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Nyheder2018november08

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Warming waters caused rapid — and opposite — shifts in connected marine communities

Two connected marine ecosystems — the Eastern English Channel and Southern North Sea — experienced big and opposite changes in their fish communities over a 30-year period, according to researchers who report their findings in Current Biology on Nov. 8. Rapid warming drove smaller ocean fishes to shift abruptly northward from one ecosystem to the other.

7h

 

Orangutans spontaneously bend straight wires into hooks to fish for food

Cognitive biologists and comparative psychologists have just studied hook tool making in a non-human primate species — the orangutan. To the researchers' surprise the apes spontaneously manufactured hook tools out of straight wire within the very first trial and in a second task unbent curved wire to make a straight tool.

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Plug-in-hybrider og dieselbiler er i praksis lige grønne

Ifølge Klimarådet er plug-in-hybriderne lige så miljøvenlige som effektive dieselbiler, og tyske plug-in-brugere meddeler, at bilerne ikke er lavemissionsbiler ved virkelighedens forbrug.

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The origins of Earth’s water are a big mystery—but we may have one more piece of the puzzle

Space An old theory gets a new assist from the sun. Exactly how water sprung up on this planet has always been a perpetual mystery.

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Who Were the 1st Americans? 11,000-Year-Old DNA Reveals Clues

People genetically linked to the Clovis culture, one of the earliest continentwide cultures in North America, made it down to South America as far back as 11,000 years ago. Then they mysteriously vanished around 9,000 years ago, new research reveals.

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Pot stocks soar as Sessions resigns — but will his replacement relax laws?

Former Attorney General Jeff Sessions resigned on Wednesday. Stocks of marijuana companies soared in the following hours. The interim attorney general, Matthew Whitaker, has expressed support for a law that legalizes a non-psychoactive form of cannabis, though it's unclear where he stands on medicinal or recreational legalization of other forms of the drug. 6 out 10 Americans support legalization

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How to unsend messages you’ve sent via Facebook and other apps

Technology Facebook now gives you a grace period on your bad messages—and other apps do too. You can unsend Facebook Messenger messages—if you're quick enough…

44min

 

The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: Down for the Recount

Written by Madeleine Carlisle ( @maddiecarlisle2 ), Olivia Paschal ( @oliviacpaschal ), and Elaine Godfrey ( @elainejgodfrey ) Today in 5 Lines A gunman killed 12 people at a bar in Thousand Oaks, California, Wednesday night. Authorities identified the shooter, who was also found dead at the scene, possibly from a self-inflicted wound, as 28-year-old Ian David Long. The Florida Senate and governo

55min

 

Investigational urate elevation does not appear to raise hypertension risk

A study from a group of Massachusetts General Hospital investigators may reduce the concern that elevating levels of urate, an approach being investigated to treat several neurodegenerative disorders, could increase the risk of hypertension.

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Google 'Arbitration Optional' Harassment Plan Limits GroupsGoogle Sundar Pichai

Organizers of last week's walkout say ending mandatory arbitration for individual harassment claims still thwarts collective action, among other concerns.

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Stephen Hawking personal effects fetch £1.8m at auction

A copy of the physicist's signed PhD thesis sells for £584,750, nearly four time the guide price.

1h

 

Virgin Hyperloop One Gets a New CEO: Jay Walder

The former head of New York, London, and Hong Kong transit signs on with the hyperloop company.

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Researchers simplify tiny structures' construction drip by drip

Princeton researchers explore methods of using carefully controlled droplets as a way to make soft, biomimetic structures. The trick comes in controlling the droplets, which form under competing influences like gravity and surface tension. A new study, published Oct. 26 in Nature Communications, explains how a deeper understanding of these highly dynamic forces can be harnessed to cheaply and quic

1h

 

Ragweed may expand its range northward with climate change

A new predictive model developed by an ecologist at the University of Massachusetts Amherst and a climate scientist at the University of Washington suggests that climate change may allow common ragweed to extend its growing range northward and into major northeast metro areas, worsening conditions for millions of people with hay fever and asthma.

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Emu and Donkey Fall in Love

A rescued emu and donkey in North Carolina seem to see each other as family.

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Why allowing governments to single out reporters sets a dangerous precedentWhite House Jim Acosta

CNN reporter Jim Acosta has frequently locked horns with President Donald Trump during press briefings. On Wednesday, Acosta and Trump had a standoff that ended with the White House revoking the reporter's press badge. White House Press Secretary Sarah Sanders issued a tweet saying Acosta had placed his hands on an intern who tried to take the microphone away from him, a claim which many rebuked.

1h

 

AI is not “magic dust” for your company, says Google’s Cloud AI boss

Andrew Moore says getting the technology to work in businesses is a huge challenge.

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Without Action, Drug-Resistant "Superbugs" Will Kill Millions in Europe

A report also concludes that an investment of $2 per person per year could forestall that fate.

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A 'Breaking Bad' Movie Is Finally in the Works—Tread Lightly

Plus: 'Swamp Thing' casting details, the 'Missing Link' trailer, and more.

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Materials scientist creates fabric alternative to batteries for wearable devices

A major factor holding back development of wearable biosensors for health monitoring is the lack of a lightweight, long-lasting power supply. Now scientists at the University of Massachusetts Amherst led by materials chemist Trisha L. Andrew report that they have developed a method for making a charge-storing system that is easily integrated into clothing for 'embroidering a charge-storing pattern

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Anopheles mosquitoes could spread Mayaro virus in US, other diverse regions

Mosquitoes of the genus Anopheles are well known as primary vectors of malaria. But a new study suggests that Anopheles species, including some found in the United States, also are capable of carrying and transmitting an emerging pathogen, Mayaro virus, which has caused outbreaks of disease in South America and the Caribbean.

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Devah Pager, Who Documented Race Bias in Job Market, Dies at 46

Her research established that a white man, even if he had a felony conviction, fared better when applying for a job than a black man with no criminal record.

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Tech leaders call for greater social media regulation

Social networks need better regulation to stop them spreading "fake news" and undermining democracy, disillusioned tech pioneers said at an industry conference that closed in Lisbon Thursday.

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Waking sleeping plants with plasmas

Commercial crops like grapes, peaches, berries and flower bulbs all go dormant in the winter, essentially sleeping through the seasonal cold before they resume growing, flowering and fruiting again in the warmer months.

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Severe Caribbean droughts may magnify food insecurity

Climate change is impacting the Caribbean, with millions facing increasing food insecurity and decreasing freshwater availability as droughts become more likely across the region, according to new Cornell University research in Geophysical Research Letters.

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Purdue's giant leap toward personalized medicine helps eyes drain themselves

Purdue University researchers have invented a new smart drainage device to help patients with glaucoma, a leading cause of blindness in the world, as they try to save their eyesight.

2h

 

It Wouldn’t Be Easy for Whitaker to Shut Down the Trump Investigations

President Donald Trump has been saying for 18 months that he wanted to fire Attorney General Jeff Sessions. He’s been saying for 18 months that he thought Sessions was disloyal for having recused himself from the Russia investigation and for having given day-to-day control over the investigation to the deputy attorney general, Rod Rosenstein. And, of course, Trump has been saying for 18 months th

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Trump Is Trying to Change ‘What it Means to Be American’

The first words of the Fourteenth Amendment, argues legal scholar and Atlantic contributor Garrett Epps, are the key to its meaning: “All persons born or naturalized in the United States and subject to the jurisdiction thereof, are citizens of the United States and of the State wherein they reside.” In the newest Atlantic Argument, Epps details the history of the citizenship clause and explains w

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Purdue's giant leap toward personalized medicine helps eyes drain themselves

Purdue University researchers created a new smart drainage device to help patients with glaucoma, a leading cause of blindness in the world, as they try to save their eyesight.

2h

 

When low-income families can meet their basic needs, children are healthier

A series of reports from five cities across the US found that young children and their parents are healthier when they are able to afford basic needs.

2h

 

Millions in danger of food insecurity due to severe Caribbean droughts

Climate change is impacting the Caribbean, with millions facing increasing food insecurity and decreasing freshwater availability as droughts become more likely across the region, according to new Cornell University research in Geophysical Research Letters.

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Creating better devices: The etch stops here

A team of multi-disciplinary scientists and engineers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have discovered a new, more precise, method to create nanoscale-size electromechanical devices. Their research findings are published in Nature Communications.

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The Romanoffs Defends the Men of #MeToo

“Bright and High Circle,” the fifth episode of Matthew Weiner’s Amazon series, The Romanoffs , takes its title from a line in a poem by Alexander Pushkin, one that the character Katherine (Diane Lane) teaches in her Russian-literature class: When your so young and fairy years Are smeared by the gossip’s noise, And by the high word’s trial, fierce, Your public honor’s fully lost; Alone midst indif

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RBG's Broken Ribs: Why Is Breaking Bones Dangerous for Older Adults?

Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg is in the hospital after falling and breaking three ribs. But why are broken bones and other fall-related injuries so worrisome for older adults?

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Creating better devices: The etch stops here

A team of multi-disciplinary scientists and engineers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have discovered a new, more precise, method to create nanoscale-size electromechanical devices. Their research findings are published in Nature Communications.

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How to deal with seasonal affective disorder and stay alert this winter

Health Hibernation, unfortunately, is not a healthy option for humans. Seasonal affective disorder is a common problem in northern latitudes. Fortunately, you can fight it.

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Brain signature of depressed mood unveiled in new study

New research has identified a common pattern of brain activity that may be behind low mood feelings, particularly in people who have a tendency towards anxiety. The newly discovered network is a significant advance in research on the neurobiology of mood, and could serve as a biomarker to help scientists developing new therapies to help people with mood disorders such as depression.

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History of early settlement and survival in Andean highlands revealed by ancient genomes

A multi-center study of the genetic remains of people who settled thousands of years ago in the Andes Mountains of South America reveals a complex picture of human adaptation from early settlement, to a split about 9,000 years ago between high and lowland populations, to the devastating exposure to European disease in the 16th-century colonial period.

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Decline in shorebirds linked to climate change, experts warn

Researchers have discovered that daily nest predation of shorebirds has increased threefold over the last 70 years. The data suggest the larger increase in the Arctic relative to the tropics indicates a link to climate change.

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DNA of world's oldest natural mummy unlocks secrets of Ice Age tribes in the Americas

A wide ranging international study that genetically analysed the DNA of a series of famous and controversial ancient remains across North and South America has discovered that the Spirit Cave remains — the world's oldest natural mummy – was a Native American. They were also able to dismiss a longstanding theory that a group called Paleoamericans existed in North America before Native Americans.

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The one easy trick that will sharpen your decision-making

Every month, the University of Pennsylvania's Wharton Executive Education and Wharton's Center for Leadership and Change Management come together to release a " nano tool " that hones in on small changes you can make to improve your performance and leadership abilities. Their September suggestion highlights the positive impact — and widespread usage amongst successful people — of walking while ma

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How an InfoWars Video Became a White House TweetWhite House Jim Acosta

A video distributed by Sarah Sanders to justify revoking the press pass of CNN reporter Jim Acosta was altered in ways that made it misleading.

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Did you see that? The Mysteries of Sensory Deprivation

When I was a kid swimming in the neighbor’s pool, I loved to float on my back, eyes closed, with ears submerged so that I could only hear the muted sounds of the water around me. Though I found the experience relaxing, I also felt profoundly strange. We are constantly bombarded with sensory information from […]

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What Does Sadness Look Like in the Brain?

Feelings of sadness or anxiety might be linked to increased "chitchat" between two areas of the brain

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Moving the motivation meter

Rats given the drug that reduced dopamine were much less likely to work for preferred morsels of food. But when these rats were then given one of the experimental drugs, they regained their motivation to work for the treat.

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High-performance solar cells: Physicists grow stable perovskite layers

Crystalline perovskite cells are the key to cutting-edge thin-film solar cells. Although they already achieve very high levels of efficiency in the laboratory, commercial applications are hampered by the fact that the material is still too unstable. Furthermore, there is no reliable industrial production process for perovskites. In a new study published in the Journal of Physical Chemistry Letters

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To Every Pathogen There Is a Season

Infectious Diseases affect us like clockwork, although it’s not clear why — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Bitcoin mining uses as much energy as mining for gold, study finds

New study reveals that mining crypto can be use more energy than mine for gold. In order to understand the findings, we must first understand what crypto mining is. The crypto community is looking for a way to solve these issue. None According to a study published in the journal Nature Sustainability on November 5, from researchers Max J. Krause and Thabet Tolaymat, it appears that mining cryptoc

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Study tracks severe bleaching events on a Pacific coral reef over past century

As climate change causes ocean temperatures to rise, coral reefs worldwide are experiencing mass bleaching events and die-offs. For many, this is their first encounter with extreme heat. However for some reefs in the central Pacific, heatwaves caused by El Nino are a way of life. Exactly how these reefs deal with repeated episodes of extreme heat has been unclear. A new study from the Woods Hole O

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Stephen Hawking’s wheelchair sells for £300,000 at auction

Christie’s sale also includes items belonging to Isaac Newton, Charles Darwin and Albert Einstein Stephen Hawking’s wheelchair and a set of his medals and awards have been sold for a combined total of nearly £600,000, while a copy of his PhD thesis raised almost that amount on its own, at an auction of items belonging to him and other celebrated scientists. The sale, run online by Christie’s and

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Navigating our thoughts: Fundamental principles of thinking

Humans think using their brain's navigation system: Researchers combine individual threads of evidence to form a theory of human thinking.

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How many calories do you burn? It depends on time of day

Researchers have made the surprising discovery that the number of calories people burn while at rest changes with the time of day. When at rest, people burn 10 percent more calories in the late afternoon and early evening than in the early morning hours.

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Ancient DNA evidence reveals two unknown migrations from North to South America

A team has used genome-wide ancient DNA data to revise Central and South American history. Their analysis of DNA from 49 individuals spanning about 10,000 years in Belize, Brazil, the Central Andes, and southern South America has concluded that the majority of Central and South American ancestry arrived from at least three different streams of people entering from North America, all arising from o

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Harvesting renewable energy from the sun and outer space at the same time

Scientists have demonstrated for the first time that heat from the sun and coldness from outer space can be collected simultaneously with a single device. Their research suggests that devices for harvesting solar and space energy will not compete for land space and can actually help each other function more efficiently.

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Watch a 3D-engineered human heart tissue beat

Researchers have developed a way to grow human heart tissue that can serve as a model for the upper chambers of the heart, known as the atria. The tissue, derived from human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPCSs), beats, expresses genes, and responds to drugs in a manner similar to a real human atrium. The model may be useful for evaluating disease mechanisms and drugs for atrial fibrillation —

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Blue-Wave Photos

I’ve been hearing a lot about a “ blue wave ” in the news lately, so it occurred to me that I should do my best to cover this tidal force with news photos. The images below capture some spectacular rides and wipeouts, as people try their hardest to navigate these massive waves and avoid washing out.

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People at Rest Burn More Calories in the Afternoon

Circadian rhythms heavily influence how our bodies use energy, a small study suggests.

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Social media use increases depression and loneliness

Facebook, Snapchat, and Instagram may not be great for personal well-being. In the first experimental study examining use of multiple platforms, Melissa G. Hunt of the University of Pennsylvania shows a causal link between time spent on these social media and increased depression and loneliness.

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Study tracks severe bleaching events on a Pacific coral reef over past century

A new study from the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI), has uncovered the history of bleaching on a reef in the epicenter of El Nino, revealing how some corals have been able to return after facing extreme conditions. The study was published Nov. 8, 2018, in the journal Communications Biology.

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“My-side bias” makes it difficult for us to see the logic in arguments we disagree with

In what feels like an increasingly polarised world, trying to convince the "other side" to see things differently often feels futile . Psychology has done a great job outlining some of the reasons why, including showing that, regardless of political leanings , most people are highly motivated to protect their existing views. However a problem with some of this research is that it is very difficul

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Atomic microscope offers peek at how cells behave

A specialized microscope is bringing scientists one step closer to understanding cell behavior, according to a new study. Previously, in order to study cell membranes, researchers would often have to freeze samples—but the proteins within the samples wouldn’t behave like they would in a normal biological environment. Now, using an atomic force microscope, researchers can observe individual protei

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It's Not Just the Flu: Many Infectious Diseases Are Seasonal

It's Not Just the Flu: Many Infectious Diseases Are Seasonal Polio peaks in the summer, measles during the school year, and chickenpox in the spring. Seasons_topNteaser.jpg The Four Seasons, oil painting Image credits: By Yehouda Chaki via Wikimedia Commons Human Thursday, November 8, 2018 – 14:15 Claire Cleveland, Contributor (Inside Science) — During the height of the polio epidemic in the U.S

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Now I Know Why They Said I Lied

When I said that Corey Lewandowski, then Trump’s campaign manager, had grabbed and bruised me at a rally in 2016, Trump World called me a liar. “It’s a hoax,” pro-Trump voices on Twitter and in parts of right-wing media claimed. They reasoned that I, a Breitbart reporter sent to cover the rally, had teamed up with The Washington Post ’s Ben Terris, who witnessed the incident and wrote about it, t

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Tiny footprints, big discovery: Reptile tracks oldest ever found in Grand Canyon

Geologists have discovered that a set of 28 footprints left behind by a reptile-like creature 310 million years ago are the oldest ever to be found in Grand Canyon National Park.

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Matter: Crossing From Asia, the First Americans Rushed Into the Unknown

Three new genetic analyses lend detail, and mystery, to the migration of prehistoric humans throughout the Western Hemisphere.

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As oceans grow more acidic, they’re eating away at their protective floors

Nexus Media News The ocean is digesting itself. Acidic ocean waters, an effect of climate change, are destroying the seafloor.

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Mozilla chief regrets internet's addictive quality

Web users are being drawn into a relationship with the internet that resembles gambling addicts using slot machines, the head of non-profit tech company Mozilla said Thursday.

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Not Just the Flu: Gonorrhea, Chicken Pox Also Go Through Seasons

You probably know when flu season happens, but what about chicken-pox season or gonorrhea season?

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Germany denies Pastafarians religious rights

The Church of the Flying Spaghetti Monster has been denied the rights of a religion in Germany Church members were seeking permission to erect public signage Are views of opposition expressed as satire less valid than the ideas they oppose? There are those who believe in God, whatever that word means, and there are those who don't. And then are those in the latter group who consider their best de

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The House Science Committee is getting a leader who believes climate change is real

Nine science-credentialed representatives were elected to the 116th Congress after Tuesday's midterms—one senator and eight members of the House. Since 2010, the House Science Committee has been led by Republican Lamar Smith, who's been criticized for his skepticism on human-caused climate change. Rep. Eddie Bernice Johnson, a Texas Democrat, will likely take over as chair of the committee. None

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Why Japan's Buddhists run a deadly 1,000-day marathon

The kaihōgyō — a seven-year, 1,000-day marathon — is among the world's most difficult physical challenges. It is rarely completed, and those who fail are historically expected to kill themselves. Why do Japan's Buddhist monks take on this nearly impossible challenge? None Many of us have that friend—the one who runs marathons. Their car is plastered with bumper stickers: 13.1, 26.2, "I'd rather b

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Ford enters scooter wars with acquisiton of startup SpinFord Scooter Startup Spin

Ford Motor Co. agreed Thursday to acquire the electric scooter-sharing startup Spin, entering the fast-growing segment of last-mile urban mobility.

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Chinese smartphone giant Xiaomi debuts in LondonXiaomi Mi 8 Pro UK

China's Xiaomi unveiled the Mi 8 Pro smartphone in London Thursday, making a UK debut as the tech giant ramps up its European presence before an expected American launch next month.

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Do kitchen items shed antimicrobial nanoparticles after use?

Because of their antimicrobial and antifungal properties, silver nanoparticles measuring between one and 100 nanometers (billionth of a meter) in size, are being incorporated outside the United States into a variety of kitchen products known as food contact materials (FCMs). Among the nanosilver-infused FCMs now on the market overseas are spatulas, baby mugs, storage containers and cutting boards.

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Tiny footprints, big discovery: Reptile tracks oldest ever found in grand canyon

A geology professor at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas, has discovered that a set of 28 footprints left behind by a reptile-like creature 310 million years ago, are the oldest ever to be found in Grand Canyon National Park.

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Culture may explain why brains have become bigger

A theory called the cultural brain hypothesis could explain extraordinary increases in brain size in humans and other animals over the last few million years, according to a study published in PLOS Computational Biology by Michael Muthukrishna of the London School of Economics and Political Science and Harvard University, and colleagues at the University of British Columbia and Harvard University.

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Common allergen, ragweed, will shift northward under climate change

New research from the University of Washington and the University of Massachusetts—Amherst looks at how the most common cause of sneezing and sniffling in North America is likely to shift under climate change.

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What could cause the Mississippi Bight to become hypoxic?

A recent article explores aspects of the environmental conditions that can potentially lead to hypoxia in the Mississippi Bight region of the northern Gulf of Mexico. This area extends from Apalachicola in Florida to the Mississippi River Delta.

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Yellowstone streams recovering thanks to wolf reintroduction

In the first study of its kind, scientists show that the return of large terrestrial carnivores can lead to improved stream structure and function.

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Unique study shows how bats maneuver

For the first time, researchers have succeeded in directly measuring the aerodynamics of flying animals as they maneuver in the air. Previously, the upstroke of the wings was considered relatively insignificant compared to the powerful downstroke but, in a new study, biologists have observed that it is on the upstroke of the wings that bats often turn.

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Aging a flock of stars in the Wild Duck Cluster

The way they move belies the true ages of the almost 3,000 stars populating one of the richest star clusters known. Astronomers recently discovered the stars all were born in the same generation, solving a long-standing puzzle about how stars evolve.

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The secret behind coral reef diversity? Time, lots of time

One of the world's premier diving destinations owes its reputation as a hot spot of marine biodiversity to being undisturbed over millions of years, according to ecologists. The researchers conclude that patterns of high diversity may take tens of millions of years to arise, but can be wiped out in a few years by human impacts.

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The cause of half of all developmental disorders is a genetic mystery

More than 1 in 200 children have serious developmental disorders but we’ve only been able to find the genetic cause of half of them

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Indigenous peoples in the Amazon and Australia share some ancestry

Fifteen ancient human genomes reveal how people first spread through the Americas – and strengthen a mysterious link between people in the Amazon and in Australasia

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New tool to predict which plants will become invasive

Around the world, over 13,000 plant species have embedded themselves in new environments—some of them integrate with the native plants, but others spread aggressively. Understanding why some plants become invasive, while others do not is critical to preserving the world's biodiversity.

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Tiny footprints, big discovery: Reptile tracks oldest ever found in grand canyon

UNLV geologist Stephen Rowland discovered that a set of 28 footprints left behind by a reptile-like creature 310 million years ago are the oldest ever to be found in Grand Canyon National Park.

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Do kitchen items shed antimicrobial nanoparticles after use?

In a new paper, scientists from NIST, FDA and CPSC describe how they simulated knife motion, washing and scratching on bacteria-fighting, nanosilver-infused cutting boards to see if consumer use affects nanoparticle release. The test should help regulatory bodies identify if any safety or health risks exist from silver nanoparticles in kitchenware now being sold overseas, and if so, find ways to d

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Embryos remember the chemicals that they encounter

A new study shows that embryonic cells retain a memory of the chemical signals to which they are exposed. Without these memories, cells fail organize into distinct tissue types.

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Report finds inequity may slow progress in preventing child pneumonia and diarrhea deaths

A new report finds health systems are falling woefully short of ensuring the most vulnerable children have sufficient access to prevention and treatment services in 15 countries that account for 70% of the global pneumonia and diarrhea deaths in children under five.

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Common allergen, ragweed, will shift northward under climate change

The first study of common ragweed's future US distribution finds the number one allergen will expand its range north, reaching places including upstate New York, Vermont, New Hampshire and Maine, while retreating from some current hot spots.

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Culture may explain why brains have become bigger

A theory called the cultural brain hypothesis could explain extraordinary increases in brain size in humans and other animals over the last few million years, according to a study published in PLOS Computational Biology by Michael Muthukrishna of the London School of Economics and Political Science and Harvard University, and colleagues at the University of British Columbia and Harvard University.

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Bees on the brink

Using an innovative robotic platform to observe bees' behavior, Harvard researchers showed that, following exposure to neonicotinoid pesticides — the most commonly-used class of pesticides in agriculture — bees spent less time nursing larvae and were less social that other bees. Additional tests showed that exposure impaired bees ability to warm the nest, and to build insulating wax caps around

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Recessive genes explain only small fraction of undiagnosed developmental disorders

The Deciphering Developmental Disorders study has discovered that only a small fraction of rare, undiagnosed developmental disorders in the British Isles are caused by recessive genes. Researchers from the Wellcome Sanger Institute estimated only 5 percent of the patients had inherited a disease-causing gene mutation from both parents, far fewer than previously thought. Published in Science, this

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'Nested sequences': An indispensable mechanism for forming memories

A research team from CNRS, Université PSL, the Collège de France and Inserm has just lifted part of the veil surrounding brain activity during sleep. Though we know that some neurons are reactivated then to consolidate our memories, we did not know how these cells could "remember" which order to turn on in. The researchers have discovered that reactivating neurons during sleep relies on activation

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'Potato gene' reveals how ancient Andeans adapted to starchy diet

DNA analyses show that ancient populations of the Peruvian highlands adapted to the introduction of agriculture and an extreme, high-altitude environment in ways distinct from other global populations.

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Replaying the tape of life: Is it possible?

A review published in the Nov. 9 issue of Science explores the complexity of evolution's predictability in extraordinary detail. In it, researchers at Kenyon College, Michigan State University and Washington University in St. Louis closely examine evidence from a number of empirical studies of evolutionary repeatability and contingency in an effort to fully interrogate ideas about contingency's ro

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Failing heart cells trigger self-protection mechanism

An unexpected finding that links a structural heart protein to gene regulation following heart stress suggests potential new avenues for developing heart failure therapies. The University of Iowa study was published online by the journal Science on Thursday, Nov. 8, 2018.

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Yellowstone streams recovering thanks to wolf reintroduction

In the first study of its kind, research by Oregon State University scientists shows that the return of large terrestrial carnivores can lead to improved stream structure and function.

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Researchers work with sushi restaurants to reduce seafood fraud

A new monitoring project involving UCLA researchers and partners aims to take "fake sushi" off Los Angeles diners' plates. The Los Angeles Seafood Monitoring Project team—which includes university researchers, students, sushi restaurants and government regulators—is working to reduce sushi fraud and the mislabeling of fish.

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What could cause the Mississippi Bight to become hypoxic?

Coastal regions with low dissolved oxygen (known as hypoxia) can lead to poor water quality and harm regional fisheries. These areas of low dissolved oxygen are expanding and expected to continue growing in coming years due to human impacts on the environment.

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13-billion-year-old star is made of Big Bang stuff

Astronomers have found what could be one of the universe’s oldest stars, so ancient it’s made almost entirely of materials from the Big Bang. The discovery of this tiny, approximately 13.5 billion-year-old star means more stars with very low mass and very low metal content are likely out there—perhaps even some of the universe’s very first stars. The star is unusual because unlike other stars wit

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Facing hatred

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News at a glance

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Stopping the sting

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Trouble at the hive

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Oil when not in use

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A basic way to tan

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No longer a safe haven

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Built to be reversible

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Making vision clearer

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Uneven results

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Suppressing corrosion in primary aluminum-air batteries via oil displacement

Primary aluminum–air batteries boast high theoretical energy densities, but negative electrode corrosion irreversibly limits their shelf life. Most corrosion mitigation methods are insufficient or compromise power and energy density. We suppressed open-circuit corrosion by displacing electrolyte from the electrode surface with a nonconducting oil during battery standby. High power and energy dens

4h

 

Photon-mediated interactions between quantum emitters in a diamond nanocavity

Photon-mediated interactions between quantum systems are essential for realizing quantum networks and scalable quantum information processing. We demonstrate such interactions between pairs of silicon-vacancy (SiV) color centers coupled to a diamond nanophotonic cavity. When the optical transitions of the two color centers are tuned into resonance, the coupling to the common cavity mode results i

4h

 

Controlled crack propagation for atomic precision handling of wafer-scale two-dimensional materials

Although flakes of two-dimensional (2D) heterostructures at the micrometer scale can be formed with adhesive-tape exfoliation methods, isolation of 2D flakes into monolayers is extremely time consuming because it is a trial-and-error process. Controlling the number of 2D layers through direct growth also presents difficulty because of the high nucleation barrier on 2D materials. We demonstrate a

4h

 

Perivascular dendritic cells elicit anaphylaxis by relaying allergens to mast cells via microvesicles

Anaphylactic reactions are triggered when allergens enter the blood circulation and activate immunoglobulin E (IgE)–sensitized mast cells (MCs), causing systemic discharge of prestored proinflammatory mediators. As MCs are extravascular, how they perceive circulating allergens remains a conundrum. Here, we describe the existence of a CD301b + perivascular dendritic cell (DC) subset that continuou

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Enantiodivergent Pd-catalyzed C-C bond formation enabled through ligand parameterization

Despite the enormous potential for the use of stereospecific cross-coupling reactions to rationally manipulate the three-dimensional structure of organic molecules, the factors that control the transfer of stereochemistry in these reactions remain poorly understood. Here we report a mechanistic and synthetic investigation into the use of enantioenriched alkylboron nucleophiles in stereospecific P

4h

 

Nested sequences of hippocampal assemblies during behavior support subsequent sleep replay

Consolidation of spatial and episodic memories is thought to rely on replay of neuronal activity sequences during sleep. However, the network dynamics underlying the initial storage of memories during wakefulness have never been tested. Although slow, behavioral time scale sequences have been claimed to sustain sequential memory formation, fast ("theta") time scale sequences, nested within slow s

4h

 

Global pattern of nest predation is disrupted by climate change in shorebirds

Ongoing climate change is thought to disrupt trophic relationships, with consequences for complex interspecific interactions, yet the effects of climate change on species interactions are poorly understood, and such effects have not been documented at a global scale. Using a single database of 38,191 nests from 237 populations, we found that shorebirds have experienced a worldwide increase in nes

4h

 

Neonicotinoid exposure disrupts bumblebee nest behavior, social networks, and thermoregulation

Neonicotinoid pesticides can negatively affect bee colonies, but the behavioral mechanisms by which these compounds impair colony growth remain unclear. Here, we investigate imidacloprid’s effects on bumblebee worker behavior within the nest, using an automated, robotic platform for continuous, multicolony monitoring of uniquely identified workers. We find that exposure to field-realistic levels

4h

 

Heterogeneity in efflux pump expression predisposes antibiotic-resistant cells to mutation

Antibiotic resistance is often the result of mutations that block drug activity; however, bacteria also evade antibiotics by transiently expressing genes such as multidrug efflux pumps. A crucial question is whether transient resistance can promote permanent genetic changes. Previous studies have established that antibiotic treatment can select tolerant cells that then mutate to achieve permanent

4h

 

Identity inference of genomic data using long-range familial searches

Consumer genomics databases have reached the scale of millions of individuals. Recently, law enforcement authorities have exploited some of these databases to identify suspects via distant familial relatives. Using genomic data of 1.28 million individuals tested with consumer genomics, we investigated the power of this technique. We project that about 60% of the searches for individuals of Europe

4h

 

WDFY4 is required for cross-presentation in response to viral and tumor antigens

During the process of cross-presentation, viral or tumor-derived antigens are presented to CD8 + T cells by Batf3- dependent CD8α + /XCR1 + classical dendritic cells (cDC1s). We designed a functional CRISPR screen for previously unknown regulators of cross-presentation, and identified the BEACH domain–containing protein WDFY4 as essential for cross-presentation of cell-associated antigens by cDC1

4h

 

An autoimmune disease variant of IgG1 modulates B cell activation and differentiation

The maintenance of autoreactive B cells in a quiescent state is crucial for preventing autoimmunity. Here we identify a variant of human immunoglobulin G1 (IgG1) with a Gly 396 ->Arg substitution (hIgG1-G396R), which positively correlates with systemic lupus erythematosus. In induced lupus models, murine homolog Gly 390 ->Arg (G390R) knockin mice generate excessive numbers of plasma cells, leadin

4h

 

De novo design of self-assembling helical protein filaments

We describe a general computational approach to designing self-assembling helical filaments from monomeric proteins and use this approach to design proteins that assemble into micrometer-scale filaments with a wide range of geometries in vivo and in vitro. Cryo–electron microscopy structures of six designs are close to the computational design models. The filament building blocks are idealized re

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Contingency and determinism in evolution: Replaying lifes tape

Historical processes display some degree of "contingency," meaning their outcomes are sensitive to seemingly inconsequential events that can fundamentally change the future. Contingency is what makes historical outcomes unpredictable. Unlike many other natural phenomena, evolution is a historical process. Evolutionary change is often driven by the deterministic force of natural selection, but nat

4h

 

Structural insight into precursor tRNA processing by yeast ribonuclease P

Ribonuclease P (RNase P) is a universal ribozyme responsible for processing the 5'-leader of pre–transfer RNA (pre-tRNA). Here, we report the 3.5-angstrom cryo–electron microscopy structures of Saccharomyces cerevisiae RNase P alone and in complex with pre-tRNA Phe . The protein components form a hook-shaped architecture that wraps around the RNA and stabilizes RNase P into a "measuring device" w

4h

 

Navigating cognition: Spatial codes for human thinking

The hippocampal formation has long been suggested to underlie both memory formation and spatial navigation. We discuss how neural mechanisms identified in spatial navigation research operate across information domains to support a wide spectrum of cognitive functions. In our framework, place and grid cell population codes provide a representational format to map variable dimensions of cognitive s

4h

 

Scientists reveal 10,000-year-old mummy is Native American ancestor

DNA testing discredits theory Nevada’s ‘Spirit Cave mummy’ is of Paleoamerican heritage Scientists attempting to map out the historical migrations of North and South America by analysing ancient bones have revealed that a 10,000-year-old skeleton unearthed in a cave in Nevada is the ancestor of a Native American tribe. The iconic skeleton, known as the “Spirit Cave mummy”, was reburied this summe

4h

 

The Extremely Fast Peopling of the Americas

Tens of thousands of years ago, two gigantic ice sheets smothered the northernmost parts of what has since been named North America. They towered more than two kilometers high and contained 1.5 times as much water as Antarctica does today. They were daunting, impassable barriers to the early humans who had started moving east from Asia, walking across a land bridge that once connected the regions

4h

 

Stephen Hawking's wheelchair sells for $393,000 at auction

A wheelchair used by physicist Stephen Hawking has sold at auction for almost 300,000 pounds ($393,000), while a copy of his doctoral thesis fetched almost 585,000 pounds ($767,000), auctioneer Christie's said Thursday.

4h

 

Replaying the tape of life: Is it possible?

How predictable is evolution? The answer has long been debated by biologists grappling with the extent to which history affects the repeatability of evolution.

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History of early settlement and survival in Andean highlands revealed by ancient genomes

A multi-center study of the genetic remains of people who settled thousands of years ago in the Andes Mountains of South America reveals a complex picture of human adaptation from early settlement, to a split about 9,000 years ago between high and lowland populations, to the devastating exposure to European disease in the 16th-century colonial period.

4h

 

Ancient DNA analysis yields unexpected insights about peoples of Central, South America

An international team of researchers has revealed unexpected details about the peopling of Central and South America by studying the first high-quality ancient DNA data from those regions.

4h

 

Decline in shorebirds linked to climate change, experts warn

Climate change could be responsible for a substantial decline in populations of shorebirds, say researchers from the Milner Centre for Evolution at the University of Bath, following a study published in Science analysing population data over a period of 70 years.

4h

 

DNA of world's oldest natural mummy unlocks secrets of Ice Age tribes in the Americas

A legal battle over a 10,600 year old ancient skeleton—called the 'Spirit Cave Mummy' – has ended after advanced DNA sequencing found it was related to a Native American tribe.

4h

 

Self-assembling protein filaments designed and built from scratch

For the first time, scientists have created, from scratch, self-assembling protein filaments.

4h

 

Bees Are Dying Off. Tiny QR Code Backpacks May Help Save Them

A novel system monitors the dynamics of colonies exposed to imidacloprid, a neurotoxin that belongs to the infamous neonicotinoid group of pesticides.

4h

 

These fragile, futuristic batteries run longer with a little oil

A redesign for batteries that use aluminum and oxygen could help these inexpensive, lightweight power cells last longer.

4h

 

How a life-threatening allergic reaction can happen so fast

Cells that act as sentries facilitate quick communication between allergens and anaphylaxis-triggering immune cells, a study in mice finds.

4h

 

Pesticide Exposure Alters Bumblebees' Behavior in Their Nests

A high-tech approach to monitoring bee activity inside the nest reveals how the neonicotinoid imidacloprid impairs colony growth.

4h

 

New tool to predict which plants will become invasive

New research from the University of Vermont provides insight to help predict which plants are likely to become invasive in a particular community. The results showed that non-native plants are more likely to become invasive when they possess biological traits that are different from the native community and that plant height can be a competitive advantage.

4h

 

Double whammy for grieving spouses with sleep problems

Sleep disturbances have a strong negative impact on the immune system of people who have recently lost a spouse, reports a new study. The overactivated immune system of the bereaved triggered by sleep disturbances — and resulting chronic inflammation — may make them more susceptible to heart disease or cancer. Grieving spouses have a higher risk of developing heart disease or dying within a year

4h

 

These pinhole cameras are capturing 1000 year photos of Lake Tahoe

Technology Will these copper cameras survive climate change? The final images will be presented at an exhibition at Sierra Nevada College in 3018.

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Here's How Much the Earth Weighs in 'Ghostly' Neutrinos

As neutrinos pass through the planet, they offer new information on what it looks like inside.

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Aging a flock of stars in the Wild Duck Cluster

The way they move belies the true ages of the almost 3,000 stars populating one of the richest star clusters known. Astronomers recently discovered the stars all were born in the same generation, solving a long-standing puzzle about how stars evolve.

4h

 

Prostate cancer radiotherapy more precisely targeted with nuclear medicine imaging

A nuclear medicine imaging procedure can pinpoint prostate cancer with superior accuracy, allowing more precisely targeted treatment, according to new research featured in the November 2018 issue of The Journal of Nuclear Medicine.

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Unique study shows how bats maneuver

For the first time, researchers have succeeded in directly measuring the aerodynamics of flying animals as they maneuver in the air. Previously, the upstroke of the wings was considered relatively insignificant compared to the powerful downstroke but, in a new study, biologists at Lund University in Sweden have observed that it is on the upstroke of the wings that bats often turn.

4h

 

Study demonstrates that long-term follow up in a trauma patient population is achievable

Achieving high follow-up rates for a difficult-to-track violently injured emergency department population is feasible.

4h

 

Bugs show stream revival succeeded after mine damage

An effort to restore a heavily polluted system of streams high in the Sierra Nevada of California that spanned more than two decades has been declared a qualified success—but there is more work to come, researchers say. Leviathan, Aspen, and Bryant Creeks, once crystalline natural streams and home to a plethora of native birds, fish, and insects, have at times run a sickening and toxic rusty-oran

4h

 

The Ecosystem in Immigrants’ Guts Is Shaped by the Place They Call Home

By studying the relationship among ethnicity, migration history and the digestive system’s microbiome, researchers hope to gain insights on health disparities in diverse communities.

5h

 

UCLA researchers and partners work with sushi restaurants to reduce seafood fraud

A new monitoring project involving UCLA researchers and partners aims to take 'fake sushi' off Los Angeles diners' plates. The Los Angeles Seafood Monitoring Project team — which includes university researchers, students, sushi restaurants and government regulators — is working to reduce sushi fraud and the mislabeling of fish.

5h

 

Unlocking the secrets of metal-insulator transitions

Using an X-ray technique available at the National Synchrotron Light Source II (NSLS-II), scientists found that the metal-insulator transition in the correlated material magnetite is a two-step process.

5h

 

Skin ages when the main cells in the dermis lose their identity and function

A study in mice done at IRB Barcelona and CNAG-CRG explains that dermal fibroblasts lose their cell identify over time and with it their capacity to produce and secrete collagen and other proteins.

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Yellowstone streams recovering thanks to wolf reintroduction

In the first study of its kind, research by Oregon State University scientists shows that the return of large terrestrial carnivores can lead to improved stream structure and function.

5h

 

What a Democratic House Means for Health and Medicine

The Democrats campaigned on protecting coverage for people with pre-existing conditions and lowering prescription drug prices — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

5h

 

This is how we might explore the internet after Google

Google has come under scrutiny lately for its dominance over the flow of information on the internet. TagTheWeb is researching a method to allow the "wisdom of the crowd" to categorize the internet more effectively. With or without Google, the internet looks to change significantly in the future, in ways we may not be ready for. The internet is always changing. It reached a billion websites in 20

5h

 

Falder antistof ned eller op?

Efter års tilløb kan flere Cern-eksperimenter måske snart besvare det spørgsmål. Det ene ledes af fysikere fra Aarhus Universitet.

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The secret behind coral reef diversity? Time, lots of time

One of the world's premier diving destinations owes its reputation as a hot spot of marine biodiversity to being undisturbed over millions of years, according to a study led by UA ecologists. The researchers conclude that patterns of high diversity may take tens of millions of years to arise, but can be wiped out in a few years by human impacts.

5h

 

Din næste telefon kan foldes på midten

Samsungs nye bøjelige telefonskærm bliver snart til virkelighed.

5h

 

Index Ranks U.S. Cities Based on Climate Risk and Readiness

The evaluation aims to help authorities better plan and prepare for the impacts of climate change — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

5h

 

Want to avoid Alzheimer’s? Try a darker roast.

Scientists pinpoint why coffee can ward off Alzheimer's. The key compounds appear to be phenylindanes. Darker roasts, even espresso, offer the greatest benefit. Scientists have been saying for a while that drinking coffee may reduce the chances of acquiring Alzheimer's disease (AD), Parkinson's (PD), and dementia. A new study , published in Frontiers in Neuroscience in October, has taken a closer

5h

 

What could cause the Mississippi Bight to become hypoxic?

A recent article published in Continental Shelf Research explores aspects of the environmental conditions that can potentially lead to hypoxia in the Mississippi Bight region of the northern Gulf of Mexico. This area extends from Apalachicola in Florida to the Mississippi River Delta.

6h

 

Brain learns to recognize familiar faces regardless of where they are in the visual field

A Dartmouth study finds that recognition of faces varies by where they appear in the visual field and this variability is reduced by learning familiar faces through social interactions. The findings suggest that repeated social interactions may tune populations of visual neurons in the face processing network to enable consistent and rapid recognition of familiar faces. The study was published in

6h

 

Sensory neurons can be used to discover therapies for ALS

Scientists have shown that mutations in specific genes that destroy motor neurons and thereby cause the devastating effects of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis — also known as ALS or Lou Gehrig's disease — also attack sensory neurons. The discovery indicates that studying sensory neurons could provide new mechanistic insights to prevent, slow, or even reverse ALS.

6h

 

Traditional glaucoma test can miss severity of disease

The most common test for glaucoma can underestimate the severity of the condition by not detecting the presence of central vision loss, also known as macular degeneration, according to a new study.

6h

 

Factors affecting turbulence scaling

A new study focuses on hydrodynamic effects of external disturbances on fluids at critical points, including inconsistent turbulence in all directions, or anisotropy, and varying degrees of compressibility.

6h

 

Theorists Debate How ‘Neutral’ Evolution Really Is

When Charles Darwin articulated his theory of evolution by natural selection in On the Origin of Species in 1859, he focused on adaptations — the changes that enable organisms to survive in new or changing environments. Selection for favorable adaptations, he suggested, allowed ancient ancestral forms to gradually diversify into countless species. That concept was so powerful that we might assume

6h

 

Conversion 'therapy' begins at home

A study by the Family Acceptance Project (FAP) at San Francisco State University has found that attempts by parents and religious leaders or therapists to change the sexual orientation of LGBT adolescents ('conversion therapy') contribute to multiple health and adjustment problems in young adulthood. These include higher levels of depression and suicidal behavior, as well as lower levels of self-e

6h

 

Rainforest destruction from gold mining hits all-time high in Peru

Small-scale gold mining has destroyed more than 170,000 acres of primary rainforest in the Peruvian Amazon in the past five years, according to a new analysis by scientists at Wake Forest University's Center for Amazonian Scientific Innovation (CINCIA).

6h

 

CWRU-Led study triggers change in WHO treatment guidelines for lymphatic filariasis

Researchers from Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine have shown that a single 'cocktail' of three pill-based anti-parasite medications is significantly more effective at killing microscopic larval worms in people diagnosed with lymphatic filariasis, commonly known as elephantiasis, than other standard two-drug combinations previously used in the global effort to eliminate this infec

6h

 

Caution, tasteless! Viruses and antimicrobially resistant bacteria in foods

Salmonella in eggs, noroviruses in frozen berries, hepatitis E viruses in domestic pigs and wild boar and resistant bacteria in meat: pathogenic microorganisms are one of the most common causes of foodborne illnesses. Every year, they cause more than 100,000 cases of disease in Germany — some of them fatal.

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How many calories do you burn? It depends on time of day

Researchers reporting in Current Biology on Nov. 8 have made the surprising discovery that the number of calories people burn while at rest changes with the time of day. When at rest, people burn 10 percent more calories in the late afternoon and early evening than in the early morning hours.

6h

 

Pore size alone does not matter when biological nanopores act as sugar chain biosensors

The effectiveness of nanopore biosensors capable of identifying sugar chains from biological molecules involved in key biological processes also depends on the nanopore's electrical charge and inner pore design.

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New marker provides insights into the development of type 2 diabetes

Small chemical changes in the DNA building blocks, which may be influenceable by lifestyle factors, can reduce the amount of IGFBP2. Researchers now report that these epigenetic changes increase the risk of type 2 diabetes. Moreover, people with high blood levels of the binding protein IGFBP2 are less likely to develop this metabolic disorder. The changes in the blood are already detectable a few

6h

 

Subaru recalls nearly 400K vehicles to fix stalling problems

Subaru is recalling nearly 400,000 vehicles in the U.S. to fix two problems that can cause them to stall.

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What are Emotions and where are they in the brain? (Intro Video)

submitted by /u/BrainsandBehavior [link] [comments]

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What do metastatic cancer cells have in common with sharks?

In a new study, researchers report that when cancer cells become invasive (metastatic), they start behaving in 'predatory' ways. Metastatic cancer cells differ from their non-metastatic counterparts not only in their genetics, but also in their moving strategy: they spread more rapidly and are more directional than non-invasive cancer cells.

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Combination chemotherapy and immunotherapy effective in Phase II leukemia study

A combination of the standard-of-care chemotherapy drug known as azacitidine, with nivolumab, an immune checkpoint inhibitor, demonstrated an encouraging response rate and overall survival in patients with relapsed or refractory acute myeloid leukemia, according to new findings.

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Body clock researchers prevent liver cancer growth in mice

The body's internal clock could play a critical role in the fight against certain types of liver cancer, according to a recent preclinical study.

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Cranking up the power setting may help some who use prosthetics

Amputees who use powered prosthetic ankles may be able to avoid the energetic costs typically associated with prosthetics by cranking up the power provided by their devices.

6h

 

New system opens the door to transforming CO2 into industrial fuels

Imagine a day when—rather than being spewed into the atmosphere—the gases coming from power plants and heavy industry are instead captured and fed into catalytic reactors that chemically transform greenhouse gases like carbon dioxide into industrial fuels or chemicals and that emit only oxygen.

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Google reforms sexual misconduct rulesGoogle Sundar Pichai

Google is promising to be more forceful and open about its handling of sexual misconduct cases, a week after high-paid engineers and others walked out in protest over its male-dominated culture.

6h

 

Tropical Cyclone Alcide's rainfall observed by GPM Satellite

The Global Precipitation Measurement mission or GPM core satellite passed over the Southern Indian Ocean and analyzed the rainfall occurring in pre-season Tropical Cyclone Alcide.

6h

 

Video: Is throwing rice at weddings bad for birds?

Many people believe that throwing rice at weddings is harmful to wild birds. Supposedly, the rice expands in the birds' digestive systems and injures them.

6h

 

Loneliness study finds one in five Australians rarely or never have someone to talk to

Research finds 27.6% of people say they feel lonely at least three days every week More than one-fifth of Australians rarely or never feel they have someone to talk to or turn to for help, and more than one quarter feel lonely for at least three days every week, according to a comprehensive study of loneliness and wellbeing. Swinburne University in Melbourne and the Australian Psychological Socie

6h

 

Here's the Time of Day When You Burn the Most Calories

Your body's internal clock plays a role not only when you're most alert and sleepy, but also when you burn the most calories, a new study finds.

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Cranking up the power setting may help some who use prosthetics

Amputees who use powered prosthetic ankles may be able to avoid the energetic costs typically associated with prosthetics by cranking up the power provided by their devices.

6h

 

Catalyzing CO2

One day in the not-too-distant future, the gases coming from power plants and heavy industry, rather than spewing into the atmosphere, could be captured and chemically transformed from greenhouse gases like carbon dioxide into industrial fuels or chemicals thanks to a system developed by Harvard researchers that can use renewable electricity to reduce carbon dioxide into carbon monoxide — a key c

6h

 

Neurons that fire together, don't always wire together

As the adage goes 'neurons that fire together, wire together,' but a new paper published today in Neuron demonstrates that, in addition to response similarity, projection target also constrains local connectivity.

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Link between autoimmune, heart disease explained in mice

Autoimmune diseases such as psoriasis, lupus and rheumatoid arthritis more than double the risk of cardiovascular disease. A new study shows that immune cells that arise during autoimmune disease cause cholesterol to become trapped inside blood vessels.

6h

 

Military risk factors for dementia

In recent years, there has been growing discussion to better understand the pathophysiological mechanisms of traumatic brain injury and post-traumatic stress disorder and how they may be linked to an increased risk of neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer's disease in veterans.

6h

 

How do peptides penetrate cells? Two sides of the same coin

The research team of Pavel Jungwirth from IOCB Prague has discovered a previously unknown mechanism by which short peptides are able to penetrate cells and, in principle, could serve as carriers of drug molecules.

6h

 

Sign language points to limitations of speech

Sign languages can help reveal hidden aspects of the logical structure of spoken language, but can also highlight its limitations because speech lacks the rich iconic resources that sign language uses on top of its sophisticated grammar, a new study shows. Linguists consider sign languages as full-fledged and grammatically sophisticated languages, which are essential to the communication of Deaf

6h

 

The Central Challenge of the Fight Against Trumpism

Jeff Sessions lasted in his post as attorney general for 18 hours after the Democrats took control of the House of Representatives on Election Day. His ouster, anticipated for months, may finally allow the president to fire Special Counsel Robert Mueller without consequence. Even for a country now accustomed to whiplash, it was a head-spinning day: the promise of national civic renewal followed b

6h

 

Factors affecting turbulence scaling

Fluids exhibiting scaling behaviour can be found in diverse physical phenomena occurring both in the laboratory and in real-world conditions. For instance, they occur at the critical point when a liquid becomes a vapour, at the phase transition of superfluids, and at the phase separation of binary liquids whose components exhibit two different types of behaviour.

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Pore size alone does not matter when biological nanopores act as sugar chain biosensors

Protein nanopores are present in cell membranes and act as biological gateways. This means that they can also be used for the detection of specific bioactive molecular chains, like sugar chains, such as molecules from the glycosaminoglycan family. The latter are responsible for key interactions at the cellular level. They typically mediate interactions with cell surfaces or with proteins, resultin

6h

 

A newly discovered, naturally low-caffeine tea plant

Tea drinkers who seek the popular beverage's soothing flavor without its explosive caffeine jolt could soon have a new, naturally low-caffeine option. In a study appearing in ACS' Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, scientists report that a recently discovered wild tea plant in China contains little or no caffeine and, unlike many industrially decaffeinated products, could potentially prov

6h

 

Some of retina's light-sensing cells may have ancient roots

Scientists at Johns Hopkins Medicine say they have identified what may be an ancient light-sensing mechanism in modern mouse retinal cells.

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Pilot study suggests pedal desks could address health risks of sedentary workplace

A recent pilot study by kinesiologists at the University of Massachusetts Amherst found that pedaling while conducting work tasks improved insulin responses to a test meal. Investigators led by Dr. Stuart Chipkin found that insulin levels following the meal were lower when sedentary workers used a pedal desk compared to a standard desk. In addition, work skills were not decreased in the pedaling c

6h

 

Tropical Cyclone Alcide's rainfall observed by GPM Satellite

The Global Precipitation Measurement mission or GPM core satellite passed over the Southern Indian Ocean and analyzed the rainfall occurring in pre-season Tropical Cyclone Alcide.

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Can stimulating the brain treat chronic pain?

For the first time, researchers at the UNC School of Medicine showed they could target one brain region with a weak alternating current of electricity, enhance the naturally occurring brain rhythms of that region, and significantly decrease symptoms associated with chronic lower back pain.

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Is throwing rice at weddings bad for birds? (video)

Many people believe that throwing rice at weddings is harmful to wild birds. Supposedly, the rice expands in the birds' digestive systems and injures them. This myth has become widespread after appearing in places as varied as an 'Ann Landers' column and an episode of 'The Simpsons.' In this video, Reactions uses some hands-on chemistry to demonstrate that rice is no more harmful than other grains

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New magnetically controlled thrombolytic successfully passed preclinical testing

New anti-thrombosis drug based on magnetite nanoparticles developed at ITMO University was successfully tested on animals. Preclinical studies showed drug's high efficacy and safety. Clot dissolution time of the new drug is 20 times shorter than the one of traditional medications. The range of permissible concentrations is very high, and the minimum dose of the active substance was a hundred times

6h

 

Top 10 chemistry start-ups

Starting a new chemistry-based company is one part discovery, one part risk. This compelling combination prompted Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN), the weekly news magazine of the American Chemical Society, to highlight 10 chemistry start-ups to watch. C&EN's writers and editors chose the finalists from reader and adviser nominations based on the strength of their groundbreaking chemistry. The s

6h

 

Gatekeeper for poison capsule

Researchers decode the toxin complex of the plague bacterium and other germs.

6h

 

Powerful method probes small-molecule structures

Small molecules — from naturally occurring metabolites and hormones to synthetic medicines and pesticides — can have big effects on living things. But for scientists to understand how the molecules work and how to design beneficial ones, they need to know the precise arrangement of atoms and chemical bonds. Now researchers have found a faster, simpler and potentially more reliable way to solve t

6h

 

New ranking method could help hotels to maximize their revenue

Researchers have devised a new method to rank hotels more accurately.

7h

 

Air pollution is associated with increased emergency department visits for heart and lung disease

Outdoor air pollution is a major health threat worldwide. New research found that exposure to certain air pollutants is linked to increased emergency department visits for respiratory and cardiovascular diseases.

7h

 

How beatboxers produce sound: Using real-time MRI to understand

Beatboxing is a musical art form in which performers use their vocal tract to create percussive sounds, and a team of researchers is using real-time MRI to study the production of beatboxing sounds.

7h

 

Among heart attack survivors, drug reduces chances of second heart attack or stroke

In a clinical trial involving 18,924 patients from 57 countries who had suffered a recent heart attack or threatened heart attack, researchers have found that the cholesterol-lowering drug alirocumab reduced the chance of having additional heart problems or stroke.

7h

 

One type of brain cell might hold key to inflammation after head injury

By eliminating one type of immune cell in the brain, researchers were able to erase any evidence of inflammation following traumatic brain injury, according to a new study.

7h

 

Watching nanoparticles: Researchers make movies of photochemistry in single nanoparticles

Stanford researchers retooled an electron microscope to work with visible light and gas flow, making it possible to watch a photochemical reaction as it swept across a nanoparticle the size of a single cold virus.

7h

 

New, more accessible staging system developed to predict survival for patients with AL Amyloidosis

A new staging system developed with a more accessible test to predict the chance of survival in patients living with light chain (AL) amyloidosis.

7h

 

Trump Bet Conservatives Wouldn't Denounce His Racist Ad. He Won.

In the Trump era, when every day brings fresh insanity, looking back is hard. But it’s worth remembering what Donald Trump did in the final days before Tuesday’s midterm elections. It’s worth remembering because it’s a template for what he may do in 2020. And for how mainstream conservatives will respond. According to CNN , Republican officials wanted to close the campaign with an upbeat “Morning

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7h

 

A newly discovered, naturally low-caffeine tea plant

Tea drinkers who seek the popular beverage's soothing flavor without its explosive caffeine jolt could soon have a new, naturally low-caffeine option. In a study appearing in ACS' Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, scientists report that a recently discovered wild tea plant in China contains little or no caffeine and, unlike many industrially decaffeinated products, could potentially prov

7h

 

Explaining happiness

It is widely believed that each person finds the source of happiness within themselves and nowhere else. To determine just how true this is, research psychologists of the Higher School of Economics conducted a survey on 600 individuals. The results of the study were published in the article 'Why Do I Feel This Way? Attributional Assessment of Happiness and Unhappiness.'

7h

 

Multiple sclerosis: Accumulation of B cells triggers nervous system damage

B cells are important in helping the immune system fight pathogens. However, in the case of the neurological autoimmune disease Multiple sclerosis (MS) they can damage nerve tissue. When particular control cells are missing, too many B cells accumulate in the meninges, resulting in inflammation of the central nervous system. A team from the Technical University of Munich (TUM) demonstrated the pro

7h

 

Woodlice back on top, slugs deterred by drought

The 4th edition of the Dutch Soil Animal Days saw 856 'citizen scientists' comb through more than 200 gardens and parks to find some 7,500 soil creatures. Findings that stand out after this year's long, dry summer: woodlice have regained their ubiquitous status, while slugs were spotted in fewer places. The drought may also explain why so many people had difficulties finding all the soil animals,

7h

 

New marker provides insights into the development of type 2 diabetes

Small chemical changes in the DNA building blocks, which may be influenceable by lifestyle factors, can reduce the amount of IGFBP2. A DIfE / DZD research team has now reported in the journal Diabetes that these epigenetic changes increase the risk of type 2 diabetes. Moreover, people with high blood levels of the binding protein IGFBP2 are less likely to develop this metabolic disorder. The chang

7h

 

Pore size alone does not matter when biological nanopores act as sugar chain biosensors

Protein nanopores can be found naturally in cell membranes, and act as biological gateways. Yet they can also be useful for the detection of specific bioactive molecular chains, like sugar chains, which are responsible for key interactions at the cell level, such as molecules from the glycosaminoglycan family.

7h

 

Factors affecting turbulence scaling

Fluids exhibiting scaling behavior can be found in diverse physical phenomena, observed when these fluids reach a critical point. In a recent study published in EPJ B, Michal Hnatič from Šafárik University in Košice, Slovakia, and colleagues investigate the influence of ambient turbulent speed fluctuations in physical systems when they reach a critical point.

7h

 

Traditional glaucoma test can miss severity of disease

The most common test for glaucoma can underestimate the severity of the condition by not detecting the presence of central vision loss, also known as macular degeneration, according to a new Columbia University study.

7h

 

Don't stare! Monkey gaze study shows dopamine's role in response inhibition

University of Tsukuba researchers revealed the importance of the brain's dopaminergic system for inhibiting already-planned actions. They trained monkeys to redirect their gaze towards targets newly presented on a screen, apart from when presented with signals to avoid such redirection. Simultaneous analysis showed that the activity of dopaminergic neurons correlated with successful refusal to red

7h

 

Genetic 'whodunnit' for cancer gene solved

Long thought to suppress cancer by slowing cellular metabolism, the protein complex AMPK also seemed to help some tumors grow, confounding researchers. Now, Salk Institute researchers have solved the long-standing mystery around why AMPK can both hinder and help cancer.

7h

 

Healing kidneys with nanotechnology

In new research appearing in the journal Nature Biomedical Engineering, Hao Yan and his colleagues at the University of Wisconsin-Madison and in China describe a new method for treating and preventing Acute Kidney Injury. Their technique involves the use of tiny, self-assembling forms measuring just billionths of a meter in diameter.

7h

 

New decision support tool improves discharge outcomes

In an effort to lessen readmission risk after discharge and achieve the best possible outcomes for patients, hospital-based clinicians are more intentionally planning discharge of those who require post-acute care (PAC). Yet, although hospital clinicians strive to effectively refer patients who require PAC, their discharge-planning processes often vary greatly and typically are not evidence-based.

7h

 

We now know how RNA molecules are organized in cells

With their new finding, Canadian scientists urge revision of decades-old dogma on protein synthesis

7h

 

Loss is more: Today's budding yeasts shed traits from their 400-million-year-old ancestor

Budding yeasts are common in nearly every environment on the planet, perhaps best known for the achievements of a handful of species in the beer, wine, and bread industries or, less attractively, sending people to the drug store to treat infections.

7h

 

Broad genome analysis shows yeasts evolving by subtraction

An unprecedented comparison of hundreds of species of yeasts has helped geneticists brew up an expansive picture of their evolution over the last hundreds of millions of years, including an analysis of the way they evolved individual appetites for particular food sources that may be a boon to biofuels research.

7h

 

Untreated hearing loss associated with increased risk of hospitalization, other health conditions

Two studies and two commentaries examine the association of untreated hearing loss with health care use, costs and other health conditions.

7h

 

ThyroSeq test helps patients avoid unnecessary diagnostic thyroid surgery, study shows

UPMC-developed genetic test helps avoid preventable surgery, curb health care costs.

7h

 

Patients with untreated hearing loss incur higher health care costs over time

Older adults with untreated hearing loss incur substantially higher total health care costs compared to those who don't have hearing loss — an average of 46 percent, totaling $22,434 per person over a decade, according to a new study led by researchers at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health.

7h

 

See-through film rejects 70 percent of incoming solar heat

MIT engineers have developed a heat-rejecting film that could be applied to a building's windows to reflect up to 70 percent of the sun's incoming heat. The film is able to remain highly transparent below 32 degrees Celsius, or 89 degrees Fahrenheit. They estimate that if every exterior-facing window in a building were covered in this film, the building's air conditioning and energy costs could dr

7h

 

Can't sleep? Fruit flies and energy drinks offer new clues

Like humans, fruit flies are active during the day, sleep at night and have similar sleep characteristics. A study has discovered a new gene and uncovered a mechanism that modulates sleep by controlling the movement of taurine — a common ingredient found in many energy drinks like Red Bull™ — into neuron cells of the fly brain. Taurine also is abundant in the human brain and is consistently elev

7h

 

Brain signature of depressed mood unveiled in new study

New research from UC San Francisco has identified a common pattern of brain activity that may be behind low mood feelings, particularly in people who have a tendency towards anxiety. The newly discovered network is a significant advance in research on the neurobiology of mood, and could serve as a biomarker to help scientists developing new therapies to help people with mood disorders such as depr

7h

 

Watch a 3D-engineered human heart tissue beat

Researchers have developed a way to grow human heart tissue that can serve as a model for the upper chambers of the heart, known as the atria. The tissue, derived from human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPCSs), beats, expresses genes, and responds to drugs in a manner similar to a real human atrium. The model, described Nov. 8 in the journal Stem Cell Reports, may be useful for evaluating dise

7h

 

Harvesting renewable energy from the sun and outer space at the same time

Scientists at Stanford University have demonstrated for the first time that heat from the sun and coldness from outer space can be collected simultaneously with a single device. Their research, published Nov. 8 in the journal Joule, suggests that devices for harvesting solar and space energy will not compete for land space and can actually help each other function more efficiently.

7h

 

EEG identifies brain signal that correlates with depression and anxiety

Researchers have long known that two brain structures, the amygdala and hippocampus, are involved with processing of emotion and mood — but not exactly how. Now, researchers from the University of California at San Francisco have identified a unique frequency of brainwaves associated with communication between these two brain structures that can be predictive of worsening mood related to depressi

7h

 

Species' longevity depends on brain cell numbers

Scientists have thought that the main determinant of maximal longevity in warm-blooded animals — which varies from as little as 2 to as many as 211 years — is a species' metabolic rate, which is inversely related to body size. It follows that at 2 years of life, small animals with high metabolic rates are already old, but large animals with low metabolic rates are still young.

7h

 

A major role for a small organ in the immune response during pregnancy

The immune system of a pregnant woman is altered during pregnancy, but not in the way previously believed, according to a new study. This study shows that the thymus, an organ of the immune system located close to the heart, plays an important role during a normal pregnancy in ensuring that the mother's immune system protects against infection while at the same time tolerating the fetus.

7h

 

Scientists opening up access to science through DIY equipment

Scientists have developed a piece of hardware to demonstrate how our brains function, as part of a growing range of equipment which uses DIY and 3D printable models to open up access to science education.

7h

 

Blue light can reduce blood pressure, study suggests

Exposure to blue light decreases blood pressure, reducing the risk of developing cardiovascular disease, a new study suggests.

7h

 

Metallic nanocatalysts imitate the structure of enzymes

An international team of researchers has transferred certain structural characteristics of natural enzymes, which ensure particularly high catalytic activity, to metallic nanoparticles. The desired chemical reaction thus did not take place at the particle surface as usual, but in channels inside the metal particles — and with three times higher catalytic activity.

7h

 

Some of retina's light-sensing cells may have ancient roots

Scientists say they have identified what may be an ancient light-sensing mechanism in modern mouse retinal cells.

7h

 

Rushing kids to specialize in one sport may not be best path to success

It may be tempting for parents or coaches to urge young children to specialize in one sport early on to help maximize their chance at making it to the big leagues, but that might not be the best path to success.

7h

 

Scientists shuffle the deck to create materials with new quantum behaviors

Layered transition metal dichalcogenides or TMDCs — materials composed of metal nanolayers sandwiched between two other layers of chalcogens — have become extremely attractive to the research community. Similar to graphene, they not only retain some of the unique properties of the bulk material, but also demonstrate direct-gap semiconducting behavior, excellent electrocatalytic activity and uniq

7h

 

Exhaustive analysis reveals cell division's inner timing mechanisms

After exploring every possible correlation, researchers shed new light on a long-standing question about what triggers cell division.

7h

 

This vaccine could help people with celiac eat gluten again, but it's not for everyone

Health The first real treatment for celiac might work by shooting gluten straight into your veins. Despite the explosion of gluten-free food in the last few years, actually being on a physician-prescribed GF diet isn’t easy.

7h

 

Deep-Brain Recordings May Show Where Unhappiness Lives

New recordings of electrical activity in the brain help reveal the underpinnings of bad moods — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

7h

 

Tour Katherine Legge's Car | In the Pit

From bumpers to brakes, Katherine Legge shows us her Acura NSX. Stream Full Episodes of In the Pit: https://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/in-the-pit/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Discovery Follow on Twitter: https://twitter.com/Discovery We're on Instagram! https://instagram.com/DiscoveryChannel From: Discovery

7h

 

New ranking method could help hotels to maximize their revenue

Researchers from the University of Portsmouth have devised a new method to rank hotels more accurately.

7h

 

Researchers Uncover A Circuit For Sadness In The Human Brain

When people are feeling glum, it often means that brain areas involved in emotion and memory are communicating. Researchers have now observed the circuit in action in humans. (Image credit: Stuart Kinlough/Ikon Images/Getty Images)

7h

 

Spørg Fagfolket: Hvordan bevæger bølger sig i rummet (del 2)?

En læser ønsker en uddybning af brevkassesvaret om, hvordan bølger bevæger sig i rummet. Det kommer her fra DTU Space og Ingeniørens Jens Ramskov.

7h

 

We now know how RNA molecules are organized in cells

Working with colleagues in the U.S., a team of Université de Montreal researchers has for the first time visualized how RNA molecules are organized in cells.

7h

 

Warming waters caused rapid—and opposite—shifts in connected marine communities

Two connected marine ecosystems—the Eastern English Channel and Southern North Sea—experienced big and opposite changes in their fish communities over a 30-year period, according to researchers who report their findings in Current Biology on November 8. Rapid warming drove smaller ocean fishes to shift abruptly northward from one ecosystem to the other.

7h

 

Loss is more: Today's budding yeasts shed traits from their 400-million-year-old ancestor

On their way to decoding the genome of every organism in a major branch of the tree of life—that of the humble budding yeasts—a team of evolutionary biologists successfully reconstructed the genomic and metabolic characteristics of the last common ancestor of today's more than 1,000 species of the organism.

7h

 

Healing kidneys with nanotechnology

Each year, there are some 13.3 million new cases of acute kidney injury (AKI), a serious affliction. Formerly known as acute renal failure, the ailment produces a rapid buildup of nitrogenous wastes and decreases urine output, usually within hours or days of disease onset. Severe complications often ensue.

7h

 

Aristotle Was Wrong—Very Wrong—But People Still Love Him

Centuries-old ideas about force and motion have an intuitive appeal that is enduring but oh-so-incorrect, as these simple experiments show.

7h

 

The number of calories you burn while resting depends on the time of day

This daily cycle of calorie burning is one of the many body processes that follow a biological clock.

7h

 

Online course may change ideas about who’s ‘math-minded’

A new online course can help to change students’ mindset about their own abilities in math, researchers say. From an early age, children are conditioned to think they fall into two categories: “math-minded people”—those who naturally have a way with numbers and non-“math-minded”—those who hate numbers. But Jo Boaler, a professor of mathematics education at Stanford University, believes this minds

7h

 

New ranking method could help hotels to maximize their revenue

Researchers from the University of Portsmouth have devised a new method to rank hotels more accurately.

7h

 

Rushing kids to specialize in one sport may not be best path to success

It may be tempting for parents or coaches to urge young children to specialize in one sport early on to help maximize their chance at making it to the big leagues, but that might not be the best path to success.

7h

 

Some of retina's light-sensing cells may have ancient roots

Scientists at Johns Hopkins Medicine say they have identified what may be an ancient light-sensing mechanism in modern mouse retinal cells.

7h

 

Online labor platforms offer growing alternative to traditional offshoring

Online labor platforms that connect freelance workers and clients around the world are emerging as an alternative to traditional offshoring, according to new Oxford University research.

7h

 

VTCRI scientists find that sensory neurons can be used to discover therapies for ALS

Scientists have shown that mutations in specific genes that destroy motor neurons and thereby cause the devastating effects of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis– also known as ALS or Lou Gehrig's disease — also attack sensory neurons. The discovery in today's Scientific Reports indicates that studying sensory neurons could provide new mechanistic insights to prevent, slow, or even reverse ALS.

7h

 

Re-inventing the hook

Cognitive biologists and comparative psychologists from the University of Vienna, the University of St Andrews and the University of Veterinary Medicine Vienna around Isabelle Laumer and Alice Auersperg studied hook tool making for the first time in a non-human primate species — the orangutan. To the researchers' surprise the apes spontaneously manufactured hook tools out of straight wire within

7h

 

A burst of 'synchronous' light

Excited photo-emitters can cooperate and radiate simultaneously, a phenomenon called superfluorescence. Researchers from Empa and ETH Zurich, together with colleagues from IBM Research Zurich, have recently been able to create this effect with long-range ordered nanocrystal superlattices. This discovery could enable future developments in LED lighting, quantum sensing, quantum communication and fu

7h

 

Brexit echo chambers on Twitter reflect in-person conversations, study finds

Social media echo chambers may reflect real-life conversations that are linked to the geographic locations of users, according to new research.The findings contradict the assumption that echo chambers — discussions which only involve people with the same views — are the result of online interactions alone.Conducted by City, University of London and published in the journal PLOS ONE, the study an

7h

 

A new lens for microscopy has been developed

BFU physicists suggested a new model of a variable focus lens called a mini transfocator. It may be used in microscopic research that requires compact and mobile optical systems. The development was supported by the Ministry of Education and Science with a grant (No. 14. Y26.31.0002). The results were published in the Microscopy and Microanalysis journal.

7h

 

Mouse model for diabetic kidney disease suggests role for immune and inflammatory pathways

A new mouse model accurately mimics diabetic kidney disease in humans, suggesting new approaches for treatment.

7h

 

Blue light can reduce blood pressure

Exposure to blue light decreases blood pressure, reducing the risk of developing cardiovascular disease, a new study from the University of Surrey and Heinrich Heine University Dusseldorf in collaboration with Philips reports.

7h

 

UK scientists opening up access to science through DIY equipment

Scientists at the University of Sussex have developed a piece of hardware to demonstrate how our brains function, as part of a growing range of equipment which uses DIY and 3-D printable models to open up access to science education.

7h

 

The global goals we've made progress on — and the ones we haven't | Michael Green

Are we delivering on the promises of the Sustainable Development Goals, the collection of 17 objectives set by the United Nations in 2015 that aims to improve the lives of billions by 2030? In this data-packed talk, economist Michael Green shares fresh analysis on the progress each country has (or hasn't) made — and offers new ideas on how we can move forward significantly. "We are living in a wo

7h

 

Fond vil støtte forskning i endokrinologi og metabolisme

Novo Nordisk Fonden etablerer nyt forskningsprogram med 600 mio. kr. til forskningsledere på forskellige karrierestadier inden for endokrinologi og metabolisme.

7h

 

UK scientists opening up access to science through DIY equipment

Scientists at the University of Sussex have developed a piece of hardware to demonstrate how our brains function, as part of a growing range of equipment which uses DIY and 3D printable models to open up access to science education.

7h

 

A major role for a small organ in the immune response during pregnancy

The immune system of a pregnant woman is altered during pregnancy, but not in the way previously believed, according to a study at Linköping University. This study, published in the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, shows that the thymus, an organ of the immune system located close to the heart, plays an important role during a normal pregnancy in ensuring that the mother's immune system

7h

 

Species' longevity depends on brain cell numbers

Scientists have thought that the main determinant of maximal longevity in warm-blooded animals — which varies from as little as 2 to as many as 211 years — is a species' metabolic rate, which is inversely related to body size. It follows that at 2 years of life, small animals with high metabolic rates are already old, but large animals with low metabolic rates are still young.

7h

 

Metallic nanocatalysts imitate the structure of enzymes

An international team of researchers has transferred certain structural characteristics of natural enzymes, which ensure particularly high catalytic activity, to metallic nanoparticles. The desired chemical reaction thus did not take place at the particle surface as usual, but in channels inside the metal particles — and with three times higher catalytic activity.

7h

 

Most complete study on Europe's greatest Hadrosaur site published

The Basturs Poble site (Lleida) is the most important site in Europe when it comes to hadrosaur remains. It has yielded over 1000 fossils, probably pertaining to the same species. Palaeontologists from the Institut Català de Paleontologia Miquel Crusafont (ICP), the Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona (UAB) and the Museum of Conca Dellà (MCD) publish the most complete study of fossils recovered from

7h

 

Revealing the inner working of magnetic materials

Björn Alling, researcher in theoretical physics at Linköping University, has, together with his colleagues at the Max-Planck-Institut für Eisenforschung in Düsseldorf, completed the task given to him by the Swedish Research Council in the autumn of 2014: Find out what happens inside magnetic materials at high temperatures.

7h

 

Technique for preventing extraction of finger vein patterns from photographs

Professor Isao Echizen's group of National Institute of Informatics (NII/Tokyo, Japan) has developed a technique for preventing the extraction of finger vein patterns from photographs. The technique involves the wearing of a clear sticker on the finger. It can prevent unwanted extraction of finger vein patterns from photographs while maintaining the convenience of finger vein authentication withou

7h

 

Study reveals that bitcoin mining uses as much energy as mining for gold

New study reveals that mining crypto can be use even more energy than needed to mine gold In order to understand the findings, we must first understand what crypto mining is The crypto community is looking for a way to solve these issue None According to a new study published in the journal Nature Sustainability from researchers Max J. Krause and Thabet Tolaymat, it appears that mining cryptocurr

7h

 

The Front Runner Fails to Tell a Grand Story of American Politics

The implosion of Gary Hart’s 1988 presidential campaign is, by itself, a fascinating tale worth adapting for the big screen. Retelling bits of political history in movie form, as though they’re sensational true-crime yarns, has seemingly only become more popular. In the past two years alone, audiences have gotten potted accounts of Watergate ( Mark Felt ), Stanley McChrystal’s resignation ( War M

7h

 

Sprint ups mobile hotspot to 50GB, turns on faster 4G LTE network before 5G arrives in 2019

Sprint users looking for a little holiday cheer are getting some small, but nice gifts Tuesday: more hotspot data and access to a faster 4G LTE network, if you have a more recent phone.

8h

 

Add-on gives antibiotic more oomph in MRSA fight

A modification to a common antibiotic makes it more effective at fighting MRSA, a type of antibiotic-resistant bacterium, according to new research. With drug-resistant infections on the rise and the development of new antibiotics on the decline, the world needs a new strategy in the fight against increasingly wily bacteria. Now, scientists think the small molecular attachment that helps conventi

8h

 

Facing climate change, cities trade sea walls for parks

To protect itself from a devastating flood, Boston was considering building a massive sea wall, cutting north to south through nearly four miles of Boston Harbor, taking $11 billion and at least 30 years to build. But a new plan unveiled in October represents a 180-degree turn: Instead of fighting to keep the water out, the city is letting it come in.

8h

 

How Whole Foods has affected the grocery business one year after the Amazon deal

It's been more than a year since e-commerce giant Amazon.com bought Whole Foods Market Inc. for $13.7 billion, a deal many expected would upend the grocery industry, especially in the hotly competitive Southern California region.

8h

 

A cavernous hangar for Google's huge ambitions

Google has moved a step closer to transforming the historic Spruce Goose hangar in the Playa Vista neighborhood of Los Angeles into a state-of-the-art office and production facility, the latest sign of how tech giants are expanding their presence in Hollywood's backyard.

8h

 

Holocene temperature in the Iberian Peninsula reconstructed with insect subfossils

Remains of chironomid subfossils, a type of insect similar to mosquitoes, were used in a study to reconstruct the temperature of the Iberian Peninsula in the Holocene, the geological period from 11,000 years ago until now. The results of the study prove some of the climate patterns of the Holocene suggested by other methodologies: a rise of temperatures in the beginning and the end of the period,

8h

 

The Science of Falling Walls

Berlin conference spotlights world-shaping science — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

8h

 

Exploiting epigenetic variation for plant breeding

Epigenetic changes can bring about new traits without altering the sequence of genes. This may allow plants to respond quicker to changes in their environment. Plant biologists at the University of Zurich have now demonstrated that epigenetic variation is also subject to selection and can be inherited. This could expand the possibilities for crop breeding.

8h

 

Air pollution is associated with increased emergency department visits for heart and lung disease

Outdoor air pollution is a major health threat worldwide. New research by George Mason University found that exposure to certain air pollutants is linked to increased emergency department visits for respiratory and cardiovascular diseases.

8h

 

Spacetime — a creation of well-known actors?

Most physicists believe that the structure of spacetime is formed in an unknown way in the vicinity of the Planck scale, i.e. at distances close to one trillionth of a trillionth of a metre. However, careful considerations undermine the unambiguity of this prediction. There are quite a few arguments in favour of the fact that the emergence of spacetime may occur as a result of processes taking pla

8h

 

Brain activity pattern may be early sign of schizophrenia

MIT neuroscientists have identified a pattern of brain activity that is correlated with development of schizophrenia, which they say could be used as marker to diagnose the disease earlier.

8h

 

The Republican Space Fans Exiting the House

After eight years in power, Republicans in the House of Representatives will soon hand over the gavel to Democrats. When the new Congress convenes in January, the chamber will contain dozens fewer Republicans—and fewer Republican supporters of space exploration. The outcome of Tuesday’s elections will sweep several longtime champions of NASA out of the House. Some have held office for many years,

8h

 

A Mass Shooting in One of the ‘Safest Cities in America’

A gunman entered Borderline Bar and Grill, in Thousand Oaks, California, late Wednesday night and opened fire. By the time the rampage was over, at least 13 people were dead, including one police officer and the gunman. Thousand Oaks, California, is routinely named one of America’s safest cities for its relatively low number of crimes reported in FBI statistics. But such day-to-day statistics can

8h

 

Did Obamacare Repeal Hurt the Republicans?

BARNEGAT, New Jersey—Health care was supposed to be the biggest issue on voters’ minds on Election Day, and in New Jersey’s Third Congressional District, it was supposed to be the issue. Incumbent Representative Tom MacArthur, a Republican, had not only previously voted to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act, or Obamacare, but authored an amendment that would have let states charge more fo

8h

 

When quantum particles swirl about, they still obey universal laws

Remarkable rules have been detected in the apparent chaos of disequilibrium processes. Different systems behave identically in many ways, if they belong to the same 'universality class'. This means that experiments can be carried out with quantum systems that are easy to handle, in order to obtain precise information about other systems that cannot be directly studied in the experiment — such as

8h

 

Low health literacy associated with early death for cardiovascular patients

Patients hospitalized with a cardiovascular event are more likely to die within one year if they have low health literacy, according to a new study.

8h

 

Study shows how vultures evesdrop to gather vital flight information

A new study has shown vultures use their very own social networks to take advantage of thermal updrafts which help them fly vast distances. Researchers examined how the vultures seemed to make risky but efficient choices when it came to their flight patterns by observing other birds in the network.

8h

 

Metallic nanocatalysts imitate the structure of enzymes

An international team of researchers has transferred certain structural characteristics of natural enzymes, which ensure particularly high catalytic activity, to metallic nanoparticles. The desired chemical reaction thus did not take place at the particle surface as usual, but in channels inside the metal particles – and with three times higher catalytic activity. A team from the University of New

8h

 

8h

 

Forskere opdager verdens ældste hulemaleri af en vildokse

Det ældst kendte hulemaleri, der ikke er abstrakt, er cirka 40.000 år gammelt. Det giver et billede af fortidens liv, siger forsker.

8h

 

Air pollution causes increased emergency department visits for heart and lung disease

Outdoor air pollution is a major health threat worldwide. New research by George Mason University found that exposure to certain air pollutants is linked to increased emergency department (ED) visits for respiratory and cardiovascular diseases.

8h

 

Forskning i diabetespsykologi bliver styrket

Britiske professor i psykologi skal lede nyt forskningsområde etableret i samarbejde mellem Steno Diabetes Center Copenhagen og Københavns Universitet.

8h

 

SGLT-2-hæmmer kan reducere risiko for hjertesvigt

Real-world-studie viser, at behandling med SGLT-2-hæmmer kan reducere indlæggelser med hjertesvigt hos patienter med type-2 diabetes.

8h

 

Tracking the hazards and benefits of volcanoes in East Africa

More than 100 young volcanoes – that have had activity within about 10,000 years – dot the landscape of the East African Rift – an area that runs for more than 3000 kilometres from Djibouti and Eritrea, down through Ethiopia, Kenya, Uganda and Rwanda to the Democratic Republic of Congo and Tanzania.

8h

 

Slavery is real and the West profits from it – Cambodia's construction boom highlights how

Modern slavery is a prominent term of late. Thus far, efforts to deal with it have tended to focus on criminality and the explicit imprisonment of people involved. Yet tackling modern slavery in a meaningful sense isn't merely a question of identifying culprits and freeing victims. To do so is merely to treat the symptoms of the issue.

8h

 

Researchers design molecules that inhibit enzymes in infectious diseases

A multidisciplinary study by the Computer Biochemistry Research Group of the Universitat Jaume I (UJI) and collaborators have designed small molecules that are able to bond with and inhibit the activity of enzymes in infectious diseases. The conclusions of this work, developed together with the Simon Fraser University of Saint Andrews, have been published in the journal Nature Communications.

8h

 

Online labour platforms offer growing alternative to traditional offshoring

Online labour platforms that connect freelance workers and clients around the world are emerging as an alternative to traditional offshoring, according to new Oxford University research.

8h

 

Better chocolate with mobile technology

Smart farming uses technology to access real-time information on crop yields and soil-mapping, fertiliser application, weather data, and intelligent assessment and so improve agricultural efficiency and crop yields. However, for some economies, there remains a huge gap between farmer and app, as it were. For those valuable commodity products such as cocoa and coffee beans, the mobile technology re

8h

 

Unique Indigenous native seed farm to help meet supply challenges

A team of scientists from Curtin University's ARC Centre for Mine Site Restoration (CMSR) has helped to install an Indigenous-owned and operated native seed farm to supply Australia's growing land rehabilitation needs.

8h

 

How to build functional and more appealing winter cities

How do you make winter cities more functional and appealing? The answer lies in social inclusion and economic engagement, according to new research by University of Alberta experts in human geography and urban planning.

8h

 

Rainforest destruction from gold mining hits all-time high in Peru

Small-scale gold mining has destroyed more than 170,000 acres of primary rainforest in the Peruvian Amazon in the past five years, according to a new analysis by scientists at Wake Forest University's Center for Amazonian Scientific Innovation (CINCIA).

8h

 

Microbiome implicated in sea star wasting disease

A first-of-its-kind study shows that the sea star microbiome is critically important to the progression of the wasting disease that is killing these animals from Mexico to Alaska — and that an imbalance of microbes might be the culprit.

8h

 

'Dual mobility' hip replacement implant reduces risk of dislocation, study finds

A new study indicates that a newer type of artificial hip known as a 'modular dual mobility' implant could reduce the risk of dislocation in patients who need a revision surgery.

8h

 

ESA skaber månelandskab på 1.000 kvadratmeter i Köln

En ny testfacilitet ved det europæiske astronauttræningscenter skal give mulighed for at teste ny teknologi og nye materialer.

8h

 

New research questions the rate of climate change

Climate change may be occurring even faster than first thought.

8h

 

Brexit echo chambers on Twitter reflect in-person conversations, study finds

Social media echo chambers may reflect real-life conversations that are linked to the geographic locations of users, according to new research.

8h

 

From 'trivial issue' to primetime TV—a researcher's journey through plastic

It is a rare TV programme that has the instant impact of David Attenborough's Blue Planet II.

8h

 

Canada's Bombardier to cut 5,000 jobs in restructuring

Canadian aerospace and transportation manufacturer Bombardier on Thursday announced 5,000 global job cuts over the next year to 18 months in a bid to "streamline" the struggling firm.

8h

 

Molecular inhibition gets cells on the move

Osaka University researchers revealed that two molecules, PTEN and PIP3, mutually inhibit each other to ensure their exclusive distribution at opposite ends of motile cells. This polarized distribution results in the establishment of pseudopodia only at one cell end, providing the driving force for cell movement. Although discovered in a simple organism, the slime mold, this mechanism may also be

8h

 

Flipped classroom enhances learning outcomes in medical certificate education

The quality of medical certificates written by students of medicine was better when they were taught by using the flipped classroom approach instead of traditional lecturing. A randomly selected student from the flipped classroom group had an 85 percent probability to receive a better total score than a student from the traditional teaching group, according to a new study from the University of Ea

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8h

 

German court orders diesel bans in Cologne, Bonn

A German court Thursday ordered Cologne and Bonn to join a slew of cities in banning older diesels from its roads to combat air pollution, as the government struggled to reach a deal with carmakers on cleaning up the cars.

8h

 

CommScope, getting ready for 5G, spends $5.7B for Arris

Telecommunications equipment maker CommScope is paying $5.7 billion for Arris International as it prepares for the entrance of faster 5G service to the wireless market.

8h

 

Ryanair strikes deal with German cabin crew union

Ryanair has forged a preliminary labour agreement with German cabin crews, the low cost airline said Thursday, after strikes over employment contracts caused widespread disruption earlier this year.

8h

 

Scientists shine light on minute peptide changes affecting immune system

Human leukocyte antigen (HLA) molecules are a group of proteins that help the immune system identify foreign invaders such as viruses and bacteria and which impact a wide variety of clinical outcomes including infection and cancer. Now Monash Biomedicine Discovery Institute (BDI) researchers have made some important insights into the link between genetic diversity and the intricate changes in pept

8h

 

Biodiversity draws the ecotourism crowd

Nature—if you support it, ecotourists will come. Managed wisely, both can win.

8h

 

Florida monarch butterfly populations have dropped 80 percent since 2005

A 37-year survey of monarch populations in North Central Florida shows that caterpillars and butterflies have been declining since 1985 and have dropped by 80 percent since 2005.

8h

 

Bugs could be key indicator of reclaimed soil health

When assessing the health of reclaimed land, look for the bugs, says a University of Alberta land reclamation researcher.

8h

 

Unlocking the secrets of metal-insulator transitions

By using an X-ray technique available at the National Synchrotron Light Source II (NSLS-II), scientists found that the metal-insulator transition in the correlated material magnetite is a two-step process. The researchers from the University of California Davis published their paper in the journal Physical Review Letters. NSLS-II, a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science user facility l

8h

 

New integrated analytical approach reveals molecules involved in disease

Technological advances have enabled scientists to obtain massive amounts of data on different information-carrying molecules in cells and tissues, such as DNA, proteins and various forms of RNA. However, to date, it has been difficult to perform integrated analyses of such information to further our knowledge on the molecules and processes involved in the development of particular diseases.

8h

 

Astronomers witness David versus Goliath fight between galaxies

Astronomers have witnessed, in the finest detail yet, a brutal David-vs-Goliath fight between two nearby galaxies that are tearing chunks from each other and flinging them into the gaseous Magellanic Stream, a cosmic river of blood encircling our Milky Way.

8h

 

An eco-friendly, low-cost solution to wastewater treatment

Researchers developed a sustainable wastewater treatment system made from agricultural and industrial wastes.

8h

 

Driving autonomous cars off the beaten path

Autonomous vehicles can follow the general rules of American roads, recognizing traffic signals and lane markings, noticing crosswalks and other regular features of the streets. But they work only on well-marked roads that are carefully scanned and mapped in advance.

8h

 

Unique study shows how bats manoeuvre

For the first time, researchers have succeeded in directly measuring the aerodynamics of flying animals as they manoeuvre in the air. Previously, the upstroke of the wings was considered relatively insignificant compared to the powerful downstroke but, in a new study, biologists at Lund University in Sweden have observed that it is on the upstroke of the wings that bats often turn.

8h

 

A.I. teaches Minecraft players about architecture

Researchers have developed a Minecraft modification that uses artificial intelligence to help players improve their in-game architecture skills. Minecraft is a popular 3D video game where players build and navigate their own digital environments. The modification will tell players whether their buildings fit into certain architectural styles and offer ideas for how the structures could be improve

8h

 

Letters: ‘We Continued Our 70-Year-Long Unbroken String of Voting’

We Asked Readers: Voter turnout for midterm elections is traditionally mediocre, though there are signs of a swell this year. While some eligible voters sit out because they’ve become disillusioned with the political process , others become excluded from the process through what is tantamount to voter suppression. If you voted—or tried to—on Tuesday, tell us about your experience. Here’s how read

8h

 

CPR can save lives. Here’s how (and when) to do it.

DIY No saliva required. CPR is easy now—and you don't even have to do mouth-to-mouth. Here's how to assist fallen cardiac-arrest victims.

8h

 

How the 'Ghostly' Image of a Sunken Plane Wound Up on Google Earth

Don't worry, the plane is not really underwater.

8h

 

Micropumps as a platform for understanding chemically propelled micromotors

The development of self-propelled micro- and nanomachines able to emulate the intricate inner workings of the human body and/or the natural environment has captured the imagination of an ever expanding research community since the turn of the millennium. It is envisioned that these devices will play an important role in nanomedicine and environmental remediation.

8h

 

Scientist gets the dirt on what could be the planet's oldest soil

UO geologist Greg Retallack has dirt on his hands—and at 3.7 billion years old, it might be some of the oldest dirt on Earth.

8h

 

Monash scientists shine light on minute peptide changes affecting immune system

Researchers have made important insights into the link between genetic diversity and the intricate changes in peptides bound to human leukocyte antigen molecules — which help the immune system identify foreign invaders such as viruses and bacteria. Their findings have important implications for understanding how the immune system recognises infected cells in different individuals.

9h

 

Breast milk & babies' saliva shape oral microbiome

Newborn breastfed babies' saliva combines with breastmilk to release antibacterial compounds that help to shape the bacterial communities (microbiota) in babies' mouths, biomedical scientists have found.

9h

 

Researchers closer to gonorrhea vaccine after exhaustive analysis of proteins

In a study of proteins historic in its scope, researchers have pushed closer both to a vaccine for gonorrhea and toward understanding why the bacteria that cause the disease are so good at fending off antimicrobial drugs.

9h

 

Long-term study shows that HIV-2 is deadlier than previously thought

A study shows that HIV-2 is more pathogenic than previously demonstrated. The new findings indicate that early treatment should be applied to all patients with HIV, not only to those with HIV-1.

9h

 

Disrupting communication in infectious bacteria

Chemists report that they have inhibited the biosynthesis of a bacterial signal and, as a result, blocked the infectious properties of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, the most common germ found in health care facilities.

9h

 

Nasal delivery of weight-loss hormone eases breathing problems in sleeping mice

Experimenting with mice, Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers have added to evidence that a hormone best known for helping regulate hunger and body weight might also ease breathing problems experienced during sleep more effectively when given through the nose.

9h

 

Patients use only a fraction of opioids given after surgery — but prescription size affects use

The first large study of surgical opioid prescribing and patient usage shows the potential for reduced amounts and the importance of safe disposal of unused pills.

9h

 

Learning music early can make your child a better reader

Neuroscience has found a clear relationship between music and language acquisition. Put simply, learning music in the early years of schooling can help children learn to read.

9h

 

Tiny titanium barrier halts big problem in fuel-producing solar cells

What if we could turn sunlight and water into fuel? That's the idea behind certain types of solar cells. Known as dye-sensitized photoelectrochemical cells, these devices use the energy contained in sunlight to split water into hydrogen and oxygen. Hydrogen itself can be used as a fuel, or it can be used to make other types of fuels. The problem? The conditions necessary to split water tend to dam

9h

 

Automated feminine hygiene disposal for developing communities

The lack of safe and discreet menstrual hygiene options contributes to lost workplace productivity and missed schooling for millions of women and girls around the world. A technical solution called S.H.E. strives to address this pressing need.

9h

 

LASSO case study—tapping ARM's Doppler lidars

Cumulus clouds, low and rain-free, get their name from the Latin word for "heap." With flat bases and puffy upper surfaces, such clouds appear to bubble into the sky, turning grey at the bottom and brilliant white at the top.

9h

 

A wealth tax forces those responsible for climate change to pay for it

The costs of climate change are mounting. A wealth tax would provide funds to address both the climate crisis and poverty.

9h

 

Very heavy elements deliver more electrons

Actinides, a series of 15 radioactive elements, are vital to medicine, energy, and national defense. Scientists examined two exceedingly rare actinides, berkelium and californium. These elements are at the extreme end of what is possible to synthesize in more-than-atom amounts for chemical study. These elements are only available in tiniest amounts. The scientists showed that the elements can lose

9h

 

How Both Parties Lost the Texas Senate Race

On Tuesday, Texas voters did as Texas voters historically do: They sent the full slate of Republican statewide candidates back to office. Those candidates faced varying degrees of difficulty—Senator Ted Cruz crawled his way to victory; Governor Greg Abbott and Attorney General Ken Paxton enjoyed more of a brisk sail—but the result was the same. The Republican Party maintained its grip on the stat

9h

 

How massive solar eruptions 'probably' detonated dozens of US sea mines

An extraordinary account of the impact space weather had on military operations in Vietnam in 1972 was found buried in the US Navy archives, according to a newly published article in Space Weather.

9h

 

Most complete study on Europe's greatest hadrosaur site published

The Basturs Poble site is what is known in English as a bone bed, a geological stratum containing a great number of fossils. The stratum dates back some 70 million years. It is the only one to have been found in Europe exclusively containing hadrosaur remains. The excavations conducted during the past 10 years have yielded approximately 1000 fossils. The remains are disjointed and possibly belong

9h

 

What do metastatic cancer cells have in common with sharks?

IBS-CSLM researchers in collaboration with researchers from several international institutes in the US, the Netherlands, and Poland have reported that when cancer cells become invasive (metastatic), they start behaving in 'predatory' ways. Metastatic cancer cells differ from their non-metastatic counterparts not only in their genetics, but also in their moving strategy: they spread more rapidly an

9h

 

Why modest goals are so appealing

Study finds that people feel it's easier to achieve a small incremental goal than to maintain the status quo.

9h

 

Combination chemotherapy and immunotherapy effective in Phase II leukemia study

A combination of the standard-of-care chemotherapy drug known as azacitidine, with nivolumab, an immune checkpoint inhibitor, demonstrated an encouraging response rate and overall survival in patients with relapsed or refractory acute myeloid leukemia (AML) according to findings from a Phase II study at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center.

9h

 

Overlæger: Kommuner har ikke de rette sundhedstilbud

I en undersøgelse blandt overlæger på landets sygehuse svarer en stor andel, at de oplever, at der er kommuner, der ikke har de sundhedstilbud, som patienterne har brug for.

9h

 

‘Like’ resulterer i redegørelse af koncerndirektørs ytringsfrihed

Regionsrådsformand i Region Hovedstaden igangsætter redegørelse, efter Svend Hartling ‘liker’ et kritisk tweet om bevarelsen af akutklinikkerne i hovedstadsområdet.

9h

 

Bats versus dolphins – the ultimate battle of sonar systems

Active sensors are incorporated into a number of technologies, such as meteorology devices and self-driving cars, and use the echo from sound, radio or light waves to locate objects. But despite nearly a century of development, these active sensing technologies still fail to replicate the performance of sonars (sound waves) used in the biological world by dolphins and bats for echolocation.

9h

 

Enhanced power factor in transparent thermoelectric nanowire materials

A research group led by Professor Yoshiaki Nakamura of Osaka University successfully developed a methodology for enhancing thermoelectric power factor while decreasing thermal conductivity. By introducing ZnO nanowires into ZnO films, the thermoelectric power factor became three times greater than that of ZnO film without ZnO nanowires.

9h

 

Analysing graffiti helps to understand the Egyptian uprising of 2011

How are the protesters who were killed in connection with the Egyptian uprising of 2011 depicted? A thesis in religious studies has shown that an analysis of the cultural production surrounding the 2011 protests in Cairo and their aftermath—which included graffiti and murals—can assist in the understanding of the uprising.

9h

 

Aging a flock of stars in the Wild Duck Cluster

Do star clusters harbor many generations of stars or just one? Scientists have long searched for an answer and, thanks to the University of Arizona's MMT telescope, found one in the Wild Duck Cluster, where stars spin at different speeds, disguising their common age.

9h

 

Producing four top quarks at once to explore the unknown

For several decades, particle physicists have been trying to better understand nature at the smallest distances by colliding particles at the highest energies. While the Standard Model of particle physics has successfully explained most of the results produced by experiments, many phenomena remain baffling. Thus, new particles, forces or more general concepts must exist and – if the history of par

9h

 

Scientists extend mechanism for cracking biochemical code

Since the time of ancient Egypt, humans have been making and breaking secret codes to retain and gain critical information. Human life itself is based upon a genetic code of DNA or RNA sequences which cells read and translate into proteins—the building blocks of life. Recent scientific discoveries have revealed the body's mechanisms for transcribing DNA regulated by the "histone code"—different ch

9h

 

DNA fragments reveal the variety of species in rivers

Bits of genetic material in rivers make it possible to detect the organisms living in them – without having to collect these and examine them under the microscope. Researchers at Eawag, the ETH and the EPFL have now developed a computer model that, with the help of single DNA measurements, even simulates exactly where and how often the species are present in bodies of water.

9h

 

Molecular inhibition gets cells on the move

Researchers at Osaka University show how the mutual inhibition of two molecules results in their localization at opposite ends of cells, acting as a trigger for the formation of appendages at one cell end that makes directional cell movement possible

9h

 

Radars, Cameras, and Lidar: How Self-Driving Cars See the Road

Autonomous vehicles use several technologies to create their maps of the world, and (hopefully) not run over humans.

9h

 

Microsoft Surface Laptop 2 (2018) Review: Impressive Features, Design

Microsoft’s ultralight PC is back with faster processing and longer, 10-hour battery life.

9h

 

A DJI Bug Exposed Drone Photos and User Data

Researchers found that they could compromise DJI's single sign-on tokens, similar to the issue behind Facebook's massive breach this September.

9h

 

Securing IoT connections by edge computing

A new reconfigurable security solution outperforms currently available ones in protecting Internet of things (IoT) devices and data by exploiting edge computing.

9h

 

Pilot-scale plant to extract rare earth elements in heart of coal country

Americans use rare earth elements (REEs) every day—without knowing it. In fact, they are crucial to society. Rick Honaker, professor of mining engineering at the University of Kentucky, knows all about these fascinating elements and the modern electronics they make possible.

9h

 

Høj elpris holder liv i pensionsmodne møller

Næsten halvdelen af de i alt 4.224 ­landvindmøller i Danmark er over 20 år gamle og kører ufortrødent videre med renoverede gearkasser, reparerede vinger og helt nye styre­systemer.

9h

 

Biodiversity draws the ecotourism crowd

Nature — if you support it, ecotourists will come. Managed wisely, both can win.The balancing act of protecting and fostering biodiversity with hordes of tourists in pristine nature parks is a global challenge.There are pathways to having it all — protected areas with a rich variety of animals and plants and thriving tourism. In fact, the better the biodiversity, the more tourists will visit. Wh

9h

 

Cell behavior, once shrouded in mystery, is revealed in new light

Previously, in order to study cell membranes, researchers would often have to freeze samples. The proteins within these samples would not behave like they would in a normal biological environment. Now, using an atomic force microscope, researchers can observe individual proteins in an unfrozen sample — acting in a normal biological environment. This new observation tool could help scientists bett

9h

 

Otago study calls for sugar tax

People who drink sugary beverages are more likely to eat fast food and confectionery and less likely to make healthy dietary choices, University of Otago research has found.

9h

 

A buzz-worthy surprise during the total solar eclipse

Previous research conducted on bee behavior notes that bees commonly fly slower at dusk and return to their colonies at night. In this study, researchers found that while bees completely stopped buzzing during the totality of a solar eclipse, they continued to fly during the periods of reduced light that occur in the phases of a partial eclipse.

9h

 

Study finds new single-dose antibiotic safe and effective for uncomplicated gonorrhea

A phase 2 clinical trial led by Stephanie N. Taylor, MD, Professor of Medicine and Microbiology in the Section of Infectious Diseases at LSU Health New Orleans School of Medicine, has found that a new antibiotic effectively treats uncomplicated urogenital and rectal gonorrhea infections in a single oral dose.

9h

 

Body clock researchers prevent liver cancer growth in mice

The body's internal clock could play a critical role in the fight against certain types of liver cancer, according to a preclinical study by scientists from The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth). The results were published recently in the journal Nature Communications.

9h

 

Hunt for interesting metabolites with the antiSMASH database

Scientists who hunt for interesting bacterial metabolites using the online tool antiSMASH now have the opportunity to use an antiSMASH database with pre-calculated results of nearly 25,000 bacterial genomes. This database will ease the discovery of antibiotics, pesticides, and anti-cancer drugs.

9h

 

Artificial sensor mimics human sense of touch

A team of researchers have developed an artificial tactile sensor that mimics the ability of human skin to detect surface information, such as shapes, patterns and structures. This may be one step closer to making electronic devices and robots that can perceive sensations such as roughness and smoothness.

9h

 

How to help the environment: Turn cooking oil into renewable fuels

Greenhouse gases and plastic waste are the targets of a USC Dornsife chemistry startup.

9h

 

Opening access to explore the synthetic chemistry of neptunium

Leftovers from nuclear reactors contain the element neptunium. To safely store the waste, scientists need to know more about how to control neptunium's chemistry. Knowing the stability of different oxidation states is central to chemical control. The +3 oxidation state is generally inaccessible in aqueous (water-based) solutions. Researchers devised an easy way to access neptunium in the +3 oxidat

9h

 

Research shows cities take long road to recycling

Among municipalities recycling and reusing construction waste, including gravel, concrete, sand and asphalt, Ontario has its 'leaders' and its 'laggards,' explained Kate Graham, a Political Science professor at King's and Brescia University Colleges.

9h

 

Revealing the inner working of magnetic materials

Björn Alling, researcher in theoretical physics at Linköping University, has, together with his colleagues, completed the task given to him by the Swedish Research Council in the autumn of 2014: Find out what happens inside magnetic materials at high temperatures.

9h

 

Embryos remember the chemicals that they encounter

We all start out as a clump of identical cells. As these cells divide and multiply, they gradually take on distinct identities, acquiring the traits necessary to form, for instance, muscle tissue, bone, or nerves. A recent study from Rockefeller scientists offers new insight into how these cellular identities are cultivated over the course of development.

9h

 

Engagement i ledelse – og et begrænset antal patienter – sikrer kvalitet i praksis

Praksislægers brug af egen kvalitetsrapport afhænger ifølge et nyt dansk studie i høj grad af deres engagement i ledelse. Jo mere de engagerer sig, jo tættere følger de deres data. Det kan løfte kvaliteten – som dog bliver truet, hvis antallet af patienter bliver for højt.

9h

 

CT-scanning af rygere kan reducere dødelighed ved lungekræft

Et nyt, europæisk studie viser, at CT-scanning af rygere kan sænke dødeligheden ved lungecancer. Det er længe ventede resultater, siger professor.

9h

 

Otte læger står til at blive fyret i Region Sjælland

Seks overlæger og to yngre læger er indstillet til afskedigelse i Region Sjælland. En yngre læge er indstillet til at gå ned i tid.

9h

 

Exploiting epigenetic variation for plant breeding

Epigenetic changes can bring about new traits without altering the sequence of genes. This may allow plants to respond quicker to changes in their environment. Plant biologists at the University of Zurich have now demonstrated that epigenetic variation is also subject to selection and can be inherited. This could expand the possibilities for crop breeding.

9h

 

The argument from cyberspace for eliminating nuclear weapons

At the height of the Cold War in 1982, American psychiatrist Robert Jay Lifton argued that the "central existential fact of the nuclear age is vulnerability." That warning predated the proliferation of computers into almost every aspect of modern life, including nuclear weapons.

9h

 

Florida monarch butterfly populations have dropped 80 percent since 2005

A 37-year survey of monarch populations in North Central Florida shows that caterpillars and butterflies have been declining since 1985 and have dropped by 80 percent since 2005.

9h

 

The Democrats' Deep-South Strategy Was a Winner After All

It would be easy to look at what the Democrats tried to do in the Deep South and forget about the incredible degree of difficulty. In Florida, Andrew Gillum aimed to become the state’s first Democratic governor in 20 years, and the first black governor in the state’s history. In Georgia, Stacey Abrams aimed to break the GOP’s monopolistic hold on power, and sought to become her state’s first blac

9h

 

Are organisms basically living machines?

Scientists are increasingly interested in the prospect of solving a range of fundamental problems facing our civilisation by designing and reconstructing organisms.

10h

 

Learning from gorillas to save killer whales

In 2018, the southern resident killer whale population in the Pacific Northwest's Salish Sea was at its lowest ever. The world watched in September as an orca named Scarlet, or J50, wasted away and died, leaving just 74 of her kind left. Some wondered if this was "What extinction looks like."

10h

 

Researchers investigate complex molecular structures

The job of hemoglobin seems to be quite simple: It transports oxygen molecules through the bloodstream. But this only works so well because the hemoglobin molecule is extremely complex. The same applies to chlorophyll, which converts sunlight into energy for plants.

10h

 

Smallholder clearing found to be dominant reason for forest loss in the Congo Basin

A team of researchers from the University of Maryland and the State University of New York has found that smallholder clearing is the dominant driver of forest loss in the Congo Basin. In their paper published in the journal Science Advances, the group describes the techniques they used to assess forest loss in the area over the period from 2000 to 2014 and what they found.

10h

 

Stretchy solar cells a step closer

Organic solar cells that can be painted or printed on surfaces are increasingly efficient, and now show promise for incorporation into applications like clothing that also require them to be flexible.

10h

 

CRISPR solves cotton bollworm resistance mystery

Scientists have used genomics and gene editing to discover a genetic mutation that makes cotton bollworm caterpillars—one of the world’s most destructive cotton pests—resistant to genetically engineered cotton. The method may signal a new era in efforts to promote more sustainable pest control. Cotton, corn, and soybeans have been genetically engineered to produce pest-killing proteins from the w

10h

 

Researchers simplify tiny structures' construction drip by drip

Popping the top on house paint usually draws people to look inside the can. But Princeton researchers have turned their gaze upward, to the underside of the lid, where it turns out that pattern of droplets could inspire new ways to make microscopically small structures.

10h

 

Image: Recovery of the test Orion capsule in the Pacific Ocean

On Nov. 1, 2018, the USS John P. Murtha recovered the test version of the Orion capsule at sunset in the Pacific Ocean.

10h

 

Short stature in rainforest hunter-gatherers may be linked to cardiac adaptation

African and Asian rainforest hunter-gatherers share short stature, and now an international team of researchers has shown that this is an example of convergent adaptation that may also be linked to changes in cardiac development pathways.

10h

 

10h

 

For Conservatives Like Me, Tuesday Couldn’t Have Gone Better

It’s hard to tell how large they are exactly, because Twitter is not the real world, but it does seem safe to say there are significant factions in the country that believe we are living in a revolutionary moment. I don’t mean to evoke here lurid fantasies of a hot civil war. I have in mind instead the Jacksonian revolution, or the many revolutions of the New Deal—punctuations in our punctuated e

10h

 

Republicans Must Choose Between Trump and the Rule of Law

After Wednesday, elected officials in the Republican Party should have no doubt that Donald Trump will force them to choose in coming days, weeks, and months between loyalty to him and loyalty to the rule of law, between the public’s right to the truth and Trump’s efforts to hide it. The president began the day with an extraordinary threat on Twitter: “If the Democrats think they are going to was

10h

 

One million years of precipitation history of the monsoon reconstructed

With its wind and precipitation patterns, the South Asian Monsoon influences the lives of several billion people. Recent studies indicate that its drivers are more complex than previously assumed. Scientists from the GEOMAR Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel have now published a reconstruction of precipitation over the eastern Indian Ocean over the past one million years in the international

10h

 

Targeted radiation provides option for kids with difficult-to-treat liver cancer

Targeted tumor radiation provides a feasible treatment option for children with difficult-to-treat liver cancer, according to a new study published today in the journal Pediatric Blood and Cancer.

10h

 

NASA is advising Yuri Milner on his private mission to Enceladus

Saturn's moon Enceladus might host life, and Russian billionaire Yuri Milner is planning the first private mission to deep space to find out more

10h

 

Double the risk of death! The problem with headline health statistics

The way in which a statistic is presented can entirely change how alarming it sounds. And too often, both newspapers and scientific journals choose the most alarming, but least informative, way

10h

 

DNA evidence could soon tell cops your age, whether you smoke, and what you ate for breakfast

Health Epigenetic markers on DNA can reveal far more intricate details about someone than current techniques. Forensic scientists and law enforcement agencies around the world think leveraging epigenetics could add key tools to the investigative arsenal. They’re working to…

10h

 

Thanksgiving Tip: Butterball's Turkey Talk-Line Adds Alexa

This Thanksgiving season, the Butterball hotline adds Amazon Alexa to its turkey toolkit, among other new features.

10h

 

Image of the Day: Shark Skin

Fish scales follow a model famed computer scientist Alan Turing developed to describe patterns observed in other animals’ feathers, spines, and scales.

10h

 

Amazon Was Never Going to Choose Detroit

After a months-long, high-stakes, razzle-dazzle, headline-grabbing beauty pageant, Amazon is reportedly planning not to create a second headquarters in a hard-up or overlooked region, as many had hoped, but instead to put large offices in two places along the prosperous northeast corridor: Long Island City in Queens, New York, and Crystal City in Arlington County, Virginia. If made, it is a decis

10h

 

How a Landlocked Aquarium Gets Its Seawater

Chicago is 800 miles from the nearest ocean, so when the world’s largest aquarium opened there in 1930, its director decided, logically, that the ocean must come to Chicago. The Shedd Aquarium sent a series of railway tank cars down to Key West, Florida. There, they siphoned up a million gallons of ocean water for Chicago’s “ magnificent marble home for fish .” Visitors in the 1930s were greeted

10h

 

The Confounding Truth About Frederick Douglass

It is difficult to imagine a more remarkable story of self-determination and advancement than the life of Frederick Douglass. Emblematic of the depths from which he rose is the pall of uncertainty that shrouded his origins. For a long time he believed that he had been born in 1817. Then, in 1877, during a visit to a former master in Maryland, Douglass was told that he had actually been born in 18

10h

 

Radiation therapy advances extend, improve lives of patients with anal cancer, studies find

Two recent studies find advances in radiation therapy are helping to prolong or improve the lives of people with anal cancer, including those whose cancer has advanced to stage IV. Both studies were published in the International Journal of Radiation Oncology * Biology * Physics (Red Journal), the flagship scientific journal of the American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO).

10h

 

NASA Figures Out Where Weirdly Square Iceberg Was Born

NASA went back and looked at how that weirdly square iceberg formed. What they found surprised them.

11h

 

Image: Proba-V images the Yucatán peninsula

ESA's Proba-V minisatellite images the verdant Yucatán peninsula, once home to the Maya civilization and the site of the impact believed to have doomed the dinosaurs.

11h

 

Cosmic detective work: Why we care about space rocks

The entire history of human existence is a tiny blip in our solar system's 4.5-billion-year history. No one was around to see planets forming and undergoing dramatic changes before settling in their present configuration. In order to understand what came before us—before life on Earth and before Earth itself—scientists need to hunt for clues to that mysterious distant past.

11h

 

EU court backs Dyson on vacuum cleaner energy tests

An EU court ruled Thursday that Brussels regulators are wrong to test the energy efficiency of vacuum cleaners using empty dust bags, in a victory for British manufacturer Dyson.

11h

 

Dating apps use artificial intelligence to help search for love

Forget swiping though endless profiles. Dating apps are using artificial intelligence to suggest where to go on a first date, recommend what to say and even find a partner who looks like your favourite celebrity.

11h

 

There’s a dark side to self-control. Here’s why you should loosen up

Willpower is the secret of success – or so we've been told. But too much can be bad for the body and mind. The trick is to know when to give in to temptation

11h

 

Ancient tribes of Scotland learned to write after contact with Romans

The Picts lived in what is now Scotland 1700 to 1100 years ago – and new evidence suggests the enigmatic carvings they left behind are Roman-inspired writing

11h

 

Ny kinesisk rumstation er et 17 meter langt himmelsk palads

Kina har afsløret en model af den rumstation, som efter planen skal være i kredsløb om Jorden i 2022.

11h

 

Video: ESA's future Lagrange mission to monitor the sun

Space weather describes the changing environment throughout the Solar System, driven by the energetic and unpredictable nature of our sun. Solar wind, solar flares and Coronal Mass Ejections can result in geomagetic storms on Earth, potentially damaging satellites in space and the technologies that rely on them, as well as infrastructure on the ground.

11h

 

Opinion: Methods for protecting England's coastal communities 'not fit for purpose'

In October 2018, a stark report suggested that current methods being used to protect England's coastal communities are 'not fit for purpose'.

11h

 

Researchers generate plants with enhanced drought resistance without penalizing growth

Extreme drought is one of the effects of climate change that is already occurring. This year, the decrease in rainfall and the abnormally hot temperatures in northern and eastern Europe have caused large losses in cereals and potato crops and in other horticultural species. Experts have long warned that to ensure food security, it is becoming necessary to use plant varieties that are productive in

11h

 

Clever Tech Keeps America's Disabled Farmers on the Job

One in five American farmers has some sort of disability, and they rely on a cornucopia of tools from services like AgrAbility and Breaking New Ground to keep putting food on everyone's table.

11h

 

Sandwich structure of nanocrystals as quantum light source

Excited photo-emitters can cooperate and radiate simultaneously, a phenomenon called superfluorescence. Researchers from Empa and ETH Zurich, together with colleagues from IBM Research Zurich, have recently been able to create this effect with long-range ordered nanocrystal superlattices. This discovery could enable future developments in LED lighting, quantum sensing, quantum communication and fu

11h

 

Quantum systems: Same, but different

Remarkable rules have been detected in the apparent chaos of disequilibrium processes. Different systems behave identically in many ways, if they belong to the same "universality class." This means that experiments can be carried out with quantum systems that are easy to handle in order to obtain precise information about systems that cannot be directly studied in the experiment—such as the Big Ba

11h

 

Interdisciplinary interactions inspire new discovery

Following an interdisciplinary approach, researchers in Japan have found new catalysts using unique Heusler alloys. Most studies on catalysts have been conducted by researchers in chemistry. However, catalysts also relate to other research fields. For example, materials science, including metallurgy, also involves making and analyzing catalysts, and solid state physics is necessary to understand e

11h

 

Far fewer lakes below the East Antarctic Ice Sheet than previously believed

AWI researchers recently assessed subglacial lakes detected by satellite, and found very little water. But if that's the case, what is the source of the East Antarctic Ice Sheet's massive ice streams?

11h

 

Graphene takes a step toward renewable fuel

Using the energy from the sun and graphene applied to the surface of cubic silicon carbide, researchers at Linköping University, Sweden, are working to develop a method to convert water and carbon dioxide to the renewable energy of the future. They have now taken an important step toward this goal, reporting a method that makes it possible to produce graphene with several layers in a tightly contr

11h

 

Nancy Pelosi Keeps Baseball Bats in Her Office

In Nancy Pelosi’s office, steps away from the House floor, there’s a mahogany cabinet that encloses four separate television screens. They’re tuned to the cable-news networks and C- SPAN at all times. Leaning against that cabinet is a stack of baseball bats. It’s the bats, not the screens, that tell the story of Pelosi’s approach to leadership, including maintaining her own in the Democratic cauc

11h

 

The Real Metaphor of the ‘Blue Wave’

One report announced the results of the 2018 midterms like this : “Democratic ‘Blue Wave’ Washes Over House as Republicans Keep Senate.” Another shared the results like this : “Democrats Take Control of House as ‘Blue Wave’ Wipes Out Republicans . ” But then there was this : “Democrats Seize U.S. House But Trump Averts ‘Blue Wave.’” And also this : “The Blue Wave Ran Into Trump’s Red Wall.” And a

11h

 

The GOP Just Lost Its Most Important Climate Moderates

The 2018 midterm election dramatically shrank the small group of House Republicans who have painted themselves as moderates on climate change. At most, only about two dozen Republicans in the next House of Representatives will have expressed any interest in taking federal action to stop climate change. (Votes are still being tallied in several close races as of this writing.) At least 18 district

11h

 

The Questionable Year of the Teacher Politician

Even before the election, pundits were calling 2018 “ the year of the teacher .” The Christian Science Monitor and the Associated Press both said an unprecedented number of educators sought political office this year. “The teacher strikes pushed a record number of educators to run for office,” wrote Vox , in an article noting that “more than 1,000 teachers will be on the ballots across the countr

11h

 

DigiTech: Nyt medie om digitalisering i det offentlige

Ingeniøren går nu helt tæt på digitaliseringen og de vigtigste it-projekter i den offentlige sektor. Vi stiller skarpt på de største udfordringer og de bedste løsninger.

11h

 

Vand og offentlig digitalisering: Ingeniøren lancerer to nye medier samtidig

Ny satsning på PRO-medier går hurtigere end ventet med to nye medier i november. »Vi må og skal være mediet for teknologerne,« siger chefredaktør.

11h

 

WaterTech: Nyt medie om teknologi og vandets kredsløb

Ingeniøren går nu tæt på vandsektoren med det nye medie WaterTech. Vi stiller skarpt på udfordringer og løsninger.

11h

 

How to Engineer Biology

Billion-dollar bridges rarely fail—whereas billion-dollar drug failures are routine — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

11h

 

China’s giant transmission grid could be the key to cutting climate emissions

But are the country’s next-generation power lines a clean-power play or a global power move?

11h

 

How Dad's Stresses Get Passed Along to Offspring

Mouse studies show tiny intercellular pods convey to sperm a legacy of a father’s hard knocks in life — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

11h

 

Dansk forskningsprojekt vil printe bygninger i flere etager

Bedre armering, simuleringsværktøjer, dokumentation og standardiserede regnemetoder skal gøre det muligt at printe etageboliger og betonelementer om få år

12h

 

A guide to DIY activism, from the creator of the Pussyhat

Krista Suh founded the Pussyhat Project , a bold and powerful visual statement that saw handcrafted pink beanies on thousands of heads at women's marches across the world in January of 2017 through to today. Suh advises aspiring activists not to underestimate themselves and the unique talents that can help them launch a big movement. "What are your skills, what do you actually have fun doing?" sh

12h

 

Jon Tester Wins in Montana, Despite Trump’s Best Efforts

Before he arrived at the balloon-decorated Holiday Inn in Great Falls, Montana, for his Election Night watch party, Jon Tester was 80 miles away on his farm in Big Sandy, taking the engine out of his ’86 Chevy pickup. When the race was finally called on Wednesday morning, the engine still had a blown head gasket—but the 62-year-old farmer and two-term Democratic senator had managed to get his pol

12h

 

Oprah, Cousin Pookie, and the Long Tradition of Shaming Black Voters

It’s hard not to listen to Oprah. The media magnate has spent decades guiding rapt audiences toward one broad, secular nirvana. Live your best life , her show and her post-television mantra became. In whispers and in proclamations, the mogul has championed the joys and comforts of mindfulness-driven behavior. But at a campaign event last week for Stacey Abrams, the Democratic candidate in Georgia

12h

 

How YouTube’s Algorithm Really Works

Of all the videos posted to YouTube, there is one that the platform recommends more than any other right now, according to a Pew Research study published Wednesday. That video is called “Bath Song | +More Nursery Rhymes & Kids Songs – Cocomelon (ABCkidTV).” YouTube recommended it more than 650 times among the 696,468 suggestions that Pew tracked, substantially more than the second-place finisher:

12h

 

Britisk datatilsyn: Foruroligende disrespekt for vælgeres privacy blandt politiske partier

Både partier, sociale medier og datavirksomheder er kommet under luppen i den britiske informationskommissærs undersøgelse af, hvordan persondata bliver brugt til politiske formål.

12h

 

Regeringen vil give fordele til plug-in hybrider, der overskrider CO2-grænse

Plug-in hybridbiler, der ikke lever op til regeringens egne definitioner for lavemissionsbiler, må stadig nyde godt af fordelene til grønne biler i klima- og luftudspillet. Det mindsker klimaeffekten, lyder det fra ekspert.

12h

 

Scientists Unveil Ancient Sea Monsters Found In Angola

Almost 100 million years ago, when the South Atlantic Ocean was young, giant reptiles prowled the seas. Scientists have found a trove of these ancient creatures in the African nation of Angola. (Image credit: Madeleine Cook/NPR)

13h

 

Biomimetics: The chemical tricks of our blood

Biomolecules such as hemoglobin or chlorophyll are difficult to study. It is worth investigating similar but simpler structures in the lab. Unexpected behaviour has now been found in phthalocyanines, whose molecular ring structure closely resembles the crucial sections of hemoglobin or chlorophyll. Their center can be switched into different states with the help of green light, which affects their

13h

 

One million years of precipitation history of the monsoon reconstructed

With its wind and precipitation patterns, the South Asian Monsoon influences the lives of several billion people. Recent studies indicate that its drivers are more complex than previously assumed. Scientists from the GEOMAR Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel have now published a reconstruction of precipitation over the eastern Indian Ocean over the past one million years in the international

13h

 

Researchers generate plants with enhanced drought resistance without penalizing growth

Extreme drought is one of the effects of climate change that is already being perceived. A team led by the researcher at the Centre for Research in Agricultural Genomics (CRAG) Ana Caño-Delgado has obtained plants with increased drought resistance by modifying the signaling of the plant steroid hormones, known as brassinosteroids. The study, published in Nature Communications, is the first to find

13h

 

Gene signature discovery may predict response to immune therapy

Scientists led by Dr. Daniel De Carvalho at Princess Margaret Cancer Centre have discovered a gene signature biomarker that may predict which patients will respond — or not — to immune therapy.

13h

 

Marine Protected Areas overlook a large fraction of biodiversity hotspots

Around 75 percent of marine biodiversity in Finnish waters is left unprotected, reveals a performance assessment of the country's current Marine Protected Area network. Increasing protection by just 1 percent in the most biodiverse areas could double conservation of the most important species. In addition to identifying areas of high conservation value, the methodology can also be used in ecosyste

13h

 

Marine Protected Areas overlook a large fraction of biodiversity hotspots

Current marine protected areas (MPAs) leave almost three-quarters of ecologically and functionally important species unprotected, concludes a new performance assessment of the Finnish MPA network. Published in Frontiers in Marine Science, the study finds the MPAs were designated with little knowledge of local marine biodiversity—and that increasing existing networks by just 1% in ecologically most

13h

 

An American Accused of Joining ISIS Is Free, and a Bigger Story Is Beginning

A 13-month legal saga ended quietly last week when an American citizen accused of joining ISIS went free. For more than a year, the U.S. military had held him in Iraq without charging him. At one point, the government offered to release him somewhere in Syria with a cellphone and a few thousand dollars, an outcome his lawyers said would amount to a death sentence. In the end, he was transferred t

13h

 

Inflammation sætter insulinproduktionen på pause

Når man bliver overvægtig og udvikler diabetes, går kroppen i en kronisk steril betændelsestilstand….

14h

 

ESA-direktør: »At sende den første europæer mod Månen bliver et historisk øjeblik«

David Parker er chef for udforskning og robot-teknologi hos ESA. Han glæder sig som et lille barn til at få Europa til Månen.

14h

 

Nissan first-half profit slumps on rising costs

Japanese automaker Nissan on Thursday logged a 10.9-percent drop in net profit for the six months to September due to a decline in global sales and rising material costs.

14h

 

Tesla names board director to replace MuskTesla Denholm Elon Musk

Tesla said it has appointed Robyn Denholm of the Australian telecoms company Telstra as board director after Elon Musk resigned from the post.

14h

 

Live-streaming a marshland for fun—and science

If a tree falls in the Tidmarsh Wildlife Sanctuary, it doesn't matter if there's no one around. You can hear it anyway.

14h

 

Philippines marks five years since its deadliest storm

Philippine survivors of Super Typhoon Haiyan recalled their terror and loss while gathered Thursday at a mass grave for thousands killed five years ago in the country's worst storm on record.

15h

 

Toshiba slashes 7,000 jobs, downgrades profit outlook

The boss of struggling Toshiba said Thursday he would cut 7,000 jobs over the next five years as the Japanese engineering firm pulled out of foreign investments and downgraded its annual profit forecasts.

15h

 

NewsCorp sees higher profits as subscriptions rise

Profits rose in the past quarter at Rupert Murdoch's News Corp, led by gains in digital subscriptions at the Wall Street Journal and newspapers in Britain and Australia, the company said Wednesday.

15h

 

Magic Medicine review – making the case for mushrooms

This engaging documentary explores controversial research into the treatment of depression with magic mushrooms An intriguing, inconclusive film about an intriguing, inconclusive drug trial. Monty Yates’s documentary shows the work of Dr Robin Carhart-Harris at Imperial College London: after years of bureaucratic wrangling, he got permission to conduct research into the possibility that psilocybi

15h

 

Watchdog approves landmark Australian media merger

A landmark merger between Australian broadcaster Nine Entertainment and venerable newspaper group Fairfax won regulatory approval Thursday, clearing the way for the creation of a media giant across television, print, video streaming and digital.

15h

 

Lions suspected in drowning of 400 buffaloes in Botswana

More than 400 buffaloes believed to have been chased by lions drowned in a river in northern Bostwana this week, the government said.

15h

 

Bolivian observatory collects data as glaciers melt

The snow appears to be pristine on the Andean peaks that loom above Bolivia's capital, but even here ash and smog reach up to a remote plateau that is home to the world's highest atmospheric observatory.

15h

 

Siemens profit falls on severance, tax costs; dividend up

Industrial equipment and technology company Siemens AG says net profit fell 46 percent in the most recent quarter as the company had expenses for severance and higher tax costs.

15h

 

Samsung folding screen lets smartphone open into tabletSamsung Android IF

Samsung on Wednesday showed off a folding screen that lets a smartphone open into a tablet, heralding it as the future for portable devices.

15h

 

Toxic smog cloaks New Delhi morning after Diwali festivities

Toxic smog shrouded the Indian capital as air quality plummeted to hazardous levels Thursday after tens of thousands of people set off a multitude of firecrackers to celebrate the major Hindu festival of Diwali.

15h

 

Report: Google planning big New York City expansion

Google is planning a major expansion in New York City, according to a report in the Wall Street Journal .

15h

 

Climate change causing more severe wildfires, larger insect outbreaks in temperate forests

A warmer, drier climate is expected is increase the likelihood of larger-scale forest disturbances such as wildfires, insect outbreaks, disease and drought, according to a new study co-authored by a Portland State University professor.

15h

 

Dry conditions may have helped a new type of plant gain a foothold on Earth

In the dramatically changing conditions of ancient Earth, organisms had to evolve new strategies to keep up. From the mid-Oligocene, roughly 30 million years ago, to the mid-to-late Miocene, about 5 million years ago, carbon dioxide concentrations in the atmosphere fell by a roughly a third. This same period saw the emergence of a new form of photosynthesis in a subset of plants, the C4 pathway. P

16h

 

Amazon forests failing to keep up with climate change

A team of more than 100 scientists has assessed the impact of global warming on thousands of tree species across the Amazon to discover the winners and losers from 30 years of climate change. Their analysis found the effects of climate change are altering the rainforest's composition of tree species but not quickly enough to keep up with the changing environment.

16h

 

Diabetes patients denied new device in 'postcode lottery' rollout

Investigation reveals 25 of 195 CCGs in England have not issued glucose monitoring devices Tens of thousands of people living with type 1 diabetes in England are being refused access to devices that could improve lives, an investigation has revealed, with experts claiming that the situation amounts to a “postcode lottery”. About 400,000 people in the UK have type 1 diabetes – an autoimmune condit

17h

 

Goop and Dr. Mark Hyman join forces for some functional medicine heavy metal fear mongering

Goop and the Cleveland Clinic's Dr. Mark Hyman join forces for some functional medicine heavy metal fear mongering featuring bogus diagnostic testing and discredited treatments. Experts crush their pseudoscience.

17h

 

Dine stjålne login-oplysninger bliver solgt for en slik på det sorte online-marked

Nettets lyssky webshops sælger login-oplysninger til Facebook, Netflix og din mailkonto helt ned til en dollar per styk. Få et indblik i den sorte data-handel og flere råd til, hvordan du beskytter dig mod at få dine online-data sat til salg på nettet.

17h

 

Læren fra det store Mærsk-hackerangreb: Disse 27 punkter skal du have styr på

Sidste år var Mærsk under belejring af NotPetya ransomware-angrebet i ni dage, hvilket kostede det danske erhvervsflagskib op mod to milliarder kroner. Her er it-direktørens tjekliste for it-beredskabet, inden du selv skal afværge et ransomware-angreb.

17h

 

Party all night: Verdens største fugle var natdyr

Analyser af den uddøde fugle-familie, elefantfuglene, har bekræftet, at de store dyr var vågne om natten. Det overrasker forskere, der troede, at de var aktive om dagen.

17h

 

Amazon forests failing to keep up with climate change

New research has assessed the impact of global warming on thousands of tree species across the Amazon to discover the winners and losers from 30 years of climate change. The analysis found the effects of climate change are altering the rainforest's composition of tree species but not quickly enough to keep up with the changing environment.

18h

 

Novel strategy appears to protect retina when disease reduces oxygen

An enzyme known to help our liver get rid of ammonia also appears to be good at protecting our retina, scientists report.

18h

 

Men focused on muscle building struggle with binge drinking and other problems

Boys and young men who are obsessed with building muscle have more mental health issues than researchers and healthcare professionals have previously recognized.

18h

 

Social Construct of Race Imposes Biology

Anthropologist Jennifer Raff argues that race is culturally created, but has biological consequences. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

19h

 

Novel antibiotic shows promise in treatment of uncomplicated gonorrhea

An investigational oral antibiotic called zoliflodacin was well-tolerated and successfully cured most cases of uncomplicated gonorrhea when tested in a Phase 2 multicenter clinical trial, according to new findings.

21h

 

Quantitative 3D analysis of bone tools sheds light on ancient manufacture and use

Quantitative three-dimensional analysis of bone wear patterns can provide insight into the manufacture and use of early human tools, according to a new study.

21h

 

Could machines using artificial intelligence make doctors obsolete?

The technology of these tools is evolving rapidly. Standalone machines can now perform limited tasks raising the question of whether machines will ever completely replace doctors?

21h

 

Some factors have a greater impact on heart attack risk in women than they do in men

High blood pressure, smoking and diabetes increase the risk of heart attack in both sexes but they have more impact in women than they do in men.

21h

 

Patients with type 1 diabetes missing out on glucose devices

The device, which works via a sensor attached to the skin, has been available on prescription since November 2017. Users can access glucose readings by scanning the sensor with a portable reader or a smartphone app. The reading comes with an arrow that indicates whether glucose is rising or falling.

21h

 

Skin-like sensor maps blood-oxygen levels anywhere in the body

A new flexible sensor can map blood-oxygen levels over large areas of skin, tissue and organs, potentially giving doctors a new way to monitor healing wounds in real time. The sensor is made of organic electronics printed on bendable plastic that molds to the contours of the body.

21h

 

Climate change causing more severe wildfires, larger insect outbreaks in temperate forests

A warmer, drier climate is expected is increase the likelihood of larger-scale forest disturbances such as wildfires, insect outbreaks, disease and drought, according to a new study.

21h

 

Batteryless smart devices closer to reality

Researchers have taken a huge step towards making smart devices that do not use batteries or require charging.

21h

 

Dry conditions may have helped a new type of plant gain a foothold on Earth

Plants reap energy from the sun using two photosynthesis pathways, C3 and C4. A new study suggests that water availability drove the expansion of C4 species, which may help to explain how different plant lineages came to be distributed on the planet today.

21h

 

Saving wildlife: Using geology to track elusive hawks

Researchers are using isotopic analysis to track where elusive hawks were fledged. This technique helps wildlife managers identify critical habitat.

21h

 

Levitating particles could lift nuclear detective work

Laser-based 'optical tweezers' could levitate uranium and plutonium particles, thus allowing the measurement of nuclear recoil during radioactive decay. This technique provides a new method for conducting the radioactive particle analysis essential to nuclear forensics

21h

 

The Latest Drama in Trump’s Slow-Motion Saturday Night Massacre

In the space of a single, dizzying day, the president of the United States confronted his party’s loss of the House of Representatives (putting him at risk of subpoenas, investigation, and even impeachment). In a rambling, combative news conference, he alternately reached out to his Democratic opponents and lashed out at them, threatening to investigate them. And finally, as if all that were not

22h

 

How the Midterm Elections' Results Affect Science

The Democrats' takeover of the House inspires hope for science-based policies, but voters struck down several ballot initiatives to counteract climate change.

22h

 

Codebreaker Turing's theory explains how shark scales are patterned

A system proposed by world war two codebreaker Alan Turing more than 60 years ago can explain the patterning of tooth-like scales possessed by sharks, according to new research.

22h

 

After a bad winter in the ocean, female Magellanic penguins suffer most, study shows

Research is showing how Magellanic penguins fare during the winter months when they spend months at sea feeding. They have discovered that oceanographic features are more likely to negatively impact the body conditions of Magellanic penguin females, but not males, when the penguins return to their nesting grounds in spring.

22h

 

Tumour immune cells could aid cancer therapies, study shows

A pioneering technique designed to spot differences between immune cells in tumours could speed the development of cancer treatments, research suggests.

22h

 

New hope for world's most endangered mammal

New genetic analysis of white rhino populations suggests it could be possible to rescue the critically endangered northern white rhinoceros from extinction, using the genes of its less threatened southern cousin.

22h

 

Finland: Where second-hand comes first

As concern grows about climate change and resources, is it time to re-use more of our junk?

22h

 

The House Science Committee May Soon Become… Pro-Science

“Hopefully we will no longer see the science committee used as a messaging tool for the fossil fuel industry,” says Rep. Bill Foster, a science committee member.

23h

 

The Atlantic Daily: “What Are You Talking About?”

What We’re Following Sessions Out: Attorney General Jeff Sessions—who recused himself from the Russia investigation in 2017—handed in his resignation just a day after the midterm elections, forced out by President Donald Trump. His new replacement has in the past expressed skepticism about the reach of the Russia investigation —which he’ll now oversee. While there’s no denying Sessions has been a

23h

 

New integrated analytical approach reveals molecules involved in disease

Osaka University researchers developed a novel method of identifying disease-related molecules and processes. They achieved this by integrating genetic data obtained from genome-wide association studies with data on networks of miRNAs and their target genes. This method built on previous work by including tissue-specific data, and enabled the identification of novel miRNAs with pathological releva

23h

 

Exercise, diet and wellness apps are powerful learning resources for young people — study finds

Research undertaken at the University of Birmingham has found that young people are able to judge which health related apps are relevant to their age and bodies, are able to source appropriate digital content as well as dismiss app content that might be harmful to them.

23h

 

Midterm Elections 2018: Voters Chipped Away at Gerrymandering

A series of successful ballot initiatives should create more districts where voters get to choose their representatives—not the other way around.

23h

 

San Francisco Sets a New Tech Trend: Tax the Companies

Proposition C, which will raise an additional $300 million a year for homeless services, was approved with roughly 60 percent of the vote.

23h

 

Patients with type 1 diabetes missing out on glucose devices, finds BMJ investigation

The device, which works via a sensor attached to the skin, has been available on prescription since November 2017. Users can access glucose readings by scanning the sensor with a portable reader or a smartphone app. The reading comes with an arrow that indicates whether glucose is rising or falling.

23h

 

Some factors have a greater impact on heart attack risk in women than they do in men

High blood pressure, smoking and diabetes increase the risk of heart attack in both sexes but they have more impact in women than they do in men, shows a study published by The BMJ today.

23h

 

Could machines using artificial intelligence make doctors obsolete?

The technology of these tools is evolving rapidly. Standalone machines can now perform limited tasks raising the question of whether machines will ever completely replace doctors? Experts debate the issue in The BMJ today.

23h

 

Smoking, diabetes and high blood pressure increase women's risk of heart attack

Smoking, diabetes and high blood pressure increase the risk of a heart attack more in women than in men, new research from The George Institute for Global Health at the University of Oxford has found.

23h

 

The House Science Committee Is Back in Democrat's Control: What That Means for Science

House Committee on Science, Space and Technology may now actually advance science

23h

 

Trump Will Only Get More Dangerous

Jeff Sessions was unfit to serve as attorney general of the United States. He had lied about his civil-rights record, claiming that he’d desegregated schools in Alabama when he hadn’t , as he later admitted under oath . He and his surrogates misled the public by insisting that he had begun his political life campaigning against the segregationist Lurleen Wallace , without mentioning that her GOP

1d

 

Artificial sensor mimics human sense of touch

A new tactile sensor can detect surface shapes and structures, showing advantages over existing sensors, according to new research.

1d

 

Interdisciplinary interactions inspire new discovery

Researchers have found new good catalysts using unique 'Heusler' alloys, following an interdisciplinary approach. Most studies on catalysts have been conducted by researchers in chemistry. However, catalysts also relate to other research fields. For example, materials science including metallurgy is effective for making and analyzing catalysts, and solid state physics is necessary to understand an

1d

 

Preventing heart disease in cancer survivors

A new study by Washington State University researchers suggests that a protein called CDK2 plays a critical role in heart damage caused by doxorubicin, a commonly used chemotherapy drug. Published in the Journal of Biological Chemistry, their finding could be used as the basis for future development of treatment strategies and drugs to reduce heart disease risk in cancer survivors, especially thos

1d

 

Bullying 'follows' LGB people from school to work

A new study finds bullying against minorities is more likely to persist over several years.

1d

 

Trump Repeatedly Threatens Retaliation Against Russia Investigators

The day after Democrats seized control of the House of Representatives, Donald Trump threatened retaliation against lawmakers who “waste Taxpayer Money” by scrutinizing him and his administration, and boasted of his power to end Special Counsel Robert Mueller’s investigation into possible collusion between Russia and the Trump campaign. Then, late on Wednesday, he announced the resignation of the

1d

 

Trump’s Evangelical Allies Really Didn’t Like Jeff Sessions

American Christian leaders did not like former Attorney General Jeff Sessions, who resigned the day after the midterm elections at the president’s request. Not just progressive Christians who abhor the Trump administration: Many of President Donald Trump’s staunch evangelical allies, along with more moderate conservative leaders, also found Sessions lacking in his role. This is curious, because S

1d

 

Discovery: Rare three-species hybrid warbler

Scientists have shown that a bird found in Pennsylvania is the offspring of a hybrid warbler mother and a warbler father from an entirely different genus — a combination never recorded before now and which resulted in a three-species hybrid bird.

1d

 

Hunt for interesting metabolites with the antiSMASH database

Scientists who treasure hunt for interesting bacterial metabolites using the online tool antiSMASH now have the opportunity to use an antiSMASH database with pre-calculated results of nearly 25,000 bacterial genomes. This database will ease the discovery of antibiotics, pesticides, and anti-cancer drugs.

1d

 

How many mosquitoes can you squish into a syringe? Scientists may finally have an answer.

Science It might be a pretty important question. A new study asks a question about the yellow fever mosquito that’s never been asked before: just how many can you fit in a syringe?

1d

 

Marijuana Stocks Spiked After Jeff Sessions Resigned

Jeff Sessions is gone, and marijuana advocates—and the businesses that serve them—are celebrating. Forced out by President Donald Trump, Sessions tendered his resignation as the attorney general on Wednesday afternoon, and his departure has signaled the fall of a major political roadblock to more widespread legalization. In response, stock prices for cannabis businesses have leapt. Nasdaq’s Alter

1d

 

The ‘Gateway Drug to Democracy’

The fastest way to reveal a nation’s priorities is to take a look at its budget. Where money is allocated, improvements and expansions are made; where costs are cut, institutions and policies wither. In America and other similar democracies, political candidates campaign on budget promises, but it can be difficult to maintain transparency—and enforce accountability—once a politician is elected in

1d

 

Goffin's cockatoos can create and manipulate novel tools

Goffin's cockatoos can tear cardboard into long strips as tools to reach food — but fail to adjust strip width to fit through narrow openings, according to a new study.

1d

 

Clinical and environmental factors impact absorption of common sunscreen ingredient

New research demonstrates that heat and reapplication influences different sunscreen products containing the same amount of a key ingredient, oxybenzone, potentially affecting safety and toxicity of the UV filters included in sunscreens.

1d

 

Trump Fired His Most Effective Lieutenant

The paradox of Jeff Sessions’s tenure as attorney general is that no member of Donald Trump’s administration was so beleaguered and disparaged by the president, but no member got as much done. Even as he endured persistent verbal abuse from Trump, Sessions steamed forward on a range of conservative social-policy priorities, aggressively reorienting the Justice Department’s stances on immigration,

1d

 

Photos: New Yorkers Wait 'on Line' to Vote in Midterms

In the face of big lines, bad weather, and extra-long ballots, perseverance is key.

1d

 

Boeing Issues Safety Warning After a Fatal 737 MAX Nosedive

The plane builder wants pilots to brush up on what to do if a faulty sensor sends a 737 MAX into a dive.

1d

 

Engineering a better toilet could save millions of lives

Technology Bill Gates took a jar of poop on stage to remind us of this fact. Every sanitation expert in the world is in Beijing right now, at a Gates Foundation-sponsored conference on the future of the toilet.

1d

 

Novel antibiotic shows promise in treatment of uncomplicated gonorrhea

An investigational oral antibiotic called zoliflodacin was well-tolerated and successfully cured most cases of uncomplicated gonorrhea when tested in a Phase 2 multicenter clinical trial, according to findings published today in the New England Journal of Medicine. The National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), part of the US National Institutes of Health, sponsored the clinica

1d

 

Among heart attack survivors, drug reduces chances of second heart attack or stroke

In a clinical trial involving 18,924 patients from 57 countries who had suffered a recent heart attack or threatened heart attack, researchers at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus and fellow scientists around the world have found that the cholesterol-lowering drug alirocumab reduced the chance of having additional heart problems or stroke.

1d

 

One type of brain cell might hold key to inflammation after head injury

By eliminating one type of immune cell in the brain, researchers were able to erase any evidence of inflammation following traumatic brain injury, according to a new study from The Ohio State University.

1d

 

Skeptisk DTU-professor: Harvard-forskere kalder 'cigarformet objekt' et muligt rumfartøj

DTU-professor kalder teorien 'spektakulær', og mener der skal være plads til den slags.

1d

 

How to Hack an Election (Without Touching the Machines)

In 2018, we should worry less about bot-nets and more about the oldest political tricks: misdirection, misinformation, and outright voter suppression.

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A new drug may boost dwindling treatment options for gonorrhea

An antibiotic that targets the bacteria that causes gonorrhea proved effective in treating patients in a clinical trial.

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Dry conditions may have helped a new type of plant gain a foothold on Earth

Plants reap energy from the sun using two photosynthesis pathways, C3 and C4. A new study led by University of Pennsylvania biologists suggests that water availability drove the expansion of C4 species, which may help to explain how different plant lineages came to be distributed on the planet today

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Midterm Elections 2018: Net Neutrality Faces New Uncertainty

The next Congress could have majorities in both houses that support net neutrality, but the outlook for legislation is bleak.

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High patient satisfaction rates after 'Adam's apple' reduction surgery

Cosmetic surgery to reduce the masculine appearance of the 'Adam's apple' has a high patient satisfaction rate, according to a study in Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery–Global Open®, the official open-access medical journal of the American Society of Plastic Surgeons (ASPS).

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Now It’s Up to the Public

The most surprising thing about Wednesday’s resignation of Jeff Sessions is that it did not happen sooner. President Trump has long been furious with his attorney general for recusing himself from the Russia investigation, and has had the power to fire him at any time. Trump’s decision to oust Sessions also removes Rod Rosenstein as acting attorney general for the purposes of the Russia investiga

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Samsung unveils foldable phone prototype

Samsung has been developing a flexible, foldable smartphone for years. The prototype unveiled Wednesday isn't quite the finished product some had hoped to see, but it offered a glimpse at how its long-awaited foldable phone will work when released, likely in 2019. Samsung also announced other device upgrades, including a new user interface and changes to its virtual assistant Bixby. Samsung unvei

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Skin-like sensor maps blood-oxygen levels anywhere in the body

A new flexible sensor developed by engineers at the University of California, Berkeley, can map blood-oxygen levels over large areas of skin, tissue and organs, potentially giving doctors a new way to monitor healing wounds in real time. The sensor is made of organic electronics printed on bendable plastic that molds to the contours of the body.

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Climate change causing more severe wildfires, larger insect outbreaks in temperate forests

A warmer, drier climate is expected is increase the likelihood of larger-scale forest disturbances such as wildfires, insect outbreaks, disease and drought, according to a new study co-authored by a Portland State University professor

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Scientists shuffle the deck to create materials with new quantum behaviors

Generating complex multi-principle element TMDCs essential for the future development of new generations of quantum, electronic, and energy conversion materials is difficult.

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Astronomers get best view yet of supermassive black holes in colliding galaxies

Two galaxies, drawn together by the force of gravity, are merging into a tangled mass of dense gas and dust. Structure is giving way to chaos, but hiding behind this messy cloud of material are two supermassive black holes, nestled at the center of each of the galaxies, that are now excitingly close, giving astronomers the best view yet of the pair marching toward coalescence into one mega black h

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Experimental compound reduces Gulf War illness-like behavior in mice

An experimental drug is showing some promise in stopping mood abnormalities and cognitive disorders similar to those seen in people with Gulf War illness, an animal study suggests.

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Democratic Governors Will Now Lead a Majority of Americans

Scott Walker’s eight-year run as the union-busting conservative governor of Wisconsin ended on Tuesday night, and Kansas voters rejected Kris Kobach’s bid to take his hard-right views on immigration and voter fraud to the most powerful perch in Topeka. In Maine, voters replaced the combative and uncompromising conservative Paul LePage with a Democratic woman, Janet Mills, running on a message of

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Climate Change and the Elections: Five Takeaways

Carbon taxes, renewable energy and climate bipartisanship were all on the ballot in various forms. Here's how they fared.

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Marijuana may change the decision-making part of teen brains

A marijuana-like drug given to male rats during adolescence changed the structure of their brains.

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Trump Repeatedly Claims Not to Understand Certain Accents

There is by now a familiar pattern to President Donald Trump’s news conferences: He loudly proclaims his victories and deal-making prowess; dismisses reporters he believes are unfair to him; and rails against policies he doesn’t like. And so it was on Tuesday—with an addition: The president had trouble understanding anyone with a foreign accent. Taken in isolation, the exchanges at Tuesday’s pres

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A science-loving lady could head the next House Science Committee

Science The 2018 midterm elections shifted the balance of power in the House of Representatives. Here's what that means. For the first time since 2010, a democrat will chair the House Committee on Science, Space, and Technology following the 2018 midterm elections.

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Sudden heat can drive RNA changes in plants

The stress of hotter temperatures may trigger a response in a plant’s RNA, or ribonucleic acid, part of a cell’s genetic messaging system, according to a new study. The study with rice plants shows that a sudden increase in temperature led to changes in the structure of the plant’s RNA, which was linked to a loss in the number of its messenger RNAs—or mRNAs. The mRNA molecule is a particular type

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Three paralyzed men are walking again thanks to targeted neurotechnology

Three paralyzed men are walking in Switzerland thanks to modified spinal implants. The implants provided intermittent as opposed to continuous stimulation. This isn't a cure for paralysis, but the work appears to indicate a promising future. None Three paralyzed men are walking again in Switzerland with the help of a team at the École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne . The innovative rehabilita

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The teeth of Changchunsaurus: Rare insight into ornithopod dinosaur tooth evolution

The teeth of Changchunsaurus parvus, a small herbivorous dinosaur from the Cretaceous of China, represent an important and poorly-known stage in the evolution of ornithopod dentition, according to a study.

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Singing may reduce stress, improve motor function for people with Parkinson's disease

Singing may provide benefits beyond improving respiratory and swallow control in people with Parkinson's disease, according to new data. The results from the pilot study revealed improvements in mood and motor symptoms, as well as reduced physiological indicators of stress.

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Ultrasound releases drug to alter activity in targeted brain areas in rats

Scientists have developed a noninvasive way of delivering drugs to within a few millimeters of a desired point in the brain. The method, tested in rats, uses focused ultrasound to jiggle drug molecules loose from nanoparticle 'cages' that have been injected into the bloodstream.

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MIT scientists propose giant laser beacon to attract alien attention

It could be the thing that makes an intelligent alien civilization stop and look at us further It's surprisingly not all that difficult to accomplish; a 100-foot diameter primary mirror and 1 to 2 megawatt laser is about what it takes. The idea is to create a noticeable anomaly, rather than trying to directly target anything. But hold on a second… should we do this? Star light, start bright…

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How kids can help design cities | Mara Mintzer

Adults tend to think of kids as "future citizens" — their ideas and opinions will matter someday, just not today. But kids make up a quarter of the population, so shouldn't they have a say in what the world they'll inherit will look like? Urban planner Mara Mintzer shares what happened when she and her team asked kids to help design a park in Boulder, Colorado — and how it revealed an important

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What Sessions’s Resignation Means for Robert Mueller

President Donald Trump has forced out Attorney General Jeff Sessions just one day after the midterm elections and after nearly a year of berating him for recusing himself from the Justice Department’s Russia investigation. Sessions’s temporary replacement, his chief of staff, is now effectively Special Counsel Robert Mueller’s new boss. But he’s expressed repeated skepticism over the scope of Mue

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Forcing Out Sessions Is an Attack on Accountability

“Jobs, not mobs,” was President Donald Trump’s slogan in the 2018 midterm elections. With the election behind him, the president has opted instead for a move toward constitutional and political disorder likely to destabilize the whole economy, jobs and all. In the first minutes after the coerced resignation of Attorney General Jeff Sessions on Wednesday, the plan has begun to take shape. The new

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Jeff Sessions resigns at Trump's request

Matthew G. Whitaker, the former chief of staff to Sessions, will take over as acting attorney general. President Donald Trump requested Sessions to resign one day after the midterm elections. Sessions was often brutally criticized by Trump, primarily for recusing himself from the Russia probe. None U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions stepped down from his position on Wednesday after President Don

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Batteryless smart devices closer to reality

Researchers at the University of Waterloo have taken a huge step towards making smart devices that do not use batteries or require charging.

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What students don’t know about boozy blackouts increases risk

Though most college students typically don’t intend to drink alcohol to the point that they “black out,” many don’t fully grasp what specific drinking behaviors present the greatest risk, a new series of studies finds. According to previous research, between 30 and 50 percent of young adults who drink regularly report that they have experienced alcohol-related memory impairment in the past year,

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Samsung's Folding Galaxy Smartphone Concept Bends All the RulesSamsung Android IF

At a developer event today, Samsung showed off a smartphone with a folding screen that points to a possible future for mobile computing.

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Midterm Election Voters Shot Down a Carbon Tax, But It'll Rise Again

Washington voters will likely shoot down a ballot initiative that would tax carbon emissions, but carbon pricing is still likely to reach the US.

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First monarch butterflies arrive at Mexico wintering area

The first monarch butterflies have arrived at their wintering grounds in the mountains of central Mexico almost a week later than usual, Mexico's Environment Department said Wednesday.

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Midterm voting exposes growing problem of aging machines

Election experts have long warned about the nation's aging fleet of voting equipment. This week's elections underscored just how badly upgrades are needed.

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Clean apartments are less likely to house cockroaches

Poor home sanitation and residents’ tolerance regarding German cockroaches may be a good predictor of the pest’s presence in their apartments, research shows. The study in the Journal of Economic Entomology includes interviews with senior citizen and disabled residents in 388 apartments in seven apartment buildings. Researchers also checked apartment conditions and glue traps placed to detect coc

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Preparing for the Centenary of the End of World War I

This Sunday, November 11, 2018, will mark the passing of 100 years since the end of World War I—the “war to end all wars.” In 1918, on “the 11th hour of the 11th day of the 11th month,” in a forest near the French city of Compiègne, French, British, and German leaders met and signed an armistice that officially ended a horrific conflict that claimed the lives of more than 16 million people over f

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People will never vote for a carbon tax, so let’s stop asking

Voters in the state of Washington rejected, once again, what would have been the US’s first carbon tax.

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Blood test can spot DNA from eight different types of cancer

A blood test can detect if you have breast, bowel or other cancers by looking for characteristic tumour DNA fragments that have leaked into the circulation

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How worrying is it that more and more teens are using e-cigarettes?

Many are alarmed by the fast-rising popularity of vaping among teenagers in the US. But experts are divided on whether e-cigarettes should be more tightly regulated

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Brazil’s next president threatens the people and forests of the Amazon

Jair Bolsonaro’s victory in Brazil’s presidential election could be a disaster for the Amazon, but his opponents can unite, say Mary Menton and Felipe Milanez

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World’s first figurative art is of an unknown animal in Borneo

A red animal painted on a cave wall in Borneo more than 40,000 years ago is the oldest drawing of a real-life object ever discovered

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Smartphone makers bet on foldable screens as next big thing

The smartphone industry has been searching for a breakthrough to revive a market mired in an innovation lull and a sales slump.

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Italy to sue Ryanair, Wizz Air over bag charge

Italy's competition watchdog said on Wednesday it will begin legal proceedings against low-cost airlines Ryanair and Wizz Air for failing to suspend controversial charges for carry-on bags.

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Advance pay service may reduce use of payday loans

Americans take out roughly $50 billion in payday loans a year, each racking up hundreds of dollars in fees and interest. But a small and growing service that allows its users to take an advance on their paycheck might be giving the payday loan industry a run for its money.

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Why We Need Innovative Nuclear Power

Our future will depend on finding every possible source of reliable, carbon-free energy — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Powered by windows: Enhanced power factor in transparent thermoelectric nanowire materials

A research group has successfully developed a methodology for enhancing thermoelectric power factor while decreasing thermal conductivity. By introducing ZnO nanowires into ZnO films, the thermoelectric power factor became 3 times larger than that of ZnO film without ZnO nanowires. The success of this research will lead to the realization of high-performance transparent thermoelectric devices whic

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Goldilocks and the optimal mating distance: Neither too small nor too large but just right

Evolutionary theory predicts that the fitness of an individual is maximized when the genetic differences between its parents are neither too small nor too large but some ideal amount known as the optimal mating distance.

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Hawk study could benefit conservation

Researchers at the University of Cincinnati are perfecting an innovative way to track the migration of elusive wildlife to help in their conservation.

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Levitating particles could lift nuclear detective work

Laser-based 'optical tweezers' could levitate uranium and plutonium particles, thus allowing the measurement of nuclear recoil during radioactive decay. This technique, proposed by scientists at Los Alamos National Laboratory, provides a new method for conducting the radioactive particle analysis essential to nuclear forensics.

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What Is Inflammatory Bowel Disease?

Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a condition that involves chronic inflammation in all or part of the digestive tract.

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Watch people beatbox in an MRI

Science They’re blazing new linguistic territory. Many artists produce sounds entirely unknown to modern linguists. Now you can see exactly what produces those extra-lingual effects.

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Tiny molecule has big effect in childhood brain tumor studies

A very small molecule under study is able to kill a childhood brain cancer, and the lead researcher said it may be possible to reduce by 90 percent the amount of chemotherapy and radiation required to kill such tumors.

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Chlamydia attacks with Frankenstein protein

When Chlamydia trachomatis, the bacterium that causes one of the most common sexually transmitted infections worldwide, enters a human cell, it hijacks parts of the host to build protective layers around itself. Inside this makeshift fortress, the bug grows and reproduces, eventually bursting out in search of a new target and killing the host cell. While scientists have known for years that Chlamy

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Bacteria use different strategies to divide and survive under stress

A new study shows how cyanobacteria, or bacteria that produce energy through photosynthesis like plants, change the way they grow and divide in response to different levels of light.

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Secrets of engineered protein receptor, CAR

Researchers have shed light on Chimeric Antigen Receptor (CAR) T cell therapy, information that could one day result in better cancer therapies with fewer side effects.

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Autonomous vehicles could shape the future of urban tourism

In a new study, researchers examine how Autonomous Vehicles (AVs) may have a substantial impact on the future of urban tourism.

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A molecular switch links a Scottish mouse, a Finnish patient and Parkinson's disease

Researchers have made an unexpected and vital contribution to an international collaborative effort in Parkinson's disease research.

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Protecting adult female north atlantic right whales from injury and death key to recovery

Why is the endangered western North Atlantic right whale population growing far more slowly than those of southern right whales, a sister species also recovering from near extinction by commercial whaling? Researchers looked more closely at the question and have concluded that preserving the lives of adult females in the population is by far the most effective way to promote population growth and

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An overlooked giant: Useful and abundant, African 'Zam' palm newly described for science

It might have been it's extremely large size, or maybe confusion with a similar species, that has previously discouraged botanists from collecting and describing a fairly common palm, now named Raphia zamiana. Locally known and widely used in Cameroon and Gabon, the "Zam" has now been officially described, alongside a less common Gabonese endemic species from the same genus and already possibly

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Far fewer lakes below the East Antarctic Ice Sheet than previously believed

Researchers recently assessed subglacial lakes detected by satellite, and found very little water. But if that's the case, what is the source of the East Antarctic Ice Sheet's massive ice streams?

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Graphene takes a step towards renewable fuel

Researchers are working to develop a method to convert water and carbon dioxide to the renewable energy of the future, using the energy from the sun and graphene applied to the surface of cubic silicon carbide. They have now taken an important step towards this goal, and developed a method that makes it possible to produce graphene with several layers in a tightly controlled process.

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Trilobites: Watch Beatboxers Break It Down Inside an M.R.I. Scanner

Researchers got an inside look at beatboxers’ lips, mouths and throats as they performed.

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Steve King Keeps Getting Reelected

Democrats conquered in the House on Tuesday night, picking up more than enough seats to secure a majority in the chamber. In Iowa alone, two GOP congressmen were unseated by women challengers. But, at the end of the night, from under all the dust and rubble, emerged Steve King. King, the Iowa Republican whose nativist rhetoric has brought a lot of unusual attention to the state’s Fourth Congressi

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World's Oldest Animal Drawing, Discovered in Borneo Cave, Is a Weird Cow Beast

A 40,000-year-old painting of a mysterious, wild cow-like beast discovered in a Borneo cave is the oldest human-made drawing of an animal on record, a new study finds.

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Supermassive Black Holes Collide in Galactic Merger Grand Finales

Astronomers have observed new details of black-hole growth previously hidden by obscuring clouds of gas and dust — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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New, more accessible staging system developed to predict survival for patients with AL Amyloidosis

A new staging system developed with a more accessible test to predict the chance of survival in patients living with light chain (AL) amyloidosis.

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Levitating particles could lift nuclear detective work

Laser-based 'optical tweezers' could levitate uranium and plutonium particles, thus allowing the measurement of nuclear recoil during radioactive decay. This technique, proposed by scientists at Los Alamos National Laboratory, provides a new method for conducting the radioactive particle analysis essential to nuclear forensics

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Save wildlife? Researchers use geology to track elusive animals

The University of Cincinnati is using isotopic analysis to track where elusive hawks were fledged. This technique helps wildlife managers identify critical habitat.

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