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Nyheder2018november12

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The US Is the Only Country Where There Are More Guns Than People

The US has worst rate of gun violence among all developed countries, and still we fail to regulate.

27min

 

Want your kid to be an elite athlete? Let them play the field.

Health Specializing in one sport won’t turn your child into an elite athlete—and it might get them hurt. Research suggests that kids are focusing on one sport earlier, and that this is leading to an uptick in overuse injuries.

44min

 

Politics and science need more women, says Angela Merkel

German chancellor makes speech in Berlin on 100th anniversary of female suffrage The German chancellor, Angela Merkel, has said that her role as the most powerful woman in Germany should not let society off the hook for the small proportion of women in politics. As Germany marked the 100th anniversary of women’s suffrage, Merkel said in a speech in Berlin that there was a lot still to do to achie

15min

 

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The Best of Stan Lee’s Marvel Comic Books

From the first hundred issues of Fantastic Four to the genesis of the Incredible Hulk, these comics define some of the very best of Stan Lee's canon.

9min

 

How getting in sync with your partner can lead to increased intimacy and sexual desire

Scientists say coordinating movements leads to increased intimacy and sexual desire in a couple. The improved rapport and empathy was also observed in people who didn't know each other. Non-verbal clues are very important in the development stages of a relationship. None If you are walking side by side with someone, chances are your footsteps will eventually become synchronized. The same goes for

1h

 

The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: California Ablaze

Written by Madeleine Carlisle ( @maddiecarlisle2 ) and Elaine Godfrey ( @elainejgodfrey ) Today in 5 Lines Multiple wildfires have engulfed California . The Camp Fire in Northern California is now the deadliest wildfire in modern California history, with 29 confirmed dead. The Woolsey Fire raging in the southern part of the state has forced 265,000 people to evacuate in Ventura and Los Angeles co

1h

 

Hopes for AI to stop bee decline

Scientists hope artificial intelligence will gives us more insights into bee health and behaviour.

1h

 

The Psychic’s Tragic Prediction That Came True

Matthew Palmer’s mother, Susan, doesn’t believe in clairvoyance. She can’t reconcile that, however, with the fact that a psychic predicted—with inexplicable accuracy—her husband’s untimely death. It would happen, said the fortune teller, when her son turned 13. At that point, Susan didn’t even have a son. After Palmer was born, his parents would sometimes joke about the psychic’s prediction. Then

1h

 

Commercial Satellites Reveal North Korean Missile Base

The previously undisclosed base contains networks of tunnels used to hide and fuel mobile missiles. Intelligence agencies believe there are some 20 similar bases scattered throughout North Korea. (Image credit: KCNA via Reuters)

1h

 

Insufficient sleep in children is associated with poor diet, obesity and more screen time

A new study conducted among more than 177,000 students suggests that insufficient sleep duration is associated with an unhealthy lifestyle profile among children and adolescents.

2h

 

Stan Lee Was Synonymous With American Superhero Comics

Stan Lee was just 16 when he got his first job in the comic-book industry; in 1939 he joined Timely Comics, a new pulp division belonging to the publisher Martin Goodman. Born Stanley Lieber, the son of Romanian Jewish immigrants dreamed of writing the “Great American Novel.” He later said he took the nom de plume Stan Lee out of embarrassment: “People had no respect for comic books at all. Most

2h

 

A ‘Time Capsule’ for Scientists, Courtesy of Peter the Great

A Russian zoological museum filled with centuries-old specimens finds renewed relevance in the age of genetics.

2h

 

Ellen Trane: Almen praksis skal indeholde flere fagligheder

De praktiserende læger får en afgørende rolle i en kommende sundhedsreform, og det kræver, at lægerne styrker de faglige fællesskaber. Sådan lød det fra sundhedsministeren til åbningsarrangementet under Lægedage.

2h

 

Ebola Clinical Trial to Begin Amid Outbreak in DRC

The study will examine the efficacy of four drugs–an antiviral and three monoclonal antibodies–that are already being used to treat patients in Democratic Republic of Congo.

2h

 

Megafires More Frequent Because Of Climate Change And Forest Management

Dry weather and strong winds mean that what would have been small blazes in the past are now monster fires. And more people live in harm's way. (Image credit: Josh Edelson/AFP/Getty Images)

2h

 

Stan Lee, Marvel co-creator, is dead at 95Stan Lee Marvel Spider-Man

Stan Lee, co-creator of the Marvel Comics universe that was home to nuanced superheroes like Spider-Man and the Incredible Hulk, died today in Los Angeles at the age of 95. The comics titan had reportedly suffered from a number of illnesses recently, including pneumonia, according to TMZ . Lee, whose full name was Stanley Martin Lieber, was born to Romanian-born Jewish immigrants in New York City

2h

 

Creating a Garden on the Floating Homestead | Alaska: The Last Frontier

Aboard the Yule Tide, Atz Sr., Bonnie, Eivin and Eve build the foundations of a garden on Atz's floating homestead. Stream Full Episodes of Alaska: The Last Frontier: https://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/alaska-the-last-frontier/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/AlaskaTLF/ https://www.facebook.com/Discovery Follow on Twitter: htt

2h

 

Facebook back up after Americas service interruption

Facebook users in the Americas were able to get back onto their profiles Monday afternoon, after the social media network went down briefly across some parts of the region.

2h

 

Scientists: Wind, drought worsen fires, not bad management

Both nature and humans share blame for California's devastating wildfires, but forest management did not play a major role, despite President Donald Trump's claims, fire scientists say.

2h

 

Rocket-maker ArianeGroup to cut 2,300 jobs

European aerospace and defence firm ArianeGroup is to cut 2,300 jobs by 2022 as orders tumble and development of a new rocket nears its end, management said Monday.

2h

 

From beaker to solved 3D structure in minutes

A new method for learning the structures of small molecules, such as hormones, is 'like science fiction.'

2h

 

America Is a Dream

In the comic below, Stan Lee offers a powerful definition of the American idea, illustrated by Anthony Winn. This piece was first published in The Atlantic’s 150th anniversary issue in November 2007.

2h

 

Scientists debunk potential link to crop cold tolerance

When temperatures drop, the enzyme Rubisco that fuels plant growth and yield gets sluggish. Many crops compensate by producing more Rubisco; however, scientists speculated that some crops may lack space in their leaves to boost the production of this enzyme, making them more susceptible to cold. A new study from the University of Illinois and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology refutes this

3h

 

How mitochondria deploy a powerful punch against life-threatening bacteria

The constant battle for dominance between disease-causing bacteria and our immune systems has led to the evolution of some crafty warfare tactics on both sides.

3h

 

Beneficial gut bacteria metabolize fiber to improve heart health in mice

Diets rich in fiber have long been associated with an array of positive outcomes, chief among them healthy hearts and arteries protected from the ravages of atherosclerosis, the accumulation of fatty plaques linked to heart attacks and strokes.

3h

 

Setting a maximum wage for CEOs would be good for everyone

Under capitalism, the argument goes, it's every man for himself. Through the relentless pursuit of self-interest, everyone benefits, as if an invisible hand were guiding each of us toward the common good. Everyone should accordingly try to get as much as they can, not only for their goods but also for their labour. Whatever the market price is is, in turn, what the buyer should pay. Just like the

3h

 

Breakthrough in understanding how deadly pneumococcus avoids immune defences

Scientists at the University of Liverpool have discovered a new and important function of a toxin produced by disease-causing bacteria that could have significant implications for future vaccine design.

3h

 

Beneficial gut bacteria metabolize fiber to improve heart health in mice

In support of a microbial connection between fiber and heart health, researchers at the University of Wisconsin-Madison have identified a particular fatty acid as the mechanism behind certain protective effects of a high-fiber diet in a mouse model. Known as butyrate, this fatty acid is produced by certain bacteria in the gut as they digest plant fiber.

3h

 

Ableton Loop Is More of a EDM Networking Event Than a Rave

Now in its fourth year, the conference moved its festivities to Los Angeles, where hundreds of aspiring musicians convened to learn new tricks.

3h

 

'Move More and Sit Less': These Are the New Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans

After a decade, Americans have new physical activity guidelines to aim for — and officials hope the changes will get more people encouraged to get moving.

3h

 

An extinct monkey evolved to live like a sloth in the Caribbean

Jamaica was once home to a sloth-like monkey – now we know it was a strange descendant of South America’s titi monkeys that adapted to island life

3h

 

Researchers identify risk factors of advanced liver disease in cystic fibrosis patients

Children's Hospital Colorado (Children's Colorado) pediatric gastroenterologist, Michael Narkewicz, MD, recently shared results of the Prospective Study of Ultrasound to Predict Hepatic Cirrhosis in Cystic Fibrosis (PUSH), which sought to determine if liver ultrasounds could identify children and adolescents with cystic fibrosis who are at greater risk of developing advanced liver disease.

3h

 

Resonant mechanism discovery could inspire ultra-thin acoustic absorbers

New research led by academics at the University of Bristol has discovered that the scales on moth wings vibrate and can absorb the sound frequencies used by bats for echolocation (biological sonar). The finding could help researchers develop bioinspired thin and lightweight resonant sound absorbers.

3h

 

Spectrum of cardiovascular toxicities with immune checkpoint inhibitors revealed

The study, published online Nov. 12 in The Lancet Oncology, augments previous work by Vanderbilt University Medical Center (VUMC) researchers who first reported in 2016 rare but fatal cardiac side effects from the most widely prescribed class of immunotherapies. The researchers used VigiBase, a global database of drug complications maintained by the World Health Organization, to track adverse card

3h

 

Largest ever study of psychological sex differences and autistic traits

Scientists at the University of Cambridge have completed the world's largest ever study of typical sex differences and autistic traits. They tested and confirmed two long-standing psychological theories: the Empathizing-Systemizing theory of sex differences and the Extreme Male Brain theory of autism.

3h

 

Mutations, CRISPR, and the biology behind movement disorders

Scientists at the RIKEN Center for Brain Science (CBS) in Japan have discovered how mutations related to a group of movement disorders produce their effects. Published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences USA, the study found three ways in which mutations affecting the IP3R1 protein can affect the chemical balance of neurons in the brain, ultimately leading to the degeneration of mot

3h

 

Escape responses of coral reef fish obey simple behavioral rules

The escape response to evade perceived threats is a fundamental behavior seen throughout the animal kingdom, and laboratory studies have identified specialized neural circuits that control this behavior. To understand how these neural circuits operate in complex natural settings, researchers recorded and analyzed escape responses in wild coral reef fish. Their results show how a sequence of well-d

3h

 

No cooperation without open communication

In models that explore how humans act when their reputation is at stake, usually assumptions were made that are at odds with reality. In a new, more realistic model, scientists explore what happens when information is incomplete and people make mistakes. In their model, previously successful strategies do not lead to sustained cooperation, and in most cases do not evolve at all. Their results will

3h

 

Alpine ice shows three-fold increase in atmospheric iodine

Analysis of iodine trapped in Alpine ice has shown that levels of atmospheric iodine have tripled over the past century, which partially offsets human-driven increases in the air pollutant, ozone.

3h

 

Primates of the Caribbean: Ancient DNA reveals history of mystery monkey

Analysis of ancient DNA of a mysterious extinct monkey named Xenothrix — which displays bizarre body characteristics very different to any living monkey — has revealed that it was in fact most closely related to South America's titi monkeys (Callicebinae). Having made their way overwater to Jamaica, probably on floating vegetation, their bones reveal they subsequently underwent remarkable evolut

3h

 

Can scientists change mucus to make it easier to clear, limiting harm to lungs?

For people with conditions such as cystic fibrosis and COPD, mucus can get too thick and sticky; coughing alone can't clear it. Infections develop, leading to severe chronic disease and early death. Now, for the first time, scientists at UNC and Duke showed why coughing often cannot tear mucus apart and away from the airway lining. And they showed how to make mucus thinner and less sticky so cough

3h

 

How plants evolved to make ants their servants

Plants have evolved ways to make ants defend them from attacks and spread their seeds, and this new study shows how it happened. In a new study breaking down the genetic history of 1,700 species of ants and 10,000 plant genera, researchers found that the long history of ant and plant co-evolution started with ants foraging on plants and plants responding by evolving ant-friendly traits.

3h

 

David Sabatini (Whitehead, MIT, HHMI) 3: Ribophagy and Nucleotide Recycling

www.iBiology.org David Sabatini outlines the critical role of mTOR in the regulation of growth. mTOR senses nutrient levels, growth factors and other signals and integrates a response to regulate cell growth. Growth can be defined as the increase in the size of a cell or organism, due to a gain in mass caused by nutrient uptake and assimilation. Surprisingly, how growth is regulated was not well

3h

 

David Sabatini (Whitehead, MIT, HHMI) 2: Regulation of mTORC1 by Nutrients

www.iBiology.org David Sabatini outlines the critical role of mTOR in the regulation of growth. mTOR senses nutrient levels, growth factors and other signals and integrates a response to regulate cell growth. Growth can be defined as the increase in the size of a cell or organism, due to a gain in mass caused by nutrient uptake and assimilation. Surprisingly, how growth is regulated was not well

3h

 

David Sabatini (Whitehead, MIT, HHMI) 1: Introduction to mTOR and the Regulation of Growth

www.iBiology.org David Sabatini outlines the critical role of mTOR in the regulation of growth. mTOR senses nutrient levels, growth factors and other signals and integrates a response to regulate cell growth. Growth can be defined as the increase in the size of a cell or organism, due to a gain in mass caused by nutrient uptake and assimilation. Surprisingly, how growth is regulated was not well

3h

 

Cliff Brangwynne (Princeton & HHMI) 3: Using Light to Study and Control Intracellular Phase Behavior

www.iBiology.org Liquid-liquid phase separation drives the formation of membrane-less organelles such as P granules and the nucleolus. Brangwynne explains how this process works and its important role in normal cell function and disease. How do the tiny, crowded, constantly moving molecules inside of cells come together to form functional structures such as organelles? Dr. Cliff Brangwynne explai

3h

 

Cliff Brangwynne (Princeton & HHMI) 2: Multiphase Liquid Behavior of the Nucleus

www.iBiology.org Liquid-liquid phase separation drives the formation of membrane-less organelles such as P granules and the nucleolus. Brangwynne explains how this process works and its important role in normal cell function and disease. How do the tiny, crowded, constantly moving molecules inside of cells come together to form functional structures such as organelles? Dr. Cliff Brangwynne explai

3h

 

Cliff Brangwynne (Princeton & HHMI) 1: Liquid Phase Separation in Living Cells

www.iBiology.org Liquid-liquid phase separation drives the formation of membrane-less organelles such as P granules and the nucleolus. Brangwynne explains how this process works and its important role in normal cell function and disease. How do the tiny, crowded, constantly moving molecules inside of cells come together to form functional structures such as organelles? Dr. Cliff Brangwynne explai

3h

 

Lots and lots of time is key to coral reef diversity

One of the world’s premier coral reef diving destinations owes its reputation as a hot spot of marine biodiversity to being undisturbed over millions of years, according to a new study. But human impact could wipe it out in just a few years, scientists warn. Strap on a diving mask and fins and slip under the crystal-clear water near a coral reef in Indonesia, Papua-New Guinea, or the Philippines,

3h

 

Resonant mechanism discovery could inspire ultra-thin acoustic absorbers

New research led by academics at the University of Bristol has discovered that the scales on moth wings vibrate and can absorb the sound frequencies used by bats for echolocation (biological sonar). The finding could help researchers develop bioinspired thin and lightweight resonant sound absorbers.

3h

 

Alpine ice shows three-fold increase in atmospheric iodine

Analysis of iodine trapped in Alpine ice has shown that levels of atmospheric iodine have tripled over the past century, which partially offsets human-driven increases in the air pollutant, ozone.

3h

 

How plants evolved to make ants their servants

Plants are boring. They just sit there photosynthesizing while animals have all the fun. Right? Not so much. Take a look at the interactions between ants and plants—plants have evolved features specifically to make them enticing to ants, like juicy nectar for the insects to eat and hollow thorns for them to take shelter in. In exchange, plants use ants to spread their seeds and even act as bodygua

3h

 

Primates of the Caribbean: Ancient DNA reveals history of mystery monkey

Analysis of ancient DNA of a mysterious extinct monkey named Xenothrix—which displays bizarre body characteristics very different to any living monkey—has revealed that it was in fact most closely related to South America's titi monkeys (Callicebinae). Having made their way overwater to Jamaica, probably on floating vegetation, their bones reveal they subsequently underwent remarkable evolutionary

3h

 

Escape responses of coral reef fish obey simple behavioral rules

The escape response to evade perceived threats is a fundamental behavior seen throughout the animal kingdom, and laboratory studies have identified specialized neural circuits that control this behavior. Understanding how these neural circuits operate in complex natural settings, however, has been a challenge.

3h

 

Scientists develop new and more realistic model of human interaction

Indirect reciprocity is a model of how humans act when their reputation is at stake, and which social norms people use to evaluate the actions of others. Researchers seek to know which social norms lead to cooperation in a society. Previous studies have always assumed that everyone in the population has all the relevant information and that everyone agrees who is good and bad—assumptions at odds w

3h

 

Mystery monkey: history of unique Xenothrix fossil revealed

A now-extinct monkey from Jamaica had South American roots, according to new DNA evidence.

3h

 

Less social media may make you feel less lonely

Researchers have discovered a connection between Facebook, Snapchat, and Instagram use and decreased well-being. The link between social-media use, depression, and loneliness has been talked about for years, but a causal connection had never been proven. Few prior studies, however, have attempted to show that social media use harms users’ well-being, and those that have either put participants in

3h

 

How architects made California’s Getty Museum fireproof

Environment Suppressing sparks isn’t easy in wildfire-prone Los Angeles. Indoor and outdoor sprinklers, flame-proof materials, and more help the Los Angeles-based Getty Museum resist Southern California’s regular fires.

4h

 

Con­ser­va­tion areas help bird­life ad­apt to cli­mate change

A warming climate is pushing organisms towards the circumpolar areas and mountain peaks. A recently conducted study on changes in bird populations reveals that protected areas slow down the north-bound retreat of species.

4h

 

RIP Stan Lee: What 20 Years of Lunches With the Comics Legend Taught Me

From his love of the Cheesecake Factory to his take on religion, writer Jim McLauchlin looks back on two decades of conversations with the Marvel Comics chairman emeritus.

4h

 

New framework pushes the limits of high-performance computing

Virginia Tech researchers found a way to give high-performance computing data systems the flexibility to thrive with a first-of-its-kind framework called BespoKV, perhaps helping to one day achieve the HPC goal of performing at the exascale, or a billion billion calculations per second.

4h

 

Pulling the genome apart: Chromosome segregation during mitosis explained

Researchers shed light on the protein complexes and processes that enable microtubules to bind to the centromeres of chromosomes and redistribute them to the daughter cells during mitosis. Via experiments including partial protein deletion, chimeric protein production, and measurement of microtubule pulling force, the team showed that interaction of the Ndc80 complex with the CENP-T pathway of kin

4h

 

Dynamic audiovisuals increase spectator attention, but inhibits conscious processing

According to a new study, scene changes diminish a spectator's blink rate, producing an increase in attention. The results of the study demonstrate that a dynamic and chaotic audiovisual editing causes more activity in the visual processing areas, while continuous and orderly editing produces more cognitive processing activity.

4h

 

Ultra-thin transparent silver films for solar cells

A new fabrication process for transparent ultra-thin silver films has been developed. The material may help build highly efficient solar cells and light-emitting diodes. However, traditional chemical methods have not been able to produce ultra-thin and pure silver films.

4h

 

Misunderstood flying fox could prove bat species demise, warn scientists

A large fruit-eating bat native to Mauritius is the subject of controversy over the announcement of a major cull to protect the Indian island's fruit crops, despite a lack of evidence as to the extent of damage directly attributed to the endangered species. Monitoring the damage directly caused by the Mauritian flying fox to commercial fruit, researchers found the bat is responsible for only some,

4h

 

New insights into the aging brain

A group of scientists investigated why the choroid plexus contains so much more klotho than other brain regions.They showed that klotho functions as a gatekeeper that shields the brain from the peripheral immune system.

4h

 

AI capable of outlining in a single chart information from thousands of scientific papers

Scientists have developed a Computer-Aided Material Design (CAMaD) system capable of extracting information related to fabrication processes and material structures and properties — factors vital to material design — and organizing and visualizing the relationship between them. The use of this system enables information from thousands of scientific and technical articles to be summarized in a si

4h

 

New light cast on fishing throughout history

A new study has revealed new insights into ancient fishing throughout history, including what type of fish people were regularly eating as part of their diet.

4h

 

Children with autism thrive in mainstream pre-schools

In a world first, breakthrough research has shown that toddlers with autism are just as capable of learning important life skills through early-intervention delivered in mainstream pre-schools as in specialized settings.

4h

 

Key takeaways from three landmark heart studies

New findings about sudden cardiac arrest, one of medicine's biggest mysteries, were revealed at the American Heart Association Scientific Sessions.

4h

 

Patients with common heart failure more likely to have lethal heart rhythms

New Smidt Heart Institute Research shows that patients with Heart Failure with Preserved Ejection Fraction (HFpEF) are more likely to have lethal heart rhythms.

4h

 

Scientists debunk potential link to crop cold tolerance

New research debunks a long-held theory that corn and other grass crops are susceptible to cold because they lack the space in their leaves needed to boost photosynthetic efficiency in low temperatures.

4h

 

COPD patients rarely receive pulmonary rehabilitation despite its health benefits

Only a tiny fraction of patients hospitalized for COPD, or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, participate in a pulmonary rehabilitation program following hospitalization, even though such programs are recommended and Medicare covers their cost, according to new research published online in the Annals of the American Thoracic Society.

4h

 

Racial disparities in sudden cardiac death rates cannot be explained by known risk factors

A Penn Medicine study, published online today in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology, showed that even after controlling for risk factors like income, education, smoking, exercise, and bad cholesterol, among others, black patients remained at significantly higher risk for sudden cardiac death than white patients.

4h

 

Bacterial pneumonia far more dangerous to the heart than viral pneumonia

Heart complications in patients diagnosed with bacterial pneumonia are more serious than in patients diagnosed with viral pneumonia, according to new research.

4h

 

Kawasaki disease: One disease, multiple triggers

Researchers have evidence that Kawasaki Disease (KD) does not have a single cause. By studying weather patterns and geographical distributions of patients in San Diego, the research team determined that this inflammatory disease likely has multiple environmental triggers influenced by a combination of temperature, precipitation and wind patterns.

4h

 

Defective DNA damage repair leads to chaos in the genome

Scientists have now found a cause for the frequent catastrophic events in the genetic material of cancer cells that have only been known for a few years: If an important DNA repair system of the cells has failed, this promotes fragmentation and defective assembly of the genetic material. Cancer cells with such a repair defect can now possibly be treated by a specific group of drugs.

4h

 

Exosomes 'swarm' to protect against bacteria inhaled through the nose

A research team describes a newly discovered mechanism. The findings shed new light on our immune systems — and also pave the way for drug delivery techniques to be developed that harness this natural transportation process from one group of cells to another.

4h

 

Last week in tech: Folding phones, electric Harleys, and the never-ending Black Friday

Technology Don't let the looming shopping season make you miss important tech news. Do you want a folding phone? Well, too bad! You're getting one anyway.

4h

 

Counting The Bugs And Bacteria, You're 'Never Home Alone' (And That's OK)

Ecologist Rob Dunn's new book describes the tiny life forms, helpful and risky, that live in different parts of the home, including on floors and in water faucets, basements and heating systems. (Image credit: Basic Books )

4h

 

Obesity both feeds tumors and helps immunotherapy kill cancer

A groundbreaking new study by UC Davis researchers has uncovered why obesity both fuels cancer growth and allows blockbuster new immunotherapies to work better against those same tumors.

4h

 

The Beets Crew Adds a Major Advantage | Gold Rush

With a new feeder installed, Monica's wash-plant is finally running! Stream Full Episodes of Gold Rush: https://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/gold-rush/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/GoldRush/ https://www.facebook.com/Discovery Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/Gold_Rush https://twitter.com/Discovery We're on Instagram!

5h

 

Streamside forests store tons of carbon

Researchers have compiled carbon storage data from 117 publications, reports, and other data sets on streamside forests around the world. Researchers found that the average amount of carbon stored in mature streamside forest rivals the highest estimates for any other forest type around the world, such as tropical or boreal forests.

5h

 

How pneumococci challenge our immune system

Pneumococci are the most common cause of respiratory tract infections, such as otitis and sinusitis, as well as of severe infections like pneumonia and meningitis. A new study shows how the bacteria can inhibit immune cell reaction and survive inside cells to give rise to pneumonia.

5h

 

Half moons and pinch points: Same physics, different energy

For the first time, physicists present a unified theory explaining two characteristic features of frustrated magnets and why they're often seen together.

5h

 

Merging galaxies fuel supermassive black holes

New research offers a preview of what will likely happen in our own cosmic backyard when our Milky Way combines with the neighboring Andromeda galaxy and their respective central black holes smash together. No need to worry, though—this process is several billion years away and takes a billion years itself. At the center of almost every galaxy, there is a gigantic black hole, a massive marker of

5h

 

New Research: Streamside forests store tons of carbon

In a new effort from Point Blue Conservation Science and Santa Clara University, researchers led by Dr. Kristen Dybala compiled carbon storage data from 117 publications, reports, and other data sets on streamside forests around the world. Researchers found that the average amount of carbon stored in mature streamside forest rivals the highest estimates for any other forest type around the world,

5h

 

How pneumococci challenge our immune system

Pneumococci are the most common cause of respiratory tract infections, such as otitis and sinusitis, as well as of severe infections like pneumonia and meningitis. A new study from Karolinska Institutet in Sweden published in Nature Microbiology shows how the bacteria can inhibit immune cell reaction and survive inside cells to give rise to pneumonia.

5h

 

New insights into the aging brain

A group of scientists at the Gladstone Institutes investigated why the choroid plexus contains so much more klotho than other brain regions. In a new study published in the scientific journal PNAS, they showed that klotho functions as a gatekeeper that shields the brain from the peripheral immune system.

5h

 

High availability of tobacco raises smoking rates in mothers-to-be

Pregnant women are more likely to smoke if they live in an area in which tobacco is widely sold, research has shown.

5h

 

New strategy discovered toward possible prevention of cancers tied to mono

Researchers have discovered a possible path forward in preventing the development of cancers tied to two viruses, including the virus that causes infectious mononucleosis –more commonly known as mono or the 'kissing disease' — that infects millions of people around the globe each year.

5h

 

Cancer stem cells get energy from protein, and it's proving to be their Achilles' heel

CU Cancer Center study shows that cancer stem cells switch from metabolizing sugar to metabolizing protein. Clinical trial based on this observation may revolutionize care for older adults with acute myeloid leukemia.

5h

 

Combination therapy promising against blindness-causing bacterial keratitis

Multidrug-resistant bacterial infections of the cornea are a leading cause of blindness and cannot be effectively managed with current ophthalmic antibiotics. A team of investigators has now devised a combination therapy that largely circumvents resistance, and quickly and effectively eradicated bacterial keratitis in 70 percent of animal models treated.

5h

 

Better way to transplant human stem cells

A tissue-like structure created from human stem cells and implanted into a damaged region of the mouse brain improves cell survival and differentiation relative to conventional, cell-based methods. The research, published in eNeuro, encourages further investigation of this strategy and its potential to treat traumatic brain injury and neurodegeneration.

5h

 

Opinion: The New Frontiers of Epigenetics

Newly developed techniques could propel a field already advancing rapidly to complement modern medicine.

5h

 

Study: The effects of online trolling on authors, publications

It's well known that abusive comments online happen to women more than men Such comments caused a "significant effect for the abusive comment on author credibility and intention to seek news from the author and outlet in the future" Some news organizations already heavily moderate or even ban comments entirely; this should underscore that effort In a study published by Taylor Francis Online, and

5h

 

New concussion recommendations for kids

The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) has updated its concussion recommendations to support children and teens engaging in light physical activity and returning to school as they recover. The report, revised for the first time in eight years, also advises against complete removal of electronic devices. Mark Halstead, MD, an associate professor of pediatrics and of orthopedic surgery at Washingt

5h

 

Breakthrough in understanding how deadly pneumococcus avoids immune defenses

Scientists at the University of Liverpool have discovered a new and important function of a toxin produced by disease-causing bacteria that could have significant implications for future vaccine design.

5h

 

At African Ministerial Summit, IPBES experts detail continent's critical biodiversity challenges

The threat today to African plants, fish, amphibians, reptiles, birds and large mammals is unprecedented, caused by a range of both human-induced and natural causes, leading scientists warned African ministers meeting on the eve of major global biodiversity talks.The ministers are determining Africa's joint position on the critical challenges of biodiversity loss for the 14th meeting of the Confer

5h

 

How mitochondria deploy a powerful punch against life-threatening bacteria

Researchers discover that mitochondria play an important role in supporting the immune system's response against MRSA infection.

5h

 

Blue Wave in Midwest Could Resurrect Climate Compact

A 2007 agreement aimed to reduce regional emissions, then political winds shifted — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

5h

 

Stem Cells Remember Tissues’ Past Injuries

Stem cells, famous for replenishing the body’s stockpile of other cell types throughout life, may have an additional, unforeseen ability to cache memories of past wounds and inflammation. New studies in the skin, gut and airways suggest that stem cells, often in partnership with the immune system, can use these memories to improve the responses of tissues to later injuries and pathogenic assaults

6h

 

Drill, Baby, Drill: What will we look for when we mine on Mars?

In the second season of National Geographic Channel's MARS (premiering tonight, 11/12/18,) privatized miners on the red planet clash with a colony of international scientists Privatized mining on both Mars and the Moon is likely to occur in the next century The cost of returning mined materials from Space to the Earth will probably be too high to create a self-sustaining industry, but the resourc

6h

 

Quantum leap for mass as science redefines the kilogramme

Sealed in a vault beneath a duke's former pleasure palace among the sycamore-streaked forests west of Paris sits an object the size of an apple that determines the weight of the world.

6h

 

Thanks, statistics! A faster way to improve mobile apps

Life can be tough for mobile app developers.

6h

 

Fish's brain size influenced by habitat, new study reveals

The busier the neighbourhood, the bigger the brain—at least for pumpkinseed sunfish, according to a pioneering study by University of Guelph biologists.

6h

 

Those using psychotropic drugs in suicide attempts more likely to have had prescriptions

As prescriptions for psychotropic drugs increase, researchers at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus have found that prescribed access to anti-anxiety and anti-psychotic medications may make it easier for some patients to use the drugs in attempted suicides.

6h

 

From the cosmos to fusion plasmas, PPPL presents findings at global APS gathering

Piece summarizes invited PPPL talks ranging from fusion to astrophysics at 60th APS-DPP annual meeting.

6h

 

Short stature in rainforest hunter-gatherers potentially linked to cardiac adaptations

African and Asian rainforest hunter-gatherers share short stature, and now an international team of researchers has shown that this is an example of convergent adaptation that may also be linked to changes in cardiac development pathways.

6h

 

Surfaces with controlled wettability to trap & identify molecules at trace concentrations

An international group of physicists from Far Eastern Federal University (FEFU), the Russian Academy of Sciences, and Swinburne University of Technology (Australia) developed a technology for trapping and chemical analysis of organic and non-organic molecules at ultra low concentrations. The article was featured in the Nanoscale journal issued under the patronage of the Royal Society of Chemistry.

6h

 

Fish's brain size influenced by habitat, new University of Guelph study reveals

This is the first known study to connect habitat with varying brain size in a single lake fish population. The finding may provide clues about how fish and other creatures will respond to mounting environmental stressors from pollution to climate change. Researchers say bigger brains contain more neurons, and more connections among them, that lend its owner cognitive and behavioural smarts that ma

6h

 

Q&A: ‘Touch Not the Cat’

The Scottish wildcat, the last native cat in the United Kingdom, is endangered; fewer than 100 purebred specimens remain in the wild.

6h

 

Synthetic molecule invades double-stranded DNA

Carnegie Mellon University researchers have developed a synthetic molecule that can recognize and bind to double-stranded DNA or RNA under normal physiological conditions. The molecule could provide a new platform for developing methods for the diagnosis and treatment of genetic conditions. Their findings are published in Communications Chemistry.

6h

 

A step closer to 'design on demand' scaffolds for tissue regeneration

The structure of cross-linked polymeric gels is very similar to soft tissue—which is one reason that understanding this material is so critical, according to Kelly Schultz, assistant professor in the Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering at Lehigh University.

6h

 

Scientists use patients' own cells and materials to engineer fully personalized tissue implants of any kind

In a new study, Tel Aviv University researchers reveal how they invented the first fully personalized tissue implant, engineered from a patient's own materials and cells. The new technology makes it possible to engineer any kind of tissue implant from one small fatty tissue biopsy.

6h

 

It's not trails that disturb forest birds, but the people on them

The physical presence of trails has less impact on forest birds than how frequently the trails are used by people, finds the first study to disentangle the effect of forest trails from the presence of humans. This is also the case when trails have been used for decades, suggesting that forest birds do not get used to human activity. To minimize disturbance, people should avoid roaming from designa

6h

 

Fecal Transplant Heals Colitis Caused by Immunotherapy

A case study of two patients with advanced cancer shows it might be possible to avoid a common and severe side effect of immunotherapy treatment.

6h

 

Synthetic molecule invades double-stranded DNA

Carnegie Mellon University researchers have developed a synthetic molecule that can recognize and bind to double-stranded DNA or RNA under normal physiological conditions. The molecule could provide a new platform for developing methods for the diagnosis and treatment of genetic conditions.

6h

 

Thanks, statistics! A faster way to improve mobile apps

A Cornell statistician and his colleagues have found a faster way for developers to improve mobile apps, with a new text-mining method that aggregates and parses customer reviews in one step.

6h

 

Natatanuran frogs used the Indian Plate to step-stone disperse and radiate across the Indian Ocean

The evolutionary history of near-cosmopolitan Natatanuran frogs involved using the Indian Plate as a stepping-stone to disperse between Africa, Asia and Madagascar. This research, led by Dr. Jing Che (KIZ, CAS), together with an international team, challenges the traditional view that the Indian Plate ferried biota across the Indian Ocean and carried Gondwanan biodiversity to Asia in the Early Ter

6h

 

Which outreach method encourages patients overdue for cancer screening to get tested?

Phone calls are more effective reminders for patients to book cancer screening appointments than mailed letters but are also more costly, suggests a new study from St. Michael's Hospital.

6h

 

Dynamic audiovisuals increase spectator attention, but inhibits conscious processing

According to a study conducted by the UAB and the UPO, scene changes diminish a spectator's blink rate, producing an increase in attention. The results of the study demonstrate that a dynamic and chaotic audiovisual editing causes more activity in the visual processing areas, while continuous and orderly editing produces more cognitive processing activity.

6h

 

Atomic parity violation research reaches new milestone

Physicists at Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU) have recently succeeded in observing parity violation in ytterbium atoms with different numbers of neutrons. The research was published in the renowned Nature Physics journal.

6h

 

New clues to the origin and progression of multiple sclerosis

Mapping of a certain group of cells, known as oligodendrocytes, in the central nervous system of a mouse model of multiple sclerosis (MS), shows that they might have a significant role in the development of the disease. The discovery can lead to new therapies targeted at other areas than just the immune system. The results are published in Nature Medicine by researchers at Karolinska Institutet in

6h

 

'Masterminds,' Episode 2: Making a Stormtrooper Out of Bodies Is Easier Than You'd Think

At least, it is if you’re in Pilobolus, a dance company that specializes in shadowy illusions.

6h

 

1 in 10 low-income women say landlord sexually harassed them

Ten percent of low-income women who took part in a new pilot study said their landlords had sexually harassed them. The harassment included landlords asking them to trade rent for sex and subjecting them to lewd comments, home invasions, and indecent exposure. During the past year, thousands of women have shared their stories about sexual harassment and assault as part of the Me Too movement. The

6h

 

Experiments on Dogs Will Continue, VA Secretary Says

Robert Wilkie, head of the US Department of Veterans Affairs, defends controversial research practices that have been heavily criticized by lawmakers on both sides of the aisle.

6h

 

6h

 

SfN18: Celebrating Women in Science Luncheon

Guest post by Kayt Sukel Type “self-promotion” into the search field of Dictionary.com and you’ll be rewarded with the following definition: self-pro·mo·tion, noun, plural noun: self-promotions the action of promoting or publicizing oneself or one’s activities, especially in a forceful way. “she’s guilty of criminally bad taste and shameless self-promotion” Dr. Yasmin Hurd speaks during the Celeb

6h

 

Earliest known animal might have inflated its body like a balloon

Dickinsonia lived about 560 million years ago and may have been the first animal – but it seems to have inflated its body in a way no animals do today

6h

 

More than 80 percent of Americans are concerned with antibiotic resistance health threat

Nearly two thirds of Americans (65 percent) say antibiotic resistance is a public health problem and a strong majority (81 percent) say they are concerned that antibiotic resistance will make more infections difficult or impossible to treat and even deadly, according to a national public opinion survey commissioned by Research!America in collaboration with the Infectious Disease Society of America

7h

 

Study suggests diabetes medication improves heart structure

The diabetes medication empagliflozin has important effects that can improve cardiac structure in people with Type 2 diabetes who also have heart disease, suggests a new study led by St. Michael's Hospital.

7h

 

A novel strategy to potentially reduce breast cancer bone metastasis

Uncovering a novel mechanism that promotes growth of breast cancer bone metastasis has revealed a potential Achilles' heel for these cancer cells.

7h

 

Can AIs Create True Art?

And if they can, what are the implications for the future of creativity? — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

7h

 

Frustrerede forskere jog arrangør af fup-konference på flugt

Kemiprofessor opfordrer andre forskere, der er blevet ført bag lyset, til at stå frem for at kaste lys over problemets omfang, så man kan komme uvæsenet med pseudovidenskab til livs.

7h

 

A step closer to 'design on demand' scaffolds for tissue regeneration

Lehigh University chemical engineer Kelly Schultz was part of a special session of the American Institute of Chemical Engineering (AIChE) Annual Meeting in Pittsburgh last month, where she was invited to present her lab's work determining how increasing the concentrations of polymers in solution changes the structure of cross-linked gels. The title of the session was 'AIChE Journal Futures: New Di

7h

 

Patients' own cells and materials used to create personalized tissue implants of any kind

In a new study, Tel Aviv University researchers reveal how they invented the first fully personalized tissue implant, engineered from a patient's own materials and cells. As a result, the risk of an immune response to an organ implant virtually disappears, the researchers say.

7h

 

Global warming has never stopped in the past hundred years

The global warming has never stopped in the past hundred years, with maximum rate of change after Second World War II and almost constant rate during the latest three decades. The hiatus is merely a decadal balance between global warming and the cooling resulting from anomalous sea surface temperature in equatorial Pacific.

7h

 

Higher dietary quality associated with improved glycemic control in women with GDM

A new study has found that higher dietary quality was associated with improved overall glycemic control and postprandial glycemic control in women with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM).

7h

 

Ultra-thin transparent silver films for solar cells

A new fabrication process for transparent ultra-thin silver films has been developed by researchers at Ruhr-Universität Bochum and the University of Wuppertal. The material may help build highly efficient solar cells and light-emitting diodes. However, traditional chemical methods have not been able to produce ultra-thin and pure silver films.

7h

 

Spread of deadly eye cancer halted in cells and animals

By comparing genetic sequences in the eye tumors of children whose cancers spread with tumors that didn't spread, Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers report new evidence that a domino effect in cells is responsible for the cancer spreading.

7h

 

Sourdough Hands: How Bakers And Bread Are A Microbial Match

In Robert Dunn's new book, Never Home Alone , he explores our symbiotic relationship with food: Not only do we impact the bacteria in our food, but the microbes in our food imprint our bodies. (Image credit: Rick Gayle/Getty Images)

7h

 

Purrfect Photos: Cat Mummies and Wooden Cat Statues Discovered at Ancient Egyptian Burial Complex

Tens of cat mummies and around 100 wooden statues of cats were discovered near a pyramid in Saqqara, Egypt. The area seems to have been used for cat burials thousands of years ago.

7h

 

Tens of Cat Mummies and 100 Cat Statues Found Near Ancient Egyptian Pyramid

Ancient Egyptians seem to have been "cat people," or at least cat mummy people.

7h

 

Politics this week

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7h

 

Business this week

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7h

 

KAL’s cartoon

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7h

 

Ekstrem tørke og nedbør gør Californien til en brandfælde

Skovbrande hærger hvert år den amerikanske solstat. Men klimaforandringer vil skabe endnu større brande i fremtiden.

7h

 

Modest warming risks 'irreversible' ice sheet loss, study warns

Even modest temperature rises agreed under an international plan to limit climate disaster could see the ice caps melt enough this century for their loss to be "irreversible", experts warned Monday.

7h

 

New study sheds light on medicines storage practices on UK dairy farms

Researchers at the University of Bristol, supported by the British Veterinary Association, the British Cattle Veterinary Association and the Responsible Use of Medicines in Agriculture (RUMA) Alliance, are calling for veterinary surgeons in the UK to work together with their farmer clients to remove expired and inappropriate veterinary medicines from farms and dispose of them appropriately.

7h

 

Scientists bring polymers into atomic-scale focus

From water bottles and food containers to toys and tubing, many modern materials are made of plastics. And while we produce about 110 million tons per year of synthetic polymers like polyethylene and polypropylene worldwide for these plastic products, there are still mysteries about polymers at the atomic scale.

7h

 

Decrease in specific gene 'silencing' molecules linked with pediatric brain tumors

Experimenting with lab-grown brain cancer cells, researchers have added to evidence that a shortage of specific tiny molecules that silence certain genes is linked to the development and growth of pediatric brain tumors known as low-grade gliomas.

7h

 

Artificial intelligence to accelerate malaria research

Insilico Taiwan, a Taipei-based subsidiary of Insilico Medicine, publishes a new research paper titled 'In Silico Study Reveals How E64 Approaches, Binds to, and Inhibits Falcipain-2 of Plasmodium falciparum that Causes Malaria in Humans' in Scientific Reports. The Results of the study have shown that the binding of E64 and FP2 are facilitated by the amino acids of FP2 located within and nearby th

7h

 

Scientists bring polymers into atomic-scale focus

A Berkeley Lab-led research has adapted a powerful electron-based imaging technique to obtain a first-of-its-kind image of atomic-scale structure in a synthetic polymer. The research could ultimately inform polymer fabrication methods and lead to new designs for materials and devices that incorporate polymers.

7h

 

Traditional eutectic alloy brings new hope for high energy density metal-O2 batteries

A research team led by ZHANG Xinbo from the Changchun Institute of Applied Chemistry (CIAC), Chinese Academy of Sciences, YAN Junmin from Jilin University, ZHANG Yu from Beihang University Beijing developed a long-life AM-O2 battery using Li-Na eutectic alloy as novel metal anode for the first time.

7h

 

Less surveillance needed for simple ovarian cysts

Simple ovarian cysts are extremely common in women and do not require additional ultrasound surveillance or surgical removal, according to a new study of more than 72,000 women and close to 119,00 pelvic ultrasound exams over a dozen years.

7h

 

Pulling the genome apart: Chromosome segregation during mitosis explained

Osaka University researchers shed light on the protein complexes and processes that enable microtubules to bind to the centromeres of chromosomes and redistribute them to the daughter cells during mitosis. Via experiments including partial protein deletion, chimeric protein production, and measurement of microtubule pulling force, the team showed that interaction of the Ndc80 complex with the CENP

7h

 

Fecal transplant effective against immunotherapy-induced colitis

For the first time, transplanting gut bacteria from healthy donors was used to successfully treat patients suffering from severe colitis caused by treatment with immune checkpoint inhibitors. The study from The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, which includes two patients, suggests fecal microbiota transplantation is worth investigating in clinical trials as a therapy for this common

7h

 

Planetary boundaries for antibiotic and pesticide resistance identified

Researchers have now published the first estimates of antibiotic and pesticide 'planetary boundaries' in the journal Nature Sustainability. The researchers suggest that if resistance to antibiotics and pesticides goes beyond these boundaries, societies risk large-scale health and agricultural crises. The results indicate one group of bacteria has passed a boundary.

7h

 

Study opens route to ultra-low-power microchips

MIT researchers have developed a new way of controlling magnetism in materials, which could lead to new low-power technologies for memory, computing, and sensing devices.

7h

 

Two-pronged device enables maverick immune cells to identify and kill cancers

Immune cells called Gamma Delta T cells can act independently to identify and kill cancer cells, defying the conventional view of the immune system. This will help scientists to understand and treat cancer and autoimmune conditions such as inflammatory bowel disease.

7h

 

Trends in opioid prescriptions in children, adolescents

Prescription opioids dispensed to children and adolescents have steadily decreased since 2012 in an analysis of data from a large commercial insurance provider. The analysis include all oral opioids used for pain, excluding cough suppressants, and individuals with a health care claim associated with a cancer diagnosis were excluded.

7h

 

Concussion associated with suicide risk

Experiencing concussions or mild traumatic brain injury (TBI) was associated with increased risk of suicide in a new analysis but the absolute risk was small because nearly all patients diagnosed with concussion or TBI didn't die by suicide. Data from 17 studies for more than 700,000 patients diagnosed with concussion or mild TBI and more than 6.2 million people without such diagnoses were include

7h

 

Combining hospital, police data to better understand violence

This research letter suggests that combining hospital and police data might provide a more complete picture of violence in a community because some hospital-treated injuries result from violent incidents unreported to police. Nurses at an emergency department in Atlanta collected information on violent injuries that happened in public places as part of a surveillance system set up for a violence p

7h

 

Exercise intervention benefits older hospitalized patients

A randomized clinical trial in Spain that included 370 hospitalized patients 75 or older showed an exercise intervention was effective at helping to reverse the functional decline associated with hospitalization for older patients. The exercise intervention, which included two daily sessions of moderate-intensity resistance, balance and walking exercises, was compared with usual care in the hospit

7h

 

Poxvirus hijacks cell movement to spread infection

Vaccinia virus, a poxvirus closely related to smallpox and monkeypox, tricks cells it has infected into activating their own cell movement mechanism to rapidly spread the virus in cells and mice, according to a new UCL-led study published in Nature Microbiology.

7h

 

Scientists shine new light on link between obesity and cancer

The body's immune surveillance systems stutter and fail in the presence of excess fat, which reduces their ability to fight cancer and disease. The results highlight immuno-metabolic pathways as a promising target to reverse immune defects in obesity, and suggest that metabolic reprogramming of Natural Killer cells may kick-start their anti-cancer activity and improve treatment outcomes.

7h

 

In live brain function, researchers are finally seeing red

For years, green has been the most reliable hue for live brain imaging, but after using a new high-throughput screening method, researchers at the John B. Pierce Laboratory and the Yale School of Medicine, together with collaborators at Stanford University, have identified a new fluorescent protein that will make it possible for live neurons to glow red when activated.

7h

 

How nurses rate daily job difficulty plays key role in patient care

A neonatal intensive care unit nurse's ability to provide optimal patient care is influenced by a variety of factors — not just how many babies he or she is caring for or how sick they might be, a new study suggests.

7h

 

Modelling reveals dynamics of climate change, urbanization and heat-mitigating technologies

Researchers led by Arizona State University have completed some of the most sophisticated modeling of the effects of climate change and urban centers in the US, and are finding that some of today's proposed solutions will provide only a fraction of relief from the projected heat.

7h

 

Suicide handshakes kill precursor T cells that pose autoimmune dangers

The mechanisms that trigger the elimination of T cells that pose autoimmune dangers work very mechanically via physical forces. T cell precursors must loosen their grip on human antigens within a reasonable time in order to advance to being T cells and defend the body. But if precursor T cells, thymocytes, grip the human antigens too tightly, the immune cells must die. Here's how the grip of death

7h

 

Research brings personalized medicine to treat leukemia one step closer

Scientists at the University of Birmingham have revealed the roles that different types of gene mutations play in causing blood cancers in a study that was the culmination of a decade's research.

7h

 

RIP1 Kinase identified as promising therapeutic target in pancreatic cancer

An experimental drug may be effective against a deadly form of pancreatic cancer when used in combination with other immune-boosting therapies, according to a cover study publishing online Nov. 12 in Cancer Cell.

7h

 

Nitrogen fixation in ambient conditions

EPFL scientists have developed a uranium-based complex that allows nitrogen fixation reactions to take place in ambient conditions. The work lays the foundation to develop new processes for synthesizing nitrogen products like cyanamide.

7h

 

Hepatitis C treatment can be shortened in 50 percent of patients, study finds

Hepatitis C drugs cure more than 90 percent of patients, but can cost more than $50,000 per patient. Findings from a Loyola University Chicago study could lead to significant cost savings. In 50 percent of patients, the standard 12-week treatment regimen could be shortened to as little as six weeks without compromising efficacy, the study found.

7h

 

Fagforeninger råber vagt i gevær over RFID-chips i ansatte

To af Storbritanniens største fagforeninger gruer for, at firmaer skyder genvej til at detailstyre ansattes gøren og laden ved at presse dem til at sige ja til RFID-chips som implantater.

7h

 

Visualizing California's current fires, some of the deadliest and most destructive on record

Environment These graphics show how the fires have spread over the last few days. California is ablaze once again, and despite an already horrific season these new fires are still setting records.

7h

 

Pluto’s weird ridges may be glacial landforms unlike any on Earth

Next to Pluto’s heart-shaped plains are strange rolling hills unlike anything we’ve seen on Earth, and they may be left over from receding ancient glaciers

7h

 

Developing instruments to detect language problems earlier

Using the Computerized Comprehension Task, the team measured concepts by asking children to touch images on a touch-sensitive screen that represented words they were learning. The team used a measure of vocabulary that focused on stable concepts, finding that it was superior to prior measures in predicting children's general language ability at age 3. The team also identified individual children a

7h

 

How a spider and a pitcher plant can benefit from collaboration

Ecologists have shed light on the relationship between the slender pitcher plant and its 'tenant', the crab spider Thomisus nepenthiphilus, providing insights to the little known foraging behaviors of the spider.

7h

 

How your muscles form

An international team of researchers discovers two proteins essential to the development of skeletal muscle.

7h

 

Physicists wrangled electrons into a quantum fractal

The tiny, repeating structure could reveal weird behavior of electrons in fractional dimensions.

7h

 

For yeast evolution, ‘loss is more’

On their way to decoding the genome of every organism in a major branch of the tree of life—budding yeasts—evolutionary biologists reconstructed the genomic and metabolic characteristics of the last common ancestor of today’s more than 1,000 species of the organism. The scientists started by sequencing the genomes of a staggering 220 yeast species and examining them together with more than 100 ot

7h

 

Innovative approach to controlling magnetism opens route to ultra-low-power microchips

A new approach to controlling magnetism in a microchip could open the doors to memory, computing, and sensing devices that consume drastically less power than existing versions. The approach could also overcome some of the inherent physical limitations that have been slowing progress in this area until now.

7h

 

Modelling reveals dynamics of climate change, urbanization and heat-mitigating technologies

The near-term future of Earth is one of a warming planet, as urban expansion and greenhouse gas emissions stoke the effects of climate change. Current climate projections show that in U.S. cities temperatures are expected to rise by 2 to 7 C (3.6 to 12.6 F) by the year 2099.

7h

 

Poxvirus hijacks cell movement to spread infection

Vaccinia virus, a poxvirus closely related to smallpox and monkeypox, tricks cells it has infected into activating their own cell movement mechanism to rapidly spread the virus in cells and mice, according to a new UCL-led study.

7h

 

Physicists build fractal shape out of electrons

In physics, it is well-known that electrons behave very differently in three dimensions, two dimensions or one dimension. These behaviours give rise to different possibilities for technological applications and electronic systems. But what happens if electrons live in 1.58 dimensions – and what does it actually mean? Theoretical and experimental physicists at Utrecht University investigated these

7h

 

Nitrogen fixation in ambient conditions

Abundant in the atmosphere, nitrogen is rarely used in the industrial production of chemicals. The most important process using nitrogen is the synthesis of ammonia used for the preparation of agricultural fertilizers.

7h

 

New study sheds light on medicines storage practices on UK dairy farms

Researchers at the University of Bristol, supported by the British Veterinary Association, the British Cattle Veterinary Association and the Responsible Use of Medicines in Agriculture (RUMA) Alliance, are calling for veterinary surgeons in the UK to work together with their farmer clients to remove expired and inappropriate veterinary medicines from farms and dispose of them appropriately.

7h

 

Misunderstood flying fox could prove bat species demise, warn scientists

A large fruit-eating bat native to Mauritius is the subject of controversy over the announcement of a major cull to protect the Indian island's fruit crops, despite a lack of evidence as to the extent of damage directly attributed to the endangered species. Monitoring the damage directly caused by the Mauritian flying fox to commercial fruit, researchers found the bat is responsible for only some,

7h

 

Citizens prefer landscapes that combine nature with built infrastructure

A pioneering study analyses the photographs shared by citizens in social networks to evaluate the aesthetic consideration of natural landscapes. In the province of Barcelona, the preferred images are those taken in urban and periurban environments that integrate green spaces with grey infrastructure.

7h

 

A 1985 Recount Is Suddenly Relevant Again

As Florida begins a statewide recount to determine the outcome of its gubernatorial and U.S. Senate contests, commentators are rehashing the famous Bush v. Gore recount of 2000. That’s the most obvious reference—the same state and even some of the same counties are at issue, after all—but it’s not the only or even the most useful one. Democrats in particular should look to the now-forgotten fight

7h

 

Remembering Matthew Shepard in Today’s Climate of Hate

In October 1998, Reggie Fluty, a police officer responding to a phoned-in tip, came across a limp figure strung up on a fence in a desolate field on the outskirts of Laramie, Wyoming. There had been, initially, confusion about what Fluty was responding to: The teen boy who had called in the tip had initially assumed, riding his bike across the field, that he’d seen a scarecrow. He had not. The fi

7h

 

Climate change protests leads to '22 arrests' over blockade

The chained-together demonstrators are blockading the government energy department in London.

8h

 

What to trust in a "post-truth" world | Alex Edmans

Only if you are truly open to the possibility of being wrong can you ever learn, says researcher Alex Edmans. In an insightful talk, he explores how confirmation bias — the tendency to only accept information that supports your personal beliefs — can lead you astray on social media, in politics and beyond, and offers three practical tools for finding evidence you can actually trust. (Hint: appoi

8h

 

Family, school support makes kids more likely to stand up to bullying

A recent study finds young people with good family relationships are more likely to intervene when they witness bullying or other aggressive behavior at school — and to step in if they see victims planning to retaliate. The study found that kids who were already excluded, or discriminated against by peers or teachers, were less likely to stand up for victims of bullying.

8h

 

New study: Parents put nature in the shopping basket

In a world of vast consumer choice, ambiguous product descriptions and self-appointed experts, parents face a minefield when picking out food, toys or other products for their children. A new qualitative study from the University of Copenhagen indicates that naturalness is the current benchmark for consumer choice among parents.

8h

 

Smino’s Funky Raps Soothe the Soul

Smino isn’t afraid to get a little weird. The North St. Louis–bred rapper twists his voice into dizzyingly distinct harmonies. He delights in the indulgent poetics of slant rhyme. He weaves multiregional R&B into the tapestry of his rap. The 27-year-old’s newly released sophomore album, NØIR , builds on his years of making funky, soulful music. It’s soothing, inventive, and fun. The video for “L.

8h

 

Stripping the linchpins from the life-making machine reaffirms its seminal evolution

This experiment had a good chance of crashing. Instead, it delivered whopping evidence to corroborate the earliest evolution of the translational system, the mechanisms which make life out of our genes. The study swapped out all its magnesium, tabula rasa, and showed that the system, centering on the ribosome, would have thrived basically as it is today 4 billion years ago at the earliest foundati

8h

 

The whole tooth: New method to find biological sex from a single tooth

Researchers have come up with a new way to estimate the biological sex of human skeletal remains based on protein traces from teeth.

8h

 

The whole tooth: New method to find biological sex from a single tooth

A team led by UC Davis researchers have come up with a new way to estimate the biological sex of human skeletal remains based on protein traces from teeth.

8h

 

New records in perovskite-silicon tandem solar cells through improved light management

Using microstructured layers, an HZB team has been able to increase the efficiency of perovskite-silicon tandem solar cells, achieving 25.5 %, which is the highest published value to date. At the same time, computational simulations were utilized to investigate light conversion in various device designs with different nanostructured surfaces. This enabled optimization of light management and detai

8h

 

Renewable energy cooperatives, an opportunity for energy transition

Three researchers from the UPV/EHU's Faculty of Engineering — Bilbao and the University of Valladolid have explored how renewable energy cooperatives have evolved. They have found that these cooperatives have developed a significant capacity to survive and adapt in response to the hostile context brought about by the economic and political regime.

8h

 

Con­ser­va­tion areas help bird­life ad­apt to cli­mate change

A warming climate is pushing organisms towards the circumpolar areas and mountain peaks. A recently conducted Finnish study on changes in bird populations reveals that protected areas slow down the north-bound retreat of species.

8h

 

A magnetic method to control the transport of chiral Majorana fermions

Majorana fermion with antiparticle being itself, was originally introduced as a putative elementary particle by Ettore Majorana in 1937, and the chiral Majorana fermion was experimentally observed in topological superconductors in 2017. Since Majorana fermion is a charge-neutral particle, the direct effect on Majorana fermions by electromagnetic methods should fail. Now researchers propose a schem

8h

 

Stripping the linchpins from the life-making machine reaffirms its seminal evolution

So audacious was Marcus Bray's experiment that even he feared it would fail.

8h

 

Trapped cholesterol may explain psoriasis and heart disease link

People with autoimmune diseases are at high risk of developing cardiovascular disease, even though they don’t seem to target the cardiovascular system directly. Now scientists are beginning to understand why. A study with mice that had a psoriasis-like condition showed their blood vessels were stiff. Cholesterol normally circulates freely between the blood and the tissues, but in these mice the i

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