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Nyheder2018november11

 

Climate change will make Queensland's ecosystems unrecognisable – it's up to us if we want to stop that

Climate change and those whose job it is to talk about current and future climate impacts are often classed as the "harbingers of doom". For the world's biodiversity, the predictions are grim – loss of species, loss of pollination, dying coral reefs.

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Diverse biofeedstocks have high ethanol yields and offer biorefineries flexibility

Biorefineries are picky eaters. They only consume one or two types of plant matter. Researchers processed and experimentally measured ethanol production from five different herbaceous feedstocks. They examined two annuals (corn stover and energy sorghum) along with three perennials (switchgrass, miscanthus, and restored prairie). They determined that a lignocellulosic ethanol refinery could use a

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Hospitals report fewer bedsores, but does the math check out?

The prevention and management of hospital-acquired pressure ulcers, or HAPUs, varies greatly, according to new research. Ask any patient who has ever had one: a bedsore hurts a lot. And if it doesn’t heal, that sore can last for years, eating away at the flesh and leading to infections, sepsis, or even death. That’s why hospitals have worked for years to reduce the chance that patients will devel

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Photo Gallery: When the Baby in Family Photos Is a High-End Silicone "Reborn"

Berlin-based photographer Lena Kunz set out to chronicle the world of meticulously crafted baby dolls and the people who love them.

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The role of resource misallocation in productivity decreases since the 2007 financial crisis

Since the financial crisis of 2007, productivity growth has been slowing in all the major economies for unknown reasons, and in 2016, labor productivity in the U.S. recorded negative growth for the first time in 30 years. Part of the explanation of this productivity puzzle in advanced economies may lie in a generalized difficulty of reallocating resources between firms in the same industry and in

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Scale of California's Deadly Camp Fire Shown in Satellite Photos

As wildfires continue to burn in California, new satellite photos show the sheer scale of the deadly Camp Fire that has devastated the state's northern town of Paradise.

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Nine apps that will improve your productivity at work

DIY Manage your time, stay calm, avoid distractions, and more. Technology can help you do your best work. We selected apps to make your time at the office calmer, more productive, and maybe even enjoyable.

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Cardiovascular disease, Alzheimer's genetically linked

In the largest genetic study of Alzheimer's disease, researchers at the University of California, San Francisco and Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, have found that genes that increase risk of cardiovascular disease also heighten the risk for Alzheimer's.

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ANU study casts new light on fishing throughout history

A new study from The Australian National University (ANU) has revealed new insights into ancient fishing throughout history, including what type of fish people were regularly eating as part of their diet.

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2018 California Safety and Wellbeing Survey details firearm ownership in the state

Fourteen percent of California adults, or roughly 4.2 million individuals, personally own firearms. While the majority (54 percent) of owners have just one or two firearms, 10 percent own 10 or more firearms, which combined account for roughly half of all civilian-owned firearms in the state.

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NUS study explains how a spider and a pitcher plant can benefit from collaboration

Two recent studies by ecologists from the National University of Singapore have shed light on the relationship between the slender pitcher plant and its 'tenant', the crab spider Thomisus nepenthiphilus, providing insights to the little known foraging behaviours of the spider.

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Half moons and pinch points: Same physics, different energy

For the first time, physicists present a unified theory explaining two characteristic features of frustrated magnets and why they're often seen together.

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How Capital Influences Attitudes toward Capital Punishment

When people think the economy is poor, support for the death penalty rises — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Sequencing pollen DNA to discover insect migratory routes

Metabarcoding, a technique of mass DNA sequencing, allows for tracing migratory routes of insects, an understudied subject due to technical limitations. A small DNA fragment of the pollen that insects transport is used as a barcode to identify the plant species they visited previously. A new study shows that transcontinental pollination mediated by migrating insects is possible and, therefore, var

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AI capable of outlining in a single chart information from thousands of scientific papers

NIMS and the Toyota Technological Institute at Chicago have jointly developed a Computer-Aided Material Design (CAMaD) system capable of extracting information related to fabrication processes and material structures and properties–factors vital to material design–and organizing and visualizing the relationship between them. The use of this system enables information from thousands of scientific

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Lack of exercise impacts mental health in Japanese expats

A study of Japanese people living in Malaysia found that their exercise routines affected time spent sitting down and quality of life, including their mental health. This study was published in Gerontology and Geriatric Medicine on October 25.

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Frail seniors going without desperately needed in-home healthcare, study finds

There is a tremendous disparity between the need for home-based medical care and the number of frail seniors actually receiving it, a new study finds. In many rural areas, the problem is so great that the researchers label it 'remarkable.'

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Stripping the linchpins from the life-making machine reaffirms its seminal evolution

This experiment had a good chance of crashing. Instead, it delivered whopping evidence to coroborrate the earliest evolution of the translational system, the mechanisms which make life out of our genes. The study swapped out all its magnesium, tabula rasa, and showed that the system, centering on the ribosome, would have thrived basically as it is today 4 billion years ago at the earliest foundati

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The whole tooth: New method to find biological sex from a single tooth

A team led by UC Davis researchers have come up with a new way to estimate the biological sex of human skeletal remains based on protein traces from teeth.

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The more pills patients get, the more they take

Many surgeons write prescriptions for opioid pain medications four times larger than what their patients will actually use after common operations, according to new research. And the size of that prescription may be the biggest determining factor in how many pills they actually take, outweighing pain scores, intensity of the operation, and personal factors, the study suggests. The study, which ap

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How Natural Disasters Impact Meteorologists

How Natural Disasters Impact Meteorologists Scientists reporting on severe weather can get hit hard by emotions, flashbacks and even nightmares. How Natural Disasters Impact Meteorologists Video of How Natural Disasters Impact Meteorologists Earth Monday, November 12, 2018 – 09:30 Emilie Lorditch, Staff Writer (Inside Science) — It’s understandable that first responders like police, EMTs and fir

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25 Amazing Holiday Gift Ideas Under $25

Whether you're shopping for travelers, coffee-lovers, or phone addicts, just because you're cheap doesn't mean your holiday gifts can't be awesome.

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Developing a 3-D collagen model to test magnetic-assisted osteogenesis in vitro

The cellular and molecular mechanisms of magnetic stimulation-based bone regeneration require further understanding at present. To evaluate the phenomenon in the lab, a three-dimensional (3-D) native collagen model was recently developed via plastic compression to produce a cellular, dense and mechanically strong collagen structure. To produce cell-laden models in the study, Zhiyu Yuan and colleag

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Tommorow's population will be larger, heavier and eat more

Food demand is growing as people are getting bigger. Feeding a population of 9 billion in 2050 will require much more food than previously calculated.

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Ancient Egyptians discovered Algol's variability 3,000 years before western astronomers

An ancient Egyptian papyrus, known as the Cairo Calendar, could be the oldest historical record of a star's brightness, providing a new perspective on the development of the Algol triple star system over thousands of years.

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How to produce fluorescent nanoparticles for medical applications in a nuclear reactor

Under the leadership of Petr Cígler from the Institute of Organic Chemistry and Biochemistry (IOCB Prague) and Martin Hrubý from the Institute of Macromolecular Chemistry (IMC), a team of researchers has developed a revolutionary method for the easy and inexpensive production of irradiated nanodiamonds and other nanomaterials suitable for use in highly sensitive diagnostics of diseases, including

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Statsministeren diskuterede sundhedsreform med læger

Sundhedsvæsenets medarbejdere var i dag inviteret på Marienborg for at tale med statsministeren om en kommende sundhedsreform.

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Hovedstadens hospitalsdirektører: Vi ved, hvor vi vil behandles

Drop skræmmebilledet af Region Hovedstadens hospitaler, opfordrer hovedstadens hospitalsdirektører.

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Atomic parity violation research reaches new milestone

A reflection always reproduces objects as a complete mirror image, rather than just its individual parts or individual parts in a completely different orientation. It's all or nothing, the mirror can't reflect just a little. This illustrates a fundamental symmetry principle in nature. For decades, physics assumed that the laws of nature in our world and in the mirror world would be identical, that

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Big data used to predict the future

Technology is moving in giant leaps and bounds, and with it, the information with which society operates daily. Nevertheless, the volume of data needs to be organized, analyzed and correlated to predict certain patterns. This is one of the main functions of what is known as Big Data.

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Nature-inspired crystal structure predictor

Scientists from Russia have reported a way to improve crystal structure prediction algorithms, making the discovery of new compounds multiple times faster. The results of the study were published in Computer Physics Communications.

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New method enables large-scale production of bio-based plastic bottles

Scientists have discovered a novel method to synthesize furan-2,5-dicarboxylic acid (FDCA) in a high yield from a glucose derivative of non-food plant cellulose, paving the way for replacing petroleum-derived terephthalic acid with biomaterials in plastic bottle applications.

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Unified theory explains two characteristic features of frustrated magnets

For the first time, physicists present a unified theory explaining two characteristic features of frustrated magnets and why they're often seen together.

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Image: Testing the radar antenna for Juice spacecraft

A miniaturised model of the Juice spacecraft during electromagnetic tests at ESA's technical heart in the Netherlands.

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The tale of a spider and a pitcher plant: Study explains how two predators can benefit from collaboration

Two recent studies by ecologists from the National University of Singapore (NUS) have shed light on the relationship between the slender pitcher plant and its 'tenant', the crab spider Thomisus nepenthiphilus, providing insights into the little known foraging behaviours of the spider.

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TS Swag: Turkeys, Trees, and Tiny Microbes – Science Shirts For The Holidays

Get your hot, fresh, science-themed T-shirts here!

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Misunderstood flying fox could prove bat species demise, warn scientists

A large fruit-eating bat native to Mauritius is the subject of controversy over the announcement of a major cull to protect the Indian island's fruit crops, despite a lack of evidence as to the extent of damage directly attributed to the endangered species. An international team of researchers, including the University of Bristol, that monitored the damage directly caused by the Mauritian flying f

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Conservation areas help birdlife adapt to climate change

As the climate warms up, the belts of current climate conditions move further north, forcing species to follow the climate suited to them. At the same time, environmental transformation by humans is causing problems. Species are experiencing great difficulties in adapting simultaneously to a decrease in the quality of their habitat and the pressure brought on by climate change.

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Inspired by earthworms, new breathing material lubricates itself when needed

Earthworms are always clean, even if they come from moist, sticky soil. They owe this to a dirt-repellent, lubricating layer, which forms itself again and again on its skin. Researchers at INM have now artificially recreated this system of nature: They developed a material with a surface structure that provides itself with lubricant whenever pressure is applied. Because the lubricated material red

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Ultra-thin transparent silver films for solar cells

A new fabrication process for transparent ultra-thin silver films has been developed by researchers at Ruhr-Universität Bochum and the University of Wuppertal. The material may help build highly efficient solar cells and light-emitting diodes. However, traditional chemical methods have not been able to produce ultra-thin and pure silver films. A team headed by Professor Anjana Devi and Nils Boysen

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'Strongest evidence yet' that being obese causes depression

New research released today from the University of South Australia and University of Exeter in the UK has found the strongest evidence yet that obesity causes depression, even in the absence of other health problems.

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VITAL study: How vitamin D and fish oil affect risk of heart attack, stroke and cancer

Brigham and Women's Hospital investigators leading the VITamin D and OmegA-3 TriaL (VITAL) conducted a rigorous placebo-controlled trial over the course of 5.3 years, gleaning a treasure trove of information on the effects of both supplements.

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REDUCE-IT reveals high dose of pure EPA in omega-3 drug cuts risk of cardiovascular events

Results released today from a major clinical trial may have direct implications for patients who remain at increased cardiovascular risk despite taking statin therapy.

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Low-dose methotrexate does not reduce risk of cardiovascular events

When it comes to reducing inflammation to decrease the risk of heart disease and stroke, results from the much-anticipated Cardiovascular Inflammation Reduction Trial (CIRT) indicate that targeting the right inflammatory pathways in at-risk patients is crucial.

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Diabetes drug prevents heart failure

In the largest trial to date to assess cardiovascular outcomes for an important class of diabetes medications, researchers have found that dapagliflozin markedly reduced the risk of hospitalization for heart failure in a broad population of patients with diabetes.

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Children with autism thrive in mainstream pre-schools

In a world first, breakthrough research from La Trobe University has shown that toddlers with autism are just as capable of learning important life skills through early-intervention delivered in mainstream pre-schools as in specialised settings.

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Ingeniøren-blogger finder antistoffer som neutraliserer dødbringende slangegift

Ingeniøren-blogger Andreas Laustsen har sammen med kolleger og partnere udviklet en rekombinant modgift, som neutraliserer giften fra den sorte mamba.

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Deadliest wildfires in the United States since the 1990s

Wildfires raging in California are among the deadliest recorded in the United States, with at least 31 people killed in the state as 250,000 flee their homes.

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Weight during adolescence may affect pancreatic cancer risk in adulthood

New research has linked adolescent obesity with up to a four-fold increased risk of pancreatic cancer later in life. The study's results also suggest that overweight and even higher weight within the 'normal' weight range in men may increase pancreatic cancer risk in a graded manner.

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Urban planning policy contributes to political polarization

Urban planning decisions from decades past are likely a contributing factor to the rise of right-wing populism, a new study has found.

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Researchers conduct comprehensive study of the merging galaxy cluster MACS J0417.5-1154

An international team of scientists has carried out a comprehensive multi-wavelength study of one the merging galaxy clusters known as MACS J0417.5-1154. The research, available in a paper published November 1 on arXiv.org, provides new insights into the nature of this peculiar cluster.

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Would a new definition of gender erase trans people?

In October, major news outlets like The New York Times ran articles with headlines like "Transgender' Could Be Defined Out of Existence Under Trump Administration." Here, the Office of Equality and Diversity's Associate Director of Education and Prevention Jesse Krohn explained what that would mean.

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Image: Flooding along the Nueces River

On Nov. 1, 2018, the Operational Land Imager (OLI) on Landsat 8 captured a false-color view of flooding along the Nueces River in a series of storms that have delivered historic amounts of rain to central Texas.

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Five surprising Aussie pollinators that make your dinner possible

We owe such a lot to the humble European honeybee. For an insect that was only brought to Australia in 1822, it has become well-established as one of our most important crop-pollinating insects.

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Research reveals the dangerous impact of increasing temperatures on children

New research by Western Sydney University explores the concerning impact the changing climate and increasing heat are having on Australian schools and childcare centres, as experts predict temperatures will reach extreme heights this summer.

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Why UX Designers Should Consider the Role of Sound Design

Opinion: Science shows the sound of TV streaming or a chip reader blaring can be as distressing as nails on a chalkboard.

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SDSU-led team developing instruments to detect language problems earlier

Using the Computerized Comprehension Task, the team measured concepts by asking children to touch images on a touch-sensitive screen that represented words they were learning. The team used a measure of vocabulary that focused on stable concepts, finding that it was superior to prior measures in predicting children's general language ability at age 3. The team also identified individual children a

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Beaches at risk due to the increase in atmospheric carbon dioxide

The appearance of dunes and beaches might be changing due to the increase in carbon dioxide emissions in the atmosphere, already a significant factor in the ongoing phenomena of climate change. The findings are the result of a study coordinated by the Institute for the Study of Anthropic Impacts and Sustainability in Marine Environments of the National Research Council (CNR-IAS) of Oristano, carri

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Delhi homeless to be given masks as smog worsens: official

New Delhi's homeless will be given cotton masks to help them survive in the world's most polluted major city, officials said Monday, although experts said the basic coverings would be useless against deadly smog particles.

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Aboard the first spacecraft to the trojan asteroids—NASA Ralph's next adventure

Ralph, one of NASA's most well-traveled space explorers, has voyaged far and accomplished much: on the New Horizons mission, Ralph obtained stunning flyby images of Jupiter and its moons; this was followed by a visit to Pluto where Ralph took the first high-definition pictures of the iconic minor planet. And, in 2021, Ralph journeys with the Lucy mission to Jupiter's Trojan asteroids.

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Oxia Planum favoured for ExoMars surface mission

The ExoMars Landing Site Selection Working Group has recommended Oxia Planum as the landing site for the ESA-Roscosmos rover and surface science platform that will launch to the Red Planet in 2020.

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The uncertain future of U.S. coal communities

At a town hall meeting in Ohio in March 2016, Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton said: "…I'm the only candidate who has a policy about how to bring economic opportunity using clean renewable energy as the key into coal country. Because we're going to put a lot of coal miners and coal companies out of business, right?"

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New catalyst turns pollutant into fuel

Rather than allow power plants and industry to toss carbon dioxide into the atmosphere, incoming Rice University assistant professor Haotian Wang has a plan to convert the greenhouse gas into useful products in a green way.

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HD video from the moon in near real time

A new optical modem, capable of sending high-definition quality video significantly faster than standard radio frequency systems, is being developed for NASA's Orion spacecraft. The hardware, offered by LGS Innovations, is expected to deliver near real time footage from the moon and other space destinations.

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Keto, Mediterranean or Vegan: Which Diet Is Best for the Heart?

How do these three diets stack up against each other when it comes to heart health?

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Car tires and brake pads produce harmful microplastics

Scientists surveyed tiny airborne plastics near German highways and found that bits of tires, brake pads and asphalt make up most of the particles.

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The day a Siberian tiger nearly killed me

Pavel Fomenko patrols the icy and dangerous forests of Russia’s far east to protect its big cats. But the worst happened when he least expected it

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We’ve discovered a whole new defence system against germs in our noses

Billions of tiny sacs filled with weapons and warning signals to other cells are released into the lining of our noses when dangerous bacteria are detected

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Too busy for the PTA, but working-class parents care

There is a persistent perception among public high school administrators and staff that working-class immigrant parents are disinterested and uninvolved in their children's education.

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Citizens prefer landscapes that combine nature with built infrastructure

Citizens prefer to enjoy natural landscapes that combine nature with built infrastructure, and that are close and accessible. This is apparent from the results of a pioneering study developed by researchers from the Institute of Science and Environmental Technology of the Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona (ICTA-UAB) in which, for the first time, the preferences of the citizens of Barcelona have be

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SpaceX is going to build a mini-BFR to launch on a Falcon 9

In September of 2016, Elon Musk unveiled his vision for a super-heavy launch vehicle, which would be SpaceX's most ambitious project to date. Known as the Big Falcon Rocket (BFR), this massive launch vehicle is central to Musk's plan of conducting space tourism with flights into orbit and to the Moon. It is also intrinsic to his vision of sending astronauts and colonists to Mars.

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Study casts new light on fishing throughout history

A new study from The Australian National University (ANU) has revealed new insights into ancient fishing throughout history, including what type of fish people were regularly eating as part of their diet.

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Political blogs by teenagers promote tolerance, participation and public debate

When it comes to being politically active, young people typically have a bad reputation. In democracies such as the United States and the United Kingdom, young voters tend to have low turnout rates – but there are early signs that this is changing.

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Could yesterday's Earth contain clues for making tomorrow's medicines?

Several billion years ago, as the recently formed planet Earth cooled down from a long and brutal period of heavy meteor bombardment, pools of primordial muck began to swirl with the chemical precursors to life.

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First Universal Flu Vaccine to Enter Phase 3 Trial

Numerous experimental vaccines that aim to provide multi-season protection are in human studies.

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Ventetiden i børne- og ungepsykiatrien brager ned

Antallet af patienter i børne- og ungdomspsykiatrien stiger, samtidig med et det er lykkedes at skære ventetiden med næsten tre fjerdedele på landsplan siden 2010, viser tal fra regionerne.

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Lyme disease is thriving thanks to climate change

Nexus Media News Rising temperatures are creating new habitats for ticks. Climate change is expected to cause a 21 percent rise in Lyme disease cases in the United States.

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Fregat kollideret med tankskib: 385.000 liter diesel skal pumpes ud

Den norske fregat KNM Helge Ingstad ligger på siden og skal hæves. Nu begynder forklaringerne på forliset at dukke op.

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Decrease in specific gene 'silencing' molecules linked with pediatric brain tumors

Experimenting with lab-grown brain cancer cells, Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers have added to evidence that a shortage of specific tiny molecules that silence certain genes is linked to the development and growth of pediatric brain tumors known as low-grade gliomas.

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New physical activity guidelines for Americans released

Updated physical activity guidelines released by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) tell Americans to get moving, and for how long, with aerobic and muscle-strengthening activities.

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Hands-only CPR training kiosks can increase bystander intervention, improve survival

Hands-Only CPR training kiosks are becoming more widespread and are an effective training tool, a new Annals of Emergency Medicine analysis finds.

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The One Direction Fan-Fiction Novel That Became a Literary Sensation

John Cuneo One afternoon in the summer of 2013, Anna Todd was in the checkout line at Target when, as most of us do, she pulled out her phone. Then she propped her elbows on her shopping cart and began to type. Todd was 24 years old and living near Fort Hood, Texas, with her husband, a soldier she had married a month after graduating high school, and their newborn, who suffered daily seizures. Wh

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Massive Solar Storm Detonated Hidden American Bombs During the Vietnam War, Navy Records Show

Researchers digging through naval records uncovered a strange and alarming consequence of a massive 1972 solar storm.

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How to Farm During a Zombie Apocalypse

Groceries stores are gone, and zombies want to eat you. How do you feed yourself and those around you?

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The Flu Shot Needs Fewer Stats and More Stories

It's hard to entice people with a calm portrayal of a crisis avoided, so more medical officials are employing a technique long used by anti-vaxxers: personal narrative.

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The Risk That Ebola Will Spread to Uganda Is Now ‘Very High’

With the Ebola outbreak in the Democratic Republic of Congo continuing to spread, neighboring Uganda deploys its health care defenses.

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Bats Beat Dolphins in the Battle over Who Has the Best Sonar

But the dolphins are no slouches either — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Image of the Day: Bird Brain

Goffin's cockatoos customize tools to accommodate a specific need.

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Exosomes 'swarm' to protect against bacteria inhaled through the nose

A research team from Massachusetts Eye and Ear describes a newly discovered mechanism in a report published in the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology (JACI). The findings shed new light on our immune systems — and also pave the way for drug delivery techniques to be developed that harness this natural transportation process from one group of cells to another.

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Amazon’s HQ2 Spectacle Isn’t Just Shameful—It Should Be Illegal

The Amazon HQ2 saga had all the hallmarks of the gaudiest reality TV. It was an absurd spectacle, concluding with a plot twist, which revealed a deep and dark truth about the modern world. Fourteen months ago, Amazon announced a national beauty contest, in which North American cities could apply to win the honor of landing the retailer’s second headquarters. The prize: 50,000 employees and the gl

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What Happened When a Nation Erased Birthright Citizenship

This is a story about what happens when you limit birthright citizenship and stir up hate against a certain class of immigrants. It takes place in the Dominican Republic. Like most countries in the Americas, for a century and a half the Caribbean nation’s constitution guaranteed birthright citizenship for anyone born on its soil, with a couple of exceptions: the children of diplomats and short-te

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Dear Therapist: Life in a Multigenerational Household Is Terrible

Editor’s Note: Every Monday, Lori Gottlieb answers questions from readers about their problems, big and small. Have a question? Email her at dear.therapist@theatlantic.com . Dear Therapist, I am 24 years old and have lived at home with my grandparents and mother since I was in college. It was a nice arrangement for many of those years, and the deal has been simple: I get to live at home for basic

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What Vets Think of ‘23andMe for Dogs’

When Mars Petcare launched its first DNA test for dogs, in 2007, you could only get it through a vet. The breed-mix test required a blood draw, and Mars thought vets could help interpret the results for inquiring dog owners. But veterinarians, it turned out, weren’t so keen on newfangled DNA tests then. “We struggled with vets,” says Angela Hughes, the veterinary-genetics research manager at Mars

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A Road-Trip Novel That Punctures Political Myopia

The first car scene in Alfonso Cuarón’s road-trip movie Y Tu Mamá También takes place in Mexico City traffic. The protagonists, two privileged teenagers named Julio and Tenoch, kill time by smoking, farting, and joking about girls. The shot is so tight that the audience can barely see out the window. Suddenly, mid-banter, the boys freeze. The camera skates over the hood of the car. “That day,” th

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Researchers discover genes that give vegetables their shape

From elongated oblongs to near-perfect spheres, vegetables come in almost every size and shape. But what differentiates a fingerling potato from a russet or a Roma tomato from a beefsteak? Researchers at the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences have recently found the genetic mechanism that controls the shape of our favorite fruits, vegetables and grains.

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Bending DNA costs less energy than assumed

The way DNA folds largely determines which genes are read out. John van Noort and his group have quantified how easily rolled-up DNA parts stack. This costs less energy than previously assumed. Publication in Biophysical Journal.

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Environmentally-inspired 'niche' features impact species evolution

Researchers from Tokyo Metropolitan University have shown that the environment-driven evolution of a unique ovipositor in the female fruit fly Drosophila suzukii may have caused coevolution of the male genitalia; new features were found to cause mechanical incompatibility during reproduction with similar species, impeding crossbreeding and isolating the species. The dual role of the female genital

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Innovative experimental scheme can create mirror molecules

Exploring the mystery of molecular handedness in nature, scientists have proposed a new experimental scheme to create custom-made mirror molecules for analysis. The technique can make ordinary molecules spin so fast that they lose their normal symmetry and shape and form mirrored versions of each other. The research team from DESY, Universität Hamburg and University College London led by Jochen Kü

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The impact of tourism on the sustainability of an aging community in japan

Tourism has been an economic tool for rural development the world over. In areas where agriculture has declined, tourists can activate local economies and improve livelihoods. However, rural tourism's true impacts on the local environment and communities, and especially on individual households, have been hard to measure and interpret.

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The Pink Tax Means Women Spend More Than Men to Get Around NYC

New research suggests women in New York spend up to $50 a month more than men do on transportation, largely to feel safe and avoid harassment.

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Minister: Ingen samlet plan for klimaet

Regeringens højt profilerede klimaplan skal ikke ses som en samlet pakke. I stedet forsøger man at få enkeltinitiativer vedtaget med skiftende flertal.

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Populær drone: Billeder og video har været tilgængelige via sikkerhedsbrist

Droner fra DJI, et af dronemarkedets største spillere, har været sårbare for hackerangreb grundet adskillige sikkerhedshuller.

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Solving Microplastic Pollution Means Reducing, Recycling—and Fundamental Rethinking

New practices, and new chemistries, are needed to end the scourge — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Pocket money apps aim to help kids in cashless world

For kids growing up in today's cashless society, the piggy bank is going virtual.

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China postpones lifting rhino, tiger parts ban

China appeared to backtrack on a controversial decision to lift a ban on trading tiger bones and rhinoceros horns, saying it has been postponed, state media reported Monday.

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Amazon HQ favorites: Similar basics, different vibes

The communities said to be favored to become homes to a pair of big, new East Coast bases for Amazon are both riverfront stretches of major metropolitan areas with ample transportation and space for workers.

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E-bog, lydbog eller papirbog: Det skal du vælge, hvis du vil have mest ud af bogen

Forskning der tyder på, at du husker bedst, hvis du læser på papir. Men lydbogen har også sine fordele, siger forsker.

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Techtopia 78: Kan vi skabe etisk kunstig intelligens?

Kommer kunstig intelligens til at slå os ihjel? Eller er det bare en skør Hollywood fantasi?

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Super recognisers: the people who never forget a face

We all have an innate ability to pick a face out of a crowd. But some can memorise thousands of people – often seen only fleetingly on CCTV. Alex Moshakis meets the ‘super recognisers’ Earlier this year, a softly-spoken community support officer named Andy Pope received the Chief Constable’s Award, an honour bestowed on police force employees who’ve shown extraordinary bravery, or remarkable dedi

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America’s Struggle for Moral Coherence

W ith the United States starkly divided and with many Americans asking what kind of nation we are, it seems a good moment to look back to November 1863 in Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, when Abraham Lincoln tried to answer the same question. Consecrating a Civil War battlefield where thousands of young men and boys had died four months before, he spoke of a nation “conceived in liberty, and dedicated

12h

 

The Day Europe Fell Silent

In Cape Town, the firing of a pair of guns from the city’s Signal Hill has marked the hour of noon every day except Sunday for more than 200 years. In the spring of 1918, the city’s mayor, Sir Harry Hands, turned that timekeeping tradition into a memorial ritual. His eldest son, Reginald, had died of gas poisoning on the Western Front. On May 14, the day Hands heard the news, he merged his privat

12h

 

Rural Kids Face an Internet 'Homework Gap.' The FCC Could Help

Many students trek to classrooms or local businesses to do their homework. Going without isn’t an option.

12h

 

Where Will Science Take Us? To the Stars

A monthlong visit to observatories in Chile, Hawaii and Los Angeles revealed spellbinding visions of the heavens.

12h

 

In Brazil, Animals Cross a Road of No Return

Highway BR-262 is among the deadliest in the world for wildlife. Biologist Wagner Fischer has been monitoring its grim toll for more than two decades.

12h

 

The Wheels on These Buses Go Round and Round With Zero Emissions

Some states, concerned about pollution and global warming, see school buses as the next frontier for electric vehicles. Prices are high, but that's starting to change.

12h

 

Antimicrobial resistance is a growing threat to good health and well-being

Antimicrobial-resistant pathogens are one of the largest threats to global health today. As we get older, our immune systems age, increasing our risk of life threatening infections. Without reliable antibiotics, life expectancy could decline for the first time in modern history. If antibiotics become ineffective, common infections could result in hospitalization or even death. Life-saving interve

13h

 

How the global health community is fighting the rise of superbugs

Antimicrobial drugs are losing their effectiveness because pathogens change and find ways to resist the effects of antibiotics, leading to the development of superbugs. Antimicrobial resistance (AMR) causes 700,000 deaths annually across the globe, a number that is projected to skyrocket to 10 million by the year 2050 if new interventions are not developed. Antibiotics are crucial in treating min

13h

 

Briton dies from rabies after trip to Morocco

UK resident infected with disease after being bitten by cat, says Public Health England A Briton has died after contracting rabies while visiting Morocco, public health officials have said. The UK resident was infected with the disease after being bitten by a cat, Public Health England (PHE) said on Monday. Continue reading…

13h

 

The Wider Earth review – Darwin’s Beagle days make a gripping play

An unusual venue stages an intriguing play about Darwin's Beagle days as London's Natural History Museum turns theatrical–with superb puppets as exotic wildlife

13h

 

Defective DNA damage repair leads to chaos in the genome

Scientists at the German Cancer Research Center (Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum, DKFZ) have now found a cause for the frequent catastrophic events in the genetic material of cancer cells that have only been known for a few years: If an important DNA repair system of the cells has failed, this promotes fragmentation and defective assembly of the genetic material. Cancer cells with such a repair d

13h

 

It's not trails that disturb forest birds, but the people on them

The physical presence of trails has less impact on forest birds than how frequently the trails are used by people, finds the first study to disentangle the effect of forest trails from the presence of humans. This is also the case when trails have been used for decades, suggesting that forest birds do not get used to human activity. To minimize disturbance, people should avoid roaming from designa

13h

 

Kawasaki disease: One disease, multiple triggers

Researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine, Scripps Institution of Oceanography, and international collaborators have evidence that Kawasaki Disease (KD) does not have a single cause. By studying weather patterns and geographical distributions of patients in San Diego, the research team determined that this inflammatory disease likely has multiple environmental triggers i

13h

 

Konkurrent: Hvorfor ejer staten ikke beredskabets radionet?

Danmark er i dag det eneste europæiske land, der ikke selv ejer et kommunikationsnetværk til beredskabet. Det bør laves om, mener net-ejerens konkurrent forud for en fornyelse af systemet.

13h

 

You thought fake news was bad? Deep fakes are where truth goes to die

Technology can make it look as if anyone has said or done anything. Is it the next wave of (mis)information warfare? In May, a video appeared on the internet of Donald Trump offering advice to the people of Belgium on the issue of climate change. “As you know, I had the balls to withdraw from the Paris climate agreement,” he said, looking directly into the camera, “and so should you.” The video w

13h

 

It's not trails that disturb forest birds, but the people on them

The first study to disentangle the effect of forest trails from the presence of humans shows the number of birds, as well as bird species, is lower when trails are used on a more regular basis. This is also the case when trails have been used for many years, suggesting that forest birds do not get used to this recreational activity. Published in Frontiers in Ecology and Evolution, the finding sugg

13h

 

Retailers Plan To Clear Deadly Paint Removers From Shelves, As EPA Delays Ban

A chemical in common paint removal products is implicated in more than 50 deaths. Even though a federal ban has been delayed, some major retailers are voluntarily taking the products off shelves. (Image credit: Ben McCanna/Portland Press Herald via Getty Images)

14h

 

Devastation as deadly California blaze tallies grim stats

As wildfires continued to rage on both ends of California, officials released another grim statistic: six more dead in a swath of Northern California wiped out by fire, raising the death toll there to 29. It matched California's record for deaths in a single fire.

14h

 

Freitag og det faglige fællesskab

Almen praksis kommer i fokus i regeringens kommende reform, og fremtiden hedder sundhedsfaglige fællesskaber, mener formanden for Praktiserende Lægers Organisation.

14h

 

Prisvinder skaber sammenhæng mellem forskning og kvalitetsudvikling

Praktiserende læge og professor Flemming Bro er årets modtager af Halfdan Mahler-prisen. Han modtager prisen for sit arbejde med at skabe sammenhæng mellem forskning og kvalitetsudvikling.

14h

 

DTU Miljø: God og dårlig plast bør skilles ad i hjemmet

Tænk i emballagedesign og effektivitet i sortering af plastaffald, og indret så indsamlingssystemet til det, lyder anbefalingen fra DTU Miljø.

14h

 

Personlig medicin gør lægegerningen mere kompleks

Lægernes faglighed bliver udfordret med indtoget af personlig medicin, hvor flere patienter ønsker svar på komplicerede spørgsmål. De praktiserende læger skal i højere grad agere sparringspartner, mener professor og overlæge Henrik Ullum.

15h

 

Are placebo effects genetically determined?

We frequently write about placebo effects here at SBM because understanding placebo effects is essential to understanding a lot of clinical trial science and, most relevant to the topics of this blog, how those promoting unscientific medicine misunderstand and misuse placebo effects to promote quackery. Last week, The NYT published an article asking if placebo effects are genetically determined. T

15h

 

SoftBank unveils massive $21 bn IPO of Japan mobile unit

Telecoms giant SoftBank will list shares in its Japanese mobile unit next month in a sale that could raise over $21 billion and be one of the biggest tech IPOs in years.

15h

 

In China's Himalayas, a wine 'flying above the clouds'

A $300 bottle of wine sold in the United States and Europe is made in the unlikeliest of places: at the foot of the Himalayas in China, where farmers sing traditional songs while picking grapes.

15h

 

Alibaba hits another 'Singles Day' record but growth slows

Chinese e-commerce giant Alibaba filled a record $30.7 billion in orders on Sunday during its annual "Singles Day" shopping frenzy, but growth slowed from previous years.

15h

 

SAP buying Qualtrics for $8 billion in cash

SAP says it has agreed to pay $8 billion cash for survey-software provider Qualtrics International Inc., which was preparing for an initial sale of stock to the public.

15h

 

How to drive a robot on Mars

Some 78 million miles (126 million kilometers) from Earth, alone on the immense and frigid Red Planet, a robot the size of a small 4×4 wakes up just after sunrise. And just as it has every day for the past six years, it awaits its instructions.

15h

 

Henriettes snorken ødelagde mandens søvn: Flere får søvnapnø

Mange har ubehandlet søvnapnø og øget risiko for blandt andet diabetes og blodpropper.

16h

 

Urban planning policy contributes to political polarization

Urban planning decisions from decades past are likely a contributing factor to the rise of right-wing populism, a study from the University of Waterloo has found.

16h

 

Crazy in love? The Japanese man 'married' to a hologram

Akihiko Kondo's mother refused an invitation to her only son's wedding in Tokyo this month, but perhaps that isn't such a surprise: he was marrying a hologram.

16h

 

Badger cull: Vets accuse ministers of 'barefaced lies'

Campaigners accuse the government of telling "bare faced lies" about the effectiveness of badger culls.

17h

 

Anonym sikkerhedsforsker: Så let er det at købe et ransomware-angreb

En sikkerhedsforsker fra Bitdefender har samarbejdet med Europol om at få skovlen under den seneste udgave af ransomware-as-a-service-programmet GandCrab.

18h

 

Hver tiende dansker lider af ben-sygdom: Kun få kommer i behandling

Sygdommen Restless Legs Syndrome ødelægger livskvaliteten for tusindvis af danskere. Der findes god behandling. Men de færreste får den.

18h

 

Montreal researchers explain how your muscles form

An international team led by Montreal researchers discovers two proteins essential to the development of skeletal muscle.

18h

 

Urban planning policy contributes to political polarization

Urban planning decisions from decades past are likely a contributing factor to the rise of right-wing populism, a study from the University of Waterloo has found.

18h

 

Weight during adolescence may affect pancreatic cancer risk in adulthood

New research has linked adolescent obesity with up to a four-fold increased risk of pancreatic cancer later in life. The study's results also suggest that overweight and even higher weight within the 'normal' weight range in men may increase pancreatic cancer risk in a graded manner. The findings are published early online in CANCER, a peer-reviewed journal of the American Cancer Society.

18h

 

Fewer Canadians winning major health research prizes

An analysis of major health research prizes, including the Canada Gairdner International Award, found that few Canadian-based scientists are winning these prestigious prizes. The article is published in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal).

18h

 

Major traumatic injury increases risk of mental health diagnoses, suicide

People who experience major injuries requiring hospital admission, such as car crashes and falls, are at substantially increased risk of being admitted to hospital for mental health disorders, found a study in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal). As well, they are at much higher risk of suicide than people without such injuries.

18h

 

Primary care clinicians' willingness to care for transgender patients

A new survey finds that most family medicine and general internal medicine clinicians are willing to provide routine care for transgender patients.

18h

 

After the Election, the Renewal Begins

Back in the days before all data was stored everywhere, forever, never to disappear even if you try, writers and composers shared the experience of waking up at 3am, in cold-sweat terrors because of the “lost manuscript” nightmare. This fear was based on hoary stories about some novelist or historian who got into a cab with a bag containing a 1,000-page manuscript representing years of work — and

19h

 

Multirotormølle overrasker: Turbulens øger elproduktionen

De første offentliggjorte målinger på Vestas' multirotorvindmølle viser, at turbulens omkring de fire rotorer ikke er et problem. Tværtimod.

19h

 

Community choirs reduce loneliness and increase interest in life for older adults

An innovative San Francisco program of community choirs for older adults found that singing in a choir reduced loneliness and increased interest in life, but did not improve cognition or physical function, according to a new study.

20h

 

Sequencing pollen DNA to discover insect migratory routes

Metabarcoding, a technique of mass DNA sequencing, allows for tracing migratory routes of insects, an understudied subject due to technical limitations. A small DNA fragment of the pollen that insects transport is used as a barcode to identify the plant species they visited previously. This study shows that transcontinental pollination mediated by migrating insects is possible and, therefore, vari

20h

 

Solar power: largest study to date discovers 25 percent power loss across UK

Regional 'hot spots' account for the power slump and these are more prevalent in the North of England than in the south.

20h

 

Fully identified: The pathway of protons

The question how certain algal enzymes accomplish the high proton transfer rate for hydrogen production had in the past been subject to speculation. Researchers traced the pathway of protons all the way into the active center of [FeFe]-hydrogenases. Their findings might enable scientists to create stable chemical reproductions of such efficient, yet fragile biocatalysts.

20h

 

Artificial intelligence may fall short when analyzing data across multiple health systems

A new study shows deep learning models must be carefully tested across multiple environments before being put into clinical practice.

20h

 

Making steps toward improved data storage

Researchers created the world's most powerful electromagnetic pulses to control a data-storage material's physical form, leading to a potential way to scale down memory devices and revolutionize how computers handle information.

20h

 

Investigational urate elevation does not appear to raise hypertension risk

A new study may reduce the concern that elevating levels of urate, an approach being investigated to treat several neurodegenerative disorders, could increase the risk of hypertension.

20h

 

Hypertonic saline may help babies with cystic fibrosis breathe better

Babies with cystic fibrosis may breathe better by inhaling hypertonic saline, according to a randomized controlled trial conducted in Germany.

20h

 

Ready for a close-up: The science behind face massage rollers

Facial massaging using a roller can increase skin blood flow for more than ten minutes after the massage. It can also improve vasodilation — the widening of blood vessels, — in the long-term, according to a new study.

21h

 

Freshwater turtles navigate using the sun

A new study shows that simulating a clock shift of six hours causes hatchling Blanding's turtles to shift their course, demonstrating that the sun is central to their navigational compass.

21h

 

Scientists capture the 'sound' of sunrise on Mars

Scientists have created the soundtrack of the 5,000th Mars sunrise captured by the robotic exploration rover, Opportunity, using data sonification techniques to create a two-minute piece of music.

21h

 

Yelp reviews reveal strengths and weaknesses of emergency departments and urgent care

Comparing five- and one-star Yelp reviews, a research team found what patients consider to be the strengths and weaknesses of hospital emergency departments and urgent care centers.

21h

 

Cellphone technology developed to detect HIV

Investigators have designed a portable and affordable mobile diagnostic tool, utilizing a cellphone and nanotechnology, with the ability to detect HIV viruses and monitor its management in resource-limited regions.

21h

 

Big change from small player: Mitochondria alter body metabolism and gene expression

Mitochondria have their own DNA, but the 13 genes in human mitochondria — along with DNA sequences for tRNAs, rRNAs and some small peptides — are massively overshadowed by the 20,000 genes in the human nucleus. Nevertheless, these diminutive mitochondria may have a strong influence on cellular metabolism and susceptibility to metabolic diseases like heart failure or obesity.

21h

 

Nursing science could help reduce firearm violence and its impact

A new article frames firearm violence as a health and public policy problem and shows how nurses are in a prime position to understand the complex factors leading to firearm violence and investigate how to reduce its frequency and impact.

21h

 

Tiny pacemakers aim to make infant heart surgeries less invasive, while cutting operating costs and time

A prototype for a miniature pacemaker, about the size of an almond, aims to make pacemaker procedures for infants less invasive, less painful, and more efficient, measured by shorter surgeries, faster recovery times and reduced medical costs.

21h

 

Scientists simplify and accelerate directed evolution bioengineering method

Researchers reported that they have accelerated and simplified directed evolution by having live cells do most of the heavy lifting. By inserting a specially engineered DNA replication system into yeast, the scientists were able to coax selected genes to rapidly and stably mutate and evolve as the host yeast cells reproduced.

21h

 

Leading researchers call for a ban on widely used insecticides

Public health experts have found there is sufficient evidence that prenatal exposure to widely used insecticides known as organophosphates puts children at risk for neurodevelopmental disorders.

21h

 

Holocene temperature in the Iberian Peninsula reconstructed studying insect subfossils

Remains of chironomid subfossils, a type of insects similar to mosquitoes, were used to reconstruct the temperature of the Iberian Peninsula in the Holocene, the geological period that goes from 11,000 years ago until now. The results of the study demonstrate some of the climate patterns of the Holocene brought by other methodologies: a rise of temperatures in the beginning and the end of the peri

21h

 

Mangroves can help countries mitigate their carbon emissions

Geographers have found that coastal vegetation such as mangroves, seagrasses, and salt marshes may be the most effective habitats to mitigate carbon emissions.

21h

 

Small populations of normal cells affect immunity in patients with XLP1

Human SH2D1A mutations resulting in X-linked lymphoproliferative syndrome type 1 (XLP1) are associated with a unique susceptibility to the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), which may lead to fatal infectious mononucleosis (FIM). Many studies have attempted to elucidate an appropriate treatment for XLP1 that does not involve hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT); clinical evidence supporting such

21h

 

Big data used to predict the future

Technology is taking giant leaps and bounds, and with it, the information with which society operates daily. Nevertheless, the volume of data needs to be organized, analyzed and crossed to predict certain patterns. This is one of the main functions of what is known as 'Big Data', the 21st century crystal ball capable of predicting the response to a specific medical treatment, the workings of a sma

21h

 

Experts find that stone tools connected communities

Stone tools that were discovered and examined by a group of international experts showed for the first time that various communities that lived during the Middle Stone Age period were widely connected and shared ideas around tool design.

21h

 

Beaches at risk due to the increase in atmospheric CO2

Scientists have carried out the first scientific research on the ripple effects linking atmospheric emissions, sea acidification, and coastal erosion. The Mediterranean case study: a possible 31 percent decrease in sediment by 2100.

21h

 

How much debris is lying on glaciers?

Scientist show a possibility to detect the extent of debris on mountain glaciers globally and automatically vi a satellite monitoring. The scientists used the cloud computing platform Google Earth Engine for their study.

21h

 

Nano-scale process may speed arrival of cheaper hi-tech products

Researchers have developed an inexpensive way to make products incorporating nanoparticles — such as high-performance energy devices or sophisticated diagnostic tests — which could speed the commercial development of devices, materials and technologies.

21h

 

Intense tests reveal elusive, complex form of nitrogen

Scientists have used high pressure and high temperature experiments to recreate an unusually complex form of nitrogen in the lab for the first time.

21h

 

Psychological science can make your meetings better

Meetings are the bane of office life for many professionals but they don't have to be. Drawing from almost 200 scientific studies on workplace meetings, a team of psychological scientists provides recommendations for making the most out of meetings before they start, as they're happening, and after they've concluded.

21h

 

Hidden estrogen receptors in breast epithelium

Scientists have uncovered that next to estrogen receptor positive and negative there are cells with very low amounts of the receptor protein. The discovery has significant implications for the role of the receptor in the growth and development of the breast and breast cancer development.

21h

 

Autism and zinc deficiency in early development

Autism has been associated with zinc deficiency in infancy. While it is not yet known whether zinc deficiency in early development causes autism, scientists have now found a mechanistic link. Their study connects zinc, autism risk genes and abnormal neuronal connections associated with autism spectrum disorders.

21h

 

Using mice, researchers identify how allergic shock occurs so quickly

Researchers used mouse models to track how immune cells are triggered during anaphylactic shock. They describe a previously unknown mechanism in which a newly identified immune cell basically mines the blood vessels for allergens and then utilizes an unusual mechanism for rapidly delivering the blood-borne allergens to mast cells.

21h

 

Innovative experimental scheme can create tailor-made mirror molecules

Exploring the mystery of the molecular handedness in nature, scientists have proposed a new experimental scheme to create custom-made mirror molecules for analysis. The technique can make ordinary molecules spin so fast that they lose their normal symmetry and shape and instead form mirrored versions of each other.

22h

 

Excessive posting of selfies is associated with increase in narcissism

A new study has established that excessive use of social media, in particular the posting of images and selfies, is associated with a subsequent increase in narcissism by an average of 25 percent.

22h

 

Scalpel-free surgery enhances quality of life for Parkinson's patients

A high-tech form of brain surgery that replaces scalpels with sound waves improved quality of life for people with Parkinson's disease that has resisted other forms of treatment, a new study has found.

22h

 

Soy formula feeding during infancy associated with severe menstrual pain in adulthood

New research suggests that infant girls fed soy formula are more likely to develop severe menstrual pain as young adults. The finding adds to the growing body of literature that suggests exposure to soy formula during early life may have detrimental effects on the reproductive system.

22h

 

Latest global disease estimates show health worker shortfall, suggest progress not inevitable

The latest global estimates for the state of the world's health from the Global Burden of Disease study highlight that global progress in health is not inevitable.

22h

 

UK wine-making areas to rival Champagne revealed

New research identifies areas of the UK which could rival the Champagne region of France. Climate and viticulture experts identified nearly 35,000 hectares of prime viticultural land for new and expanding vineyards — much of it in Kent, Sussex and East Anglia. As climate change drives warmer growing season temperatures in England and Wales, this new viticulture suitability model allows, for the f

22h

 

Yuri Orlov – The Cornell physicist who was arrested by the KGB and exiled to Siberia

Physicist Yuri Orlov fought for human rights during the Cold War. He was arrested by the KGB and exiled to Siberia. Orlov's story can inspire scientists to fight for their beliefs. None The midterm elections saw 9 new scientists elected to Congress, a positive trend in the anti-science climate supported by the White House. Scientists are prepared to fight. They can take some inspiration from Yuri

23h

 

Broad genome analysis shows yeasts evolving by subtraction

An unprecedented comparison of hundreds of species of yeasts has helped geneticists brew up an expansive picture of their evolution over the last hundreds of millions of years, including an analysis of the way they evolved individual appetites for particular food sources that may be a boon to biofuels research.

23h

 

Why modest goals are so appealing

Study finds that people feel it's easier to achieve a small incremental goal than to maintain the status quo.

23h

 

'Nested sequences': An indispensable mechanism for forming memories

A research team has just lifted part of the veil surrounding brain activity during sleep. Though we know that some neurons are reactivated then to consolidate our memories, we did not know how these cells could "remember" which order to turn on in. The researchers have discovered that reactivating neurons during sleep relies on activation that occurs during the day: "nested" theta sequences.

23h

 

We now know how RNA molecules are organized in cells

Researchers have for the first time visualized how RNA molecules are organized in cells.

23h

 

Potatoes may have altered ancient people’s genomes

As the ancient Andean people turned wild tubers into the domesticated potato, the potato may have altered the genomes of the Andeans who made it a staple of their diet, according to new research. Potatoes, native to South America, became an agricultural crop thousands of years ago in the Andean highlands of Peru. Now, researchers have used DNA analysis to show that the ancient populations of the

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