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Nyheder2018november13

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Dark matter 'hurricane' offers chance to detect axions

A team of researchers from Universidad de Zaragoza, King's College London and the Institute of Astronomy in the U.K. has found that a "dark matter hurricane" passing through our solar system offers a better than usual chance of detecting axions. In their paper published in the journal Physical Review D, the group describes their findings and why they believe their observations could offer help in

4h

 

Three ways to find your purpose in life and reap the benefits

Having a sense of what you want to do with your life can help you live longer, slash your risk of disease and improve your sex life – and it’s easy to do

1h

 

Wishes help keep pediatric patients out of the hospital

In the retrospective study patients granted a wish were 2.5 times more likely to have fewer unplanned hospital admissions and 1.9 times more likely not to have to use the emergency department. This led to a decline in cost of care even after accounting for the average cost of the wish.

12h

 

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Amazon’s HQ2 Hunger Games Are Over, and Jeff Bezos Won

After 238 cities vied to be home to Amazon's new "headquarters," the company chose the obvious: New York City and Arlington, Virginia.

4min

 

An Italian Cosmologist Who Wanders in Dante’s Dark Wood

In 2004, the Italian theoretical cosmologist Valeria Pettorino wrote her doctoral thesis on “dark energy in generalized theories of gravity.” As a side project, she translated the opening lines of Dante’s Divine Comedy into a geometry problem. “I felt there was mathematics already within Dante’s writing,” Pettorino said recently. Dante’s epic poem, in Mark Musa’s translation, begins: Midway along

5min

 

'Scaring' soybeans into defensive mode yields better plants a generation later

By temporarily silencing the expression of a critical gene, researchers fooled soybean plants into sensing they were under siege, encountering a wide range of stresses. Then, after selectively cross breeding those plants with the original stock, the progeny 'remember' the stress-induced responses to become more vigorous, resilient and productive plants, according to a team of researchers.

11min

 

New methods to identify Alzheimer's drug candidates with anti-aging properties

Old age is the greatest risk factor for many diseases, including Alzheimer's disease (AD) and cancer. Geroprotectors are a recently identified class of anti-aging compounds. New Salk research has now identified a unique subclass of these compounds, dubbed geroneuroprotectors (GNPs), which are AD drug candidates and slow the aging process in mice.

11min

 

Brain changes found in self-injuring teen girls

The brains of teenage girls who engage in serious forms of self-harm, including cutting, show features similar to those seen in adults with borderline personality disorder, a severe and hard-to-treat mental illness, a new study has found.

11min

 

First blood-based biomarker in response to the treatment of the most aggressive prostate cancer

In castration-resistant prostate cancer, the tumors continue to progress even though testosterone production has been blocked; more than 90% of these patients develop metastasis and the survival rate is one to two years.* Using liquid biopsy, a simple blood test has been successful in determining what type of treatment can help to prolong the life expectancy of more than 150 patients

11min

 

Mystery “space cow” is a weird new type of powerful space explosion

Months of observations have shown that the strange explosion in space called “the Cow” gets extra power from within, making it a new type of celestial event

16min

 

China may have developed a quantum radar that can spot stealth planes

A defence firm has unveiled a prototype quantum radar. If it works, it could use entangled protons to locate stealth aircraft that normally avoid detection

16min

 

Stan Lee’s legacy isn’t just superheroes but the humanity he gave themStan Lee Marvel Spider-Man

The Marvel comics legend has died aged 95. The creative force behind Spider-Man, Iron Man, The Incredible Hulk, Avengers, Thor, X-Men and many more, Lee's influence on culture was huge – but let's not overlook his impact on our humanity

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18min

 

Don’t worry if baby doesn’t sleep through the night

New research shows that parents shouldn’t worry if their infant doesn’t sleep through the night by 6 to 12 months of age. New parents often expect their baby to start sleeping through the night by around six months of age. Indeed, they often receive messages from pediatricians and others about the importance of early sleep consolidation. But the authors of the new study, which appears in the jour

20min

 

How mammoths competed with other animals and lost

Mammoths, mastodons and other ancient elephants were wiped out at the end of the last ice age by climate change and spear-wielding humans.

22min

 

Solving the mystery of NPM1 in acute myeloid leukemia

Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cells expressing the NPM1 mutant gene are highly dependent on continued export of protein NPM1c to proliferate. This finding provides a rationale for testing nuclear export inhibitor therapeutics in NPM1-mutated AML.

33min

 

Combination gene therapy more effective in cartilage preservation in osteoarthritis

A combinatorial gene therapy approach — one designed to inhibit inflammation and one targeting protection against cartilage degeneration — was shown to preserve articular carti-lage better than each approach alone in animal models of both moderate and severe post-traumatic osteoarthritis.

33min

 

Blocking 'secondary cataracts'

Cataracts surgery is a modern-day medical marvel, but even 10 years after a procedure, so-called secondary cataracts can form. UD researchers are identifying what's behind that and how to stop it.

33min

 

Diabetic foot ulcers heal quickly with nitric oxide technology

Around the world, 425 million people live with diabetes and upwards of 15 percent develop foot ulcers, which increases their risk of death 2.5 times. A new nitric oxide-releasing technology has the potential to cut down the healing time of diabetic foot ulcers from 120 days to 21 days.

33min

 

Scientists identify potential new treatment strategy for kidney cancer

Researchers have provided new insight on the mechanisms behind the development of clear cell Renal Cell Carcinoma (ccRCC), according to new findings published in eLife.

33min

 

A.I. turns 57 million crop fields into stunning abstract art

Using satellite images and artificial intelligence, OneSoil wants to make 'precision farming' available to the world. The start-up from Belarus has already processed the U.S. and Europe, and aims for global coverage by 2020. The map is practical, and more — browse 'Random Beautiful Fields' at the touch of a button. Where farming meets art This is where precision farming meets abstract art. OneSoi

41min

 

1 hour of weights a week may cut heart attack risk

Lifting weights for less than an hour a week may reduce your risk for a heart attack or stroke by 40 to 70 percent, according to a new study. Spending more than an hour in the weight room did not yield any additional benefit, the research shows. “People may think they need to spend a lot of time lifting weights, but just two sets of bench presses that take less than 5 minutes could be effective,”

41min

 

See random beautiful fields at the touch of a button

Using satellite images and artificial intelligence, OneSoil wants to make 'precision farming' available to the world. The start-up from Belarus has already processed the U.S. and Europe, and aims for global coverage by 2020. The map is practical, and more — browse 'Random Beautiful Fields' at the touch of a button. Where farming meets art This is where precision farming meets abstract art. OneSoi

45min

 

Why Young, Talented Democrats Flee the House

One of the great ironies of the 2018 midterm elections is that the Democratic Party’s emergent stars—Representatives Kyrsten Sinema and Beto O’Rourke—likely would have remained nameless had they tabled their Senate bids in favor of another term in the House. This isn’t only because Senate candidates attract a brighter spotlight than they would as one of hundreds in the lower chamber. It’s because

51min

 

'We need their brains': donating to the brain bank in search of a dementia cure

Scientists studying the tissue bequeathed to the Sydney Brain Bank hope it will lead them to an eventual cure for neurodegenerative diseases It’s a rainy Wednesday morning and Dr Andrew Affleck is driving more carefully than usual on his way to the Neuroscience Research Australia building in Randwick. It’s not just the slick, crowded roads putting the edge on his caution; in the boot of his car,

52min

 

Spain considers ban on sale of gas and diesel cars by 2040

Spain's government is eyeing ambitious steps to tackle climate change, including a ban on the sale of gas and diesel cars from 2040.

52min

 

Social relationships more important than hard evidence in partisan politics

Study explains how partisan groupings evolve to become extreme, ultimately resulting in the formation of 'echo chambers' in which political beliefs go unchallenged and increase in strength.

54min

 

Novel mechanism of immune activation in HIV-exposed, seronegative people who inject drugs

According to Wistar researchers, the S100A14 protein is expressed at higher levels in people who inject drugs and remain uninfected despite many years of high-risk, needle sharing behavior in areas with high HIV prevalence. The protein mediates activation of a type of immune cell called natural killer cells (NK), which play a key role in the host immune defense during the earliest phases of viral

54min

 

'Waltzing' nanoparticles could advance search for better drug delivery methods

Indiana University scientists paired drug-delivering nanoparticles like dance partners to reveal that molecules attach to targets on cells differently based upon their position in time. The discovery could improve methods for screening drugs for therapeutic effectiveness.

54min

 

Weightlifting is good for your heart and it doesn't take much

Lifting weights for less than an hour a week may reduce your risk for a heart attack or stroke by 40 to 70 percent, according to a new Iowa State University study. Spending more than an hour in the weight room did not yield any additional benefit, the researchers found. The results show benefits of strength training are independent of running, walking or other aerobic activity.

54min

 

Africa Doesn't Need Genetically Modified Mosquitoes

There are plenty of less drastic ways to fight malaria — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

55min

 

‘Twin’ power produces stronger, harder metals

Researchers have found a new way to use nanotwins—tiny linear boundaries in a metal’s atomic lattice that have identical crystalline structures on either side—to make stronger metals. In a paper in the journal Science , the researchers show that varying the spacing between twin boundaries, as opposed to maintaining consistent spacing throughout, produces dramatic improvements in a metal’s strengt

55min

 

Nigerian ISP says error caused disruption in Google servicesGoogle China Russia

A Nigerian internet service provider says a configuration error it made during a network upgrade caused a disruption of key Google services that routed traffic to China and Russia.

57min

 

'Waltzing' nanoparticles could advance search for better drug delivery methods

Indiana University researchers have discovered that drug-delivering nanoparticles attach to their targets differently based upon their position when they meet—like ballroom dancers who change their moves with the music.

57min

 

Drill, baby, Drill: What will we look for when we mine on Mars?

In the second season of National Geographic Channel's MARS (premiering tonight, 11/12/18,) privatized miners on the red planet clash with a colony of international scientists Privatized mining on both Mars and the Moon is likely to occur in the next century The cost of returning mined materials from Space to the Earth will probably be too high to create a self-sustaining industry, but the resourc

59min

 

Back-to-the-future plants give climate change insights

If you were to take a seed and zap it into the future to see how it will respond to climate change, how realistic might that prediction be? After all, seeds that actually grow in the future will have gone through generations of genetic changes and adaptations that these "time traveling" seeds don't experience.

1h

 

Men obsessed with building muscle mass have higher mental health risks

Body dysmorphia is not limited to women, a new study from Norway and Cambridge shows. Young men that focus on building muscle are at risk for a host of mental and physical health problems. Selfie culture is not helping the growing number of teens that are anxious and depressed. None Self-obsession comes at a heavy cost. A recent study published in Open Psychology Journal notes that excessive self

1h

 

Stretchy solar cells a step closer

Rice University scientists develop flexible organic photovoltaics with a chemical additive that mitigates the material's brittle qualities. At the right concentration, thiol-ene molecules infiltrate the polymer material and form a mesh that makes the entire material stretchable without losing efficiency.

1h

 

Popular science helps to discover the abundance of this jellyfish

When the Rhizostoma luteum jellyfish was discovered at the beginning of the 19th century in the waters of the Strait of Gibraltar, only nine specimens were identified. For years, it was so inconspicuous that later, in the 20th century, it failed to turn up for six decades. A team of scientists, with the help of a citizen initiative, has now confirmed that it is not really as difficult to find as p

1h

 

Back-to-the-future plants give climate change insights

If you were to take a seed and zap it into the future to see how it will respond to climate change, how realistic might that prediction be? More so than was previously realized, according to a study from UC Davis and the University of Southampton.

1h

 

Spredning af husdyr-MRSA skyldes handel med svin og tre sejlivede bakterier

Helgenom-sekventering af bakteriestammer fra svinebesætninger og mennesker viser, hvorfor den antibiotikaresistente stafylokokbakterie MRSA CC398 kunne brede sig. Der er dog stadig ubekendte, skriver SSI og DTU.

1h

 

Why Google Internet Traffic Rerouted Through China and RussiaGoogle China Russia

For two hours Monday, Google internet traffic rerouted through China, Russia, and elsewhere. Here's why.

1h

 

Archaeologists unearth dozens of mummified cats in Egypt

Archaeologists in Egypt have found dozens of mummified cats in the tomb of a royal offical. The cats will join the ranks of hundreds of thousands of previously discovered ancient kitties. While the cats are nothing special, the tomb also held well preserved beetles. There are three things that everybody knows about ancient Egypt: they had mummies, built the pyramids as tombs for kings, and really

1h

 

Satellite Images Reveal North Korea's Missile Program Is Very Much Alive

North Korea's missile program has not actually been dismantled, according to a report published this weekend.

1h

 

Fish recognize their prey by electric colors

The African elephantnose fish generates weak electrical pulses to navigate its environment. This localization sense apparently shows an astonishing similarity to vision, as a study by the University of Bonn now shows. The study demonstrates that different objects have different electrical "colors". Fish use these colors for instance to distinguish their favorite food – mosquito larvae – from other

1h

 

Study examines opioid use among Massachusetts adolescents, trends in opioid prescriptions

I wanted to alert you to two interesting papers from our researchers on opioid use. One focuses on overdoses among Massachusetts adolescents while the other is a data analysis that found prescription opioids dispensed to children/adolescents have steadily decreased since 2012.

1h

 

First microarrayed 3D neuronal culture platform developed

Neuronal development is often regulated by the graded distribution of guidance molecules, but many details about the process is largely unexplored. A research team from City University of Hong Kong (CityU) has tackled this problem in a precise and systematic way by developing a novel device, and has published their findings in the latest issue of Nature Communications.

1h

 

Simulation versus observation

As an indicator of the impacts of climate change, Arctic sea ice is hard to beat. Scientists have observed the frozen polar ocean advance and retreat at this most sensitive region of the Earth over decades for insight on the potential ripple effects on assorted natural systems: global ocean circulation, surrounding habitats and ecosystems, food sources, sea levels and more.

1h

 

Scientists shed light on semiconductor degradation mechanism

SiC-based electrical devices degrading will be improved by controlling the semiconductor material deformation with atomic level.

1h

 

An enzyme in immune cells plays essential role in host defense against tuberculosis

Using freshly resected lung tissue from 21 patients and two distinct mouse models, tuberculosis researchers at the University of Alabama at Birmingham and the Africa Health Research Institute, or AHRI, have identified a protein that plays an essential role in host defense against this deadly disease.

1h

 

Immunity connects gut bacteria and aging

EPFL scientists have discovered how a dysfunction in the immune system can cause an overload of a gut bacterium. The bacterium produces excess lactic acid, which in turn triggers the production of reactive oxygen species that cause damage to cells and many age-related pathologies.

1h

 

Pancreatic cancer's addiction could be its end

Researchers at CSHL have discovered that an inappropriately produced protein may be why some pancreatic cancer patients die exceptionally early. They note that this same protein which helps the cancer spread is also its addiction. Without it, they theorize, cancer may wither away.

1h

 

USPSTF recommendation statement on screening and behavioral counseling interventions to reduce unhealthy alcohol use in adolescents and adults

The US Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommends screening adults 18 and older, including pregnant women, for unhealthy alcohol use in primary care settings. Those patients who engage in risky or hazardous drinking should be offered brief behavioral counseling interventions to reduce unhealthy alcohol use. The USPSTF also concludes the evidence is insufficient regarding screening for alco

1h

 

Studies examine availability of opioid-overdose antidote at pharmacies

Two studies looked at the availability of naloxone, an antidote for opioid overdoses, from pharmacies in two states that have passed legislation to allow pharmacists to dispense the medication without a physician's prescription.

1h

 

Amazon turtle populations recovering well thanks to local action

The historically over-exploited Giant South American Turtle is making a significant comeback on river beaches in the Brazilian Amazon thanks to local protection efforts, say researchers at the University of East Anglia.And not only have turtle populations benefited from conservation efforts, other co-occurring species have begun to thrive once again on the protected beaches and in surrounding area

1h

 

Probiotics increase bone volume in healthy mice

A widely used probiotic stimulates bone formation in young female mice, according to a study published Nov. 13 in the journal Immunity. In response to treatment with Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (LGG), other intestinal microbes produced a metabolite called butyrate, which in turn activated bone-enhancing immune cells, including regulatory T cells.

1h

 

Why do people become homeless? Ask them

A new study examines the question of why people become homeless. There is a significant perception gap between what the general public think about why people become homeless, and what people who have experienced homelessness say—particularly when it comes to substance use, says Julie Moschion, senior research fellow at the Melbourne Institute Of Applied Economic and Social Research at the Univers

1h

 

Er øllen for bitter? Du kan træne din smagssans

Nola Grace Gaardmand kan ikke lide øl. Det prøver hun at lave om på.

1h

 

Business as usual for Antarctic krill despite ocean acidification

A new study has found that Antarctic krill are resilient to the increasing acidification of the ocean as it absorbs more C02 from the atmosphere due to anthropogenic carbon emissions. Krill are one of the most abundant organisms on Earth and a critical part of the Southern Ocean marine ecosystem.

1h

 

Treating obesity: One size does not fit all

Understanding the very different characteristics of subgroups of obese patients may hold the key to devising more effective treatments and interventions, new research found.

1h

 

Detecting light in a different dimension

Scientists from the Center for Functional Nanomaterials (CFN)–a US Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science User Facility at Brookhaven National Laboratory–have dramatically improved the response of graphene to light through self-assembling wire-like nanostructures that conduct electricity.

1h

 

New scheduling system could help reduce flight delays

Scheduling and coordinating air traffic can be difficult, but taking the airlines' and passengers' delay costs into account can actually save airlines money and result in fewer delays, according to a new study from Binghamton University, State University of New York.

1h

 

Stealth-cap technology for light-emitting nanoparticles

Scientists from the Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR), in collaboration with the Monash University Australia, have succeeded in significantly increasing the stability and biocompatibility of special light-transducing nanoparticles. They have developed so-called "upconverting" nanoparticles that not only convert infrared light into UV-visible light, but also are water-soluble, remain stab

1h

 

Cool Aunt vs Fun Uncle: Relative Battle

There’s something great about being an aunt or uncle. It’s all the fun of having a kid, without any of the responsibility! Yessss. Take your nieces and nephews out for the day and feel like a kid again! Go to the zoo. Play dress-up. Finally get the audience you’ve always dreamed of for your all-fart-joke stand-up routine. And being a niece or nephew is just as great. Get away with things your par

1h

 

Amazon turtle populations recovering well thanks to local action

The historically over-exploited Giant South American Turtle is making a significant comeback on river beaches in the Brazilian Amazon thanks to local protection efforts, say researchers at the University of East Anglia.

1h

 

The Uncommon, Requisite Resolve of Michelle Obama

The life of a political spouse is a grueling parade of thankless labor. There are endless speeches, luncheons, galas, campaign events, and fund-raisers. Amid the flurry, though, one constant emerges: the complete surrendering of one’s private life. To assume such a role is to become a public accessory in the eyes of a constituency, a variable to be calculated and then scrutinized. In her new memo

1h

 

Metroselskabet fejer tvivlen væk: Nu tyder alt på, at cityringen åbner til juli

Det går så stærkt med at færdiggøre de 17 stationer på Københavns kommende metroring, at projektselskabet bag føler sig mere og mere sikker på, at planerne holder.

1h

 

Beneath Antarctica's Ice, Intriguing Evidence of Lost Continents

A new map reveals the ancient precursors to Antarctica.

1h

 

Germany hopes to kickstart EU battery-making in 2019

German economy minister Peter Altmaier said Tuesday Berlin would provide one billion euros ($1.3 billion) of funding for electric car battery production by 2021, as talks with companies reach an advanced stage.

1h

 

Rare fossil bird deepens mystery of avian extinctions

Today's birds descend from a small number of bird species living before the dinosaur extinction. Some of the birds that went extinct, the enantiornithines, were actually more common than and out-competed modern bird ancestors. Analysis of a newly described fossil, the most complete known from the Americas, demonstrates, too, that the enantiornithines were as agile and strong in flight as the ances

2h

 

My journey to thank all the people responsible for my morning coffee | AJ Jacobs

Author AJ Jacobs embarked on a quest with a deceptively simple idea at its heart: to personally thank every person who helped make his morning cup of coffee. More than one thousand "thank yous" later, Jacobs reflects on the globe-trotting journey that ensued — and shares the life-altering wisdom he picked up along the way. "I discovered that my coffee would not be possible without hundreds of peo

2h

 

Trump Is Rewriting Asylum Law

Two days after yet another mass shooting , President Donald Trump on Friday issued a proclamation addressing mass migration. “The continuing and threatening mass migration of aliens with no basis for admission into the United States through our southern border,” he wrote, “has precipitated a crisis and undermines the integrity of our borders. I therefore must take immediate action to protect the

2h

 

House Progressives Celebrate a ‘New Kind of Centrism’

Even as pundits begin to muse about the presidential prospects of more moderate Democrats like Sherrod Brown of Ohio or Minnesota’s Amy Klobuchar, progressives are declaring victory in the midterms—and doubling down on their agenda. “These candidates are truly our future,” said Representative Mark Pocan of Wisconsin, before introducing the new members of the Congressional Progressive Caucus at th

2h

 

J.K. Rowling Enters George Lucas Mode With the New Fantastic Beasts Movie

There came a certain point in George Lucas’s career, as he began writing prequels to his Star Wars films and tinkering with re-edited “special editions” of the originals, when he finally lost all grasp on narrative momentum and became a glorified encyclopedia editor. Story took a backseat to explanation, and characters seemed to exist only to be related to future characters in some way. With the

2h

 

The Sex Drought

Both young people and adults are having less sex than ever before. In the space of a generation, sex has gone from something most high-school students have experienced to something most haven’t. The average adult used to have sex 62 times a year; now, that number is 54. Research continues to show that a healthy sex life is linked to a happy life, and having a partner is a stronger predictor than

2h

 

Climate change may have made the Arctic deadlier for baby shorebirds

What were once relatively safe havens in the Arctic are now feasting sites for predators of baby birds.

2h

 

The illusion of multitasking boosts performance

Our ability to do things well suffers when we try to complete several tasks at once, but a series of experiments suggests that merely believing that we're multitasking may boost our performance by making us more engaged in the tasks at hand. The findings are published in Psychological Science , a journal of the Association for Psychological Science.

2h

 

Moths and magnets could save lives

Rice University bioengineers have combined a virus that infects moths with magnetic nanoparticles to create a potential new therapy for inherited genetic diseases like muscular dystrophy, sickle cell, cystic fibrosis, spinal muscular atrophy and some forms of cancer.

2h

 

Scientists uncover crucial biological circuits that regulate lipids and their role in overall health

Tiny microscopic worms, invisible to the naked eye, are helping scientists to better understand an extraordinarily complex biological pathway that connects fat to overall health and aging in humans.

2h

 

New finding of particle physics may help to explain the absence of antimatter

With the help of computer simulations, particle physics researchers may be able to explain why there is more matter than antimatter in the Universe. The simulations offer a new way of examining conditions after the Big Bang, and could provide answers to some fundamental questions in particle physics.

2h

 

Warmer winter temperatures linked to increased crime, study finds

Milder winter weather increased regional crime rates in the United States over the past several decades, according to new research that suggests crime is related to temperature's effect on daily activities.

2h

 

Scientists uncover crucial biological circuits that regulate lipids and their role in overall health

Tiny microscopic worms, invisible to the naked eye, are helping scientists to better understand an extraordinarily complex biological pathway that connects fat to overall health and aging in humans.

2h

 

Violent crime rates rise in warmer winters

As global temperatures climb, warmer winters in parts of the country may set the scene for higher rates of violent crimes such as assault and robbery, according to a new CIRES study.

2h

 

Czech highest court upholds Uber ban in city of Brno

The Czech Republic's highest legal authority has upheld a ban for the operations of the ride-sharing service Uber in Brno, the second-largest city in the country.

2h

 

Doubly-excited electrons reach new energy states

Positrons are short-lived subatomic particle with the same mass as electrons and a positive charge. They are used in medicine, e.g. in positron emission tomography (PET), a diagnostic imaging method for metabolic disorders. Positrons also exist as negatively charged ions, called positronium ions (Ps-), which are essentially a three-particle system consisting of two electrons bound to a positron.

2h

 

Deepwater Horizon oil spill's dramatic effect on stingrays' sensory abilities

It has been almost a decade since the Deepwater Horizon Oil spill. Described as the worst environmental disaster in the United States, nearly 5 million barrels of crude oil oozed into the Gulf of Mexico, severely degrading the marine ecosystem immediately surrounding the spill site and directly impacting coastal habitats along 1,773 kilometers of shoreline. About 10 million gallons remain in the s

2h

 

Why women go to war – new study reveals motivations of female militia fighters

Women militia fighters make a positive choice to join combat units and are motivated by similar factors to male fighters, according to a new study by Dr. Jennifer Philippa Eggert of the University of Warwick's Department of Politics and International Studies, which draws on the experiences of women fighters in Lebanon to challenge current theories about female fighters.

2h

 

Driverless cars will make you sick – but there's a fix

Driverless cars will usher in a transport utopia, at least according to many of their proponents. Concept art for these futuristic vehicles often show passengers sat facing each other, reading, working or enjoying some other activity as their car does the driving for them. I would argue that one of the main attractions of an automated vehicle is being able to do something else while you're safely

2h

 

Chinese satellites provide advanced solutions to modeling small particles

The assimilation of aerosol optical depth (AOD) observational data from the Chinese satellite Fengyun-3A (FY-3A) can significantly improve the ability to model aerosol mass.

2h

 

Immunotherapy combination and chemotherapy show encouraging results in Phase II acute myeloid leukemia study

A triple therapy combining two immune checkpoint inhibitors (ICPIs) with the standard-of-care chemotherapy, a hypomethylating agent called azacitidine, has shown promising results for treatment of relapsed or refractory acute myeloid leukemia (AML), according to findings from a Phase II study at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center.

2h

 

Violent crime rates rise in warmer winters

As global temperatures climb, warmer winters in parts of the country may set the scene for higher rates of violent crimes such as assault and robbery, according to a new CIRES study published in AGU's GeoHealth.

2h

 

Health costs of ageism calculated at $63 billion annually, study finds

Ageism — a widespread form of prejudice that is directed at older persons — led to excess costs of $63 billion for a broad range of health conditions during one year in the United States, a new study by the Yale School of Public Health has found.

2h

 

Smoke From California’s Fires Is Harming the State’s Most Vulnerable

The deadliest fire in California’s history continues to burn, and San Francisco is filled with smoke and ash. On Tuesday, for the fifth day in a row, air throughout Northern California contained high amounts of fine-particulate-matter pollution, and the Bay Area Air Quality Management District warned that the air was unhealthy for everyone. “The public should limit outdoor activity as much as pos

2h

 

How big plant-eating animals affect biodiversity

A new study may upend a widely held ecological theory about how grazing herbivores influence their ecosystems. The theory holds that plant-hungry creatures help shape ecosystems by mowing down dominant plants that might smother other plants, thus enhancing biodiversity—but only if the area is lush. The new study shows that this might not be entirely true. Researchers synthesized data from more th

2h

 

Randers får ny ledende overlæge på medicinsk afdeling

Pernille Sarto tiltræder som ledende overlæge på medicinsk afdeling på Regionshospitalet Randers.

2h

 

Næstved Sygehus bliver Sjællands første specialsygehus

Næstved Sygehus skal omdannes til et specialsygehus, og bliver ifølge sygehusdirektør regionens åbne ambulante og elektive sygehus.

2h

 

New finding of particle physics may help to explain the absence of antimatter

With the help of computer simulations, particle physics researchers may be able to explain why there is more matter than antimatter in the Universe. The simulations offer a new way of examining conditions after the Big Bang, and could provide answers to some fundamental questions in particle physics.

2h

 

Tiny cells may best survive hot soils

As the planet warms, what life will survive and thrive? If the coal fire-fueled soils around Centralia, Pennsylvania, are any indication, organisms with smaller genomes and cells may do just fine, researchers say. A new study represents the first time these kinds of microbes have been found afield and clearly shows that, for soil microbiomes, hot temperatures result in both smaller genomes on ave

2h

 

Why space debris cleanup might be a national security threat

As an international relations scholar who studies space law and policy, I have come to realize what most people do not fully appreciate: Dealing with space debris is as much a national security issue as it is a technical one.

2h

 

Climate change: Heatwaves 'halve' male insect fertility

A study of beetles could explain global decline in insects – and how heat can damage male fertility.

2h

 

See How the Buoyancy Force Works in Water or Air

The buoyancy force gives you the boost that helps you float and do cool maneuvers in water. This experiment lets you see it in action.

2h

 

In Defense of Old-School Feminism

The amnesia didn’t take long to set in. Feminists of the late 1960s and early 1970s spent years fighting for reforms they hoped would transform marriage, work, and domestic life. But by the end of the ’70s, the Fordham University history professor Kirsten Swinth notes in her new book, Feminism’s Forgotten Fight , even the feminist movement’s own one-time leaders were accusing it of ignoring women

2h

 

Rising sea levels may build, rather than destroy, coral reef islands

Rising global sea levels may actually be beneficial to the long-term future of coral reef islands, such as the Maldives, according to new research published in Geophysical Research Letters.Low-lying coral reef islands are typically less than three metres above sea level, making them highly vulnerable to rising sea levels associated with climate change. However, research has found new evidence that

2h

 

Football coaches between victories, defeats and emotions

Football coaches who have their emotions under control are more successful. This has now been reported in the Sports journal by scientists from Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) and Goethe University in Frankfurt am Main. Because emotions and how they are dealt with have a great impact on the performance of coaches and therefore also the team as a whole.

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The dawn of a new era for genebanks

One important aspect of biodiversity is genetic variation within species. A notable example is the variety of cultivars of crop plants. An international research consortium led by the of the Leibniz Institute of Plant Genetics and Crop Plant Research (IPK Gatersleben) and supported by the iDiv research centre has now characterised at the molecular level a world collection of barley, comprising see

2h

 

Microorganisms help production

Oil is still the most economically attractive resource for fuels and basic chemicals that can be used to manufacture everyday products such as plastic bottles and detergent. New biotechnological processes aim to simplify the use of renewable biomass as an alternative to the fossil raw material and make it more cost-effective.

2h

 

The world's plastic problem is bigger than the ocean

As you read this, a strange object that looks like a 2,000-foot floating pool noodle is drifting slowly through the central north Pacific Ocean. This object is designed to solve an enormous environmental problem. But in so doing, it brings attention to a number of others.

3h

 

Doubly-excited electrons reach new energy states

Sabyasachi Kar from the Harbin Institute of Technology, China, and Yew Kam Ho from the Academia Sinica, Taipei, Taiwan, have now characterised the higher energy levels reached by electrons in resonance in three-particle systems, which are too complex to be described using simple equations. This theoretical model, published in a recent study in EPJ D, is intended to offer guidance for experimentali

3h

 

Mathematical understanding of Bell nonlocality and quantum steering

Bell nonlocality and quantum steering are the two most important quantum properties. A recent study reveals the mathematical connotations and equivalent characterizations of these two quantum properties. The contribution will be published in Sci. China-Phys. Mech. Astron., 2019, 62(3): 030311.

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Feeding trials showed cranberry reduces low fiber, animal-based diet effects on gut health

In a recently published feeding trial in The Journal of Nutritional Biochemistry, scientists investigated the potential protective effect of cranberries on the gut microbiome with an animal-based diet. Consuming cranberry compounds modified the impact of an animal-based diet in study participants by restoring a healthier microbiota profile.

3h

 

Autism behaviors show unique brain network fingerprints in infants

A new study has identified unique functional brain networks associated with characteristic behaviors of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) in 12- and 24-month old children at risk for developing ASD.

3h

 

Nationality likely a key factor in life-and-death decisions

People making decisions about life-and-death situations consider individuals' nationalities when deciding who should be sacrificed to save others, according to a study out of the University of Waterloo.

3h

 

Greek authorities say lost ancient city of Tenea located

Greece's culture ministry says archaeologists have located the first tangible remains of a lost ancient city that, according to tradition, was first settled by Trojan war captives after the Greek sack of Troy.

3h

 

Delhi 'lungs' turn sickly brown in days

A pair of artificial lungs put up in New Delhi to demonstrate the lethal effects of smog have turned a sickly dark brown within 10 days of their installation, underscoring the city's pollution crisis.

3h

 

IAEA urges quick plan on Fukushima radioactive water cleanup

Experts from the International Atomic Energy Agency urged the operator of Japan's tsunami-wrecked Fukushima nuclear plant on Tuesday to urgently decide on a plan to dispose of massive amounts of radioactive water stored in tanks on the compound.

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3h

 

How to Move a Single Electron

How to Move a Single Electron Scientists have developed a way to encourage a single electron to hop atop a silicon atom, a feat that may find applications in future nanoscale electronics. singleelectron_color2.jpg Image credits: Abigail Malate, Staff Illustrator Rights information: Copyright: American Institute of Physics Physics Tuesday, November 13, 2018 – 09:15 Yuen Yiu, Staff Writer (Inside S

3h

 

Why it's hard to tell where police are treating minorities unfairly

Donald Trump has waved the words "stop and frisk" around like a banner call to cure violent crime in American cities.

3h

 

Cobalt – a potential bottleneck in the transition to electric mobility

The coming electric vehicle boom will significantly increase the demand for cobalt in the EU and globally. As a result, demand is expected to exceed supply already in 2020 and the EU must take steps to boost supply and curb demand without hindering the growth in electric vehicles, according to a new report by the European Commission's Joint Research Centre (JRC), presented at the EU Raw Material W

3h

 

Microorganisms help production

Oil is still the most economically attractive resource for fuels and basic chemicals that can be used to manufacture everyday products such as plastic bottles and detergent. New biotechnological processes aim to simplify the use of renewable biomass as an alternative to the fossil raw material and make it more cost-effective. Researchers at KIT are focusing on plant biomass such as wood and straw

3h

 

Climate change damaging male fertility

Climate change could pose a threat to male fertility — according to new research. New findings reveal that heatwaves damage sperm in insects – with negative impacts for fertility across generations. The research team say that male infertility during heatwaves could help to explain why climate change is having such an impact on species populations, including climate-related extinctions in recent y

3h

 

California's wildfires: 'Everybody is at risk' from smoky conditions, experts say

Just as Californians have long been told to prepare for earthquakes, they must now start protecting their health from the wildfires becoming more commonplace in this state, experts warned Sunday.

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Volcanic eruptions once caused mass extinctions in the oceans – could climate change do the same?

All animals, whether they live on land or in the water, require oxygen to breathe. But today the world's oceans are losing oxygen, due to a combination of rising temperatures and changing ocean currents. Both factors are driven by human-induced climate change.

3h

 

Anticancer drugs to be delivered directly to cells by magnetic nanospring capsules

A team of scientists from the Far Eastern Federal University (FEFU) and Korea University (Republic of Korea) obtained cobalt and cobalt-iron nanosprings with unique combined magnetic properties and long-lasting elasticity that may be used to develop nanorobots, nanosensors, new types of memory, and targeted drug delivery agents (specifically, for anticancer therapy). The article was published in N

3h

 

Penn Study shows regular behavioral counseling leads to clinically significant weight loss

Intensive behavioral therapy (IBT), which provides diet and physical activity counseling, is proven to help adults with obesity achieve meaningful weight loss in six to 12 months. A new Penn Medicine study, published today in Obesity, the journal of the Obesity Society, is the first randomized controlled evaluation of the efficacy of IBT when implemented under the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid

3h

 

New anisotropic conductive film for ultra-fine pitch assembly applications

Researchers have moved to one step closer to realizing ultra-fine resolution for displays with a novel thermoplastic anchoring polymer layer structure. This new structure can significantly improve the ultra-fine pitch interconnection by effectively suppressing the movement of conductive particles. This film is expected to be applied to various mobile devices, large-sized OLED panels, and VR, among

3h

 

Scientists develop microbiome search engine to assess microbiome novelty and impact

Scientists from the Qingdao Institute of Bioenergy and Bioprocess Technology developed a way to objectively evaluate the novelty and impact of plethora of microbiomes in the vast universe of microbiome big-data, based on an innovative tool called Microbiome Search Engine (MSE).

3h

 

Osteopontin: A new emerging role in HCV-related hepatocellular carcinoma

A research team based in Japan led by Kanazawa University has demonstrated the effect of osteopontin on hepatitis C virus replication and interferon signaling in cancer stem cells. Their research sheds light on a novel therapeutic target for treating hepatocellular carcinoma.

3h

 

NUS researchers offer solution in fight against fake graphene

A new study by researchers from the National University of Singapore has uncovered a major problem – a lack of graphene production standards has led to many cases of poor quality products from suppliers. Such practices can impede the progress of research that depend fundamentally on the use of high-quality graphene

3h

 

Genomics provide hope for those with 'one in a million' cancer diagnosis

New research has shown that many people with rare cancers can benefit from genomic profiling. The findings of the patient-driven trial are being presented today at the Clinical Oncology Society of Australia Annual Scientific Meeting and could result in dramatic changes to the way those with rare cancers are diagnosed and treated.

3h

 

Pressure helps to make better Li-ion batteries

Lithium titanium oxide (Li4Ti5O12, LTO), a "zero-strain" anode material for Li-ion batteries (LIBs), exhibits excellent cycling performance. However, it shows poor conductivity which is the major drawback and limits its applications. In a recent paper published in National Science Review, it is reported that static compression can highly improve the conductivity of LTO by pressure-induced amorphiz

3h

 

Deepwater Horizon oil spill's dramatic effect on stingrays' sensory abilities

Marine fishes rely on their sensory systems to survive. A study is the first to quantify the physiological effects of whole crude oil on the olfactory function of a marine vertebrate — the Atlantic stingray. Results of the study, confirm that exposure to crude oil, at concentrations mimicking those measured in coastal areas following the Deepwater Horizon oil spill in 2010, significantly impaired

3h

 

Prenatal food insecurity associated with severity of neonatal abstinence syndrome

A new study shows that food insecurity in pregnant women being treated for opioid use disorder may be associated with increased risk for their infants receiving pharmacologic treatment for neonatal abstinence syndrome. Published in Addiction, the Boston Medical Center study indicates that screening for food insecurity in pregnant women who are being treated with opioid agonist therapy (methadone o

3h

 

More American students are studying abroad, new data show

Kelsey Hrubes knew she had a challenge on her hands when she visited Germany as a study abroad student back in 2015.

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3h

 

Purple bacteria 'batteries' turn sewage into clean energy

Purple phototrophic bacteria — which can store energy from light — when supplied with an electric current can recover near to 100 percent of carbon from any type of organic waste, while generating hydrogen gas for use as fuel.

3h

 

How plants evolved to make ants their servants

Plants have evolved ways to make ants defend them from attacks and spread their seeds, and this new study shows how it happened. In a new study breaking down the genetic history of 1,700 species of ants and 10,000 plant genera, researchers found that the long history of ant and plant co-evolution started with ants foraging on plants and plants responding by evolving ant-friendly traits.

3h

 

Ingen læger ønsker at praktisere i Vollsmose

Regionsrådets omdiskuterede beslutning om at binde to nye ydernumre i Odense til Vollsmose har indtil videre ikke båret frugt. Ikke en eneste praksislæge har reageret på jobopslaget.

3h

 

Beskæftigelsesminister: Overbelægning giver ikke automatisk dårligt arbejdsmiljø

Overbelægning behøver ikke give dårligt arbejdsmiljø på sygehusene, mener regeringen. Ikke desto mindre skal det holdes på et minimum.

3h

 

Giant flare detected on a pre-main sequence M star

Using the Next Generation Transit Survey (NGTS), astronomers have identified an energetic flare displaying quasi-periodic pulsations on the pre-main sequence M star NGTS J121939.5-355557. The newly detected flare is one of the most energetic flares seen on an M-type star to date. The finding is reported in a paper published November 5 on arXiv.org.

3h

 

How research is helping to reduce prejudice between people online

The internet often gets a bad rap, and for good reason. Social media use can contribute to poorer mental health in teens. It can also be used to manipulate users' emotions, and to disseminate misinformation and click bait to sway public opinion.

3h

 

Poorer children priced out of learning instruments but school music programmes benefit the wider community

Years of austerity in the UK have bitten away at school budgets, and the arts have suffered heavily. Schools can no longer afford to employ teaching assistants, so it is little wonder that local authorities have cut school music funding.

3h

 

High stakes, entrenched interests and the Trump rollback of environmental regulations

Since his days on the campaign trail, President Donald Trump has promised to roll back environmental regulations, boost the use of coal and pull out of the Paris climate agreement—and he's moving toward doing all those things.

3h

 

Cosmologists provide new measurement of cosmic controversy

Researchers from the University of Portsmouth have come up with a new measurement of one of the most debated topics in cosmology.

3h

 

Merging galaxy cluster provides laboratory for accelerating electrons

Merging galaxy clusters provide natural laboratories for astronomers to study cosmic phenomena. Igone Urdampilleta from SRON Netherlands Institute for Space Research uses the merger Abell 3376 to study how electrons rush through the intracluster medium at relativistic speeds. The findings point towards an acceleration mechanism called Diffusive Shock Acceleration. The study is published in Astrono

3h

 

Tailoring the surface of carbon may hold the key to monitoring patient blood in real-time

The potential applications for tailor-made carbon surfaces are wide and include protective coatings, car parts, biomedical coatings and biosensors. Yet for these developments to be realised, detailed atomic level knowledge is still needed on how carbon surfaces are structured and how they can be modified.

3h

 

More flowers around apple orchards can yield higher harvest

Apple growers should increase the amount of flowers around their apple orchards if they want to increase their harvest. A new study by researchers from Stockholm University, among others, shows that more pollinators, such as bees and flower flies, are attracted to orchards with flowers – which increase the chance for pollination.

3h

 

Pandora's Podcast Genome Project Wants to Find Your Next Favorite ShowPandora PGP GP Project

The company hopes to do for podcasts what its Music Genome Project did for streaming songs.

3h

 

Obesity and food restrictions proven to be associated with less food enjoyment

A study carried out by UGR scientists shows that obesity and food restrictions -even trivial ones- such as temporary diets are associated with a reduction in enjoymentFor this research, food-related emotions were analyzed in 552 adolescents aged 11 to 17 belonging to several high schools from Granada.

3h

 

Emotional intelligence: A new criterion for hiring?

The cognitive skills of a future employee are examined during a job interview. However, qualifications and a nice character don't necessarily mean that the interviewee will be a competent colleague. The individual's emotional intelligence has to be factored in, that is, his capacity to understand, regulate and manage emotions in the specific context of the work environment. Researchers at the UNIG

3h

 

Tailoring the surface of carbon may hold the key to monitoring patient blood in real-time

Machine learning is increasing the pace of development of customised carbon surfaces with a wide variety of applications

3h

 

Researchers ID promising key to performance of next-gen electronics

Taking electrons out for a spin through the nanoscopic streets of a digital device – without spinning out of control – has challenged researchers for years.

3h

 

Detecting light in a different dimension

Scientists from the Center for Functional Nanomaterials (CFN)—a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science User Facility at Brookhaven National Laboratory—have dramatically improved the response of graphene to light through self-assembling wire-like nanostructures that conduct electricity. The improvement could pave the way for the development of graphene-based detectors that can quickly se

3h

 

Sudden cardiac arrest: New findings

Scientists have recently completed three critical research studies aimed at better understanding sudden cardiac arrest.

4h

 

New records in perovskite-silicon tandem solar cells through improved light management

Using microstructured layers, a team has been able to increase the efficiency of perovskite-silicon tandem solar cells, achieving 25.5 %, which is the highest published value to date. At the same time, computational simulations were utilized to investigate light conversion in various device designs with different nanostructured surfaces. This enabled optimization of light management and detailed e

4h

 

Synthetic molecule invades double-stranded DNA

Researchers have developed a synthetic molecule that can recognize and bind to double-stranded DNA or RNA under normal physiological conditions. The molecule could provide a new platform for developing methods for the diagnosis and treatment of genetic conditions.

4h

 

How mitochondria deploy a powerful punch against life-threatening bacteria

Researchers discover that mitochondria play an important role in supporting the immune system's response against MRSA infection.

4h

 

Parents put nature in the shopping basket

In a world of vast consumer choice, ambiguous product descriptions and self-appointed experts, parents face a minefield when picking out food, toys or other products for their children. A new qualitative study indicates that naturalness is the current benchmark for consumer choice among parents.

4h

 

Family, school support makes kids more likely to stand up to bullying

A recent study finds young people with good family relationships are more likely to intervene when they witness bullying or other aggressive behavior at school — and to step in if they see victims planning to retaliate. The study found that kids who were already excluded, or discriminated against by peers or teachers, were less likely to stand up for victims of bullying.

4h

 

Cancer stem cells get energy from protein, and it's proving to be their Achilles' heel

A new study shows that cancer stem cells switch from metabolizing sugar to metabolizing protein. Clinical trial based on this observation may revolutionize care for older adults with acute myeloid leukemia.

4h

 

New breakthrough in hot embossing technology

Korean researchers have developed a new hot embossing process technology that can freely imprint fine circuit patterns on flexible polymer substrate. The result is expected to be used in semiconductor processes, wearable devices and the display industry.

4h

 

Do plants poop?

Environment And other important questions. Well, sort of. It depends on what exactly you mean by “poop.”…

4h

 

Long-term study shows atmospheric biome fluctuates by season

A team of researchers with the LTER Environmental Monitoring Observatory in the Aigüestortes National Park in Spain has found that there is seasonal variation in atmospheric microbes. In their paper published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the group describes their seven-year study of airborne microorganisms and what they found.

4h

 

Surfaces with controlled wettability to trap and identify molecules at trace concentrations

An international group of physicists from Far Eastern Federal University (FEFU), the Russian Academy of Sciences and Swinburne University of Technology (Australia) has developed a technology for trapping and chemical analysis of organic and non-organic molecules at ultra-low concentrations. The article was featured in Nanoscale.

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Researchers offer solution in fight against fake graphene

Ever since the isolation of graphene was first achieved in 2004, there has been an explosion in graphene-related research and development, with hundreds of business opportunists producing graphene to capitalise on this rapidly expanding industry. However, a new study by researchers from the National University of Singapore (NUS) has uncovered a major problem – a lack of production standards has le

4h

 

Pioneering sociologist foresaw our current chaos 100 years ago

Globally, we are currently experiencing tremendous social and political turbulence. At the institutional level, liberal democracy faces the threat of rising authoritarianism and far-right extremism. At the local level, we seem to be living in an ever-increasing age of anxiety, engendered by precarious economic conditions and the gradual erosion of shared social norms. How might we navigate these d

4h

 

Kollideret fregat sunket: Forsvaret tvivler på, om skibet kan bjerges

Det norske krigsskib Helge Ingstad, som sidste uge kolliderede med et tankskib, ligger næsten under vand nu.

4h

 

Overskudsstrøm fra danske vindmøller kan lagres i stål

Tyske Lumenion udvikler en energilagringsløsning, som kan oplagre overskydende vindmøllestrøm og føre en del af den tilbage til nettet, når der er brug for den.

4h

 

A chip with blood vessels

Biochips have been developed at TU Wien (Vienna), on which tissue can be produced and examined. This allows supplying the tissue with different substances in a very controlled way.

4h

 

Experimental therapy could repair mutations that cause genetic diseases

A new technology that relies on a moth-infecting virus and nanomagnets could be used to edit defective genes that give rise to diseases like sickle cell, muscular dystrophy and cystic fibrosis.

4h

 

Rising sea levels may build, rather than destroy, coral reef islands

Rising global sea levels may actually be beneficial to the long-term future of coral reef islands, such as the Maldives, according to new research published in Geophysical Research Letters.

4h

 

'Wise consumers' show the way to better living, professor finds

Americans hear a lot about consumerism and materialism. But most either think it applies to others or succumb to the notion that there's no way around it, given our culture and the pervasive influence of the market, which doesn't always have their best interests at heart.

4h

 

Imperiled, some freshwater mussels endure. How?

Freshwater mussels are among the most imperiled animals in North America, yet some colonies have managed to persevere despite habitat loss, pollution and other threats.

4h

 

Cognitive decline — radiation — brain tumor prevented by temporarily shutting down immune response

In a new study published Nov. 13 in the journal eLife, UC San Francisco scientists report the first animal model of glioma — the most aggressive and most common form of brain cancer in the US — that can also be used to study the long-term effects of radiation therapy in tumor-bearing brains. Using this mouse model, the researchers showed that a drug that temporarily suppresses a key component of

4h

 

Purple bacteria 'batteries' turn sewage into clean energy

Purple phototrophic bacteria — which can store energy from light — when supplied with an electric current can recover near to 100 percent of carbon from any type of organic waste, while generating hydrogen gas for use as fuel. This novel finding is reported in open-access journal Frontiers in Energy Research.

4h

 

Galaxies like Russian dolls

Jairo Méndez Abreu and Adriana de Lorenzo-Cáceres, researchers at the Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias (IAC), have discovered a peanut-shaped structure in the inner bar of a double-barred galaxy close to the Milky Way. Structures of this type, previously detected only in outer bars, are useful tracers of the evolution of the galaxies.

4h

 

No pause in global warming in the past 100 years

Global warming has been attributed to persistent increases in atmospheric greenhouse gasses (GHGs), especially in CO2, since 1870, the beginning of the Industrial Revolution. Nevertheless, the upward trend in global mean surface temperature (GMST) slowed or even paused during the first decade of the 21st century, even though CO2 levels continued to rise and reached nearly 400 ppm in 2013. This epi

4h

 

California's forest management isn't the problem

Environment Despite accusations, the state has excellent manage policies—it's just also built to burn. Though the legacy of America's old fire suppression strategy resulted in the buildup of excess flammable brush, there are two other key reasons why California is the…

4h

 

Yes, climate change is making wildfires worse

Three powerful wildfires are blazing in California. By Friday morning, the Camp fire had burned 70,000 acres in 24 hours, destroying Paradise, a community of about 26,000 people north of Sacramento.

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Technology speeds up the process to detect salmonella, E. coli, other foodborne illnesses

An award-winning Purdue University technology is showing increasing promise in helping to detect foodborne pathogens in real time. It's a problem that the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates sickens about 48 million people and kills about 3,000 each year in the United States. It is also a problem gaining more attention because of an ongoing deadly salmonella outbreak in the U.S.

4h

 

Education does not always equal social mobility

Educators around the world, particularly those in secondary schools, often default to a compelling story when they are trying to motivate their students: Work hard, achieve well and you will secure a successful future with attractive job prospects.

4h

 

Trumpy Bear Divided the World—and Conquered the Internet

He wants your money, and you’ll give it to him because LOL nothing matters.

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OnePlus 6T Review: Top-Notch Specs, Unmatched Price

And, once again, the best somewhat-affordable Android phone comes from OnePlus.

4h

 

From QAnon to Pizzagate, When Online Conspiracies Form Cults

Inside these closed online communities, outside voices are discredited and dissent is often met with hostility, doxing, and harassment. Sound familiar?

4h

 

Image of the Day: Drop Set

Liquid-like droplets containing DNA and proteins provide a model for researchers to study membraneless organization in the cell.

4h

 

America: Where Retirees Are Tricked Into Regretting a Busted Savings System

When older people are asked in surveys how they feel about their finances, one feeling reliably bubbles up to the surface: regret. They wish they’d socked away more money for retirement when they were younger. In the U.S., where about a third of Baby Boomers had no money saved in retirement plans as of 2014, regret is an all-too-common indicator of deeper financial distress, even though, generall

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Letters: ‘Let’s Encourage Participation Among All Sectors of Our Population’

American Meritocracy Is Killing Youth Sports As young athletes from well-off families join expensive travel leagues, Derek Thompson argued recently, local leagues are left with fewer players, fewer involved parents, and fewer resources—creating a classist system. As a longtime educator, former Notre Dame scholarship athlete (ice hockey), and parent/grandparent, I found “American Meritocracy Is Ki

4h

 

Why Are Young People Having So Little Sex?

T hese should be boom times for sex. The share of Americans who say sex between unmarried adults is “not wrong at all” is at an all-time high. New cases of HIV are at an all-time low. Most women can—at last—get birth control for free, and the morning-after pill without a prescription. If hookups are your thing, Grindr and Tinder offer the prospect of casual sex within the hour. The phrase If some

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How to Give Better Advice

Research reveals the common mistakes we make when trying to help — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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This is heavy: The kilogram is getting an update

The kilogram is getting an update.

5h

 

After conquering the world, smartphone faces uncertain future

What is next for the smartphone, which has become the hottest-selling consumer device around the world in just over a decade?

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Rare fossil bird deepens mystery of avian extinctions

During the late Cretaceous period, more than 65 million years ago, birds belonging to hundreds of different species flitted around the dinosaurs and through the forests as abundantly as they flit about our woods and fields today.

5h

 

Business as usual for Antarctic krill despite ocean acidification

While previous studies indicate some life stages of Antarctic krill may be vulnerable to ocean acidification, the research published in the Nature journal Communications Biology found that adult krill were largely unaffected by ocean acidification levels predicted within the next 100-300 years.

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Rare fossil bird deepens mystery of avian extinctions

Today's birds descend from a small number of bird species living before the dinosaur extinction. Some of the birds that went extinct, the enantiornithines, were actually more common than and out-competed modern bird ancestors. Analysis of a newly described fossil, the most complete known from the Americas, demonstrates, too, that the enantiornithines were as agile and strong in flight as the ances

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Most complete enantiornithine bird fossil from North America

A 75-million-year-old bird skeleton from a threatened national monument in Utah represents the most complete skeleton ever found in North America for a long-extinct group of birds called enantiornithines. This large, fossilized bird provides important new insight into the evolution of flight. It has several advanced adaptations for flying, which show that the Enantiornithes evolved these features

5h

 

Planetary boundaries for antibiotic and pesticide resistance identified

Resistance to antibiotics and pesticides is rising at alarming rates. Yet, currently, there is no global framework to track the threat to human health and crops. Researchers have now published the first estimates of antibiotic and pesticide "planetary boundaries" in the journal Nature Sustainability. The researchers suggest that if resistance to antibiotics and pesticides goes beyond these boundar

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Traditional eutectic alloy brings new hope for high energy density metal-oxygen batteries

Current lithium-ion intercalation technology, even when fully developed, is insufficient to satisfy the increasing demand for high-energy-density power sources for electric vehicles and electronics. Thus, non-aqueous alkali metal-oxygen (AM-O2: AM = Li, Na, etc.) batteries are positioned to replace conventional lithium-ion batteries due to their ultrahigh theoretical energy density.

5h

 

NASA's ARIA maps California wildfires from space

California continues to be plagued by wildfires—including the Woolsey Fire near Los Angeles and the Camp Fire in Northern California, now one of the deadliest in the state's history. NASA satellites are observing these fires—and the damage they're leaving behind—from space.

5h

 

House sparrow status signalling theory no longer flies

The size of a male house sparrow's bib has long been associated with the bird's fighting abilities and status within the flock. But an international team of researchers has shown there is little evidence to support it.

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Structure of fossil-fuel source rocks is finally decoded

The fossil fuels that provide much of the world's energy orginate in a type of rock known as kerogen, and the potential for recovering these fuels depends crucially on the size and connectedness of the rocks' internal pore spaces.

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Firearms And Dementia: How Do You Convince A Loved One To Give Up Their Guns?

It's estimated that nearly half of all Americans over 65 own a gun or live with someone who does. And 7 million in the U.S. have dementia, a number that's expected to double within two decades. (Image credit: Nicole Xu for NPR)

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Ancient flower fossil points to core eudicot boom 99 million years ago

About 140 years ago, Charles Darwin seemed to be bothered by evidence suggesting the sudden occurrence of numerous angiosperms in the mid-Cretaceous. Since Darwin's theory of evolution implies that all organisms should increase gradually, the sudden appearance of angiosperms would have represented a headache in his theory.

5h

 

A magnetic method to control the transport of chiral Majorana fermions

The Majorana fermion, a particle that is its own antiparticle, was originally introduced as a putative elementary particle by Ettore Majorana in 1937, and the chiral Majorana fermion was experimentally observed in topological superconductors in 2017. Since the Majorana fermion is a charge-neutral particle, the direct effect on Majorana fermions by electromagnetic methods should fail. Now, research

5h

 

Renewable energy cooperatives, an opportunity for energy transition

Three researchers from the UPV/EHU's Faculty of Engineering—Bilbao and the University of Valladolid have explored how renewable energy cooperatives have evolved. They have found that these cooperatives have developed a significant capacity to survive and adapt in response to the hostile context brought about by the economic and political regime.

5h

 

Color vision variation in guppies influences female mate preference

A variety of animals have male-specific ornament traits and these ornaments are favored by female choice. Which male traits are preferred by females often varies among females. Genetic mechanisms that create and maintain variations in female preference has been one of the central questions in evolutionary ecology.

5h

 

Gaia spots a 'ghost' galaxy next door

The Gaia satellite has spotted an enormous 'ghost' galaxy lurking on the outskirts of the Milky Way.

5h

 

Pulling the genome apart: Chromosome segregation during mitosis explained

When a cell divides—a process known as mitosis—its chromosomes need to be separated and evenly distributed into the newly created daughter cells. Although this is known to be extremely complicated and to feature a range of cellular components, many of its details remain unclear, which has hampered efforts to develop treatments for when mitosis goes awry.

5h

 

North America's Oldest Mummy Sheds Light on Ancient Migrations

A 10,600-year-old mummy found in Nevada is helping scientists fill in their fuzzy picture of how humans first migrated into the Americas.

5h

 

The connection paradox: Why are workplaces more isolating than ever?

Technology's supposed interconnectivity doesn't breed human interaction, and has instead made many workers feel less happy and less productive. Using email rather than walking over to someone's desk and having face-to-face time is a major culprit. Inter-office messaging apps can also make employees feel more distant from their co-workers. Can the tech companies who created this issue turn workpla

5h

 

If You Drive in Los Angeles, Palantir and LAPD Are Watching

Records show police agencies tap license-plate readers hundreds of thousands of times a year.

5h

 

How to Take Better Photos on Your Phone

Give the 'gram a boost with these tips from professional photographers.

5h

 

CyPhy Wants to Set Drones Free by Tying Them to the Ground

A tether connecting a drone to the ground liberates the aircraft from reliance on short-lived batteries, allowing it to stay aloft for weeks at a time.

5h

 

Ancient Monkey Transformed into a 'Sloth' When It Arrived in Jamaica

The extinct Jamaican monkey X. mcgregori mcgregori acted like a sloth and had hardly any teeth. It may have been a seafaring hero.

5h

 

Hundreds of Tiny Terracotta Warriors Found Guarding 2,100-Year-Old Chinese Site

They look like a miniaturized version of the Terracotta Army guarding the first emperor of China.

5h

 

Photos: Mini Terracotta Army Hidden in China Pit

A 2,100-year-old pit containing chariots and small ceramic sculptures of infantry, cavalry, watchtowers, musicians and servants has been discovered in China.

5h

 

New study: Parents put nature in the shopping basket

In a world of vast consumer choice, ambiguous product descriptions and self-appointed experts, parents face a minefield when picking out food, toys or other products for their children. A new qualitative study from the University of Copenhagen indicates that naturalness is the current benchmark for consumer choice among parents.

5h

 

How Have Plants Shaped Human Societies?

We still know very little, but a new project called the Plant Humanities Initiative aims to change that — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

5h

 

Climate Change May Curtail Shorebirds' Need to Fly North

Arctic predators have been eating twice as many shorebird eggs, threatening populations and potentially migration itself — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

6h

 

Lisbeth har smertefuld ben-sygdom: Kunne hverken sove eller gå i biografen

I mere end 25 år har Lisbeth Staal haft svær RLS. Når hun ikke får medicin, har hun spasmer og kan hverken sidde eller sove.

6h

 

Facebook åbner dørene for Frankrig: Vil vise, hvordan hadefuldt indhold bekæmpes

Et lille hold fra den franske administration vil fra næste år følge Facebooks kamp mod eksempelvis hate speech og racisme.

6h

 

Da Jon ikke fandt den DAB-adapter, han ønskede sig, blev han adapterproducent

En utilfreds civilingeniør opfandt adapter, som kan håndtere både FM, DAB og netradio, da nordmændene mistede FM-nettet.

6h

 

Study finds that in treating obesity, one size does not fit all

Understanding the very different characteristics of subgroups of obese patients may hold the key to devising more effective treatments and interventions, new research from Brown University found.

6h

 

Business as usual for Antarctic krill despite ocean acidification

A new IMAS-led study has found that Antarctic krill are resilient to the increasing acidification of the ocean as it absorbs more C02 from the atmosphere due to anthropogenic carbon emissions.Krill are one of the most abundant organisms on Earth and a critical part of the Southern Ocean marine ecosystem.

6h

 

One of Earth’s shimmering dust clouds has been spotted at last

Almost 60 years after a Polish astronomer spotted clouds of dust orbiting Earth near the moon, astronomers have detected those clouds again.

6h

 

The Genius Neuroscientist Who Might Hold the Key to True AI

Karl Friston’s free energy principle might be the most all-encompassing idea since Charles Darwin’s theory of natural selection. But to understand it, you need to peer inside the mind of Friston himself.

6h

 

DIY Tinkerers Harness the Power of Artificial Intelligence

The age of homebrew AI may not be all sweetness and light. Nor will it be all darkness and porn. Meet some of the pioneers showing what happens when the masses can teach computers new tricks.

6h

 

How Google and Amazon Got So Big Without Being Regulated

Internet companies used to grow big and die—fast. But now a few of them are huge and entrenched, because regulators didn't foresee their dominance.

6h

 

How to Teach Artificial Intelligence Some Common Sense

We’ve spent years teaching neural nets to think like human brains. They’re crazy-smart, but what if we’ve been doing it all wrong?

6h

 

The Camp, Hill, and Woolsey Fires Are Climate Change at Work

Though we can point to a lack of rainfall to explain the devastation from the fires in California, they're ultimately a product of a warming world.

6h

 

How Fei-Fei Li Will Make Artificial Intelligence Better for Humanity

AI has a problem: The biases of its creators are getting hard-coded into its future. Fei-Fei Li has a plan to fix that—by rebooting the field she helped invent.

6h

 

48 Smart Holiday Gift Ideas That Everyone Will Connect With: WIRED Wish List 2018

From electric wheels to smart home hubs, this year's holiday picks will delight tinkerers, travelers, and lovers of timeless design.

6h

 

How to Salvage Congress

If you are among the 11 percent of Americans who believe that everything in Congress is going swimmingly, then save some time and stop reading right now. (But first, please share whatever experimental drugs you are on.) But if you are among the 87 percent of people who are concerned about what is going on in Congress, then I have an important message for you: It’s much worse than you think. On Tu

6h

 

Hacker stjal 12.391 e-mailadresser fra dansk it-virksomhed

Virksomheden Conventus, der leverer it-løsninger til danske foreninger, blev i slutningen af juli ramt af et hackerangreb, hvor over 12.000 e-mailadresser på kunder blev lækket.

6h

 

To reduce food waste, scientists are making labels that track produce as it spoils

A new type of use-by label for milk bottles that decomposes as the liquid inside goes sour could appear on UK supermarket shelves later this year. Labels such as these, capable of telling consumers exactly when fresh produce has gone bad, are being developed by scientists who want to stop food from being prematurely discarded. If successful, these indicators have the potential to reduce the millio

6h

 

Telecom Italia ousts CEO in long-running boardroom battle

A long-running board room battle in Italy's legacy telecoms provider, Telecom Italia, has culminated with the ouster of CEO Amos Genish, effective immediately.

6h

 

7h

 

Ny Ringsted-bane til ti milliarder åbner uden et eneste lyntog

DSB undlader at sætte lyntog, som kan fragte passagerne hurtigt mellem Sjælland og Fyn, ind på den nye jernbane mellem København og Ringsted. I stedet åbner den med ét regionaltog i timen til Nykøbing Falster.

7h

 

Ancient flower fossil points to Core Eudicot Boom 99 million years ago

A group led by Professor WANG Xin from the Nanjing Institute of Geology and Palaeontology (NIGPAS) describe a flower, Lijinganthus revoluta, embedded in Burmese amber dating to 99 million years ago. The fossil is exquisite and complete, including all parts of a perfect pentamerous flower, namely, the calyx, corolla, stamens, and gynoecium, and belongs to the Pentapetalae of Core Eudicots.

7h

 

Climate change damaging male fertility

Climate change could pose a threat to male fertility — according to new research from the University of East Anglia.New findings published today in the journal Nature Communications reveal that heatwaves damage sperm in insects – with negative impacts for fertility across generations.The research team say that male infertility during heatwaves could help to explain why climate change is having su

7h

 

Neural nets supplant marker genes in analyzing single cell RNA sequencing

Computer scientists at Carnegie Mellon University say neural networks and supervised machine learning techniques can efficiently characterize cells that have been studied using single cell RNA-sequencing (scRNA-seq). This finding, published in the online journal Nature Communications, could help researchers identify new cell subtypes and differentiate between healthy and diseased cells.

7h

 

Heatwaves can 'wipe out' male insect fertility

Study of beetles could explain global decline – and also be a warning to humankind Heatwaves severely damage the fertility of male beetles and consecutive hot spells leave them virtually sterilised, according to research. Global warming is making heatwaves more common and wildlife is being annihilated , and the study may reveal a way in which these two trends are linked. The scientists behind the

7h

 

How Can Schools Better Persuade Students To Show Up For Class?

Many schools give attendance awards to motivate students. A study found students who were awarded for perfect attendance went on to have more absences than their peers who weren't given the award. (Image credit: shorrocks/Getty Images)

7h

 

Say Au Revoir To That Hunk Of Metal In France That Has Defined The Kilogram

A small cylinder called Le Grand K has defined the kilogram for more than a hundred years. But if a scratch ever rendered it lighter, the definition of the kilo literally shifted. Time for a change. (Image credit: BIPM)

7h

 

Neural nets supplant marker genes in analyzing single cell RNA sequencing

Computer scientists at Carnegie Mellon University say neural networks and supervised machine learning techniques can efficiently characterize cells that have been studied using single cell RNA-sequencing (scRNA-seq). This finding could help researchers identify new cell subtypes and differentiate between healthy and diseased cells.

7h

 

Climate change damaging male fertility

Climate change could pose a threat to male fertility—according to new research from the University of East Anglia.

7h

 

Mystiske partikler skydes ud af isen på Antarktis

To uforklarlige observationer kan skyldes de meget eftersøgte supersymmetriske partikler, mener nogle forskere. De kan dog ikke stå alene, siger forsker på Niels Bohr Institutet.

8h

 

Ny video-blogger: Kom og opfind med mig

Steen Enevoldsen er opfinder – og han vil gerne invitere dig til at komme og se, hvad han leger med i sit laboratorium.

8h

 

Women favor daughters, men favor sons despite socioeconomic status

A Rutgers-led experimental study found that women prefer and invest more in daughters, while men favor and invest more in their sons. The study of gender biases appears in the journal Scientific Reports.

8h

 

System to rid space station of astronaut exhalations inspires Earth-based CO2 removal

When astronauts aboard the International Space Station (ISS) exhale carbon dioxide (CO2), it's removed from the air and pumped into space. Could an Earth-based version help remove greenhouse gas emissions from our atmosphere?

9h

 

Vietnam's newest airline Bamboo gets aviation licence

Vietnam's newest carrier Bamboo Airways has been granted a licence to fly, officials and the airline said, paving the way for its inaugural flight in a region crowded with competitors.

9h

 

French firm refurbishes earnings via old iPhones

One company in northern France is doing its profitable best to give an environmental makeover to smartphones, whose circuitry, batteries and plastics have become a polluting blight over the past decade.

9h

 

Fighting wars and disease, smartphones on the frontlines

At the sharp end of conflict in Syria, in a schoolchild's bag in Kenya, whether fighting deadly diseases or studying forestry, the smartphone has become ubiquitous in just over a decade.

9h

 

Molecular Phylogenetics: A New Way to Tell the Story of Evolution

The new science of molecular phylogenetics tells the story of evolution with no need to consult the fossil record. It has produced some surprises, including a whole new domain of life, the archaea.

9h

 

Smartphones: a double-edged sword for terrorists

Bombs and guns aside, a smartphone can be a powerful weapon in the hands of a terrorist—but it can also provide intelligence services with the tools to track them down.

9h

 

Cathay says 'most intense' period of data breach lasted months

The world's biggest airline data breach, affecting millions of Cathay Pacific customers, was the result of a sustained cyber attack that lasted for three months, the carrier admitted, while insisting it was on alert for further intrusions.

9h

 

Amazon picks New York, suburban Washington for new, split HQ: WSJAmazon NYC Virginia

Amazon has decided to split its new headquarters between New York City and a Washington suburb in Northern Virginia, The Wall Street Journal reported Monday night.

9h

 

Shrinking Sea of Galilee has some hoping for a miracle

It was not so long ago when swimmers at Ein Gev would lay out their towels in the grass at the edge of the Sea of Galilee.

10h

 

Internet traffic hijack disrupts Google servicesGoogle China Russia

An internet traffic diversion rerouted data through Russia and China and disrupted Google services on Monday, including search, cloud-hosting services and its bundle of collaboration tools for businesses.

10h

 

Bayer confirms forecasts as Monsanto integration grinds on

German chemicals and pharmaceuticals giant Bayer confirmed its full-year forecasts Tuesday, after a solid performance in the firm's first full quarter of integrating US seeds and pesticides maker Monsanto.

10h

 

Kropssensorer og kunstig intelligens skal redde risikopatienter

For mange alvorlige komplikationer efter større operationer får læger og forskere til at udvikle trådløst overvågningssystem, som holder øje med risikopatienter døgnet rundt.

10h

 

The first cave-dwelling centipede from southern China

Chinese scientists recorded the first cave-dwelling centipede known so far from southern China. To the amazement of the team, the specimens collected during a survey in the Gaofeng village, Guizhou Province, did not only represent a species that had been successfully hiding away from biologists in the subterranean darkness, but it also turned out to be the very first amongst the order of stone cen

10h

 

How to avoid losing your memory in the digital age

With Google taking the place of memory, many worry that a vital faculty is eroding. Can memory athletes – who can retain hundreds of numbers in seconds – show us how to get it back? Alex Mullen has an extraordinary talent: after just 16 seconds of flicking through a pack of cards, he can recall their exact order. The 26-year-old medical student began using memory techniques to help with his univer

10h

 

Udbrændte læger skal have flammen tændt igen

En tredjedel af alle praktiserende læger er udbrændte. Det skal afhjælpes ved et større fokus på at italesætte arbejdspresset, og så skal politikerne leve op til sit ansvar, mener praktiserende læge Flemming Bro.

10h

 

Seksualitet er fortsat et tovejstabu i almen praksis

De praktiserende læger skal blive bedre til at skabe naturlighed omkring at snakke om seksualitet med patienterne, mener praktiserende læge.

10h

 

Se liste med uretfærdig, manipulerende eller overvågende kunstig intelligens

Awful AI – frygtelig kunstig intelligens – er en liste over uhyggelige måder, kunstig intelligens bruges på i dag. Forfatteren håber på at skabe opmærksomhed om misbrug af kunstig intelligens.

10h

 

No 'flushable' wet wipes tested so far pass water industry tests

They say wet wipes don't break down and so cause sewage blockages which cost millions to put right.

11h

 

Sprøjtegift forvandler bier til asociale, dårlige forældre

Verdens mest anvendte insektgifte har vist sig at have endnu en skadelig effekt på de i forvejen nødlidende bier.

12h

 

Angiotensin receptor blockers normalize sodium excretion

Drugs that inhibit a hormone that constricts blood vessels also help improve sodium excretion in blacks who hold onto too much sodium in the face of stress, investigators report.

12h

 

The first cave-dwelling centipede from southern China

Chinese scientists report the first cave-dwelling centipede so far known from southern China. Collected last year during a survey in Gaofeng village, Guizhou Province, the species turned out to not only had been successfully hiding away from biologists in the subterranean darkness, but that it also represented the first in its whole order to be discovered underground in the country. It is describe

12h

 

New transgenic rat model may enable better understanding of amyloid buildup in cerebral blood vessels

In a report in The American Journal of Pathology investigators describe the generation of a successful novel transgenic rat model that accumulates amyloid specifically in brain blood vessels and strongly mimics many of the associated detrimental changes that are observed in humans – a condition known as cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA), which is also commonly observed in Alzheimer disease.

12h

 

Being overweight likely to cause depression, even without health complications

A largescale genomic analysis has found the strongest evidence yet that being overweight causes depression, even in the absence of other health problems.

12h

 

Suicide risk increases in teens who knew murder victims

Nearly half of black teenagers surveyed in Allegheny County report losing a friend or family member to murder, a disproportionately stark statistic that is associated with suicide attempts and other negative childhood experiences.

12h

 

Genetic link between obesity and depression uncovered, say scientists

Having genetic variants linked to high BMI can lead to mental health issues, study finds Being overweight can cause depression, researchers say, with the effects thought to be largely psychological. While previous studies have found that people who are obese are more likely to have depression, it has been unclear whether that is down to depression driving weight changes or the reverse. Continue r

12h

 

Lokal vejrstation kan mindske brugen af pesticider på marken

De foreløbige erfaringer med lokale vejrdata tyder på, at den nye teknologi kan få stor betydning for fremtidens markdrift, mener Sønderjysk Landboforening.

13h

 

New framework pushes the limits of high-performance computing

Researchers found a way to give high-performance computing data systems the flexibility to thrive with a first-of-its-kind framework called BespoKV, perhaps helping to one day achieve the HPC goal of performing at the exascale, or a billion billion calculations per second.

13h

 

Escape responses of coral reef fish obey simple behavioral rules

The escape response to evade perceived threats is a fundamental behavior seen throughout the animal kingdom, and laboratory studies have identified specialized neural circuits that control this behavior. To understand how these neural circuits operate in complex natural settings, researchers recorded and analyzed escape responses in wild coral reef fish. Their results show how a sequence of well-d

13h

 

Primates of the Caribbean: Ancient DNA reveals history of mystery monkey

Analysis of ancient DNA of a mysterious extinct monkey named Xenothrix — which displays bizarre body characteristics very different to any living monkey — has revealed that it was in fact most closely related to South America's titi monkeys (Callicebinae). Having made their way overwater to Jamaica, probably on floating vegetation, their bones reveal they subsequently underwent remarkable evolut

13h

 

Can Marine One Fly in the Rain?

Why, exactly, did Donald Trump not join Emmanuel Macron, Angela Merkel, and Justin Trudeau at Saturday’s commemoration of the 100th anniversary of the original Armistice Day? I don’t know, and I don’t think anyone outside the White House does at this point. What I do know is that one hypothesis that has shown up in many stories about his no-show—that Marine One, the presidential helicopter, “can’

14h

 

Insufficient sleep in children is associated with poor diet, obesity and more screen time

A new study conducted among more than 177,000 students suggests that insufficient sleep duration is associated with an unhealthy lifestyle profile among children and adolescents.

14h

 

Small molecules: From beaker to solved 3D structure in minutes

A new method for learning the structures of small molecules, such as hormones, is 'like science fiction.'

14h

 

Modelling reveals dynamics of climate change, urbanization and heat-mitigating technologies

Researchers have completed some of the most sophisticated modeling of the effects of climate change and urban centers in the US, and are finding that some of today's proposed solutions will provide only a fraction of relief from the projected heat.

16h

 

Study opens route to ultra-low-power microchips

Researchers have developed a new way of controlling magnetism in materials, which could lead to new low-power technologies for memory, computing, and sensing devices.

16h

 

Alpine ice shows three-fold increase in atmospheric iodine

Analysis of iodine trapped in Alpine ice has shown that levels of atmospheric iodine have tripled over the past century, which partially offsets human-driven increases in the air pollutant, ozone.

16h

 

Fish's brain size influenced by habitat

This is the first known study to connect habitat with varying brain size in a single lake fish population. The finding may provide clues about how fish and other creatures will respond to mounting environmental stressors from pollution to climate change. Researchers say bigger brains contain more neurons, and more connections among them, that lend its owner cognitive and behavioral smarts that may

16h

 

Badger culling has 'modest' effect in cutting cattle TB

An independent scientific review says badger culling can have a modest effect in reducing cattle TB.

16h

 

Join us for the November Marathon!

It’s on! Whether it’s your very first or you’ve been doing them each month for years, a marathon is always a very special time. Start warming up to play the wonderful little cell(s) we’ve prepped just for you! Starting at 8 PM EST on 11/14 you’ll have 24 hours to grow and complete 1-2 cells! Bonus points and cell renaming guidelines are detailed in your competition notification on eyewire.org. If

16h

 

The US Didn’t Sign the Paris Call for Trust and Security in Cyberspace

Corporations have taken the lead over nations on governing the internet: The initiative might not have counted the US as a signatory, but did include Microsoft, Facebook, Google, and others.

17h

 

Nitrogen fixation in ambient conditions

Scientists have developed a uranium-based complex that allows nitrogen fixation reactions to take place in ambient conditions. The work lays the foundation to develop new processes for synthesizing nitrogen products like cyanamide.

17h

 

Planetary boundaries for antibiotic and pesticide resistance identified

Researchers have now published the first estimates of antibiotic and pesticide 'planetary boundaries.' The researchers suggest that if resistance to antibiotics and pesticides goes beyond these boundaries, societies risk large-scale health and agricultural crises. The results indicate one group of bacteria has passed a boundary.

17h

 

New strategy discovered toward possible prevention of cancers tied to mono

Researchers have discovered a possible path forward in preventing the development of cancers tied to two viruses, including the virus that causes infectious mononucleosis — more commonly known as mono or the 'kissing disease' — that infects millions of people around the globe each year.

17h

 

'Strongest evidence yet' that being obese causes depression

New research has found the strongest evidence yet that obesity causes depression, even in the absence of other health problems.

17h

 

The Atlantic Daily: On the Edge of a Sword

What We’re Following ‘Camp Fire’: “Forest fires might be seen as the particularly horrific edge of a sword that is coming for us all,” writes Robinson Meyer on the two massive wildfires—the Camp and Woolsey fires—that have devastated communities in both the northern and southern parts of California. These conditions suggest the worst is yet to come. On Veterans Day: President Donald Trump’s Paris

17h

 

Clean Energy Is Surging, but Not Fast Enough to Solve Global Warming

The International Energy Agency said renewables were poised to surpass coal by 2040. But more is still needed to stop climate change.

17h

 

Scientists invent method to extract gold from liquid waste

Even though we think of it as exceedingly rare, gold can be found all around us. The trouble is, most of the gold is hard to get at; its too diluted in our waste or ocean waters to effectively extract. This new technique quickly, easily, and reliably extracts gold from most liquids. None Even though the thought of gold calls to mind incredible wealth hidden underground or horded away in Fort Knox

17h

 

This 5-minute neck scan can spot dementia 10 years before it emerges

The study measured the stiffness of blood vessels in middle-aged patients over time. Stiff blood vessels can lead to the destruction of delicate blood vessels in the brain, which can contribute to cognitive decline. The scans could someday become a widely used tool to identify people at high risk of developing dementia and Alzheimer's. None A five-minute scan could soon be used to predict the ons

17h

 

Stand up straight! Scientists have found 'posture' cells

Increasingly bad posture is being seen due to phone usage and other bad habits. Researchers have discovered "posture cells" that can be isolated from movement. This could have a profound effect on our understanding of body schema. None "Sit up straight" is a command you likely grew up hearing from disgruntled parents ignorant of how child bodies could slouch at such obtuse angles. This directive

17h

 

Study: young men obsessed with building muscles have higher mental health risks

Body dysmorphia is not limited to women, a new study from Norway and Cambridge shows. Young men that focus on building muscle are at risk for a host of mental and physical health problems. Selfie culture is not helping the growing number of teens that are anxious and depressed. None Self-obsession comes at a heavy cost. A recent study published in Open Psychology Journal notes that excessive self

17h

 

How Air Astana Pilots Landed a ‘Completely Uncontrollable’ Jet

When the pilots of Flight 1388 lost control of their Embraer 190, they spent a scary two hours in the air over Portugal before making it down safely.

17h

 

Drug matched to patients according to tumour gene testing shows signs of being effective

Treatment with capivasertib, a drug designed to work against a particular gene mutation found in some tumours, shows signs of being effective in a trial of 35 patients presented at the 30th EORTC-NCI-AACR Symposium on Molecular Targets and Cancer Therapeutics in Dublin, Ireland.

17h

 

Stan Lee, Marvel co-creator, is dead at 95Stan Lee Marvel Spider-Man

Lee died shortly after being rushed to an L.A. hospital. He had been struggling with multiple illnesses over the past year, reports indicate. Since the 1950s, Lee has been one of the most influential figures in comics, helping to popularize heroes that expressed a level of nuance and self-doubt previously unseen in the industry. Lee, who's later years were marked by some financial and legal tumul

17h

 

Israel plans to ban sale of new gas, diesel vehicles in 2030

The legislation is expected to pass by the end of 2018. The move is inspired partly by Israel's recent discovery of several large deposits of natural gas. It's one of the latest developments in Israel's broader plan to wean itself off other more destructive fossil fuels. Israel plans to ban the sale of new gas and diesel cars in 2030, and to replace them with cars powered by electricity or compre

17h

 

What happens when you learn how much your coworkers make?

The debate on whether to be transparent about our salaries has been going on for decades. New research shows that depending on whether we share our salaries vertically (from boss to employee) or horizontally (between equal peers), we can expect different effects in our productivity and motivation. Millennials are more likely to share salary information than previous generations. What effect will

17h

 

In one coal state, renewable energy is set to win by 2028

Where politicians fail, economic realities mean renewables are far less expensive: A savings of $4 billion over the next 30 years Indiana is 7th in coal production and 3rd in consumption; this is due to change rapidly The big winners? Solar and wind energies $4 billion savings and a reduction in carbon monoxide? OK. Indiana is a state ranked #7 in coal production and #3 in coal consumption across

17h

 

RIP Stan Lee, the Man Who Made Comics Cool

The avuncular, controversial longtime writer and publisher of Marvel Comics dies in Los Angeles.

17h

 

Growing demand for oil will lead to shortage and high prices in 2020s

Even if governments step up action on energy, fossil fuel consumption will keep growing for at least another 20 years according to a major new report

17h

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