h

Midterms 2018: Weed Wins on Election Day

A win for marijuana in Michigan, Utah, and Missouri may foreshadow a win for cannabis nationwide.

12h

PET: Blokeringsfilter til terrorsites på plads inden årets udgang

Politiets Efterretningstjeneste forventer, at et filter til blokering af hjemmesider, der for eksempel opfordrer til terrorisme, vil være på plads inden årets udgang.

12h

Gartner: Masse-tab af job efter AI er en myte – kun hver sjette oplever et fald

26 procent af virksomhederne i en Gartner-undersøgelse oplever, at indførelse af løsninger baseret på kunstig intelligens har givet flere job. Det står i skærende modsætning til at næsten 8 ud af 10 frygter fald i antal job med AI.

12h

Bittesmå lag i neandertaler-tænder afslører nye detaljer om et hårdt liv

Undersøgelsen af tænderne har vist, at neandertalere fra Frankrig overlevede ekstremt hårde vintre og blev ammet i 2,5 år.

13h

Mutant protein tackles DNA guardian to promote cancer development

Melbourne scientists have discovered how tumour development is driven by mutations in the most important gene in preventing cancer, p53.

13h

Filtering liquids with liquids saves electricity

Filtering and treating water accounts for about 13 percent of all electricity consumed in the US every year and releases about 290 million metric tons of CO2 into the atmosphere annually. New research demonstrates that the Wyss Institute's liquid-gated membranes filter nanoclay particles out of water more efficiently than existing membranes and require less frequent replacement and less energy to

13h

Can social media lead to labor market discrimination?

A new Journal of Economics & Management Strategy study investigates whether social media may be used as a source of information for recruiters to discriminate against job applicants.

13h

Fine water particle sprays improve facial skin moisture

In a Skin Research & Technology study, spraying fine water particles onto the facial skin of adult women in winter, when skin is dry, improved skin hydration and softening. In addition, water retention remained constant at 360 minutes after spraying.

13h

Researchers examine health behaviors after childhood cancer diagnosis

In a Psycho-Oncology study of childhood cancer survivors, several health behaviors fell short of expectations for exercise and diet during early survivorship, and they remained sub-optimal upon reaching five years post-diagnosis.

13h

Study explores timing of muscle-related problems of statin use

Statins have been linked with muscle pain and other musculoskeletal adverse events (MAEs) in some patients. A new Pharmacology Research & Perspectives study has examined the timing of MAEs that develop during statin therapy and determined whether concomitant drugs used concurrently with statin therapy shifts the timing of MAEs.

13h

Does a woman's weight gain during pregnancy affect children's bone health?

A new study has examined whether managing weight during pregnancy might affect children's bone mass.In the Journal of Bone and Mineral Research study, investigators analyzed prospective data from 2,167 mother-child pairs from Portugal. In under/normal weight mothers, weight gain during pregnancy was associated with slightly increased bone mass at seven years of age in children, while in overweight

13h

Study compares stools of breastfed and formula-fed infants

When researchers compared the stools of 40 infants who were exclusively breastfed with those of 13 who were exclusively formula fed, the average daily stool frequency was significantly higher in the breastfed than formula-fed infants during the first month of life (4.9 versus 2.3) and second month of life (3.2 versus 1.6).

13h

Smoking during pregnancy may lead to childhood eye condition

In an Acta Ophthalmologica analysis of 11 relevant articles, maternal smoking during pregnancy was associated with a 46 percent increased risk that offspring will develop strabismus — one of the most prevalent eye-related diseases among children. Maternal smoking of 10 cigarettes per day during pregnancy was linked with a 79 percent increased risk of strabismus in offspring.

13h

Compound derived from marijuana may benefit children with epilepsy

In recent years, cannabinoids — the active chemicals in medical marijuana — have been increasingly touted as a potential treatment for a range of neurological and psychiatric disorders. In a Developmental Medicine & Child Neurology review, investigators compare their efficacy with antiepileptic drugs for children with epilepsy.

13h

Pilates provides a range of benefits for patients with chronic musculoskeletal conditions

A Musculoskeletal Care study is the first to investigate individual perceptions of the impact of a Pilates exercise program on the daily lives of people with chronic conditions.

13h

Antihormone therapy linked with higher heart failure risk in prostate cancer patients

Androgen deprivation therapy was associated with a 72 percent higher risk of heart failure in a study of patients with prostate cancer.

13h

Many older adults do not take prescribed statins properly

In a British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology study of older adults prescribed statins, first-year nonadherence and discontinuation rates were high.

13h

Health services must address multiple conditions in dementia care

Most people living with dementia also have at least one other health condition, and health services need to adapt to optimize their health and quality of life, a new study concludes.

13h

Watch Samsung Unveil Its Folding Galaxy F Smartphone

We don't know how it works or how much it will cost, but we've heard it bends.

13h

Beto O’Rourke’s National Celebrity Was His Undoing

In the past year, the Texas Senate candidate Beto O’Rourke has been compared endlessly to the great charismatic stars of the Democratic Party. He was Kennedyesque! He was the next Obama! With his boyish grin, rhythmic speech, and unabashedly left-leaning platform, the Democratic former representative was not just the state’s best hope for going blue: According to political strategists across the

14h

Sommerhusejere bremser udvidelse af Lundbecks risikofabrik

Planklagenævnet har underkendt kommunens lokalplan, der tillod en udvidelse af Lundbecks højrisikofabrik tæt på sommerhusene på Sjællands Odde. Men borgerne ruster sig til næste slag om byggeriet, der kun midlertidigt er standset.

14h

An Embarrassment of Glitches

As voters headed to the polls Tuesday, the Associated Press reported an ominous statistic: “More than 40 states use computerized voting machines that are more than a decade old or are no longer manufactured.” A voting machine that’s been around that long is at least as old as the very first iPhone that Apple released way back in 2007. In a high-stakes situation that requires many hundreds of peop

14h

The Striking Way Trump Changed Election Night

Journalists don’t like being wrong, or even wavering in the vicinity of not right. And in the run-up to Donald Trump’s 2016 victory, many of us were very wrong . Carefully designed visualizations fritzed out in the face of uncertainty. So this year, for these complex midterms, media companies have adopted the posture of humble supplicants to the American voter, waiting on a greater percentage of

14h

Democrats Seize the House

Democrats will recapture control of the House of Representatives, and could gain as much as a 20-seat advantage, ending eight years of Republican control and dealing President Donald Trump a stiff rebuke. With many results in, Democratic candidates either had won or were leading in enough districts to likely win the 23 seats needed to capture the chamber and then some. The question now is how big

15h

Early Signs of a Youth Wave

In the lead-up to the midterms, there has been a swell of appeals to the country’s youngest voters. Survivors of the Parkland, Florida, shooting launched a nationwide voter-registration drive. Dozens of celebrities organized a live-streamed telethon aimed at directing young voters to the polls. In a rare political message, Taylor Swift, notably silent throughout the 2016 election, urged her 112 m

15h

The Republican Senate Majority Is Growing

Updated on November 6 at 10:50 p.m. ET Republicans were poised to expand their slim Senate majority on Tuesday night, picking up two seats in Indiana and North Dakota while cutting off the Democrats’ narrow path to retake control of the chamber. Democratic Senators Heidi Heitkamp of North Dakota and Joe Donnelly of Indiana were defeated by conservative challengers who leaned heavily on President

16h

I Still Don’t Know If My Vote Will Be Counted in Florida

I had never been this paranoid about voting before. I checked my voter registration multiple times before flying to Florida for early voting. I traveled across the country to vote, rather than voting absentee. That’s how much I needed the reassurance of physically handing in my vote. Think of this paranoia as the post-traumatic stress of more than a century of blatant, consistent efforts by the r

16h

Nanotechnology-based immunotherapy promoting transplant acceptance

Study could transform care for organ transplant recipients.

16h

Why some Wikipedia disputes go unresolved

Study identifies reasons for unsettled editing disagreements and offers predictive tools that could improve deliberation.

16h

New deep knowledge AI system could resolve bottlenecks in drug research

Researchers have developed a new system that could significantly speed up the discovery of new drugs and reduce the need for costly and time-consuming laboratory tests.

16h

For adults, the terrible twos are a confusing earful

Here's another reason you might be exhausted after that preschool birthday party: Your brain had to work to figure out who actually asked for more ice cream. 'What we found with two-and-a-half-year-olds is that it's amazingly hard for adults to identify who's talking,' said a researcher.

16h

Midterm Elections 2018: Voting Machine Meltdowns Are Normal—That’s the Problem

Americans watched their voting technology break down right in front of their eyes—or on social media—Tuesday, but it's too soon to tell if the problems reached historic proportions.

16h

The Atlantic Daily: Rainy With a Chance of Midterm-Election Results

What We’re Following HQ2 II: Amazon’s promise of a multibillion-dollar investment and job growth in the form of a massive second headquarters has had cities across America scrambling to court the technology giant. While recent reports point to Amazon opening “HQ2s” in New York and Virginia, these other major finalist cities haven’t given up, with some approving enticing subsidies as recently as t

17h

A Runway Train Traveled 57 Miles Through Australia's Outback

Here's how engineers might have deliberately derailed it.

17h

Kitty O’Neil, Stuntwoman and Speed Racer, Is Dead at 72

Her deafness was no hindrance as she broke the land-speed record for women, one highlight in a life in daredevilry. “Deaf people,” she said, “can do anything.”

17h

Summer birth and computer games linked to heightened short-sight risk in childhood

Summer birth and hours spent playing computer games are linked to a heightened risk of developing short or near sightedness (myopia) in childhood, indicates a twin study.

17h

Children may be most at risk of stab injuries on way home from school

Children may be most at risk of being stabbed on their way home from school.

17h

Drug pollution concentrates in stream bugs, passes to predators in water and on land

Sixty-nine pharmaceutical compounds have been detected in stream insects, some at concentrations that may threaten animals that feed on them, such as trout and platypus.

17h

Northern white rhino: New hopes for IVF rescue

A new study raises hopes of saving one of the last animals of its kind – the northern white rhino.

17h

Preschool children show awake responses to naptime nonsense words

Hearing has long been suspected as being 'on' all the time — even in our sleep. Now scientists are reporting results on what is heard and not heard during sleep and what that might mean for a developing brain. Preliminary results show preschool children seem to have memory traces for sounds heard during nap time.

18h

Woodland hawks flock to urban buffet

A team of Wisconsin researchers documents that woodland hawks — once in precipitous decline due to pollution, persecution and habitat loss — have become firmly established in even the starkest urban environments, thriving primarily on a diet of backyard birds attracted to feeders.

18h

Ultra-hot gas around remnants of sun-like stars

Solving a decades-old mystery, an international team of astronomers have discovered an extremely hot magnetosphere around a white dwarf, a remnant of a star like our sun. The work was led by Dr. Nicole Reindl, Research Fellow of the Royal Commission 1851, based at the University of Leicester, and is published today in the journal Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society.

18h

Undeterred, gulf fish spawn despite hurricane

Even a Category 4 hurricane doesn't kill the mood for coastal fish — and that's good news for all species, as well as for a multibillion-dollar recreational fishing industry. As extreme weather patterns threaten to bring more and larger storms to the Gulf Coast, new findings from the University of Texas at Austin's Marine Science Institute show some important fish species are able to continue spa

18h

British Journal of Cancer press notice

This release summarizes upcoming papers from the British Journal of Cancer.

18h

Radiotherapy is 'undervalued' and 'needs greater investment' say experts

Radiotherapy is 'undervalued' and 'needs greater investment' according to a new report published today commissioned by the Marie Curie Legacy Campaign — an initiative of the European Society for Radiotherapy and Oncology (ESTRO) and the ESTRO Cancer Foundation (ECF).

18h

Woodland hawks flock to urban buffet

For the nearly 35 million Americans who faithfully stock their feeders to attract songbirds, an increasingly common sight is a hawk feeding on the birds being fed.

18h

Undeterred, gulf fish spawn despite hurricane

Even a Category 4 hurricane doesn't kill the mood for coastal fish—and that's good news for all species, as well as for a multibillion-dollar recreational fishing industry. As extreme weather patterns threaten to bring more and larger storms to the Gulf Coast, new findings from the University of Texas at Austin's Marine Science Institute show some important fish species are able to continue spawni

18h

Pandas Swoon To Particular Croons

Listening to the sounds panda pairs make when they're introduced could lead to better breeding success. Christopher Intagliata reports. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

18h

Ultra-hot gas around remnants of sun-like stars

Solving a decades-old mystery, an international team of astronomers have discovered an extremely hot magnetosphere around a white dwarf, a remnant of a star like our Sun. The work was led by Dr. Nicole Reindl, Research Fellow of the Royal Commission 1851, based at the University of Leicester, and is published today (7 November) in the journal Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society.

18h

9 out of 10 Americans would take a pay cut for more meaningful work

The report reveals how Americans increasingly regard meaningfulness as a critical component of jobs. Employees who find their jobs meaningful seem to work harder and stay with organizations longer, the survey shows. The authors list several ways employers can cultivate meaning in the workplace. None How much of your lifetime earnings would you sacrifice to work a job you find always meaningful? T

19h

Huge fall in prevalence of FGM/genital cutting among girls across Africa

The prevalence of female genital mutilation/cutting among girls up to the age of 14 has fallen sharply in most regions of Africa over the past three decades, reveals the first analysis of its kind, published in the online journal BMJ Global Health.

19h

Summer birth and computer games linked to heightened short-sight risk in childhood

Summer birth and hours spent playing computer games are linked to a heightened risk of developing short or near sightedness (myopia) in childhood, indicates a twin study, published online in the British Journal of Ophthalmology.

19h

Children may be most at risk of stab injuries on way home from school

Children may be most at risk of being stabbed on their way home from school, suggests research published in the online journal BMJ Open.

19h

The Voting-Sticker Thirst Trap Is Here

As Election Day progresses, voting selfies are dominating Instagram. Almost every user has likely encountered at least one from a celebrity or friend, urging other users to perform their civic duty. But as the now tried-and-true format has proliferated , a new one has emerged behind it: the voting thirst trap. A “thirst trap” can be an attractive person or an attractive photo of an attractive per

19h

The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: The 2018 Midterms Edition

Americans headed to the polls today to vote in the first national election since President Donald Trump was elected in 2016. There are 435 House races, 35 Senate races, and 36 gubernatorial contests across the country. Democrats need to win at least 23 seats to take back the House, and Republicans are hoping to maintain their majority—and maybe even take a few more seats—in the Senate. Here’s wha

19h

Children urged to play outdoors to cut risk of shortsightedness

Research reveals link between environmental factors and rising cases of myopia Children should be encouraged to spend time outdoors to reduce their risk of becoming shortsighted, experts have said. Shortsightedness is rising around the world , with the condition said to have reached epidemic proportions in east Asia: estimates suggest about 90% of teenagers and young adults in China have the cond

19h

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