Search Posts

Nyheder2018november09

MOST POPULAR

 

Autism is associated with zinc deficiency in early development — now a study links the two

Autism has been associated with zinc deficiency in infancy. While it is not yet known whether zinc deficiency in early development causes autism, scientists have now found a mechanistic link.Published in Frontiers in Molecular Neuroscience, their study connects zinc, autism risk genes and abnormal neuronal connections associated with autism spectrum disorders.

10h

 

Florida monarch butterfly populations have dropped 80 percent since 2005

A 37-year survey of monarch populations in North Central Florida shows that caterpillars and butterflies have been declining since 1985 and have dropped by 80 percent since 2005.

19h

 

Trods løfter om grøn omstilling: Datacentre kommer til at fyre for fuglene

It-giganterne slår sig ned så langt fra de danske fjernvarmenet, at det bliver urentabelt at udnytte overskudsvarmen. Dermed forsvinder en del af det grønne argument for at bygge centrene i Danmark.

16h

 

Sponsored

LATEST

 

The new face of South American people

Study by 72 researchers from eight countries concludes that the Lagoa Santa people are descendants of Clovis culture migrants from North America. Distinctly African features attributed to Luzia were wrong.

now

 

Alzheimer's and cardiovascular disease share common genetics in some patients

Genetics may predispose some people to both Alzheimer's disease and high levels of blood lipids such as cholesterol, a common feature of cardiovascular disease, according to a new study by an international team of researchers led by scientists at UC San Francisco and Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis.

now

 

TechEdge: Multicolor Flow Cytometry

The ideal flow cytometer will vary for each individual depending on their own research needs and goals. Identifying that ideal mix of technical power, experimental adaptability, and user friendliness will go a long way towards finding an instrument that suits not only today’s projects, but also tomorrow’s.

4min

 

How 'IRL Iron Man' Richard Browning Designed His Jetpack Racing Suit

The British thrill-seeked endured more than a few crashes—and broke some concrete—on the way to designing the jetpack suit he's now using to launch a racing league.

16min

 

Women’s Anger Still Isn’t Taken Seriously

“Women’s anger is not taken seriously as politically consequential and valid, in part because women are sucked back into a maternal or wifely aesthetic framework,” Rebecca Traister said in a recent interview with The Masthead , The Atlantic ’s membership program. “We need to understand their fury as politically and socially catalytic.” In November, as part of The Masthead Book Club, members read

17min

 

18min

 

Another Mass Shooting? 'Compassion Fatigue' Is A Natural Reaction.

As the incidents of mass shootings in the U.S. occur, some people are starting to feel numbed by them. Psychologists says this is normal. (Image credit: Kevork Djansezian/Getty Images)

19min

 

Here's How Peru's Ancient People Survived in the Treacherous Andes

By about 7,000 years ago, ancient people who lived high in the Andes Mountains had developed bigger hearts and slightly higher blood pressure, among other adaptations, to better survive life at those treacherous heights, a new genetic analysis shows.

20min

 

New flexible, transparent, wearable biopatch, improves cellular observation, drug delivery

Purdue University researchers have developed a new flexible and translucent base for silicon nanoneedle patches to deliver exact doses of biomolecules directly into cells and expand observational opportunities."This means that eight or nine silicon nanoneedles can be injected into a single cell without significantly damaging a cell. So we can use these nanoneedles to deliver biomolecules into cell

21min

 

Florence and Michael might be retired from the Hurricane naming book

Environment Meteorologists routinely retire names of severely devastating storms. Hurricanes are often so ruinous that any mention of the storm's name causes extreme discomfort. To ease the pain, meteorologists often retire these storm names. It’s…

32min

 

Gadget Lab Podcast: Darren Aronofsky on Spheres and VR

The director of Mother! and Black Swan talks about the new VR series, Spheres, which he produced.

34min

 

Pollution in cities damaging insects and ecosystems

High levels of pollution found in many of the world's major cities are having negative effects on plants and insects, according to new research.

39min

 

Unlocking the secrets of metal-insulator transitions

Using an X-ray technique, scientists found that the metal-insulator transition in the correlated material magnetite is a two-step process.

39min

 

Can stimulating the brain treat chronic pain?

For the first time, researchers have shown they could target one brain region with a weak alternating current of electricity, enhance the naturally occurring brain rhythms of that region, and significantly decrease symptoms associated with chronic lower back pain.

39min

 

Why humanity owes a lot to Jupiter

In 1994, a comet struck Jupiter, exploding on the gas giant's surface in an incredibly violent fireball. Such collisions are not uncommon for Jupiter. What is uncommon, however, are solar systems with planets like Jupiter. Without Jupiter, life on Earth might have been obliterated by comets and asteroids before it even got a chance to begin. The fact that Jupiter-like planets are so rare might be

43min

 

More Researchers Denied UK Entry to Attend Meetings

The latest rejections of visa requests have scientists up in arms.

46min

 

‘People Are Entrenched’: Rosanne Cash on Thousand Oaks, Country Music, and Gun Control

The killing of 12 people Wednesday night in Thousand Oaks, California , represents the second mass attack against gatherings of country-music fans in a little more than a year. Unthinkably, among the patrons of the “College Country Night” at the Borderline Bar and Grill were people who survived the massacre at Las Vegas’s Route 91 Harvest Festival in October 2017. Gun violence is a hazard of Amer

53min

 

Eye contact reduces lying

A new study found that eye contact can make us act more honestly.

1h

 

Making wind farms more efficient

With energy demands rising, researchers have completed an algorithm — or approach — to design more efficient wind farms, helping to generate more revenue for builders and more renewable energy for their customers.

1h

 

Ragweed may expand its range northward with climate change

A new predictive model developed by ecologists and climate scientists suggests that climate change may allow common ragweed to extend its growing range northward and into major northeast metro areas, worsening conditions for millions of people with hay fever and asthma.

1h

 

Embryos 'remember' the chemicals that they encounter

A new study shows that embryonic cells retain a memory of the chemical signals to which they are exposed. Without these memories, cells fail organize into distinct tissue types.

1h

 

Do kitchen items shed antimicrobial nanoparticles after use?

Scientists describe how they simulated knife motion, washing and scratching on bacteria-fighting, nanosilver-infused cutting boards to see if consumer use affects nanoparticle release. The test should help regulatory bodies identify if any safety or health risks exist from silver nanoparticles in kitchenware now being sold overseas, and if so, find ways to deal with them before the items are appro

1h

 

Klimaforsker spiser ikke oksekød: ”Man behøver ikke være hellig omkring det”

Du behøver ikke at ændre din kost radikalt for at hjælpe klimaet, siger dansk forsker.

1h

 

A two-atom quantum duet

IBS-QNS researchers achieved a major breakthrough in shielding the quantum properties of single atoms on a surface. The scientists used the magnetism of single atoms, known as spin, as a basic building block for quantum information processing. The researchers could show that by packing two atoms closely together they could protect their fragile quantum properties much better than for just one atom

1h

 

Graphene on the way to superconductivity

Scientists at HZB have found evidence that double layers of graphene have a property that may let them conduct current completely without resistance. They probed the band structure at BESSY II with extremely high resolution ARPES and could identify a flat area at a surprising location.

1h

 

Seeking the Truth When the Consensus Is against You

You should always listen to the experts—except when you shouldn’t — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

1h

 

A two-atom quantum duet

Researchers at the Center for Quantum Nanoscience (QNS) within the Institute for Basic Science (IBS) achieved a major breakthrough in shielding the quantum properties of single atoms on a surface. The scientists used the magnetism of single atoms, known as spin, as a basic building block for quantum information processing. The researchers could show that by packing two atoms closely together they

1h

 

Graphene on the way to superconductivity

Scientists at HZB have found evidence that double layers of graphene have a property that may let them conduct current completely without resistance. They probed the band structure at BESSY II with extremely high resolution ARPES and could identify a flat area at a surprising location. Their research is published in Science Advances.

1h

 

Revealing the inner working of magnetic materials

New research shows what happens inside magnetic materials at high temperatures.

1h

 

Most complete study on Europe's greatest Hadrosaur site published

The Basturs Poble site (Lleida) is the most important site in Europe when it comes to hadrosaur remains. It has yielded over 1000 fossils, probably pertaining to the same species. Palaeontologists have now published the most complete study of fossils recovered from the site and reveals the presence of many young individuals.

1h

 

Marine Protected Areas overlook a large fraction of biodiversity hotspots

Around 75 percent of marine biodiversity in Finnish waters is left unprotected, reveals a performance assessment of the country's current Marine Protected Area network. Increasing protection by just 1 percent in the most biodiverse areas could double conservation of the most important species. In addition to identifying areas of high conservation value, the methodology can also be used in ecosyste

1h

 

Amazon forests failing to keep up with climate change

New research has assessed the impact of global warming on thousands of tree species across the Amazon to discover the winners and losers from 30 years of climate change. The analysis found the effects of climate change are altering the rainforest's composition of tree species but not quickly enough to keep up with the changing environment.

1h

 

Livestreams now reward people just for paying attention

Technology The Blizzcon Facebook stream took the attention economy to a whole new level. This year, BlizzCon, an annual video game convention, built prizes into the livestream to reward users simply for paying attention.

1h

 

The Murky Path Forward for U.S. Olympic Gymnastics

For almost a year, the U.S. Olympic Committee has been struggling with the question of what is to be done about USA Gymnastics, the Olympic subsidiary accused of covering up decades of sexual abuse perpetrated by the sports doctor Larry Nassar. During a week-long sentencing hearing in January, 169 young women testified against Nassar, describing their assaults in wrenching detail. He was sentence

1h

 

Gene signature discovery may predict response to immune therapy

Scientists have discovered a gene signature biomarker that may predict which patients will respond — or not — to immune therapy.

1h

 

The New Old Age: Dementia Is Getting Some Very Public Faces

Stigma often prevents patients from acknowledging an Alzheimer’s diagnosis. A series of high-profile disclosures may help change that.

1h

 

"Disney+" service a year away from streaming showsDisney Marvel Star Wars

The Walt Disney Company will launch a "Disney+" streaming service in the United States late next year, boosting it with live-action shows spun from hit "Star Wars" and Marvel hero films.

1h

 

‘Secret sharing’ system keeps your personal data safe

Researchers have created a new method for keeping private the data that our many devices collect about how we use them. The people who design hardware and software for smartphones, internet browsers, high-tech cars, and many other internet-enabled devices need to know how people use their products in order to make them better. But when faced with the request to send information about a computer e

1h

 

The Books Briefing: Graphic (Novel) Content Ahead

Graphic novels aren’t just for kids or comics enthusiasts. The written word can evoke rich imagery, but in graphic storytelling, every aesthetic and narrative choice—from the colors used, to the spacing of each frame, to how and when dialogue is portrayed—can affect a reader’s experience. In The Sculptor , Scott McCloud depicts the grandest of ideas (life, death, family, fame) in small, detailed

1h

 

Researchers generate plants with enhanced drought resistance without penalizing growth

Extreme drought is one of the effects of climate change that is already being perceived. A team has obtained plants with increased drought resistance by modifying the signaling of the plant steroid hormones, known as brassinosteroids. The study is among the first to find a strategy to increase plant hydric stress resistance without affecting overall plant growth.

1h

 

One million years of precipitation history of the monsoon reconstructed

With its wind and precipitation patterns, the South Asian Monsoon influences the lives of several billion people. Recent studies indicate that its drivers are more complex than previously assumed. Scientists have now published a reconstruction of precipitation over the eastern Indian Ocean over the past one million years. It points to connections with controlling processes in the southern hemisphe

1h

 

Transmission of antibiotic resistant E. coli mapped in wild giraffe social networks

A team from the University of Minnesota has shown that antibiotic-resistant Escherichia coli bacteria in wild giraffes most likely come from anthropogenic sources, such as local cattle herds and humans. The research is published in Applied and Environmental Microbiology.

2h

 

Dynasties review: Attenborough’s latest special focuses on real drama

David Attenborough’s latest series uses a new kind of storytelling: by closing in on a few animals over two years, it creates real Game of Thrones style drama

2h

 

TS Swag: Turkeys, Trees, and Tiny Microbes – Science Shirts For The Holidays

Get your hot, fresh, science-themed T-shirts here!

2h

 

2h

 

The Ness Crew is Finally Sleuthing | Gold Rush

Six weeks into his first season as a mine boss, Rick is finally sleuthing and his 1,000oz goal is in reach. Stream Full Episodes of Gold Rush: https://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/gold-rush/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/GoldRush/ https://www.facebook.com/Discovery Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/Gold_Rush https://tw

2h

 

Transmission of antibiotic resistant E. coli mapped in wild giraffe social networks

A team from the University of Minnesota has shown that antibiotic-resistant Escherichia coli bacteria in wild giraffes most likely come from anthropogenic sources, such as local cattle herds and humans. The research is published in Applied and Environmental Microbiology.

2h

 

They Shall Not Grow Old review: Restored footage brings war to life

A poignant archive of first world war film has been brilliantly restored for Peter Jackson's powerful documentary released for the centenary commemorations

2h

 

Tooth fossil comes from tiniest ape ever

A new study shows that a newly-discovered tooth fossil found at a 12.5 million-year-old site in Kenya belongs to a new species of ape—the smallest ever yet described, weighing just under 8 pounds. Researchers say the discovery offers important clues about the unexplained decline in diversity of apes during the Miocene epoch. At the beginning of the Miocene epoch, there were only a few species of

2h

 

Trump orders limits on asylum for migrants at U.S.-Mexico border

The proclamation will bar migrants who cross the border illegally from making asylum claims. In the past, anyone who crossed the border—legally or illegally—was able to apply for asylum in the U.S. The new measures will almost surely be challenged in court. None President Donald Trump signed a presidential proclamation Friday that will deny asylum to migrants who cross the U.S.-Mexico border ille

2h

 

Five rad and random things I found this week

Gadgets The end-of-week dispatch from PopSci's commerce editor. Vol. 58. My job is to find cool stuff. Throughout the week I spend hours scouring the web for things that are ingenious or clever or ridiculously cheap.

2h

 

Unge sover ad h…… til: To ud af fem har smartphonen fremme om natten

Mere end 40 procent af studerende afbryder deres søvn for at uddele likes eller sende beskeder, viser forsøg blandt DTU-studerende.

2h

 

Camp Fire: The Terrifying Science Behind California’s Massive BlazeCalifornia Paradise

Lots of wind along with very dry vegetation turned the Northern California wildfire into a high-speed menace that tore through Paradise and Butte County.

2h

 

Next US astronaut on Russian rocket confident after mishaps

A U.S. astronaut says she has no qualms about riding a Russian rocket next month despite back-to-back mishaps.

2h

 

Protests at Joburg zoo over widowed elephant

Johannesburg Zoo is under mounting pressure to send a lonely elephant to an animal sanctuary after her male companion died last month.

2h

 

Thai businessman to buy Fortune magazine

Thai businessman Chatchaval Jiaravanon agreed Friday to buy Fortune magazine for $150 million in the latest deal for titles from the former Time Inc. family.

2h

 

France grounds Ryanair plane to force subsidy repayment

French authorities said on Friday they seized a Ryanair plane, forcing 149 London-bound passengers off the aircraft, to get the Irish low-cost airline to repay illegal public aid, the latest in a string of troubles for the carrier.

2h

 

NASA satellite sees Tropical Cyclone Alcide nearing Madgascar

Tropical Cyclone Alcide continued to linger just northeast of the Island nation of Madagascar in the Southern Indian Ocean when NASA's Aqua satellite passed overhead and captured an image of the storm.

2h

 

Study demonstrates 'tunability' of a molecular chaperone

For decades, molecular biologists studying a class of molecular chaperones known as heat shock proteins (Hsp70s) have relied on the Hsp70s found in bacteria as the model system. Now one of the world's experts on the molecule and her team report that their investigation into whether Hsps from mammalian cells behave like those in bacteria reveals "key evolutionary variations" between them.

2h

 

Freshwater turtles navigate using the sun

Blanding's turtle hatchlings need only the sun as their compass to guide them on their way to the nearest wetland—and a place of safety. This is according to John Dean Krenz of Minnesota State University in the US, lead author of a study in Springer's journal Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology. The study focused on how this freshwater turtle, native to the US and Canada, is purposefully able to t

2h

 

He Was a Drug Cop. Then His Daughter Overdosed.

Kevin Simmers is a former police sergeant in Hagerstown, Maryland. During his tenure as a narcotics officer, he aggressively pursued drug arrests—especially those related to heroin. “I believed my entire life that incarceration was the answer to this drug war,” Simmers says in a new documentary from The Atlantic . Then his 18-year-old daughter, Brooke, became addicted to opioids. In the short fil

2h

 

Solution: ‘How Equality and Inequality Shape Birds and Bees’

Our October Insights puzzle explored how evolution may have used negative and positive control mechanisms to shape the conflicting parental functions of reproduction and child rearing. In our first problem, we modeled how the conflicting demands of these two functions might have shaped the division of labor between workers and queens in eusocial insects. In the second problem, we explored how dif

2h

 

SfN18: Telling Stories of Science

Guest post by Kayt Sukel There’s an old Hopi proverb: “Those who tell the stories rule the world.” In today’s world, where science seems to often get short shrift, Wendy Suzuki , a neuroscientist at New York University and a member of the Dana Alliance, believes that storytelling can be a powerful tool for scientists to share, teach, and connect with the world outside their laboratories. She conv

3h

 

Making wind farms more efficient

With energy demands rising, researchers at Penn State Behrend and the University of Tabriz, Iran, have completed an algorithm — or approach — to design more efficient wind farms, helping to generate more revenue for builders and more renewable energy for their customers.

3h

 

3h

 

Solar power—largest study to date discovers 25 percent power loss across UK

Researchers at the University of Huddersfield have undertaken the largest study to date into the effectiveness of solar panels across the UK and discovered that parts of the country are suffering an overall power loss of up to 25% because of the issue of regional 'hot spots'. Hot spots were also found to be more prevalent in the North of England than in the south.

3h

 

Sue Gordon: Silicon Valley Should Work With the Government

In an expansive on-the-record interview with WIRED, the principal deputy director of national intelligence made her pitch for public-private partnerships.

3h

 

Radio Atlantic: What Did We Learn From the Midterms?

Subscribe to Radio Atlantic: Apple Podcasts | Spotify | Stitcher | Google Play Executive Editor Matt Thompson interviews Atlantic reporters on what lessons they drew from the midterm elections, speaking in turn with: Vann Newkirk, Emma Green, Ron Brownstein, Adam Harris, and David Graham. Links – “The Democrats’ Deep-South Strategy Was a Winner After All” (Vann R. Newkirk II, November 8, 2018) –

3h

 

These tiny, crackly bubbles are a new type of volcanic ash

Scientists have identified a new type of volcanic ash made up of millimeter-long spheres with a crackled surface.

3h

 

Scientists Spy On Bees, See Harmful Effects Of Common Insecticide

Bees exposed to a type of insecticides called neonicotinoids dramatically changed their behavior — becoming sluggish, antisocial and spending less time caring for the colony's young, researchers say. (Image credit: James Crall /Science)

3h

 

Scientists capture the sound of sunrise on Mars

Scientists have created the soundtrack of the 5,000th Mars sunrise captured by the robotic exploration rover, Opportunity, using data sonification techniques to create a two-minute piece of music.

3h

 

Water Deep in Earth's Core May Come from Dust Swirling Around the Sun

The source of some of Earth's first water may be gas left over from the sun's birth.

3h

 

3h

 

Do Brazilians Really Care about the Environment?

The election of Jair Bolsonaro as our next president suggests we don’t, but the truth is more complicated — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

3h

 

UMass Amherst study demonstrates 'tunability' of a molecular chaperone

Lila Gierasch, an expert on Hsp70s at the University of Massachusetts Amherst, with her research team, report that Hsp70s from mammalian cells behave quite differently from bacterial Hsp70s. Because of the important roles Hsp70s play in protein misfolding diseases such as cancer and neurodegenerative diseases, the new findings 'will have a major impact on how we think about Hsp70s,' she says.

3h

 

Should Childhood Trauma Be Treated As A Public Health Crisis?

New research highlights the link between childhood trauma and mental illness and addiction in adulthood, leading some researchers to call it an issue as pressing as any infectious disease. (Image credit: fzant/Getty Images)

3h

 

Small zap to brain eases chronic back pain

Targeting a specific part of the brain with weak alternating current of electricity significantly decreased chronic lower back pain in all participants of a small clinical trial, researchers report. The results suggest that doctors may one day be able to target parts of the brain with new noninvasive treatment strategies, such as transcranial alternating current stimulation, or tACS, to boost nat

3h

 

The Legal Precedent That Could Protect Jim Acosta’s Credentials

R obert Sherrill was an outsider by the nature of his work as a Washington correspondent for The Nation . A prolific anti-establishment voice, Sherrill was unafraid to play contrarian to the left or right of the aisle. “He took the shibboleths of liberalism and exposed them as what he felt they were,” Ralph Nader told The Washington Post when Sherrill died in 2014 . “He took liberals and progress

3h

 

A Wind-Whipped Wildfire Ravages Paradise, California

Yesterday, tens of thousands of residents fled their homes in Paradise, California, north of Sacramento, escaping a fast-moving wildfire driven by high winds that swept through their community. Within 24 hours, the Camp Fire has burned more than 20,000 acres, and has virtually destroyed the town. Thousands of homes and other structures in Paradise have been consumed or badly damaged by the blaze.

3h

 

Knitted shell holds up 5-ton curved concrete structure

Researchers have created a knitted textile that serves as the shaping element for curved concrete shells. They’ve used the new technology to create a five-ton concrete structure for an exhibition in Mexico City. The heart of the 13-foot tall curved concrete shell is a knitted formwork textile that a steel cable-net supports. The prototype, called KnitCandela, marks the first architectural-scale a

3h

 

Elagolix reduces menstrual bleeding from most common uterine tumors

A new oral drug significantly reduced menstrual bleeding for women with the most common gynecologic tumors in the United States – benign tumors that disproportionately affect African-Americans, an international clinical trial found.

3h

 

Eye contact reduces lying

A new study from the University of Tampere, Finland, found that eye contact can make us act more honestly.

3h

 

Letters: Sauron, Mortal Men, and ‘A Thoroughly Modern Ringwraith’

The Saruman Trap Last week, Eliot A. Cohen used The Lord of the Rings to analyze a phenomenon he observed among the “erstwhile NeverTrumpers” who “attempt to cleanse themselves of the stain of having signed letters denouncing candidate Trump by praising President Trump’s achievements and his crudely framed, rough-hewn wisdom.” When power is corrupt, Cohen argued, there is no way to escape its tox

3h

 

‘We Don’t Want to Live a Long Life in Fear’

The past few months have been busy for the student activists of March for Our Lives, an advocacy group founded after a gunman killed 17 people at a Parkland, Florida, high school earlier this year. In anticipation of the midterm elections, organizers toured the country encouraging young people to vote for candidates who support stricter gun-control laws. That didn’t quite pan out exactly the way

3h

 

Hurricane-Damaged Air Force Base Has an Opportunity to Rebuild for Resilience

Experts see the recovery effort as a test case for how the U.S. military prepares for climate change — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

3h

 

ESCMID defines generic competencies in antimicrobial prescribing and stewardship

Experts from across Europe have developed a set of competencies in antimicrobial prescribing and stewardship, using a structured consensus procedure. This ESCMID-led study has resulted in a list of competencies that represent the minimum standards that all independent prescribers of antimicrobials should reach to practice according to principles of responsible antibiotic use. The list of competenc

4h

 

NASA satellite sees Tropical Cyclone Alcide nearing Madgascar

Tropical Cyclone Alcide continued to linger just northeast of the Island nation of Madagascar in the Southern Indian Ocean when NASA's Aqua satellite passed overhead and captured an image of the storm.

4h

 

Natural climate change has major influence on hydrological cycle over 'China water tower'

Known as the 'China Water Tower', the Sanjiangyuan region is headwaters of the Yellow River, Yangtze River and Lancang-Mekong River. The streamflow and vegetation cover decreased during the end of last century, while they started to recover in recent 20 years. A new study tries to find out reasons of the change.

4h

 

Researchers study one million years of precipitation to gain new insights into South Asian monsoon

The force of the South Asian Monsoon — a weather pattern that affects the lives of several billion people — is more sensitive to warming in the southern hemisphere than scientists previously thought, according to a new study by an international team of climate researchers.

4h

 

Yelp reviews reveal strengths and weaknesses of emergency departments and urgent care

Comparing five- and one-star Yelp reviews, a Penn Medicine research team found what patients consider to be the strengths and weaknesses of hospital emergency departments and urgent care centers.

4h

 

Cellphone technology developed to detect HIV

Investigators from Brigham and Women's Hospital have designed a portable and affordable mobile diagnostic tool, utilizing a cellphone and nanotechnology, with the ability to detect HIV viruses and monitor its management in resource-limited regions.

4h

 

Soy formula feeding during infancy associated with severe menstrual pain in adulthood

New research suggests that infant girls fed soy formula are more likely to develop severe menstrual pain as young adults. The finding adds to the growing body of literature that suggests exposure to soy formula during early life may have detrimental effects on the reproductive system. The study appears online in the journal Human Reproduction.

4h

 

New study points to strategies to reduce maternal death

The number of severe maternal morbidities (SMM) a pregnant woman has is highly linked to her risk of maternal death, according to a new study by researchers at ICES and St. Michael's Hospital.

4h

 

Adults report distress associated with difficulty controlling sexual feelings, behavior

About 10 percent of men and 7 percent of women reported significant levels of distress and social impairment associated with difficulty controlling their sexual feelings, urges and behaviors.

4h

 

Charles Minard is known for the 'best graphic ever,' but he may have topped it with these maps

Science A new book catalogues the map-maker's lesser-known works. Charles Minard was not a designer by trade, or at least not the kind of artsy mind we usually think of as great creative minds. Minard was a civil engineer who spent his…

4h

 

10 Reasons Not to Panic About the Mueller Probe

At the end of last month, with the midterms looming, I gave a talk before a small private audience in California in which I argued for optimism because—among other things—the moment for firing Robert Mueller had passed. Eighteen months ago, I said, President Trump had an opportunity to disrupt the Russia investigation: He had fired the FBI director and had rocked the Justice Department back on it

4h

 

Outlaw King Picks Up Where Braveheart Left Off

David Mackenzie is a great Scottish director who hasn’t really made a film set in Scotland in years. In 2003, he emerged with Young Adam (starring Ewan McGregor), a moody yarn set in 1950s Glasgow, but since then has only occasionally revisited his native land. His most recent films—the English prison drama Starred Up and the Texas bank-robber thriller Hell or High Water —were some of his best. B

4h

 

If Everyone Left the International Space Station

In November 2000, some 250 miles above Earth, a capsule carrying one American and two Russians docked to the International Space Station (ISS). A hatch leading to their new living quarters swung open, and the crew members floated in and got to work. They hooked up cables and computers for easy communication with the ground. They installed life-support systems to maintain breathable air. They acti

4h

 

A Narcotics Officer Ends His War on Drugs

HAGERSTOWN , Md. — Kevin Simmers relished locking up drug users, no matter how little crack they had on them. “If they just had a pipe—fine,” he said. “At the end of the night, I wanted to have an arrest. I wanted a body.” Decades later, despite his efforts, the opioid epidemic was in full swing in Hagerstown, “ a small town with big-city problems ” an hour outside Baltimore. In 2013, Simmers rec

4h

 

TechEdge is a series of articles and platform-review videos to help you choose the right tools for your research.

NEW! TechEdge from The Scientist Discover new technologies and apply them to your research

4h

 

Life as a skeptic is summed up in this parody documentary

A video from QED 2018 has made the rounds on the internet, poking fun at skeptics and the credulous alike. It features a nearly perfect impression of Sir David Attenborough, jabs at peddlers of pseudoscience, and sharp British humor. The clip reminds us that while it can be difficult to be a skeptic in a superstitious world we must take a moment to laugh at these difficulties. Living as a skeptic

4h

 

The Secret Tools Magicians Use to Fool You

Louis De Belle photographed 32 gimmicks for his new book *Disappearing Objects*.

4h

 

Scalpel-free surgery enhances quality of life for Parkinson's patients, study finds

A high-tech form of brain surgery that replaces scalpels with sound waves improved quality of life for people with Parkinson's disease that has resisted other forms of treatment, a new study has found.

4h

 

Big change from small player — Mitochondria alter body metabolism and gene expression

Mitochondria have their own DNA, but the 13 genes in human mitochondria — along with DNA sequences for tRNAs, rRNAs and some small peptides — are massively overshadowed by the 20,000 genes in the human nucleus. Nevertheless, these diminutive mitochondria may have a strong influence on cellular metabolism and susceptibility to metabolic diseases like heart failure or obesity, according to prelimi

4h

 

Surgical home program for spinal fusion achieves long term success

A standardized care pathway for children with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis undergoing spinal fusion surgery reduces the need for opioid pain medications and shortens hospital stays at Children's National Health System.

4h

 

The case for a decentralized internet | Tamas Kocsis

Who controls the internet? Increasingly, the answer is large corporations and governments — a trend that's threatening digital privacy and access to information online, says web developer Tamas Kocsis. In this informative talk, Kocsis breaks down the different threats to internet freedom and shares his plan to build an alternative, decentralized network that returns power to everyday users.

4h

 

What the Beatles Sounded Like Unedited

If The White Album were a concept album, the concept would be this: The world’s greatest four-piece, comprising two geniuses, one great and searching songwriter, and a magical, melancholy drummer-clown, is breaking up—it just doesn’t know it yet. Mid-1968: The Beatles, newly returned from their trip to the Maharishi’s meditation commune in Rishikesh, India, are in an undirected and febrile state.

4h

 

Pollution in cities damaging insects and ecosystems

High levels of pollution found in many of the world's major cities are having negative effects on plants and insects, according to new research from the University of Sheffield.

4h

 

Tommorow's population will be larger, heavier and eat more

Food demand is growing at the same time as people are getting bigger. Feeding a population of 9 billion in 2050 will require much more food than previously calculated.

4h

 

How to produce fluorescent nanoparticles for medical applications in a nuclear reactor

Scientists from IOCB Prague and IMC have developed a revolutionary method for the easy and inexpensive production of irradiated nanodiamonds and other nanomaterials suitable for use in highly sensitive diagnostics of diseases, including various types of cancer. Their article was recently published in Nature Communications.

4h

 

Excessive posting of selfies is associated with increase in narcissism

A new study has established that excessive use of social media, in particular the posting of images and selfies, is associated with a subsequent increase in narcissism by an average of 25 percent.

4h

 

Shark-skin ‘teeth’ form in this mathematical pattern

New research shows that dermal denticles, or shark-skin teeth, form in line with Alan Turing’s reaction-diffusion theory. Divers avoid sharks for the obvious reasons—the teeth in their mouth—but the teeth in shark skin also have a bite. A mere bump can shred an expensive dry suit. Biologists, divers, and shark aficionados know about shark-skin teeth, but little has been known about their developm

4h

 

Sabre-toothed cats shared their food with injured pride members

Prehistoric sabre-toothed cats often injured their impressive jaws during hunts. Now fossil evidence suggests injured cats could rely on their peers for food

4h

 

Iran’s imprisoned conservationists need scientists to speak up

Environmental groups are being suppressed by Iran's radical regime , says Madani Kaveh

4h

 

Quantum 'compass' could allow navigation without relying on satellites

The UK's first quantum accelerometer for navigation has been demonstrated by a team from Imperial College London and M Squared.

4h

 

Video Doesn’t Capture Truth

The White House has revoked the press pass of Jim Acosta, CNN’s chief White House correspondent, after a testy exchange between the reporter and President Trump at a news conference on Wednesday. Acosta posed a question about the Central American migrant caravan, challenging Trump’s framing of it as an “invasion” meant to reap political advantage. An irritated Trump tried to move on, but Acosta r

4h

 

How emotions underlie even the coldest human calculations

Expert chess players run the gamut of feelings when solving chess problems, according to a study with significant implications for machine intelligence.

5h

 

ExoMars: Life-detecting robot to be sent to Oxia Planum

The joint Europe-Russia mission to the Red Planet in 2020 will investigate an ancient water-altered terrain.

5h

 

Americans got to vote on lots of energy measures in 2018 – and mostly rejected them

Americans in at least seven states voted on ballot initiatives during the 2018 midterm elections. These measures targeted everything from raising targets for the share of electricity drawn from renewable energy to charging a tax on carbon emissions.

5h

 

A new path through the looking-glass

Exploring the mystery of the molecular handedness in nature, scientists have proposed a new experimental scheme to create custom-made mirror molecules for analysis. The technique can make ordinary molecules spin so fast that they lose their normal symmetry and shape and instead form mirrored versions of each other. The research team from DESY, Universität Hamburg and University College London arou

5h

 

Fully identified: The pathway of protons

The question how certain algal enzymes accomplish the high proton transfer rate for hydrogen production had in the past been subject to speculation. Dr. Martin Winkler, Dr. Jifu Duan, Professor Eckhard Hofmann and Professor Thomas Happe from Ruhr-Universität Bochum (RUB), together with colleagues from Freie Universität Berlin, traced the pathway of protons all the way into the active center of [Fe

5h

 

Solar power — largest study to date discovers 25 percent power loss across UK

Regional 'hot spots' account for the power slump and these are more prevalent in the North of England than in the south

5h

 

How to care for your houseplants during winter

A scattering of houseplants adds much-needed greenery to long Alberta winters, so if they turn brown or draw clouds of bugs, think twice about just tossing them out, says a University of Alberta plant expert.

5h

 

Eight steps to a stronger cybersecurity strategy

If there's an attack on the country, the military mobilizes. When a natural disaster strikes, recovery plans go into effect. Should an infectious disease start to spread, health officials launch a containment strategy.

5h

 

Minister: skuffelse, hvis overskudsvarme fra kun ét af seks datacentre kan udnyttes

Energiminister Lars Chr. Lilleholt (V) erkender, at der er adskillige vanskeligheder med at udnytte store datacentres overskudsvarme. Herunder de nuværende regler for overskudsvarme.

5h

 

Was a Star Wars Escape Pod Really Just a KFC Bucket?

We can use video analysis to test whether an escape pod carrying R2-D2 and C-3PO in the first Star Wars movie was modeled using a KFC bucket, as one theory claims.

5h

 

Sequencing pollen DNA to discover insect migratory routes

Metabarcoding, a technique of mass DNA sequencing, allows for tracing migratory routes of insects, an understudied subject due to technical limitations. A small DNA fragment of the pollen that insects transport is used as a barcode to identify the plant species they visited previously. This British Ecological Society funded study shows that transcontinental pollination mediated by migrating insect

5h

 

Scientists capture the sound of sunrise on Mars

Academics transform photo of landmark Mars sunrise into a piece of music

5h

 

Freshwater turtles navigate using the sun

Blanding's turtle hatchlings need only the sun as their compass to guide them on their way to the nearest wetland — and a place of safety. This is according to John Dean Krenz of Minnesota State University in the US, lead author of a study in Springer's journal Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology. The study focused on how this freshwater turtle, native to the US and Canada, is purposefully able t

5h

 

How much debris is lying on glaciers?

A study by scientist Dirk Scherler of the German Research Centre for Geosciences GFZ and two colleagues from Switzerland shows a possibility to detect the extent of debris on mountain glaciers globally and automatically via satellite monitoring. The scientists used the cloud computing platform Google Earth Engine for their study.

5h

 

Big data used to predict the future

University of Cordoba researchers are able to improve prediction systems by reducing the quantity of information

5h

 

Scientist describes first known use of colored rocks in fish nest decoration

Cutlip minnows, a species of small fish that inhabit streams, could be described as the master interior decorators of the fish world.

5h

 

Experts find stone tools connected communities

Stone tools from the Middle Stone Age in South Africa shows that different communities were connected over long time periods over vast geographical areas.

5h

 

Prehistoric teeth give up their secrets

The isotope values of food consumed are reflected in the individual's tissues. As bone is constantly being turned over by remodelling, analysing the stable isotope ratios of bone collagen can shine a light on the main dietary protein sources consumed over many years. New research uses this factor to analyse diet, migration and society between the Neolithic (6,500 – 4,500 BC) and Iron Age (900—100

5h

 

Pollution in cities damaging insects and ecosystems

High levels of pollution found in many of the world's major cities are having negative effects on plants and insects, according to new research from the University of Sheffield.

5h

 

Undersøgelse fastslår forskel på etik og moral hos læger og sygeplejersker

Læger er resultatorienterede, mens sygeplejerskerne prioriterer omsorg højest. Det viser en ny undersøgelse fra Aalborg Universitet.

5h

 

Why Did an Ex-Marine Open Fire in a California Bar?

When gunmen whose names are best forgotten killed 12 classmates and one teacher at Columbine High School in 1999, I never imagined that a mass shooting on that scale would be a minor news story. Almost 20 years later, the latest massacre of like size is destined to fade quickly from headlines. The dead include 12 innocents and one gunman, all killed at a Thousand Oaks, California, bar where colle

5h

 

How to remove odors, instead of just hiding them behind nicer smells

DIY Science can spike that stink. Big honker or petite button, our noses hate when bad odors linger nearby. Luckily, science can help you root out that foul stench.

5h

 

Bees stopped buzzing during 2017 solar eclipse

During the solar eclipse on August 21, 2017, bees stopped buzzing, according to new research. At 16 points along the path of the total solar eclipse, tiny microphones—each about the size of a USB flash drive—captured a unique biological phenomenon. As Earth fell into complete darkness, the bees fell silent. “Getting dark in the middle of the day is not something that happens in a bee’s normal lif

5h

 

Nature-inspired crystal structure predictor

Scientists from Russia found a way of improving the crystal structure prediction algorithms, making the discovery of new compounds multiple times faster.

5h

 

Hurdles to workers' and capital's flow between firms: The roots of sluggish productivity

Since the financial crisis of 2007, with no seeming reason, productivity growth has been slowing down in all the major economies. Part of the explanation of this productivity puzzle in advanced economies may lie in a generalized difficulty of reallocating resources between firms in the same industry and in the same geographical area, a new study by Gianmarco Ottaviano, Professor of Economics at Bo

5h

 

Experts find that stone tools connected communities

Stone tools that were discovered and examined by a group of international experts showed for the first time that various communities that lived during the Middle Stone Age period were widely connected and shared ideas around tool design.

5h

 

Beaches at risk due to the increase in atmospheric CO2

Scientists from the CNR (National Research Council) and Ca' Foscari University of Venice have carried out the first scientific research on the ripple effects linking atmospheric emissions, sea acidification, and coastal erosion. The Mediterranean case study: a possible 31 percent decrease in sediment by 2100. The results have been published inClimatic Change

5h

 

A narwhal frolics with the belugas: Why interspecies adoptions happen

Since the age of the Roman Empire and the story of how the twins Romulus and Remus were raised by a wolf, tales of interspecies adoptions have captivated the human imagination. The story that emerged from Canada's St. Lawrence River in July of 2018 was no exception. While researching belugas, a group of scientists captured drone footage of a young male narwhal, more than 1,000 kilometres south of

5h

 

Americans elected mayors who care about climate change

Being pro-environment was a winning strategy for this country's mayors.

5h

 

Experts address burnout and exit from the veterinary profession

Employers and employees must work together to tackle issues of confidence and motivation, as a new report from the British Veterinary Association (BVA) reveals day-to-day experiences in the workplace are the biggest drivers for burnout and exit from the veterinary profession.

5h

 

Music streaming to music subscriber

The music business has changed dramatically in the last couple of decades since the massive expansion of the internet, the development of music file compression algorithms, and the concept of anonymous file-sharing services. The business has perhaps been slow to respond to the technological change having attempted, often through the law, to try and stem the tide of illicit file sharing with scant

5h

 

Climate change has created a storm of uncertainty. These researchers are making sense of it.

Climate change isn't a monolith. It's characterized by the melting of ice caps over time as much as by a storm surge that cuts off power to a coastal city's subway system.

5h

 

A virtual reality approach to social interaction

People tend to copy other people's behaviour, facial expressions or speech when socially interacting with them. Understanding this unintentional mimicry using sophisticated technology was the subject of the INTERHYTHM project.

5h

 

French NGO threatens Facebook with privacy lawsuit

A French NGO said Friday it was pursuing a class action suit against Facebook, saying the social network was violating users' privacy despite the enactment of strict new EU rules this year.

5h

 

Laser system prevents contamination on aircraft surfaces

Scientists have developed a laser material processing method to produce textured surfaces that repel dirt and water. This technology will primarily be used in the aerospace industry.

5h

 

Handwoven textiles—a step on the path to sustainable fashion?

The fast-industrial fashion system, where profits go mostly to those at the top, and which produces high volumes of deliberate waste, is a dinosaur that will not survive the transition to sustainability. So believes textile management doctoral student David Goldsmith at the Swedish School of Textiles. In his doctoral thesis, he studied an example of its supposed opposite: a slow-artisanal social e

5h

 

Stephen Hawking's final book suggests time travel may one day be possible – here's what to make of it

"If one made a research grant application to work on time travel it would be dismissed immediately," writes the physicist Stephen Hawking in his posthumous book Brief Answers to the Big Questions. He was right. But he was also right that asking whether time travel is possible is a "very serious question" that can still be approached scientifically.

5h

 

Fully identified—the pathway of protons

In their catalytic center, hydrogenases manufacture molecular hydrogen (H2) from two protons and two electrons. They extract the protons required for this process from the surrounding water and transfer them – via a transport chain – into their catalytic core. The exact proton pathway through the hydrogenase had as yet not been understood. "This transfer pathway is a jigsaw piece, crucial for unde

5h

 

As Arctic ship traffic increases, narwhals and other unique animals are at risk

Most Americans associate fall with football and raking leaves, but in the Arctic this season is about ice. Every year, floating sea ice in the Arctic thins and melts in spring and summer, then thickens and expands in fall and winter.

5h

 

Arnold Schwarzenegger’s War on Gerrymandering Is Just Beginning

Arnold Schwarzenegger is preparing to travel to the future of the gerrymandering war. Tuesday brought wins for independent redistricting commissions that Schwarzenegger backed in three of the four states where they were on the ballot—Michigan, Missouri, and Colorado, with Utah still counting, but also trending toward yes. Now the former California governor has begun planning a summit for advocate

5h

 

Goodbye to All Quack

My colleague Marina Koren recently posted to social media: “Patiently waiting for the mandarin duck’s wistful ‘Why I Left New York’ essay.” Imagine my delight, some hours later, when this article submission came to me: I remember now, with clarity that stirs the feathers of my nape, when New York began for me, but I cannot lay my bill upon the moment it ended. It was autumn, and I landed on a pon

5h

 

Leading researchers call for a ban on widely used insecticides

Public health experts have found there is sufficient evidence that prenatal exposure to widely used insecticides known as organophosphates puts children at risk for neurodevelopmental disorders.

6h

 

Slow death of nearby galaxy

Astronomers from CSIRO and The Australian National University have witnessed, in the finest detail ever, the slow death of a neighbouring dwarf galaxy, which is gradually losing its power to form stars.

6h

 

Tiny pacemakers aim to make infant heart surgeries less invasive, while cutting operating costs and time

Rohan Kumthekar, M.D., a cardiology fellow at Children's National, presents a prototype for a miniature pacemaker, about the size of an almond, which aims to make pacemaker procedures for infants less invasive, less painful, and more efficient, measured by shorter surgeries, faster recovery times and reduced medical costs.

6h

 

Ancient human population histories revealed in Central and South America

The first high quality ancient DNA data from Central and South America — 49 individuals some as old as 11,000 years — has revealed a major and previously unknown exchanges between populations. For the first time, researchers have archaeological and genetic evidence linking some of the oldest humans in Central America to the earliest known populations to arrive in the New World.

6h

 

A super-ageing community is saving the declining rural Japan, but how it can sustain?

In Japan, rural tourism has been promoted for some time, but has few visible long-term positive effects. Researchers centered at Kanazawa University studied rural inn households that use tourism to supplement their incomes. While tourism was found to have environmental and strong social benefits, economic impact was minor. Many proprietors are also aging and lack successors. To thrive long-term, r

6h

 

UCI scientists simplify and accelerate directed evolution bioengineering method

In a study published today in the journal Cell, University of California, Irvine researchers reported that they have accelerated and simplified directed evolution by having live cells do most of the heavy lifting. By inserting a specially engineered DNA replication system into yeast, the scientists were able to coax selected genes to rapidly and stably mutate and evolve as the host yeast cells rep

6h

 

Girls are being denied access to certain sports in PE simply because of their gender

Girls in the UK are often told that they can do whatever they want. That nothing can stop them. If they can dream it, they can achieve it. And yet, when it comes to accessing and becoming proficient in sports and activities in PE lessons, they are being stopped before they can even begin.

6h

 

New research suggests global reforestation efforts need to take the long view

Many countries have made commitments to restore huge areas of forest as part of the Bonn Challenge, organized by the International Union for Conservation of Nature. For example, Costa Rica has promised to preserve 1 million hectares (3,861 square miles) of forest by 2020—about 20 percent of the nation's total area. However, a new paper in Conservation Letters suggests that quickly reforesting larg

6h

 

Google gets girls into the game by designing apps for your mobile phone

Google challenged thousands of teenage girls to design games they wanted to see in the world. And now some of their games are hitting the Google Play store for Android users to play.

6h

 

Addressing climate change at a major source—buildings

Can silica gel desiccant packs, often found in shoe boxes and electronics, be the answer to our energy challenges for buildings? A four-year project proves yes, sort of.

6h

 

New magnetically controlled thrombolytic successfully passed preclinical testing

A new anti-thrombosis drug based on magnetite nanoparticles developed at ITMO University has been successfully tested on animals. Preclinical studies showed the drug's high efficacy and lack of side effects. Clot dissolution time of the new drug is 20 times shorter than traditional medications. The range of permissible concentrations is very high, and the minimum dose of the active substance requi

6h

 

Sending spin waves into an insulating 2-D magnet

Quantum Hall ferromagnets are among the purest magnets in the world—and one of the most difficult to study. These 2-D magnets can only be made in temperatures less than a degree above absolute zero and in high magnetic fields, about the scale of an MRI.

6h

 

Socialdemokratiet: Timing for styringsdebat er mærkelig

Det er mærkeligt at skulle diskutere styringsreform, når regeringen endnu ikke har lagt sit forslag til en sundhedsreform frem, indvendte Socialdemokratiet, da Folketinget fredag debatterede regeringens lovforslag om nærhedsfinansiering. S stemmer dog for alligevel.

6h

 

Reinterpretation of Tulán-52 excavation suggests social complexity among late hunter-gatherers

A pair of researchers has found evidence at the Tulán-52 excavation in Chile that suggests the need for a reinterpretation of how the stone complex was used. In their paper published in the journal Antiquity, Lautaro Núñez with Universidad Católica del Norte and Catherine Perlès with Allée de l'Université, suggest the new evidence shows more social complexity among the later hunter-gatherers who b

6h

 

Earthworms—integral ecosystem engineers

Global demands for food and energy are driving research on sustainably using our planet's fast-depleting natural resources. One creative initiative looked to ancient land-use systems that supported millions of people with no apparent negative effect on biodiversity and ecosystem resilience.

6h

 

Protein profiles for individual pigs enable producers to determine the cut of meat via genetics

EU research has investigated protein profiles for individual pigs so the producer will be able to determine the cut of meat from the genetics of the pig. With genomic analysis, there has been considerable progress made in determining the variability of genomes in all main livestock species. However, linking the genome with its phenotype in terms of meat quality and type for the producer remains ch

6h

 

Instant solution helps fight forest fires

EU-funded researchers developed a fresh approach to fighting forest fires based on a new instant foam technology.

6h

 

Sutherland spaceport project to move to next stage

The backers of the proposed satellite launch site are to hold further discussion with those who live in the area.

6h

 

Democrats Quickly Confront the Limits of Their Power to Stop Trump

House Democrats barely had a chance to celebrate the new majority they won on Tuesday before Donald Trump confronted them with their first test. Hours after warning Democrats of retaliation if they harassed him with congressional investigations, the president ousted Attorney General Jeff Sessions and replaced him with a loyalist who had criticized the probe that has placed Trump in legal jeopardy

6h

 

Every City Should Have a Toy Library

On July 30, 1942, then–New York City Mayor Fiorello La Guardia was uptown in Harlem, playing with toys. “Harlem Gets First Toyery,” announced a Paramount newsreel heralding the opening of the neighborhood’s first toy-lending library, a storefront on West 135th Street stocked with 1,000 playthings and sponsored by a branch of the Domestic Relations Court. Ida Cash, a city probation officer, had co

6h

 

Facebook says Portal device not for snooping

Portal, Facebook's talking speaker, is not a snooping device—that's a message the social network says has gotten lost in the coverage leading up to the device's launch.

6h

 

Ancient DNA suggests people settled South America in at least 3 waves

Genetic studies of ancient remains are filling in the picture of who the earliest Americans were and how they spread through the Americas long ago.

6h

 

From N.K. Jemisin to *We Are the Nerds*, Our Favorite End-of-Year Books

The fourth quarter of the calendar is always a doozy—but we've sifted through the best new releases to stock your shelf (or e-reader) with.

6h

 

JLab Audio Flex Sport Review: Over-Ear Workout Headphones You'll Love

Most over-ear workout headphones are preposterous. But not these.

6h

 

Will new tech taxes in Mountain View, San Francisco, East Palo Alto be contagious?

Both sides in the debate over whether Bay Area businesses should pay more taxes to help solve the region's housing, traffic and affordability problems predict that cities will increasingly turn to squeezing Big Tech after voters in three cities approved new levies aimed at tech companies.

6h

 

NUS study: Mangroves can help countries mitigate their carbon emissions

Geographers from the National University of Singapore have found that coastal vegetation such as mangroves, seagrasses, and salt marshes may be the most effective habitats to mitigate carbon emissions.

6h

 

Small populations of normal cells affect immunity in patients with XLP1

Patients with X-linked lymphoproliferative syndrome type 1 (XLP1) are at risk of fatal infectious mononucleosis. Here, a Tokyo Medical and Dental University (TMDU)-led research team performed detailed analyses of T cells in a family with a mild form of XLP1. They found small populations of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells expressing SLAM-associated protein at normal levels, suggesting that less invasive ther

6h

 

Ready for a close-up: The science behind face massage rollers

Facial massaging using a roller can increase skin blood flow for more than ten minutes after the massage. It can also improve vasodilation — the widening of blood vessels, — in the long-term, according to a study by researchers in Japan.

6h

 

Nursing science could help reduce firearm violence and its impact

Firearm violence is a significant public health problem worldwide. In the United States, firearms are used to kill almost 100 people daily. Yet despite the staggering impact of firearm violence, there is limited research directed at preventing or addressing its impact on individuals, families and communities.

6h

 

New UMBC research suggests global reforestation efforts need to take the long view

Based on data from Costa Rica spanning 1947 — 2014, the authors of a new study found 50 percent of secondary forest patches were re-cleared within 20 years, and 85 percent were re-cleared within 54 years. This suggests that committing to reforesting lands for the long term, even if smaller in total area, may provide greater benefits (habitat, carbon storage, etc.) than quickly reforesting large a

6h

 

Proofs and Guarantees

We can prove things in math, but does that mean they’re true? — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

6h

 

Evolving speech and AI as the window into mental health

Mental health and neurological disorders are a growing epidemic. In the U.S., nearly one in every five people has a mental health condition.

6h

 

Screen time to heal, and perhaps to harm

Editor in Chief Nancy Shute reflects on the advances in virtual reality technology and how much time we spend on our computers and smartphones.

6h

 

Questions about toxic red tides, and more reader feedback

Readers had inquiries about a new deicing material, harmful algal blooms and more.

6h

 

Ny opdagelse: Grønlandske gletsjere udsender metangas i store mængder

For første gang har forskere dokumenteret, at metangas frigives direkte ud i atmosfæren…

6h

 

Parents' guts tell tales to their children

Researchers at Umeå university in Sweden have published a new study showing that the gut bacteria can carry information of past experiences of an altered environment from parents to offspring. Eggs and sperm are not the only information carriers from one generation to the next.

6h

 

Scientists simplify and accelerate directed evolution bioengineering method

In a process known as directed evolution, scientists reengineer biomolecules to find ones that perform beneficial new functions. The field is revolutionizing drug development, chemical engineering and other applications, but to realize its promise involves painstaking and time-consuming laboratory work.

6h

 

Antarctic: Nasa shares close-up photos of big PIG iceberg

Scientists get a decent look at the large new iceberg that's broken away from Pine Island Glacier.

6h

 

Mangroves can help countries mitigate their carbon emissions

Geographers from the National University of Singapore (NUS) have found that coastal vegetation such as mangroves, seagrasses, and salt marshes may be the most effective habitats to mitigate carbon emissions.

6h

 

Holocene temperature in the Iberian Peninsula reconstructed studying insect subfossils

Holocene temperature in the Iberian Peninsula reconstructed with chironomid subfossils

6h

 

Four base units of measure in the metric system about to be changed

Officials with the General Conference on Weights and Measures (CGPM) have announced that at a meeting to be held next week, four of the base units used in the metric system will be redefined. The four units under review are the ampere, kilogram, mole and kelvin.

6h

 

Aerospace detection technology designed to prevent catastrophic events in energy and extreme environments

Could new technology from Purdue University researchers have helped save the Titanic? Engineers from Purdue have developed technology to help prevent catastrophic failures involving nuclear, energy and other materials in extreme environments.

6h

 

Sidste nyt fra Parker Solar Probe: Sonden har det fint

Mandag tog Nasa-sonden sin første tur rundt om Solen. Alle instrumenter kører.

6h

 

A toast to the proteins in dinosaur bones

Burnt toast and dinosaur bones have a common trait, according to a new study. They both contain chemicals that, under the right conditions, transform original proteins into something new. It's a process that may help researchers understand how soft-tissue cells inside dinosaur bones can survive for hundreds of millions of years.

6h

 

Study suggests initial success in prestigious institutions key to lifelong artistic achievement

An international team of researchers has found that early exposure by certain art institutions is a major factor in lifelong success as an artist. In their paper published in the journal Science, the group describes their study of artistic careers over a 40-year span and the major factors that contributed to success and failures.

6h

 

Image: The frozen wild Dnieper River

Curling snow drifts are magnified by the terrain around the 1,400 mile Dnieper River, flowing from Russia to the Black Sea.

6h

 

Air quality research could improve public health in West Africa

Research that models nearly 60 years of air quality in West Africa could lend insights into better forecasting a hazard that affects more than 350 million people in the region, according to an international team of researchers.

6h

 

Dansk fjernvarme kan løse Europas klimaproblemer

En kombination af vindkraft, dansk fjernvarmeteknologi og energieffektive bygninger kan gøre Europas energiproduktion meget grønnere, mener eksperter.

7h

 

Large-scale land acquisition in Africa affects farmers' ability to produce their own food

In order to avoid water conflicts and to stimulate food production in sub-Saharan Africa, large-scale land acquisition should be regulated and focus on food production. These are the conclusions of a new doctoral thesis from Lund University in Sweden.

7h

 

Parker Solar Probe reports good status after close solar approach

Parker Solar Probe is alive and well after skimming by the sun at just 15 million miles from our star's surface. This is far closer than any spacecraft has ever gone—the previous record was set by Helios B in 1976 and broken by Parker on Oct. 29—and this maneuver has exposed the spacecraft to intense heat and solar radiation in a complex solar wind environment.

7h

 

Robots as carers? First we need to assess the pros and cons

If you have seen science fiction television series such as Humans or Westworld, you might be imagining a near future where intelligent, humanoid robots play an important role in meeting the needs of people, including caring for children or older relatives.

7h

 

Math can improve flu vaccine, experts say

Mathematical modeling can improve the flu vaccine's effectiveness, according to experts at Rice University—where one such model has existed for more than 15 years—and its Baker Institute for Public Policy.

7h

 

Hovedstaden indstiller kandidat til direktørposten

Ansættelsesudvalget melder om skarp konkurrence mellem fire kandidater til posten om at blive regionsdirektør i Hovedstaden. Udvalget er enig om en kandidat, der nu skal godkendes.

7h

 

Cell phones pose plenty of risks, but none of them are cancer

Health One of the largest studies yet on the relationship between cell phones and cancer hasn't shifted the scientific viewpoint. Research into the relationship between cell phones and cancer has been ongoing since the 1990s, when David Reynard sued a cellphone company after his wife developed…

7h

 

‘Holodeck’ project brings VR and augmented reality together

The Holodeck Project at New York University explores the future of technology and the infinite possibilities for future communication. In Ken Perlin’s Future Reality Lab at the NYU’s Courant Institute, researchers are testing three-dimensional animation software called “ChalkTalk” that lets you draw in midair. A new virtual reality prototype called “The Cave” lets users go to the movies with frie

7h

 

Multimessenger links to NASA's Fermi mission show how luck favors the prepared

In 2017, NASA's Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope played a pivotal role in two important breakthroughs occurring just five weeks apart. But what might seem like extraordinary good luck is really the product of research, analysis, preparation and development extending back more than a century.

7h

 

Distant NASA camera yields new Earth views

The Earth Polychromatic Imaging Camera (EPIC) instrument operates aboard the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA) Deep Space Climate Observatory (DSCOVR) satellite, which launched in February 2015 and observes Earth from a distance of about one million miles toward the Sun, allowing for observation of the entire Earth from sunrise to sunset.

7h

 

Will the Left Go Too Far?

If you gauge the climate inside the Democratic Party merely by which candidates won its 2018 primaries, you might think reports of its leftward lurch are exaggerated. Despite the hoopla about Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez’s and Ayanna Pressley’s upset victories in congressional races in New York and Massachusetts, not a single incumbent Democratic governor or senator lost a primary to a left-leaning c

7h

 

Blizzard's 'Diablo: Immortal' Announcement Did Not Go Well

Nor did Nintendo's racist-imagery snafu or Square Enix's 'Final Fantasy' expansion plans. Plenty of wrong to go around!

7h

 

7 Best Streaming Devices for 2018 (4K or HD): Roku, Apple TV, Chromecast, Fire TV

We compare the best media streaming devices for 4K HDR or HD TVs from Roku, Google, Apple, and Amazon.

7h

 

Spacetime—a creation of well-known actors?

Most physicists believe that the structure of spacetime is formed in an unknown way at the Planck scale, i.e., at a scale close to one trillionth of a trillionth of a metre. However, careful considerations undermine this prediction. There are quite a few arguments in favour of the emergence of spacetime as a result of processes taking place at the level of quarks and their conglomerates.

7h

 

How does Listeria develop antimicrobial resistance in food products?

A research project by Surrey's BioProChem group reveals crucial evidence about the way Listeria grows in foods – particularly when novel, milder processing techniques are applied – which could have implications for the food processing industry.

7h

 

Image of the Day: Plundered Plover

Nest predation of shorebirds that raise young in the Arctic are up threefold since the mid-20th century, and climate change may be to blame, according to a study.

7h

 

Human footprint driving mammal extinction crisis

Human impacts are the biggest risk factor in the possible extinction of a quarter of all land-based mammals, according to a University of Queensland study.

7h

 

Plant detective: Missouri S&T professor studies plants as "bio-sentinels" of indoor pollution

Behold the common house plant, the front-yard shrub, the rhododendron around back that's seen better days since the next-door neighbors put their home on the market.

7h

 

Evading cell death

Cancer cells can develop resistance to the treatments designed to eliminate them. Several studies have linked stress granules (SGs), cell organelles that form transiently in response to extracellular stress, to this phenomenon. However, how SGs protect cancer cells remains unclear.

7h

 

Flipped classroom enhances learning outcomes in medical certificate education

The quality of medical certificates written by students of medicine was better when they were taught by using the flipped classroom approach instead of traditional lecturing. A randomly selected student from the flipped classroom group had an 85 percent probability to receive a better total score than a student from the traditional teaching group, according to a new study from the University of Ea

7h

 

Super-fast flying machines defy body logic

The size of a tiny insect brain bears no comparison to the super capacity of its killer instinct and flying skills and speed.

7h

 

First-generation college students rely heavily on media for expectations, study shows

When growing up, many young people look to their parents for guidance on how to prepare for all manner of experiences. But when the parents do not have a particular experience to share, where do kids turn?

7h

 

In the balance: scientists vote on first change to kilogram in a century

The weight is defined by a lump of metal in a Paris vault – which could make Earth ‘laughing stock of universe’ For the band of specialists in the much-overlooked arena of metrology, it will be the most profound moment in more than a century. Since 1889, one of the pillars of the science, the kilogram, has been defined by a lump of metal held in a triple-locked vault in a lab on the outskirts of

7h

 

Keystone XL Pipeline: US judge orders halt on constructionMichelle Obama Trump US

Trump administration "discarded" facts about climate change when it approved the Keystone XL, says judge.

7h

 

Delhi air

Some popular ways Indians try to beat air pollution – but do they really work?

7h

 

Researchers share drone expertise to help Guatemalans better prepare for volcanic eruptions

A team of scientists and engineers from the Universities of Birmingham and Bristol have returned from Guatemala where they have been teaching local scientists how to use drones to map the Fuego volcano which violently erupted earlier this year.

7h

 

Weather forecasts from alien worlds are in – and it’s wild out there

We have seen violent winds, clouds of glass and ruby hailstones. In fact, weather on exoplanets can be so extreme that it can make or break their habitability

7h

 

Sir David Attenborough lends voice to Netflix's Our Planet seriesDavid Attenborough

The documentary will "showcase the planet's most precious species and fragile habitats", Netflix said.

7h

 

Catching plastic

Microplastics have swamped our ecosystem. Can tech help prevent them entering our water systems?

7h

 

Judge Blocks the Disputed Keystone XL Pipeline in a Setback for Trump’s Energy AgendaMichelle Obama Trump US

The Trump administration “simply discarded” the effect the project would have on climate change, the court found.

7h

 

Here's Your Brain on Cirque du Soleil: Performers Spark Awe, Scans Show

What's happening in our brains when we feel a sense of awe?

7h

 

How Does the Experimental 'Vaccine' for Celiac Disease Work?

An experimental "vaccine" for celiac disease is set to be tested in a new clinical trial.

8h

 

Antarctica: The Ice-Covered Bottom of the World (Photos)

Here's a look at the southernmost continent, a place of extremes.

8h

 

Exploring life in an urban neighborhood through social media

The inspiration for a new book by Jeffrey Lane that examines how social media impacts the lives of black teenagers grew out of his involvement with a community initiative to engage teens online as a way of building a safer neighborhood.

8h

 

Draw-your-own electrodes set to speed up development of micro detection devices

Miniature devices for sensing biological molecules could be developed quicker thanks to a rapid prototyping method.

8h

 

The Day of Fate

At an evening news conference on November 9, 1989, a spokesman for the East German Communist government made a history-altering mistake. The spokesman had been authorized to say that travel restrictions on East German citizens would be lifted the next day, November 10. Instead, he said that the restrictions were lifted effective immediately. Within minutes, hundreds of thousands of East Berliners

8h

 

The Bridesmaids Are Multiplying

The picture usually appears about halfway through every Facebook wedding album—after the ceremony, before the sweaty dance circles. The bride, often posing in a scenic outdoor spot, is flanked on either side by a cluster of women. Draped in matching fabric, hair swept back with bobby pins and hairspray, they lean in close. You mess with the bride, their smiles seem to say, we smother you with a b

8h

 

Trump's Space Force Faces an Uncertain Fate

For the past several months, Donald Trump’s administration has explored the creation of a new military branch to protect national interests in outer space. Perhaps no one is as excited about this effort as President Trump, who came up with the idea. “He only asks me about the Space Force every week,” Mike Pence joked at a meeting of the National Space Council last month, where members formulated

8h

 

Video: What is space weather?

On the sidelines at European Space Weather Week 2018, in Leuven, Belgium, ESA Web TV caught up with two experts working on the fascinating science of how our Sun's raging activity affects Earth and, ultimately, the infrastructure, networks and satellites on which we rely for daily economic activity.

8h

 

Image: Coronal holes

This image shows dramatic dark areas in the Sun's corona and was acquired by the SWAP instrument on ESA's Proba-2 mission at midday on Wednesday, 7 November.

8h

 

Antibiotic resistance without the antibiotics

Antibiotic resistance is a global threat that leads to more than 23,000 deaths each year in the United States, according to the Centers for Disease Control. Over-exposure to antibiotics has long been blamed, but Assistant Professor Mary Dunlop (BME) is flipping that idea on its head, finding that bacteria can also develop resistance without being exposed to antibiotics.

8h

 

High-performance solar cells: Physicists grow stable perovskite layers

Crystalline perovskite cells are the key to cutting-edge thin-film solar cells. Although they already achieve very high levels of efficiency in the laboratory, commercial applications are hampered by the fact that the material is too unstable. Furthermore, there is no reliable industrial production process for perovskites. In a new study published in the Journal of Physical Chemistry Letters, phys

8h

 

How do peptides penetrate cells? Two sides of the same coin

The simple transport of drugs directly into cells is one of the primary goals of the pharmaceutical industry. In large part, researchers still don't possess a detailed understanding at the molecular level of the processes responsible for transporting substances into and out of cells. In collaboration with colleagues from the Czech Republic and Germany, the research team of Pavel Jungwirth from the

8h

 

Ændret afgift på vej: Overskudsvarme skal udnyttes bedre

Ifølge et nyt forslag skal en virksomhed betale afgift på overskudsvarme, uanset om den foræres væk eller ej.

8h

 

OVERBLIK: Femern-forbindelsen fra beslutning til planlov

Femernforbindelsen har været intensivt dækket i Ingeniøren. Med en ny tysk planlov under udarbejdelse, kan projektets tidshorisont igen ændres.

8h

 

Re-inventing the hook: Orangutans spontaneously bend straight wires into hooks to fish for food

The bending of a hook into wire to fish for the handle of a basket is surprisingly challenging for young children under eight years of age. Now, cognitive biologists and comparative psychologists led by Isabelle Laumer and Alice Auersperg observed hook tool-making for the first time in a non-human primate species—the orangutan. To the researchers' surprise, the apes spontaneously manufactured hook

8h

 

Don’t Want to Fall for Fake News? Don’t Be LazyWhite House Jim Acosta

An MIT professor argues that misinformation boils down to one simple thing: mental laziness, exacerbated by social media.

8h

 

Pipeline Vandals Are Reinventing Climate Activism

Angry about climate change, activists shut down an oil pipeline in Minnesota—and then tried to convince a jury that their illegal actions were necessary.

8h

 

The (Scientific) Path Less Traveled

An unconventional medical research journey toward a possible therapy for cerebral palsy — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

8h

 

Neuroscientists Make a Case against Solitary Confinement

Prolonged social isolation can do severe, long-lasting damage to the brain — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

8h

 

Femern skrevet ud af tysk lov: Tunnel-godkendelse kan trække ud i årevis

Transportudvalget i den tyske Forbundsdag afviste at skrive Femern-forbindelsen direkte ind i bemærkningerne til en ny udgave af planloven. Nu siger regeringskoordinator, at Danmark må vente på udfaldet af retssag, inden tunnelbyggeriet kan starte.

8h

 

NASA jubler: Rumsonde er i live efter nærkontakt med Solen

Rumsonden Parker Solar Probe er kommet tættere på Solen end nogen anden rumsonde. Nu skal den gøre os klogere på blandt andet solstorme.

9h

 

This is how we end hyper-partisan politics

Alice Dreger shares brilliant advice for divisive times: Break bread, literally, with your so-called enemy. "[S]ee if [you] can have a conversation, and preferably to do it over food or drink, because there is something very primal in us about sharing food and drink that allows us, I think, to open our hearts and our minds." If you're passionate about social change, Dreger recommends avoiding des

9h

 

How Straight-Ticket Voting by Democrats Took Out a Leading Texas Moderate

Senator Ted Cruz may have survived a spirited challenge from Beto O’Rourke, but straight-ticket voting by Democrats in the high-turnout election almost certainly enabled a 27-year-old graduate student with no government experience to topple the highly respected moderate Republican who has for the past decade led Harris County, Texas, the third-largest county in America. Lina Hidalgo’s 1.5 percent

9h

 

Trump’s Interference With Science Is Unprecedented

The Trump administration is breaking with 75 years of precedent by attempting to interfere in how science is practiced by the U.S. government, according to three experts who issued a dire warning to their profession in the journal Science on Thursday. The administration is empowering political staff to meddle with the scientific process by pushing through reforms disguised to look as though they

9h

 

The Backlash Against Screen Time at School

Four years ago, Paul France left a teaching job in the Chicago suburbs to move to San Francisco and be part of the so-called personalized-learning revolution in education. He joined a high-profile start-up called AltSchool whose investors include Mark Zuckerberg and the venture-capital firm Andreessen Horowitz. France was passionate about both education and technology and welcomed the opportunity

9h

 

Efter flyulykke i Indonesien: Advarsel udsendt til alle piloter på Boeing 737 Max

En fejl på ny sensor kan medføre serier af fatale fejl, som piloter har svært ved at overskue.

9h

 

Hints of Oort clouds around other stars may lurk in the universe’s first light

Sifting through the universe’s early light could reveal planetary graveyards orbiting other stars.

9h

 

Nano-scale process may speed arrival of cheaper hi-tech products

Researchers have developed an inexpensive way to make products incorporating nanoparticles — such as high-performance energy devices or sophisticated diagnostic tests — which could speed the commercial development of devices, materials and technologies.

10h

 

Intense tests reveal elusive, complex form of common element

Scientists have used high pressure and high temperature experiments to recreate an unusually complex form of nitrogen in the lab for the first time.

10h

 

Hidden estrogen receptors in the breast epithelium

EPFL scientists have uncovered that next to estrogen receptor positive and negative there are cells with very low amounts of the receptor protein. The discovery has significant implications for the role of the receptor in the growth and development of the breast and breast cancer development.

10h

 

A toast to the proteins in dinosaur bones

Burnt toast and dinosaur bones have a common trait, according to a new, Yale-led study. They both contain chemicals that, under the right conditions, transform original proteins into something new. It's a process that may help researchers understand how soft-tissue cells inside dinosaur bones can survive for hundreds of millions of years.

10h

 

Scientists solve century-old neuroscience mystery; answers may lead to epilepsy treatment

Scientists at the Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute have solved a 125-year-old mystery of the brain, and, in the process, uncovered a potential treatment for acquired epilepsy. Perineuronal nets modulate electrical impulses in the brain, and, should the nets dissolve, brain seizures can occur.

10h

 

Datacentre kommer til at fyre for fuglene

Kun ved Facebooks datacenter i Odense er der planer om at udnytte overskudsvarme til fjernevarme, som det ellers blev lovet.

10h

 

Operation i tyktarmen ser ud til at øge risikoen for at udvikle diabetes

Patienter, der får foretaget en operation i tyktarmen, har en forhøjet risiko for at udvikle type 2 diabetes. Det viser et nyt studie, som en gruppe danske forskere står bag.

10h

 

House Democrats Want to Investigate Trump's Foreign Policy

Donald Trump’s closing message ahead of the midterm elections was that voters faced a choice between imminent national catastrophe and salvation—with the United States besieged by unauthorized immigrants, shadowy terrorists, and predatory trade practices that he alone could repel. And the president, who enjoys wide latitude in foreign affairs and a Republican-controlled Senate, may largely be abl

10h

 

Hvorfor stolede politiet ikke på ANPG under menneskejagten?

Nummerpladescannere burde have vist politiet, at mistænkt Volvo ikke havde forladt Sjælland, da fynsk landsby blev mål for stor auktion i september. Men politiet vil ikke fortælle, hvordan systemet blev brugt.

10h

 

Hør ugens podcast: Grøn energipolitik bliver til varm luft i datacentre

Størstedelen af de datacentre, som Google, Facebook og Apple planlægger i Danmark kommer til at fyre for fuglene. De skal ligge så langt fra fjernvarmenettet, at det ikke kan betale sig at udnytte overskudsvarmen. Når bilerne en dag kan køre selv, vil det blive endnu sværere at komme frem i trafi…

10h

 

Intense tests reveal elusive, complex form of common element

An unusually complex form of one of the most abundant chemical elements on Earth has been revealed in the lab for the first time.

10h

 

Nano-scale process may speed arrival of cheaper hi-tech products

An inexpensive way to make products incorporating nanoparticles—such as high-performance energy devices or sophisticated diagnostic tests—has been developed by researchers.

10h

 

A toast to the proteins in dinosaur bones

Burnt toast and dinosaur bones have a common trait, according to a new, Yale-led study. They both contain chemicals that, under the right conditions, transform original proteins into something new. It's a process that may help researchers understand how soft-tissue cells inside dinosaur bones can survive for hundreds of millions of years.

10h

 

Directivity to improve optical devices

A team of researchers from the Dutch institute AMOLF, Western University (Canada), and the University of Texas (United States of America) recently demonstrated the use of algorithmic design to create a new type of nanophotonic structure. This is good news for researchers in optical quantum computing and photovoltaics, because the structure greatly improves the directivity of nanoscale emitters (in

10h

 

Nyt gennembrud øger metal-luft-batteriers levetid

En oliebarriere mellem anode og elektrolyt kan løse stor udfordring med lovende aluminium-luft-batterier, viser forskere fra MIT.

10h

 

Two new rogue planets that do not orbit stars have been discovered

Astronmers have found two new planets that don't have stars. They are incredibly difficult to spot, but there may be more of them in the Milky Way than stars

10h

 

Regionsrådsmedlemmer protesterer mod at skrive psykiatrien ud af KBU

I et bekymringsbrev til sundhedsministeren advarer to medlemmer af regionsrådet i Midtjylland om at gøre alvor af at sløjfe psykiatrien af KBU, som lægedækningsudvalget har anbefalet. Det vil kappe forsyningslinjen til psykiatrien, siger de.

11h

 

US court halts construction of Keystone XL oil pipelineMichelle Obama Trump US

A federal judge on Thursday halted construction of the Keystone XL oil pipeline, arguing that President Donald Trump's administration had failed to adequately explain why it had lifted a ban on the project.

11h

 

Fast-moving fire scorches northern CaliforniaCalifornia Paradise

A rapidly spreading, late-season wildfire in northern California has burned 20,000 acres of land and prompted authorities to issue evacuation orders for thousands of people.

11h

 

Yelp's shares take a beating after revenue miss

Shares of Yelp Inc. took a beating Thursday after the online-reviews site reported soft third-quarter sales and indicated the current period would also be weak.

11h

 

Trouble brewing?: Brexit challenge for Guinness supply chain

With its brown-black hue and cascading creamy head, Guinness is Ireland's most iconic export.

11h

 

New Tesla chairwoman's biggest challenge is controlling Musk

Australian telecommunications executive Robyn Denholm brings much-needed financial and auto industry expertise to her new role as Tesla's board chairwoman, but her biggest challenge is whether she can rein in a CEO with a proclivity for misbehavior.

11h

 

China steps up drone race with stealth aircraft

China is unleashing stealth drones and pilotless aircraft fitted with AK-47 rifles onto world markets, racing to catch up to US technology and adding to a fleet that has already seen combat action in the Middle East.

11h

 

Google bows to worker pressure on sexual misconduct policySundar Pichai Google

Google is promising to be more forceful and open about its handling of sexual misconduct cases, a week after thousands of high-paid engineers and others walked out in protest over its male-dominated culture.

11h

 

Letter shows a fearful Einstein long before Nazis' rise

More than a decade before the Nazis seized power in Germany, Albert Einstein was on the run and already fearful for his country's future, according to a newly revealed handwritten letter.

11h

 

UK wine-making areas to rival Champagne revealed

Research from the University of East Anglia has identified areas of the UK which could rival the Champagne region of France.

12h

 

Climate Change: Arctic 'no safe harbour' for breeding birds

Climate change could be behind declines in birds that lay their eggs on Arctic shores, a study says.

12h

 

Material scientists create fabric alternative to batteries for wearable devices

A major factor holding back development of wearable biosensors for health monitoring is the lack of a lightweight, long-lasting power supply. Now scientists at the University of Massachusetts Amherst led by materials chemist Trisha L. Andrew report that they have developed a method for making a charge-storing system that is easily integrated into clothing for "embroidering a charge-storing pattern

12h

 

Live from Berlin: Falling Walls Conference 2018

Which are the next walls to fall in science and society? — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

12h

 

Prestigeprojekt om kunstig intelligens smuldrer

En femårig rammeaftale med IBM skulle hjælpe Region Hovedstaden til at blive føren­de inden for kunstig intelligens. To ud af tre projekter er dog strandet, og nu vil regionen ud af samarbejdet. Investeringerne i kunstig intelligens fortsætter dog på et lavere niveau.

13h

 

Region: Aftale med IBM har vist sig at være en forhindring

Svigtende finansiering og et ønske om større smidighed er grunden til, at regionen har opsagt den femårige millionaftale med IBM om kunstig intelligens før tid.

13h

 

Bedre målinger skal afsløre de ukendte 95 procent af universets legoklodser

En bevilling på 11.2 millioner kroner fra Uddannelses- og Forskningsministeriet skal medvirke til…

13h

 

Martin købte et ekstra ydernummer i nabobyen og fik en ny kompagnon

Blot 10 PLO-lægeklinikker driver i øjeblikket mere end ét ydernummer i Danmark, ifølge nye tal fra Danske Regioner. Martin Aagaard Poulsens solopraksis var tidligere en af de få, og for ham har opkøbet været en succes. Både økonomisk og kollegialt.

14h

 

Praksislæger udnytter ikke mulighederne i sundhedsloven

Anders Kühnau, chefforhandler for Danske Regioner på overenskomstområdet, ærgrer sig over, at praksislæger afholder sig fra at tage et ekstra ydernummer og i det hele taget ikke udnytter sundhedslovens talrige muligheder. -Omvendt skal Regioner og PLO blive bedre til at informere -lægerne om de nye tiltag, siger han.

14h

 

78-årig praksislæge udskød pension for at finde en afløser – nu opgiver han

78-årige Luciano Stievano er bekymret for sine patienters fremtid, når han lige straks går på pension. For han har ikke kunnet finde en arvtager til sin praksis. Det var langtfra sådan, han havde forestillet sig at takke af. Gennem mere end 30 år har han oplevet almen praksis indefra, og hvordan der er kommet flere opgaver, mere kontrol og alt for mange patienter pr. læge. Det går ud over både kv

14h

 

Alt for få praksislæger tager ­efteruddannelse i supervision

Patientpresset i almen praksis har aldrig været større, og supervisionsgrupper kan være et afgørende redskab for ikke at brænde ud. Men ønsker nyetablerede grupper en praktiserende læge som supervisor, findes der blot ganske få. Vi er nødt til at efteruddanne nogle flere, lyder opråbet fra to af områdets nuværende kræfter.

14h

 

Cross Section: Sir Venki Ramakrishnan – Science Weekly podcast

Nicola Davis sits down with Nobel prize-winning scientist Sir Venki Ramakrishnan to discuss the competition he faced in the race to discover the ribosome – AKA the gene machine . Is competition good for science, or would a collaborative approach be better? Competition, as defined by the Oxford living dictionary , is ‘the activity or condition of striving to gain or win something by defeating or e

14h

 

Sådan blev Danmark verdens bedste Counter-Strike-nation

Med 11 af 50 spillere på de ti bedste hold, er Danmark i øjeblikket den bedste Counter-Strike-nation i verden. Men hvordan blev et lille land i norden en e-sport-supermagt?

14h

 

14h

 

Cross Section: Sir Venki Ramakrishnan – Science Weekly podcast

Nicola Davis sits down with Nobel prize-winning scientist Sir Venki Ramakrishnan to discuss the competition he faced in the race to discover the ribosome – AKA the gene machine. Is competition good for science, or would a collaborative approach be better?

14h

 

Vores galakses hidtil ældste stjerner er blevet opdaget

Forskere har fundet to stjerner, der er omkring 13,5 milliarder år gamle. Stjernerne er langt ældre end Solen.

14h

 

Psychological science can make your meetings better

Meetings are the bane of office life for many professionals but they don't have to be. Drawing from almost 200 scientific studies on workplace meetings, a team of psychological scientists provides recommendations for making the most out of meetings before they start, as they're happening, and after they've concluded.

15h

 

Hypertonic saline may help babies with cystic fibrosis breathe better

Babies with cystic fibrosis may breathe better by inhaling hypertonic saline, according to a randomized controlled trial conducted in Germany and published in the American Thoracic Society's American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine.

15h

 

Community choirs reduce loneliness and increase interest in life for older adults

An innovative San Francisco program of community choirs for older adults found that singing in a choir reduced loneliness and increased interest in life, but did not improve cognition or physical function, according to a study by researchers at UC San Francisco.

15h

 

Aflys reformen

Det vil tjene statsministeren til ære, hvis han i stedet for natlige panikløsninger aflyser sundhedsreformen.

15h

 

Uanstændigt og fornærmende forslag!

Populistiske forslag gavner ikke patienterne, og de opfattes som latterlige af de professionelle.

15h

 

»Mit kreative frirum gør mig til en bedre læge«

Praktiserende læge Jonas Dyhr Rask trækker på sin baggrund som læge, når han fotograferer, og henter samtidig overskud til arbejdet som læge i rolle som fotograf i fritiden. Han blev i 2014 officiel fotograf for fotokoncernen Fujifilm.

15h

 

Stephen Hawking’s Wheelchair and Thesis Fetch More Than $1 Million at Auction

Bids far exceeded expectations at the Christie’s auction, which also included items that once belonged to Sir Isaac Newton, Charles Darwin and Albert Einstein.

16h

 

Breast screening linked to 60 per cent lower risk of breast cancer death in first 10 years

Women who take part in breast screening have a significantly greater benefit from treatments than those who are not screened, according to a study of more than 50,000 women.

17h

 

Singing Fish Reveal Underwater Battles in the Amazon

Researchers recorded piranha 'honks' and catfish 'screeches' in the Peruvian Amazon, which might illuminate fish activity in murky jungle waters. Christopher Intagliata reports. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

17h

 

Study tracks severe bleaching events on a Pacific coral reef over past century

A new study has uncovered the history of bleaching on a reef in the epicenter of El Nino, revealing how some corals have been able to return after facing extreme conditions.

18h

 

Anopheles mosquitoes could spread Mayaro virus in US, other diverse regions

Mosquitoes of the genus Anopheles are well known as primary vectors of malaria. But a new study suggests that Anopheles species, including some found in the United States, also are capable of carrying and transmitting an emerging pathogen, Mayaro virus, which has caused outbreaks of disease in South America and the Caribbean.

18h

 

Healing kidneys with nanotechnology

Researchers have developed a new method for treating and preventing acute kidney injury. Their technique involves the use of tiny, self-assembling forms measuring just billionths of a meter in diameter.

18h

 

Genetic 'whodunnit' for cancer gene solved

Long thought to suppress cancer by slowing cellular metabolism, the protein complex AMPK also seemed to help some tumors grow, confounding researchers. Now, researchers have solved the long-standing mystery around why AMPK can both hinder and help cancer.

18h

 

F.D.A. Plans to Ban Most Flavored E-Cigarette Sales in Stores

After warning Juul and other e-cigarette makers to keep their flavored products away from minors, the F.D.A. wants to curb sales altogether.

18h

 

Can't sleep? Fruit flies and energy drinks offer new clues

Like humans, fruit flies are active during the day, sleep at night and have similar sleep characteristics. A study has discovered a new gene and uncovered a mechanism that modulates sleep by controlling the movement of taurine — a common ingredient found in many energy drinks — into neuron cells of the fly brain. Taurine also is abundant in the human brain and is consistently elevated in blood a

18h

 

See-through film rejects 70 percent of incoming solar heat

Engineers have developed a heat-rejecting film that could be applied to a building's windows to reflect up to 70 percent of the sun's incoming heat. The film is able to remain highly transparent below 32 degrees Celsius, or 89 degrees Fahrenheit. They estimate that if every exterior-facing window in a building were covered in this film, the building's air conditioning and energy costs could drop b

18h

 

Brain activity pattern may be early sign of schizophrenia

Neuroscientists have identified a pattern of brain activity that is correlated with development of schizophrenia, which they say could be used as marker to diagnose the disease earlier.

18h

 

Replaying the tape of life: Is it possible?

A new review explores the complexity of evolution's predictability in extraordinary detail. In it, researchers closely examine evidence from a number of empirical studies of evolutionary repeatability and contingency in an effort to fully interrogate ideas about contingency's role in evolution.

18h

 

Creating better devices: The etch stops here

Researchers have discovered a new, more precise method to create nanoscale-size electromechanical devices.

18h

 

Materials scientist creates fabric alternative to batteries for wearable devices

A major factor holding back development of wearable biosensors for health monitoring is the lack of a lightweight, long-lasting power supply. Now scientists report that they have developed a method for making a charge-storing system that is easily integrated into clothing for 'embroidering a charge-storing pattern onto any garment.'

18h

 

Ancient DNA Maps Early American Migrations in New Detail

Genetic information from dozens of individuals living 700 to 10,000 years reveals connections between Clovis and Native Americans and South Americans.

18h

 

19h

 

19h

 

19h

 

19h

 

Liberal MP Craig Kelly argues against climate change action – audio

The Guardian has obtained an audio recording of a presentation by Craig Kelly at the right-aligned Mosman branch of the Liberal party in September that outlines in detail his climate scepticism Continue reading…

19h

 

The Atlantic Daily: Bad Metaphors

What We’re Following No Waves: Champions of these lower-profile causes were swept out of office in Tuesday’s U.S. midterm elections: The next Congress will lose several Republican fans of space exploration, including one who’s helped grow NASA’s budget over the years, including for its climate-science programs. Also of note: Climate moderates were already a minority among House Republicans, and t

19h

 

Millions in danger of food insecurity due to severe Caribbean droughts

Climate change is impacting the Caribbean, with millions facing increasing food insecurity and decreasing freshwater availability as droughts become more likely across the region, according to new research.

20h

 

Biomimetics: The chemical tricks of our blood

Biomolecules such as hemoglobin or chlorophyll are difficult to study. It is worth investigating similar but simpler structures in the lab. Unexpected behavior has now been found in phthalocyanines, whose molecular ring structure closely resembles the crucial sections of hemoglobin or chlorophyll. Their center can be switched into different states with the help of green light, which affects their

20h

 

Novel strategy appears to protect retina when disease reduces oxygen

An enzyme known to help our liver get rid of ammonia also appears to be good at protecting our retina, scientists report.

20h

 

Study calls for sugar tax

People who drink sugary beverages are more likely to eat fast food and confectionery and less likely to make healthy dietary choices, new research has found.

20h

 

Cell behavior, once shrouded in mystery, is revealed in new light

Previously, in order to study cell membranes, researchers would often have to freeze samples. The proteins within these samples would not behave like they would in a normal biological environment. Now, using an atomic force microscope, researchers can observe individual proteins in an unfrozen sample — acting in a normal biological environment. This new observation tool could help scientists bett

20h

 

Biodiversity draws the ecotourism crowd

Nature — if you support it, ecotourists will come. Managed wisely, both can win. The balancing act of protecting and fostering biodiversity with hordes of tourists in pristine nature parks is a global challenge. There are pathways to having it all — protected areas with a rich variety of animals and plants and thriving tourism. In fact, the better the biodiversity, the more tourists will visit.

20h

 

Social media use increases depression and loneliness, study finds

Facebook, Snapchat, and Instagram may not be great for personal well-being. The first experimental study examining use of multiple platforms shows a causal link between time spent on these social media and increased depression and loneliness.

20h

 

A burst of 'synchronous' light

Excited photo-emitters can cooperate and radiate simultaneously, a phenomenon called superfluorescence. Researchers have recently been able to create this effect with long-range ordered nanocrystal superlattices. This discovery could enable future developments in LED lighting, quantum sensing, quantum communication and future quantum computing.

20h

 

Bees on the brink

Using an innovative robotic platform to observe bees' behavior, researchers showed that, following exposure to neonicotinoid pesticides — the most commonly-used class of pesticides in agriculture — bees spent less time nursing larvae and were less social that other bees. Additional tests showed that exposure impaired bees ability to warm the nest, and to build insulating wax caps around the colo

20h

 

Self-assembling protein filaments designed and built from scratch

For the first time, scientists have created, from scratch, self-assembling protein filaments built from identical protein subunits that snap together spontaneously to form long, helical, thread-like configurations. Protein filaments are essential components of several structural and moving parts in living cells, as well as many body tissues. Being able to design and build protein filaments could a

20h

 

Ancient child's tooth reveals picture of Alaska's early inhabitants

Research on a newly rediscovered 9,000-year-old child's tooth has reshaped our understanding of Alaska's ancient people, their genetic background and their diets. The tooth is only the second known remnant of a population of early migrants known as Ancient Beringians. Combined with previous research, the find indicates that Ancient Beringians remained in Alaska for thousands of years after first m

20h

 

Stephen Hawking's PhD Thesis, Wheelchair Sell in Multimillion-Dollar Auction

And Stephen Hawking's wheelchair just sold for nearly $400,000.

20h

 

Warming waters caused rapid — and opposite — shifts in connected marine communities

Two connected marine ecosystems — the Eastern English Channel and Southern North Sea — experienced big and opposite changes in their fish communities over a 30-year period. Rapid warming drove smaller ocean fishes to shift abruptly northward from one ecosystem to the other.

20h

 

Culture may explain why brains have become bigger

A theory called the cultural brain hypothesis could explain extraordinary increases in brain size in humans and other animals over the last few million years, according to a new study.

20h

END OF FEED

 

Vil du være med til at finde de mest interessante nyheder? Send email herom til BioNyt

Se nyheder fra en tidligere dato

Tegn abonnement på

BioNyt Videnskabens Verden (www.bionyt.dk) er Danmarks ældste populærvidenskabelige tidsskrift for naturvidenskab. Det er det eneste blad af sin art i Danmark, som er helliget international forskning inden for livsvidenskaberne.

Bladet bringer aktuelle, spændende forskningsnyheder inden for biologi, medicin og andre naturvidenskabelige områder som f.eks. klimaændringer, nanoteknologi, partikelfysik, astronomi, seksualitet, biologiske våben, ecstasy, evolutionsbiologi, kloning, fedme, søvnforskning, muligheden for liv på mars, influenzaepidemier, livets opståen osv.

Artiklerne roses for at gøre vanskeligt stof forståeligt, uden at den videnskabelige holdbarhed tabes.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *


CAPTCHA Image
Reload Image