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Nyheder2018november10

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Dozens of cat mummies found in 6,000-year-old tombs in Egypt

An ancient unopened tomb and rare mummified scarab beetles were also unearthed at the site south of Cairo Dozens of cat mummies and a rare collection of mummified scarab beetles have been discovered in seven sarcophagi, some dating back more than 6,000 years, at a site on the edge of the pyramid complex in Saqqara, south of Cairo. Antiquities minister Khaled el-Enany said the discovery was made b

21h

Science confirms: Earth has more than one 'moon'

Hungarian astronomers have proven the existence of two "pseudo-satellites" in orbit around the earth. These dust clouds were first discovered in the sixties, but are so difficult to spot that scientists have debated their existence since then. The findings may be used to decide where to put satellites in the future and will have to be considered when interplanetary space missions are undertaken.

3h

Sorg som diagnose på vej til Danmark

Vedvarende sorglidelse er ved at blive en psykisk diagnose i det danske sundhedsvæsen.

9h

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Queens neighborhood wary of Amazon coming to town

New York's Long Island City, where Amazon is tipped to set up a new home, is a neighborhood in flux—a construction site of warehouses and skyscrapers where some fear the online retail giant will only make everything worse.

17min

Despite restrictions, digital spending hits record in US midterms

Even as online platforms tightened rules for political ads, digital spending set new records in the 2018 US midterm elections and appears poised for further growth in 2020.

29min

'Ababis' and 'Star Wnrs': Knockoffs thrive in China e-commerce

Sneakers on a popular Chinese e-commerce platform look like Adidas, but are branded "Ababis". Underwear resembling Calvin Klein are called "Caiwen Kani". Toys with an uncanny resemblance to a certain blockbuster movie franchise opt for "Star Wnrs".

35min

California's Paradise: a ghost town emerging from hell

Smoldering debris, skeletons of cars with melted glass, a cat with a singed, soot-covered coat: ravaged by the most destructive fire to hit California, Paradise is now a ghost town.

41min

Surfer bitten by shark in latest Australia attack

A surfer was bitten on the leg by a shark off a beach on Australia's west coast Sunday, authorities said, the latest in a spate of recent attacks that saw another man killed.

47min

With Uber Eats' fast growth comes potential for profit

In three years, the Uber Eats restaurant food delivery service has grown from an experiment to serving much of the U.S. and major cities worldwide.

47min

Jane Builds Greenhouse with Recycled Glass | Alaska: The Last Frontier

Jane and friends start building a greenhouse using old recycled glass. Catch an all-new ALASKA: THE LAST FRONTIER Sundays 9p on Discovery. Stream Full Episodes of Alaska: The Last Frontier: https://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/alaska-the-last-frontier/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/AlaskaTLF/ https://www.facebook.com/Discovery

1h

Starwatch: Leonids meteor shower hits peak after midnight

Look east before dawn to see the glittering duo of Venus and Spica meet in the constellation of Virgo There is plenty to see in the sky this week. On the evening of 16 November, Mars and the moon will wheel across the southern sky. The moon will be in a waxing gibbous phase, with about 60% of its disc illuminated. The pair will be in the constellation Aquarius. Continue reading…

2h

Warming hurting shellfish, aiding predators, ruining habitat

Valuable species of shellfish have become harder to find on the East Coast because of degraded habitat caused by a warming environment, according to a pair of scientists that sought to find out whether environmental factors or overfishing was the source of the decline.

2h

Phone app effectively identifies potentially fatal heart attacks with near accuracy of medical ECG

Can your smart phone determine if you're having the most serious — and deadly — form of heart attack? A new research study says it can — and may be a valuable tool to save lives.

2h

Both Bacteria and Viruses Can Cause Pneumonia, But One Is Much Worse for the Heart

Pneumonia caused by bacterial infections poses a much greater threat to the heart than pneumonia caused by viral infections, a new study suggests.

2h

The Worst Is Yet to Come for California’s Wildfires

At least 25 people have been killed by wildfires raging across California, as the state battles with its deadliest fire season in decades. Firefighters are warring with blazes on both sides of the state. In the north, the so-called Camp Fire has become the largest and most destructive fire in state history, killing at least 23 people and consuming 109,000 acres. In its trail of ash stand the smol

3h

Study: hot coffee is better for you than cold brew

Hot coffee is found to have high-levels of antioxidants, unlike cold brew. Coffee consumption means a decreased risk of liver disease, amongst others. Why this is remains somewhat unclear, but the data is piling up. None It's the kind of news that makes you want to listen to " The Java Jive " by Ink Spots once again: a study has been published in Nature noting that hot coffee has been found to ha

3h

These Wind Patterns Explain Why California's Wildfires Are So BadCamp Fire California

The Camp Fire, Hill Fire and Woolsey Fire share an origin in the jet stream, which has produced extreme winds that are spreading the flames and hampering firefighting efforts.

4h

Nadler Says ‘Lackey’ Whitaker Will Be First Witness

Newly empowered congressional Democrats are gearing up for their first battle with the Trump administration over the acting attorney general appointed after the president fired Jeff Sessions, demanding he follow Sessions’s example and recuse himself from overseeing the special counsel’s Russia investigation. Congressman Jerry Nadler of New York, the likely incoming chairman of the House Judiciary

5h

Who Is the Most Underrated Superhero?

Graham Roumieu Rainbow Rowell, writer, Runaways She-Hulk. This is my least favorite way to create female characters— Hey, what if there was a girl version of that guy everybody likes? —but She-Hulk is the goddamn best. Complex, nuanced, always delightful. She kept working as an attorney after she went green, because she’s so good at it. Also, she’s funny. And she has Marvel’s best hair. Jess Cald

5h

Photos: The Woolsey Fire Leaves Devastation in Malibu, California

Even as firefighters continue to battle the devastating Camp Fire in California’s northern Central Valley, several other large wildfires are roaring through tinder-dry sections of the state, including the Woolsey Fire, near Malibu. The Woolsey Fire and nearby Hill Fire have forced the evacuations of nearly 250,000 residents from their homes near the Pacific Coast in Los Angeles and Ventura counti

5h

Putin’s Favorite Congressman Has Lost His Reelection

Russian President Vladimir Putin will now have one less defender in Congress. Republican Representative Dana Rohrabacher of California—who famously arm wrestled with Putin in the 1990s, and who was warned by the FBI in 2012 that Russian spies were trying to recruit him as an “agent of influence”—has lost his reelection bid after two decades in Congress, succumbing to a Democrat who ran ads toutin

6h

A Veterans Day Apology From Saturday Night Live and Pete Davidson

Last week on Saturday Night Live ’s “Weekend Update” segment, Pete Davidson made a flip, inopportune joke —hardly the first of his young career. In the midst of a series of quick-hit punch lines mocking the appearance of various congressional candidates, he turned to a picture of Lieutenant Commander Dan Crenshaw, who wears an eye patch after losing an eye in combat in Afghanistan. “This guy is k

6h

Heart failure therapy improves outcomes for patients with acute illness

A drug therapy used for patients with chronic heart failure also improves markers of poor prognosis in individuals who are hospitalized with acute heart failure, new Yale-led research shows. The findings suggest that the drug can improve outcomes for acutely ill heart patients and potentially become the new standard of care for treating this serious condition, the researchers said.

6h

Researchers find further link between a-fib, brain injury, and possible neurodegeneration

A new study presented at the American Heart Association Scientific Session conference has found that patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) also show signs of asymptomatic brain injury.

6h

Bacterial pneumonia far more dangerous to the heart than viral pneumonia, study finds

Heart complications in patients diagnosed with bacterial pneumonia are more serious than in patients diagnosed with viral pneumonia, according to new research.

6h

Aubrey Manning obituary

Ethologist, broadcaster and expert on the evolutionary genetics of animal behaviour who was a natural communicator on television Aubrey Manning’s hugely popular 1998 BBC series Earth Story , about the evolution and shaping of the planet Earth, inspired a generation and led to a noticeable increase in students applying to read earth sciences. Yet, Aubrey, who has died aged 88, was not a geologist,

7h

Tænkeboks: Byg en kasse optimalt

Her kommer opgaven for uge 45's vedkommende

8h

Droner har kortlagt ålegræsset omkring Fanø

Fly ser ud til at kunne blive erstattet af droner til overvågning af havmiljøet, viser et forsøg hos Miljøstyrelsen.

8h

What humanity will gain by going to Mars

It might take going to another planet for different nations to finally, once and for all, learn how to get along with each other. What will we eat on Mars? We can't live off of a diet of potatoes alone. There are huge problems to solve, but recent technologies like 3D printing might help things move a lot faster, and be a lot less dangerous. Leland is a featured big thinker on season 2 of Mars on

8h

Trump’s Bromance With Macron Fizzles Spectacularly

PARIS—The ceremony was planned long in advance. A chance for French President Emmanuel Macron to welcome world leaders to mark the centenary of the Armistice that ended the hostilities of World War I. A way to decry nationalism and reinforce his deep commitment to multilateralism, and to a European Union born out of past conflicts. Then President Trump came to town. Since his arrival late Friday

8h

Email aliases are the easiest path to privacy—and an organized inbox

DIY And setting them up is a snap. An email alias is an alternative address that your manage from your original account. Gmail, Outlook, and Apple Mail all let you use these—here's why.

8h

Trump Fails His Rendezvous in France

Donald Trump decided, it would appear, to skip attendance at a ceremony honoring American war dead because of rain. The site was the Aisne-Marne American Cemetery, where lie the remains of 2,289 American soldiers and marines. The occasion was intended to commemorate the end of World War I and, among other things, the Battle of Belleau Wood in June 1918. That epic fight is commemorated chiefly by

9h

An Open-and-Shut Violation of Campaign-Finance Law

I t is a strange turn of events when a president famous for denouncing “fake news” is discovered to have entered into an agreement with a media organization to finance the concealment of very real but politically unfavorable newsworthy information. The Wall Street Journal reports that Donald Trump entered into an explicit agreement with the chairman of American Media (AMI), David Pecker, to help

9h

Letters: ‘Everybody Needs Comfort, Calm, Respite’

The Fetishization of Mr. Rogers’s ‘Look for the Helpers’ After the Tree of Life shooting, Ian Bogost argued that to turn the reassuring line into a consolation meme for adults is to misinterpret advice that was originally meant for preschoolers. I was appalled to read such an intellectualized, narrow and superficial interpretation of Mr. Rogers’s direction to children: “Look for the helpers.” Of

9h

Tesla's Booming Model 3 Sales and More Car News This Week

Elon Musk puts Tesla in the black, cities rein in scooters, and a car engineer spends a lot of time throwing up.

9h

The White House's Fake-News Shenanigans Top This Week's Internet News RoundupJim Acosta White House

Oh, these crazy elections. Oh, that crazier White House.

9h

Ship Traffic in the Now-Open Northwest Passage Endangers Narwhals, Other Unique Animals

Climate change is shrinking Arctic sea ice and opening the region to ship traffic. Whales, seals and other marine mammals could be at risk unless nations adopt rules to protect them.

10h

These Plant Chemicals Could Help Your Heart's Health

Drinking a cup of tea or eating a handful of berries a day may help protect against heart disease, a new study suggests.

10h

‘The Other Coachella’ Launches Its Own Festival

Each spring, the music world hears the name “Coachella” and thinks of a major two-weekend arts and music festival. So attached are the name and the event that the web address Coachella.Com takes you not to the city’s official site but one where you can buy tickets for the festival. The rest of the year, Coachella is a smallish farming community, in the sun-baked desert, where irrigation has suppo

10h

The Hottest Trend in American Literature Isn't From the U.S.

Some of the first stories you remember reading, or hearing read aloud, were probably translations, though chances are you didn’t realize it. “The Emperor’s New Clothes?” That was from the Danish. “Sleeping Beauty?” French. “One Thousand and One Nights?” Arabic. “Hansel and Gretel?” German. “Pinocchio?” Italian. “Cinderella?” French—or, depending how far you back you want to go, German, Italian, o

10h

The Problem With Feedback

After a recent Uber ride, I hesitated between offering the four-star rating that captured my adequate ride and the five-star rating that I knew the driver expected. Eventually I tapped five stars and closed out of the app, relieved to be done with this tiny moral quandary. Later, the phone buzzed in my pocket with a text asking me to rate my experience getting an oil change. The next day, I polit

10h

11 Best Google Speakers, Ranked by Price (Holiday 2018)

An Amazon Echo may be tempting, but these Google Home speakers may be a better buy.

10h

The 12 Biggest 'Little' Mysteries of Fall — Solved!

Here are the most intriguing "little" mysteries we've gathered about fall.

10h

Armistice Day: November 11, 1918 to November 11, 2018

“The war to end all wars” that had to be renamed “The First World War” ended 100 years ago — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

10h

Science Policy In Congress

NPR's Lulu Garcia-Navarro speaks with Representative Eddie Bernice Johnson, Democrat of Texas, to discuss what the midterm results mean for the House science committee.

10h

Nancy Pelosi: Mueller Doesn’t Have to Indict Trump for Congress to Impeach Him

N ancy Pelosi really does not want to impeach Donald Trump—and she’s prepared to take all the heat from her party and from the new House Democratic majority she’s hoping to lead, unless she sees something wildly different emerge. But she said she won’t let Robert Mueller define the decision. “Recognize one point,” Pelosi told me during an interview in the conference room of her minority-leader su

11h

College Is Different for the School-Shooting Generation

When Leonor Grave moved from Portugal to the United States in 2012 to start boarding school, she and her family had some inkling of what she was getting into. In Portugal, gun violence and mass shootings “were always talked about like an American thing,” she says. “We saw things on the news, and we’d be kind of in disbelief that there didn’t seem to be anything being done about it.” Grave knew th

11h

The Radicalization of Bedtime Stories

More than 200 years ago, when books for children first became common, they delivered simple moral lessons about , for instance, cleanliness and the importance of prayer . Today, story time is still propelled by moral forces, but the issues have gotten a good deal more sophisticated. In recent years, publishers have put out children’s books with political undertones and activist calls to action on

11h

Why Trump Is the Favorite in 2020

It’s November 4, 2020. Across the United States—and across the globe—liberals and Donald Trump–opposing conservatives alike drag themselves from fitful sleep, red-eyed and exhausted, filled with dread, incomprehension, and déjà vu. How did he do it again? The night before, Trump had won reelection as president—despite a chaotic and frustrating first term, multiple investigations, and a historical

11h

Travel Writing About Africa, Reimagined

A Stranger’s Pose , a new book by the Nigerian author and photographer Emmanuel Iduma, presents photography as an art concerned with both confrontation and comfort. It is, to him, a limber, choral form. “Photography is a charismatic medium,” he writes. “Sometimes it takes five decades for a photograph to unravel itself.” Iduma’s book, like the subjects within, resists simple categorization. A Str

11h

China is about to visit uncharted territory on the moon

The next two Chinese missions to the moon will visit places no spacecraft has been before. The rest of the world wants a piece of the lunar action.

11h

How an Anonymous 4chan Post Helped Solve a 25-Year-Old Math Puzzle

A debate over the most efficient way to watch a cult classic TV series' episodes, in every possible order, lies at the heart of this mathematical breakthrough.

11h

How the 'Betrayal Legacy' Board Game Tells a Story Over Time

Game designer Rob Daviau turned a popular horror-themed board game into a spine-chilling saga.

11h

How to Safely and Securely Dispose of Your Old Gadgets

Keep your data private and the environment protected.

11h

Varmespild fra datacentre: Fjernvarme kan også ligge for langt væk

It-giganternes datacentre kommer til at ligge langt fra fjernvarmenettet, de kan ikke garantere frem­tidig drift, og de deler kun begrænset information.

12h

On David Hockney’s Likely Upcoming Record-Setting Auction

David Hockney’s 1972 painting Portrait of an Artist (Pool With Two Figures) will be on the block at the upcoming Post-War and Contemporary Art auction at Christie’s in New York on November 15, and there is speculation that it may sell for upwards of $80 million. If it does, the price would shatter the previous world record for a work sold at auction by a living artist—Jeff Koons’s Balloon Dog , w

12h

TEST DIG SELV: Får du nok søvn?

Se om du sover nok i forhold til anbefalingerne for din alder og dit køn.

13h

Spørg Fagfolket: Hvorfor ryger det fra betonpælene, når der piloteres?

En læser undrer sig over en kraftig og ildelugtende røg, når der på byggepladser bankes betonpæle i jorden. Bygge- og anlægsvirksomheden Aarsleff svarer på, hvad der sker.

14h

What makes us? Nature or nurture? The DNA debate comes back to life

An extraordinary new documentary about identical triplets who were separated at birth has reignited the debate over the dominance of DNA in controlling our behaviour and the way we live our lives Robert Shafran’s first inkling that his life would soon be turned on its head occurred on his first day at college in upstate New York in 1980. His fellow students greeted him like a long-lost friend. “G

14h

Hvad er det omvendte af en agurk? Børn sætter videnskabsfolk på prøve

Hundredvis af finurlige spørgsmål er blevet sendt til dr.dk/hvorfordet. Vi har spurgt videnskaben og fundet svar på de sjoveste af dem.

17h

Babies And Chimps Share A Laugh

Adult humans laugh primarily on the exhale, but human babies laugh on the inhale and the exhale—as do chimps. Christopher Intagliata reports. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

19h

Extending the life of low-cost, compact, lightweight batteries

A new method can greatly extend the life of inexpensive, compact, lightweight metal-air batteries.

21h

Waking sleeping plants with plasmas

A critical concern for commercial farmers is to have good and synchronized tree growth. The problem in mild winter climates is that plants do not receive enough chilling, and growth resumption becomes spread out with some buds even failing to grow. Now scientists have discovered an effective new way to control the dormancy of grapes and other fruiting plants, by using high-tech plasmas to wake the

21h

Moving the motivation meter

Rats given the drug that reduced dopamine were much less likely to work for preferred morsels of food. But when these rats were then given one of the experimental drugs, they regained their motivation to work for the treat.

21h

Giant leap toward personalized medicine helps eyes drain themselves

Researchers created a new smart drainage device to help patients with glaucoma, a leading cause of blindness in the world, as they try to save their eyesight.

21h

Flood dynamics increase population vulnerability to waterborne disease and climate

Diarrheal disease, a preventable and treatable illness, remains the second-leading cause of death in children under the age of 5 and a persistent public health threat in sub-Saharan Africa. Researchers have now uncovered how surface water dynamics may increase the vulnerability of dependent populations to diarrheal disease and climate change.

21h

Mark your calendar: All infectious diseases are seasonal

Most of us are aware of the seasonal cycle of influenza outbreaks, which for Americans peak in the winter. Scientists now make a case that all infectious diseases have a seasonal element.

21h

21h

Rocket Lab’s Modest Launch Is Giant Leap for Small Rocket Business

The company’s Electron rocket carried a batch of small commercial satellites from a launchpad in New Zealand, a harbinger of a major transformation to the space business.

22h

Salmonella found to be resistant to different classes of antibiotics

Common bacteria that cause foodborne diseases are resistant to antibiotics used to treat infections, according to research that identified 39 genes responsible for this resistance.

22h

The new face of South American people

Study by 72 researchers from eight countries concludes that the Lagoa Santa people are descendants of Clovis culture migrants from North America. Distinctly African features attributed to Luzia were wrong.

22h

Researchers find new pathway to regulate immune response, control diseases

Researchers have found a potential new pathway to regulate immune response and potentially control inflammatory diseases of the central nervous system such as meningitis and sepsis.

23h

TV scientist Alice Roberts to be president of Humanists UK

Anthropologist and presenter takes over as figurehead of campaign group next year The scientist and television presenter Alice Roberts is to be the next president of Humanists UK, championing campaigns against state funding of faith schools and in favour of removing bishops from the House of Lords and the legalisation of assisted dying . Roberts, the author of nine popular science books and the h

23h

Paradise lost: California fires rage onCamp Fire California

Firefighters in California on Saturday battled raging blazes at both ends of the state that have left at least nine people dead and thousands of homes destroyed, but there was little hope of containing the flames anytime soon.

1d

Egypt's newly discovered tombs hold mummies, animal statues

A top Egyptian antiquities official says local archaeologists have discovered seven Pharaonic Age tombs near the capital Cairo containing dozens of cat mummies along with wooden statues depicting other animals and birds.

1d

9 ways self-driving vehicles could change tourism

A study examines how autonomous vehicles could change the tourism experience Removing a human driver adds some new possibilities, like personalized sightseeing tours Sex on wheels, anyone? While experts and manufacturers often assert that self-driving vehicles will come to market by 2020, others are skeptical, as some required elements are far from realization, among them digital maps for cars an

1d

Coronary calcium levels a better predictor of patients at risk for coronary heart disease

A new study presented at the American Heart Association Scientific Session conference found that testing a patient's coronary calcium levels is a better predictor of blocked coronary arteries at risk for a heart attack and the need for revascularization than standard risk-assessment equations used in medical practice today.

1d

Overtreating patients for hypothyroidism could raise their risk of stroke, study finds

For patients who take medication to treat hypothyroidism, being treated with too much medication can lead to an increased risk of atrial fibrillation, a common heart rhythm disorder associated with stroke, a new study of more than 174,000 patients has found.

1d

Vitamin D And Fish Oil Supplements Mostly Disappoint In Long-Awaited Research Results

After years of debate, a major government funded study failed to find any overall benefit of taking widely used supplements to protect against heart disease or cancer. (Image credit: Cathy Scola/Getty Images)

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A potent fish oil drug may protect high-risk patients against heart attacks

People with, or at high risk of, cardiovascular disease lowered their chances of having a heart attack or stroke with a drug containing an omega-3 fatty acid.

1d

Vitamin D supplements don’t prevent heart disease or cancer

Vitamin D supplements won’t cut your risk of heart attack or stroke, according to highly anticipated study results.

1d

Delicate Fossil Bird Reveals Prehistoric Plumage Patterns

A new analysis gives the fossil bird Confuciusornis an updated look. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

1d

Everything Under Is a Dark and Mesmerizing Story About Fate

“M iracles of stylistic invention,” Kwame Anthony Appiah, the chair of the 2018 Man Booker Prize judging committee, called all six finalists this year. Daisy Johnson—who at 27 was the youngest writer ever to make the short list—pulls off several marvels at once in Everything Under (her debut novel, no less). She coins words, channels outlier voices, and fractures chronology. The result is an unca

1d

Why Late-Night Eating May Hurt Your Heart

Sometimes the heart wants what it wants. But it's not late-night eating.

1d

Navigating our thoughts: fundamental principles of thinking

submitted by /u/burtzev [link] [comments]

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Working Hard Even If You Might Lose

Wanting to win can inspire us to do great things, but missing the mark should not blind us to all of our accomplishment along the way — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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The ‘nudge unit’: the experts that became a prime UK export

A team of former civil servants specialising in behavioural psychology now pulls in revenues of £14m a year David Halpern pauses at the mention of a quote from one of the government’s senior Brexiters – that “ people in this country have had enough of experts ” – and briefly gazes out of a window in the Westminster offices of the Behavioural Insights Team (BIT). “Empirically, it doesn’t appear to

1d

Ugens debat: Er den selvkørende bils dilemma reelt?

En selvkørende bil skal en dag i en uheldssituation vælge, om uheldet skal koste to ældre eller en mor og et barn livet. Moralske dilemmaer som dette har 2,3 millioner mennesker i ‘Moral Machine-eksperimentet’ givet deres vurdering af. Ifølge flere ing.dk-læsere var der dog ikke nødvendigvis ta…

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Writing to prisoners unlocks more than you would think

Prison letters are a treasure trove of stories – filled with both honesty and humour Eight years ago, I saw a job ad on a local website. A small charity was looking for a PR officer. The ad was brief, but it struck me as sweet. In it, they said that through yoga and meditation, they offered hope and healing to prisoners. I liked the sound of that. Unfortunately, I had no experience at all in the

1d

Space Photos of the Week: The 6 Splendid Tails of Comet McNaught

It was a sensation when it was first spotted in 1744, but now we know much more about the effects of solar wind on comet dust.

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An Elon Musk Imposter, Foreign Malware Samples, and More Security News This Week

Compromised crypto, flawed SSDs, and more of the week's top security news.

1d

The best way to deal with fall leaves

DIY It would be so much easier to just… leave them. Fall is here, and with it one of the most dreaded of chores: wrangling dead leaves. We’ve talked to the experts about how to handle leaves with maximum efficiency.

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Verdens første kunstige intelligens-nyhedsvært har fået debut

Skal du se kinesiske nyheder, kan det være en kunstig intelligens, der læser dem op for dig. Nyhedsbureauet Xinhua har nemlig fået animerede tv-værter.

1d

Could Consciousness All Come Down to the Way Things Vibrate?

A resonance theory of consciousness suggests that the way all matter vibrates, and the tendency for those vibrations to sync up, might be a way to answer the so-called 'hard problem' of consciousness.

1d

Ultimo Destructo Gets Dissected | BattleBots: Resurrection

Team Ultimo Destructo leaves the battlebox with their bot splin in three and their rockets malfunctioning. As they race to repair before their next fight, Team Raven is still trying to put together their bot in time to get one fight in on the final day. Stream Full Episodes of BattleBots: Resurrection: https://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/battlebots-resurrection/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.

1d

Transmission of antibiotic resistant E. coli mapped in wild giraffe social networks

A team has shown that antibiotic-resistant Escherichia coli bacteria in wild giraffes most likely come from anthropogenic sources, such as local cattle herds and humans.

1d

Tiny structures' construction, drip by drip

Researchers explore methods of using carefully controlled droplets as a way to make soft, biomimetic structures. The trick comes in controlling the droplets, which form under competing influences like gravity and surface tension. A new study explains how a deeper understanding of these highly dynamic forces can be harnessed to cheaply and quickly fabricate objects that normally require a more expe

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Baby 'boom' and 'bust': Nations' rates of childbirth vary significantly

Ninety-one nations are not producing enough children to maintain their current populations, while the opposite is true in 104 countries where high birth rates are driving population increases, according to a new scientific study. Total fertility rates (TFR), a summary measurement representing the average number of children a woman would deliver over her lifetime, have declined since 1950.

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The Queer Coming-of-Age Movie Arrives

“M y God, are we gonna be like our parents?” That’s the fear voiced by one of the five motley high-school students locked in detention in John Hughes’s The Breakfast Club —and that’s the crucial question underlying most movies about adolescents coming of age. The onscreen antics of teenagers might take the form of giddy flirtations ( Grease ), drunken ramblings ( Dazed and Confused ), or feisty s

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The Chemists’ War

One hundred years after the end of World War I, the Army Corps of Engineers is still cleaning up the relics of experiments that helped develop chemical weapons to counter the Germans’ gas attacks.

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9 Best Robot Vacuums (2018): Pet Hair, Carpets, Hardwood Floors, and More

From no-frills cleaners to high-end automation, we have the ideal botvac for you.

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We Should Take Hollywood Disaster Movies More Seriously

More realistic films could raise awareness about real-world threats.

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10 of the Strangest Medical Studies (in Recent History, That Is)

Check out some of the strangest medical studies carried out in recent years.

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Mobile workers in north Ethiopia vulnerable to visceral leishmaniasis transmission

Visceral leishmaniasis (VL) is a life-threatening disease transmitted by the bite of a sand fly. Between 3,700 to 7,400 people in Ethiopia are infected annually, particularly in the northern, agricultural regions with favorable climate and environment to sand fly vectors. A study suggests that transitory populations in Ethiopia may be particularly vulnerable to acquisition of and death from VL inf

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Report finds inequity may slow progress in preventing child pneumonia and diarrhea deaths

A new report finds health systems are falling woefully short of ensuring the most vulnerable children have sufficient access to prevention and treatment services in 15 countries that account for 70% of the global pneumonia and diarrhea deaths in children under five.

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Is this AI? We drew you a flowchart to work it out

The definition of artificial intelligence is constantly evolving, and the term often gets mangled, so we are here to help.

1d

Can You Have Too Much "Good" (HDL) Cholesterol?

A new study suggests that too much “good” cholesterol may be just as bad as too little. Dr. Sanaz Majd joins Nutrition Diva to sort out what this new research means for our heart health… — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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The Queen of the Fold-and-Cut Alphabet

Manchester mathematician Katie Steckles tells us about her favorite theorem and how she used it to help design a new font — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Environmentally-inspired 'niche' features impact species evolution

Researchers have shown that the environment-driven evolution of a unique ovipositor in the female fruit fly Drosophila suzukii may have caused coevolution of the male genitalia; new features were found to cause mechanical incompatibility during reproduction with similar species, impeding crossbreeding and isolating the species. The dual role of the female genitalia was found to trigger coevolution

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Neurons that fire together, don't always wire together

As the adage goes 'neurons that fire together, wire together,' but a new article demonstrates that, in addition to response similarity, projection target also constrains local connectivity.

1d

The FDA’s Mango-Flavored Trolley Problem

The feds are coming for your crème brûlée . In an announcement scheduled for next week, the Food and Drug Administration is expected to roll out new restrictions on the sale of e-cigarette and vaping products, according to The Washington Post . The reported changes will be an aggressive next step in the agency’s ongoing effort to curb vaping’s explosive popularity with American teens, and they’ll

1d

The 19th-Century Origins of Climate Science

If you were to travel to the early 1800s and strike up a conversation with a European scientist about climate, they would begin by asking why you hadn’t read your Aristotle. First sketched by the philosopher in his fourth-century B.C. treatise Meteorologica , the model that sprang from the ancient Greek concept of klima divided the hemispheres into three fixed climatic bands: polar cold, equatori

1d

Conflict Photographer Lynsey Addario on Art, Love, and War

a story of survival that leaves our host speechless and a story of casual cruelty that will leave you shaking your head in disbelief None Think about all the images you see in a day. The advertisements. The photos and videos as you search the web or scroll through social media, if you do that. Now think back a century and a half or so to when photography was new. Imagine the first time a British

1d

18 Best Deals on Snow Gear This Week: REI, Backcountry, and More

Planning your winter ski vacations? Now is a great time to pick up all the snow gear you need.

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The Best of the Physics arXiv (week ending November 10, 2018)

This week’s most thought-provoking papers from the Physics arXiv.

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Childbirth In The Age Of Addiction: New Mom Worries About Maintaining Her Sobriety

Pain medications commonly used in labor present medical and mental challenges for pregnant women recovering from opioid addiction. (Image credit: Adam Grossberg/KQED)

1d

How History Forgot the Woman Who Defined Autism

Grunya Sukhareva characterized autism nearly two decades before Austrian doctors Leo Kanner and Hans Asperger — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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He Was a Cop Fighting the ‘Drug War.’ Then His Daughter Overdosed.

This Week in Family When a Maryland police officer found out that his daughter had become addicted to opioids, he resorted to the same solution he had for other drug addicts: throwing her in jail. Nick Varner had spent decades incarcerating people for drug possession, though he soon learned that locking his own daughter up wouldn’t cure her addiction—in fact, he now worries it may have led to her

1d

Child’s Play and the Very Human Horror of Creepy Dolls

“Hi, I’m Chucky. Wanna play?” His blue eyes and adorable bibbed overalls were deceiving. Tack on the freckled cheeks and playful red hair, and it was hard to imagine this toy as the embodiment of evil. Possessed by the spirit of a fictional serial killer named Charles Lee Ray, the doll unleashed a bloodbath in the 1988 horror film Child’s Play . At the time, Roger Ebert called the movie slick and

1d

How Foldable Phones Like Samsung's Work—and How You'll Use Them

Flexible displays aren't just gimmicks. They’re glimpses of the next great mobile frontier.

1d

YouTube Videos Keep Getting Longer to Drive Ad Revenue

Gone are the days of the 30-second clip. Today’s most viewed YouTube videos last 20 minutes or longer, a trend cemented by the platform's algorithms.

1d

Does Latinx Twitter Exist?

Black Twitter has grown into a vibrant digital community shaping political and cultural discourse. Does that place exist for Latinxs?

1d

A Jaguar Engineer's Vomit-y Teacups Ride Could Help Cure Car Sickness

Jaguar Land Rover is investigating how to detect and curtain motion sickness, and that meant emptying an engineer's stomach a few times.

1d

Droner i flok skal finde forsvundne i vildmarken

Droner med lidar-teknologi vil kunne undersøge tæt skov uden brug af GPS, mener amerikanske forskere.

1d

What Beto Won

They said it couldn’t be done and, in the end, they were right. Texas had been a one-party state for years. It’s true that the state’s motley, virtually nonexistent opposition party, hardly worthy of the same name as its national counterpart, had put up strong showings in the state in the last few presidential elections, and that the incumbent was a highly polarizing figure whose naked ambition a

1d

The Virtues of Nationalism

We all have books that have influenced how we make sense of the world. One of my favorites is Polyethnicity and National Unity in World History , a short book by the Canadian American historian William McNeill that was first published in 1985. I recently learned that McNeill died in the summer of 2016, not long after Britain voted to leave the European Union and shortly before Donald Trump was el

1d

The Grotesque Brilliance of Sally4Ever

Julia Davis is a comic genius, and by genius I mean she has a profound and uncanny gift for pinpointing the horrors buried in your subconscious mind and wrenching them out into the open. Teeth flossing, those tiny brown bits you sometimes find in raw eggs, the tampon scene from Fifty Shades of Grey —all these emerge in the first episode of HBO’s Sally4Ever , visceral and depraved. And it gets wor

1d

These Counties Kicked Out Republican Incumbents

For the first time in eight years, Democrats have regained control of the House, picking up 32 seats with seven others still undecided. Even if all seven break for the Republicans, Democrats still have a healthy edge: They needed just 23 seats to assume the chamber’s majority. In a previous analysis we published ahead of Tuesday’s vote, we described how four groups of voters were expected to play

1d

Congress gains an influx of scientists as GOP science committee head leaves

Lamar Smith, retiring chair of the House science committee, has vehemently denied that climate change is man made Seven scientists are entering the US congress next year, from engineers and health professionals to an energy businessman and a computer programmer. Five of them are women, including a new senator for Nevada. All are Democrats. Dr Rush Holt, a physicist who represented New Jersey in c

1d

Why free speech is sacred—even when it’s dangerous

Suppression of free speech dooms democracy, says law professor Nadine Strossen. We should all be open to hearing dangerous and odious ideas rather than drive them underground. "[P]eople will often say to me, as somebody who is Jewish and the daughter of a Holocaust survivor who barely survived the Buchenwald Concentration Camp: How can I of all people defend the Nazis?" says Strossen. She also sa

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Facebook stops requiring arbitration of sexual harassment claims

Facebook on Friday said it will no longer require employees to resolve sexual harassment claims via arbitration, mirroring a move by Google.

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Plastic microfibers found for first time in wild animals' stool, from South American fur seals

For the first time, plastic microfibers have been discovered in wild animals' stool, from South American fur seals. The findings were made by a team of Morris Animal Foundation-funded researchers at the University of Georgia, who suggest examining scat from pinnipeds can be an efficient way to monitor environmental levels of microfibers and microplastics in the environment. Their study was publish

1d

Unsavory Truth review – exposing the food industry’s abuse of science

Exaggerated health claims, corporate funding, unpublished negative results: a new book exposes the way the US food industry hijacks science and fights for answers

1d

Faktatjek: Kan energidrikke være farlige for dig?

Især for børn og unge er der gode grunde til ikke at bælle energidrikke. Men for voksne er det – for det meste – ikke skadeligt.

1d

The Midterms Swept in a New Class of Black Politicians

Ben Jealous lost. Andrew Gillum is heading to a recount. Stacey Abrams is chasing legal challenges that might give her a second chance in a runoff. But a new generation of black politicians is already in place. Tuesday saw the election of three new African American lieutenant governors, four new African American attorneys general, and seven new African American members of the House. (An eighth ca

1d

SAS har succes med jumboen

Luftfartsselskabet modtog i midten af november sit andet Boeing 747B-fly, som trækker størsteparten af læsset på ruten København-New York.

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Robots are learning hand gestures by watching hours of TED talks

Hand gestures are difficult for robots to reproduce convincingly, so hundreds of hours of TED videos are being used to teach them how to better gesticulate

1d

Wrong About Polio: A Review of Suzanne Humphries, MD and Roman Bystrianyk’s “Dissolving Illusions” Part 1 (the long version)

This is a longer version of my post on Friday, November 9th, 2018. It is a lengthy discussion of why Suzanne Humphries, MD and Roman Bystrianyk's book Dissolving Illusions misrepresents the dangers of polio, one in a series of posts that should comprehensively show the problems with their claims. It covers far more than just polio, but is worthwhile for those interested in the details.

1d

Why lichen may be the perfect factories for making rocket fuel on Mars

Lichens can be revived after being subjected to Mars-like conditions, so they could be used on long space flights to produce hydrogen rocket fuel along the way

1d

Harry Potter eller Fifty Shades? Test hvilke bøger, der passer til din personlighed

Forskerne mener, at de kan forudse din smag i bøger. Test dig selv og se om de har ret.

1d

Environmentally-inspired 'niche' features impact species evolution

Tokyo, Japan – Researchers from Tokyo Metropolitan University have shown that the environment-driven evolution of a unique ovipositor in the female fruit fly Drosophila suzukii may have caused coevolution of the male genitalia; new features were found to cause mechanical incompatibility during reproduction with similar species, impeding crossbreeding and isolating the species. The dual role of the

1d

F.D.A. Plans to Seek a Ban on Menthol Cigarettes

The move is part of an aggressive campaign against many products containing nicotine, including flavored e-cigarettes. Menthol has long been a concern among African-Americans because of its addictive qualities.

1d

NASA shares photos of deadly 'Camp Fire' in California

The 'Camp Fire' broke out early Thursday morning in Paradise, a town north of Sacramento. It's so far left five people dead and thousands of buildings destroyed. Meanwhile, two other wildfires are spreading north of Los Angeles. Three wildfires are wreaking havoc in California as they blaze across tinder-dry landscapes, one north of Sacramento and the other two west of Los Angeles. Early Thursday

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Why Does California Have So Many Wildfires?

There are four key ingredients that make the state such a tinderbox.

1d

Patients with untreated hearing loss incur higher health care costs over time

Older adults with untreated hearing loss incur substantially higher total health care costs compared to those who don't have hearing loss — an average of 46 percent, totaling $22,434 per person over a decade, according to a new study.

1d

New tool to predict which plants will become invasive

New research provides insight to help predict which plants are likely to become invasive in a particular community. The results showed that non-native plants are more likely to become invasive when they possess biological traits that are different from the native community and that plant height can be a competitive advantage.

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Automated detection of sleep states from olfactory brain waves

Scientists have developed a completely automated technique for real-time detection of sleep/wake states in freely moving mice.

1d

Skin ages when the main cells in the dermis lose their identity and function

A study in mice explains that dermal fibroblasts lose their cell identify over time and with it their capacity to produce and secrete collagen and other proteins.

1d

Link between autoimmune, heart disease explained in mice

Autoimmune diseases such as psoriasis, lupus and rheumatoid arthritis more than double the risk of cardiovascular disease. A new study shows that immune cells that arise during autoimmune disease cause cholesterol to become trapped inside blood vessels.

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Alzheimer's and cardiovascular disease share common genetics in some patients

Genetics may predispose some people to both Alzheimer's disease and high levels of blood lipids such as cholesterol, a common feature of cardiovascular disease, according to a new study.

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Grief linked to sleep disturbances that can be bad for the heart

People who have recently lost a spouse are more likely to have sleep disturbances that exacerbate levels of inflammation in the body, according to new research. These elevated levels of inflammation may increase risk for cardiovascular illness and death.

1d

Mild blast forces cause brain pathology and deficits, despite lack of macroscopic damage

Using a rat model of bTBI, researchers show how even mild exposure to a single blast shock wave is able to induce small but potentially very meaningful pathogenic effects that accumulate with time. These effects, detected at the microscopic level, included microvascular damage, injury to nerve axons and signs of neuroinflammation in various brain regions. Brain function also changed, as shown by i

1d

Improving city parks may be one path to help make residents more active

Researchers found that small improvements to a city's ParkScore — an evaluation of a city's park system — could lead to more physical exercise for its residents. The Trust for Public Land created the ParkScore as an index to rank the park systems of the nation's largest 100 cities, they added.

1d

'Tunability' of a molecular chaperone

Scientists report that Hsp70s from mammalian cells behave quite differently from bacterial Hsp70s. Because of the important roles Hsp70s play in protein misfolding diseases such as cancer and neurodegenerative diseases, the new findings 'will have a major impact on how we think about Hsp70s,' one of the researchers says.

1d

Scientists solve century-old neuroscience mystery; answers may lead to epilepsy treatment

Scientists have solved a 125-year-old mystery of the brain, and, in the process, uncovered a potential treatment for acquired epilepsy. Perineuronal nets modulate electrical impulses in the brain, and, should the nets dissolve, brain seizures can occur.

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Farmer adjustments can offset climate change impacts in corn production

New research looks closely at the future of maize crop yields with the effects of climate change.

1d

Plastic microfibers found for first time in wild animals' stool, from S. A. fur seals

For the first time, plastic microfibers have been discovered in wild animals' stool, from South American fur seals. The findings were made by scientists who suggest examining scat from pinnipeds can be an efficient way to monitor environmental levels of microfibers and microplastics in the environment.

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Watch: China unveils the world’s first A.I. news anchor

The A.I. anchor was based off of a real-life anchor and is able to read any text it's given. It looks realistic, but its movements are slightly awkward while speaking. The developers suggest the technology could someday be used for other purposes besides journalism. The newest anchor at China's Xinhua News Agency looks and talks like a human, but is in fact an A.I. that can report the news "tirel

1d

The Atlantic Daily: ‘I Can’t Go Home’

What We’re Following Still Gone: Saudi Arabia has acknowledged the murder of the journalist Jamal Khashoggi, though Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman has insisted he was never involved, leaving an incomplete outline of horrific events. Amid the ongoing crisis, a delegation of American evangelical Christians, including some of President Donald Trump’s advisers, moved forward on a meeting with the c

1d

Why are Americans still afraid of atheism?

51 percent of Americans would not vote for an atheist president. Though America wasn't founded as a Christian nation, religion has always had a strong influence. It wasn't until the 1950s when religion gained its current prominence in the national imagination. None America's religiosity is not as clean-cut as advertised. While we were certainly not founded as a "Christian nation," Dionysian chaos

1d

MEGAPIXELS: NASA provides a powerful view of California’s deadly wildfires

Environment Capturing the terrifying blazes from above. A terrible combination of low humidity, dry vegetation, and high winds had Californians racing to escape multiple massive fires on Friday.

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Better “nowcasting” can reveal what weather is about to hit within 500 meters

The ability to forecast heavy rainfall in small areas could change the way urban planners manage flash floods–and potentially save lives.

2d

How to Watch a Near-Earth Asteroid Zoom Closer to Earth than the Moon

Three chunky asteroids are zooming by Earth this weekend, and one of them is getting closer to our planet than the moon itself.

2d

Gravitational waves could solve a cosmological crisis within five years—or shake physics to its core

Science We’re closing in on one of the most important numbers in the universe. This could be the last decade that cosmologists debate how fast the universe is expanding.

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Tesla is making the Model 3 faster with a software update

Cars Track Mode shows the potential of electric cars to go fast. Tesla's Model 3 update makes it faster on the track.

2d

The 'painted wolves' of Zimbabwe

The endangered African wild dog will enthral TV viewers when it features in David Attenborough's new Dynasties series.

2d

An American Might Win the World Chess Championship for the 1st Time Since Bobby Fischer

Will Fabiano Caruana of Brooklyn, New York, unseat the chess grandmaster?

2d

The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: Racing Arizona

Written by Madeleine Carlisle ( @maddiecarlisle2 ), Olivia Paschal ( @oliviacpaschal ), and Elaine Godfrey ( @elainejgodfrey ) Today in 5 Lines The Wall Street Journal reported that President Donald Trump was involved in “nearly every step” of hush-money agreements with former adult-film star Stormy Daniels and ex-Playboy model Karen McDougal. Trump has repeatedly denied any involvement. A wildfi

2d

Saliva-based RNA panel distinguishes children on autism spectrum from non-autistic peers

A new saliva-based biomarker panel could improve the ability to accurately identify children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) in its earliest stages. In a study of more than 450 young children, researchers demonstrated that a panel of 32 small RNAs could differentiate autism from typical development or non-ASD developmental delay with 85 percent accuracy. This test accuracy was achieved both du

2d

Plastic microfibers found for first time in wild animals' stool, from S. A. fur seals

For the first time, plastic microfibers have been discovered in wild animals' stool, from South American fur seals. The findings were made by a team of Morris Animal Foundation-funded researchers at the University of Georgia, who suggest examining scat from pinnipeds can be an efficient way to monitor environmental levels of microfibers and microplastics in the environment. Their study was publish

2d

Transforming carbon dioxide into industrial fuels

One day in the not-too-distant future, the gases coming from power plants and heavy industry, rather than spewing into the atmosphere, could be captured and chemically transformed from greenhouse gases like carbon dioxide into industrial fuels or chemicals thanks to a new system that can use renewable electricity to reduce carbon dioxide into carbon monoxide — a key commodity used in a number of

2d

Salmonella found to be resistant to different classes of antibiotics

Common bacteria that cause foodborne diseases are resistant to antibiotics used to treat infections, according to research that identified 39 genes responsible for this resistance.

2d

Huge Lakes Thought to Be Hiding Beneath Antarctica's Ice Seem to Have Vanished

Researchers thought there were large lakes under East Antarctica's Recovery Glacier. Now they can't find them.

2d

Definition of Kilogram to Change

The unit of mass will no longer be defined by a lone physical object but instead in terms of a universal constant.

2d

Rainforest destruction from gold mining hits all-time high in Peru

Small-scale gold mining has destroyed more than 170,000 acres of primary rainforest in the Peruvian Amazon in the past five years, according to a new analysis.

2d

Research brief: Farmer adjustments can offset climate change impacts in corn production

U of M research looks closely at the future of maize crop yields with the effects of climate change.

2d

Possible treatment for rare polio-like illness shows no benefit

Researchers have been searching for possible treatments for the polio-like illness causing paralysis in children, called acute flaccid myelitis. But a new study shows no signal of efficacy for one potential treatment, the antidepressant fluoxetine. The study is published in the Nov. 9, 2018, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

2d

New flexible, transparent, wearable biopatch, improves cellular observation, drug delivery

Purdue University researchers have developed a new flexible and translucent base for silicon nanoneedle patches to deliver exact doses of biomolecules directly into cells and expand observational opportunities.

2d

Trump's Evangelical Advisers Hear from the Saudi Crown Prince on Khashoggi

A delegation of American evangelical Christians met with Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman last week in Riyadh. The group included some of President Trump’s top evangelical advisers, though they weren’t there in any official capacity. They’d come to talk about religious freedom with the young, self-styled reformer. But they found the trip overshadowed by the killing of Saudi journalist Jamal

2d

LGC announces new, integrated, global portfolio brand, Biosearch Technologies, representing genomic tools for mission critical customer applications

LGC’s Genomics division announced it is transforming its branding under LGC, Biosearch Technologies, a unified portfolio brand integrating optimised genomic analysis technologies and tools to accelerate scientific outcomes.

2d

EU moves to protect large carnivores

Farmers will receive 100% compensation for any damages caused by bears, wolves and other wild carnivores.

2d

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Brain learns to recognize familiar faces regardless of where they are in the visual field

A new study finds that recognition of faces varies by where they appear in the visual field and this variability is reduced by learning familiar faces through social interactions. The findings suggest that repeated social interactions may tune populations of visual neurons in the face processing network to enable consistent and rapid recognition of familiar faces.

2d

A newly discovered, naturally low-caffeine tea plant

Tea drinkers who seek the popular beverage's soothing flavor without its explosive caffeine jolt could soon have a new, naturally low-caffeine option. Scientists report that a recently discovered wild tea plant in China contains little or no caffeine and, unlike many industrially decaffeinated products, could potentially provide many of the health benefits of regular brewed teas.

2d

Powerful method probes small-molecule structures

Small molecules — from naturally occurring metabolites and hormones to synthetic medicines and pesticides — can have big effects on living things. But for scientists to understand how the molecules work and how to design beneficial ones, they need to know the precise arrangement of atoms and chemical bonds. Now researchers have found a faster, simpler and potentially more reliable way to solve t

2d

Gunshot wound first aid can save a life. Here's what to do.

Health There are life-saving measures any bystander can take. “Someone at the scene is going to have to intervene to save those injured victims. EMS can’t get there in time.”…

2d

How black World War I vets shaped the civil rights movement

The hundreds of thousands of African Americans who served in the US Army during World War I and returned home as heroes soon faced many more battles over their equality in American society, according to historian Chad Williams. While many celebrated black soldiers in the streets of New York at the end of the war, they also soon encountered a wave of hatred and violence. Williams, a chair in histo

2d

Improving city parks may be one path to help make residents more active

Researchers found that small improvements to a city's ParkScore — an evaluation of a city's park system — could lead to more physical exercise for its residents. The Trust for Public Land created the ParkScore as an index to rank the park systems of the nation's largest 100 cities, they added.

2d

UTA researchers find new pathway to regulate immune response, control diseases

Researchers at The University of Texas at Arlington have found a potential new pathway to regulate immune response and potentially control inflammatory diseases of the central nervous system such as meningitis and sepsis.

2d

Mild blast forces cause brain pathology and deficits, despite lack of macroscopic damage

Using a rat model of bTBI, researchers show how even mild exposure to a single blast shock wave is able to induce small but potentially very meaningful pathogenic effects that accumulate with time. These effects, detected at the microscopic level, included microvascular damage, injury to nerve axons and signs of neuroinflammation in various brain regions. Brain function also changed, as shown by i

2d

Grief linked to sleep disturbances that can be bad for the heart

People who have recently lost a spouse are more likely to have sleep disturbances that exacerbate levels of inflammation in the body, according to new research from Rice University and Northwestern University. These elevated levels of inflammation may increase risk for cardiovascular illness and death.

2d

DefiniGEN licenses CRISPR-Cas9 gene editing technology from Broad Institute to develop cell models for optimized metabolic disease drug development

DefiniGEN Ltd are pleased to announce the commercial licensing of CRISPR-Cas9 gene-editing technology from Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard in the USA, to develop human cell disease models to support preclinical metabolic disease therapeutic programmes.

2d

Toxin complex of the plague bacterium and other germs decoded

Researchers decode the toxin complex of the plague bacterium and other germs.

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Can Injecting Millions of Stem Cells into the Brain Treat Parkinson's Disease?

A new experimental therapy for Parkinson's disease that involves injecting millions of special stem cells into the brain of patients with the condition is currently being tested in a clinical trial.

2d

How humans evolved to live in the cold

According to some relatively new research, many of our early human cousins preceded Homo sapien migrations north by hundreds of thousands or even millions of years. Cross-breeding with other ancient hominids gave some subsets of human population the genes to contend and thrive in colder and harsher climates. Behavioral and dietary changes also helped humans adapt to cold climates. Humans emerged

2d

How Mueller Could Defend the Russia Investigation From Interference

In a little-noticed hearing this week before the D.C. Circuit Court of Appeals, attorneys for Special Counsel Robert Mueller laid out how much authority the acting attorney general has over the Russia investigation, including the ability to reject a proposed subpoena and scuttle an indictment. Although on its face the hearing had little to do with Matthew Whitaker, the man President Donald Trump

2d

Photos of the Week: Midterm Elections, Flaming Barrels, Diwali Lanterns

A visit to the Swiss Museum of Transport, NATO soldiers on patrol in Afghanistan, a giant’s house in Russia, new advances in powered exoskeleton technology, Californians mourn the victims of a mass shooting as they brace for destructive wildfires, autumn colors pass their peak in the North, Victoria’s Secret holds a fashion show in New York City, Bonfire Night across England, observing the centen

2d

TS Swag: Turkeys, Trees, and Tiny Microbes – Science Shirts For The Holidays

Get your hot, fresh, science-themed T-shirts here!

2d

A two-atom quantum duet

Researchers have achieved a major breakthrough in shielding the quantum properties of single atoms on a surface. The scientists used the magnetism of single atoms, known as spin, as a basic building block for quantum information processing. The researchers could show that by packing two atoms closely together they could protect their fragile quantum properties much better than for just one atom.

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Graphene on the way to superconductivity

Scientists have found evidence that double layers of graphene have a property that may let them conduct current completely without resistance. They probed the band structure at BESSY II with extremely high resolution ARPES and could identify a flat area at a surprising location.

2d

New flexible, transparent, wearable biopatch, improves cellular observation, drug delivery

Researchers have developed a new flexible and translucent base for silicon nanoneedle patches to deliver exact doses of biomolecules directly into cells and expand observational opportunities.

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