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Why Amazon’s HQ2 Search Backfired

Amazon’s year-long pursuit of new office space highlighted just how much billion-dollar companies can get from taxpayers.

30min

The outer solar system awaits—but getting there may not be as easy as we’d like

Space We're under a time crunch. A new decade is just over a year away, and with it comes a whole new slate of NASA mission ideas, some near—like Mars—and others far.

43min

A 15-minute scan could help diagnose brain damage in newborns

A 15-minute scan could help diagnose brain damage in babies up to two years earlier than current methods.

17min

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Older people are more likely to have an inappropriate prescription after hospitalization

A new study has found that older patients who were hospitalised were 72 percent more likely to be given a potentially inappropriate prescription after their hospital admission, independent of other patient factors.

17min

London's low emission zone improved air quality but no major benefit to child lung health

Peer-reviewed / Observational study / PeopleLow emission zones are now in place in 200 cities across Europe, but London findings suggest that interventions that deliver larger reductions in emissions may be needed

17min

Study of 2,000 children suggests London air pollution is restricting lung development

Children exposed to diesel-dominated air pollution in London are showing poor lung capacity, putting them at risk of lifelong breathing disorders, according to a study led by Queen Mary University of London, King's College London & University of Edinburgh

17min

Half of older patients exposed to potentially inappropriate prescribing

Around half of older patients are exposed to potentially inappropriate prescribing, each year, and hospitalisation is independently associated with an increased risk, finds a study in Ireland published by The BMJ today.

17min

Certain diabetes drugs linked to increased risk of lower limb amputation

Use of sodium glucose cotransporter 2 (SGLT2) inhibitors to treat type 2 diabetes is associated with an increased risk of lower limb amputation and diabetic ketoacidosis (a serious diabetes complication) compared with another group of drugs called glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP1) receptor agonists, finds a study in The BMJ today.

17min

Competition for shrinking groundwater

Groundwater, which has been used to irrigate crops, satiate livestock and quench thirst in general for thousands of years, continues to be a vital resource around the world.

1h

Houston's urban sprawl increased rainfall, flooding during Hurricane HarveyHouston Hurricane Harvey

Researchers found that Houston's urban landscape directly contributed to the torrential rainfall and deadly flooding of Hurricane Harvey in 2017. Houston's risk for extreme flooding was 21 times greater due to urbanization. The results highlight the human role in extreme weather events and the need to consider urban and suburban development when calculating hurricane risk.

1h

Epoxy compound gets a graphene bump

Researchers combine epoxy with a tough graphene foam and carbon nanotube scaffold to build a resilient composite that's tougher and as conductive as other compounds but as light as pure epoxy.

1h

The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: Wing Leaders

Written by Elaine Godfrey ( @elainejgodfrey ) and Olivia Paschal ( @oliviacpaschal ) Today in 5 Lines House Republicans elected Representative Kevin McCarthy as minority leader. Senators Mitch McConnell and Chuck Schumer were each reelected to their respective positions as Senate majority leader and minority leader. House Democrats will vote for Speaker of the House later this month. The Trump ad

1h

House Republicans Still Can’t Get Along

Old habits die hard. As House Republicans settle into their new status in the minority—a post in which members typically unify to obstruct policy proposals from the majority—intraparty tensions remain as strong as ever, and could spell trouble for the GOP’s efforts to reclaim the chamber sooner rather than later. In a conference-wide election on Wednesday, Republicans anointed their leaders for t

1h

Deep-time evolution of animal life on islands

A new article describes two new fossil relatives of marsupials that shed light on how a unique island ecosystem evolved some 43 million years ago during the Eocene.

1h

First tally of US-Russia polar bears finds a healthy population

The first scientific assessment of polar bears that live in the Chukchi Sea region that spans the US and Russia finds the population is healthy and does not yet appear to be suffering from declining sea ice.

1h

Space Forecast: Dark Matter Hurricane Sweeps Through the Solar System

Space Forecast: Dark Matter Hurricane Sweeps Through the Solar System Mysterious dark matter particles may be blowing past Earth at 1.8 million kilometers per hour. MilkyWay.jpg The Milky Way Image credits: McCarthy's PhotoWorks/ Shutterstock Space Wednesday, November 14, 2018 – 16:45 Charles Q. Choi, Contributor (Inside Science) — A dark matter hurricane may be blowing through the solar system

1h

Massive impact crater from a kilometer-wide iron meteorite discovered in GreenlandImpact Crater Greenland

An international team has discovered a 31-km wide meteorite impact crater buried beneath the ice-sheet in the northern Greenland. This is the first time that a crater of any size has been found under one of Earth's continental ice sheets.

1h

Late Miocene ape maxilla (upper jaw) discovered in western India

An ape maxilla (upper jaw) from the Late Miocene found in the Kutch basin, in western India, significantly extends the southern range of ancient apes in the Indian Peninsula, according to a new study.

1h

How we use music as a possible sleep aid

Many individuals use music in the hope that it fights sleep difficulties, according to a new study.

1h

Parents shouldn't worry if their infant doesn't sleep through the night by a year old

The authors of a study found that a large percentage of healthy babies don't start sleeping through the night even at a year old. The research team also examined whether infants who didn't sleep for six or eight consecutive hours were more likely to have problems with psychomotor and mental development, and found no association. The researchers also found no correlation between infants waking up a

1h

Symbiosis a driver of truffle diversity

Truffles are the fruiting bodies of the ectomycorrhizal (ECM) fungal symbionts residing on host plant roots. In many Ascomycota and Basidiomycota lineages, truffle-forming species have evolved independently in nearly every major group. This suggests that symbiosis drives evolution of truffle diversity and selects for specific traits.

1h

For arid, Mars-like Peruvian desert, rain brings death

When rains fell on the arid Atacama Desert, it was reasonable to expect floral blooms to follow. Instead, the water brought death. Planetary astrobiologists has found that after encountering never-before-seen rainfall three years ago at the arid core of Peru's Atacama Desert, the heavy precipitation wiped out most of the microbes that had lived there.

1h

Are You a Menace to Public Health?

With all the problems plaguing America today, it can be difficult to prioritize which to address. But just because a problem may not be headline-worthy doesn’t mean it isn’t a problem. Take gas-powered leaf blowers, for example. In a new Atlantic Argument , writer James Fallows advocates for phasing out the machines—which emit noise up to a dangerous 112 decibels—in favor of quieter and safer bat

1h

Do Not Fear the Dark Matter Hurricane (The Dark Matter Hurricane Is Good)

Scientists think there's a 'dark matter hurricane' coming, but it's definitely not going to kill you. It's actually kind of exciting.

2h

What Are CT Scans and How Do They Work?

A computed tomography (CT) scan is a quick and painless way to diagnose an injury, abnormality or disease.

2h

A dark matter hurricane is crashing into Earth

A stream of galactic debris is hurtling at us, pulling dark matter along with it It's traveling so quickly it's been described as a hurricane of dark matter Scientists are excited to set their particle detectors at the onslffaught Technically, "S1" is a stream of debris from a dwarf galaxy torn apart by the Milky Way's gravity, passing through space. What S1 is pulling along with it, though, is b

2h

Natural solutions can reduce global warming

A new study found that 21 percentof the United States' greenhouse gas pollution (1.2 Pg CO2e year) could be removed through enhanced management of forest, grassland, agricultural, and coastal areas. An offset at this level would be the equivalent to pollution from every single US car and truck on the road.

2h

There Is No Progressive Majority in America

As the mail-in votes are counted and the recounts finished, the Democratic advantage in the 2018 elections grows and grows. In the House, the biggest swing to the Democrats since Watergate on the strength of a 7 percent advantage in total votes cast. In the Senate, Republican gains capped at perhaps two instead of the election-night projection of four. Large pickups in state legislatures, in ways

2h

Newly Uncovered Greek City May Be Legendary Home of 'Trojan War' Prisoners

The ancient city dates back to between 300 B.C. and A.D. 400.

2h

Climate Change Made Recent Hurricanes Wetter. And They May Get Worse.

Rainfall in some of the biggest storms in recent years was fueled by climate change.

2h

The Earth Is Eating Its Own Oceans

A new study raises questions about the water cycle of the deep Earth.

2h

15 practical gifts for your photographer friends

Gift Guides Let us help you do better than that camera lens shaped coffee mug. Take the stress out of shopping for your photo friends. Let us help you do better than that camera lens shaped coffee mug.

2h

Treatment for canine leishmaniasis exists in Brazilian vaccine

A vaccine used to prevent dogs from contracting the deadly, parasitic disease canine leishmaniasis also can be used to treat currently infected dogs, found Morris Animal Foundation-funded researchers at the University of Iowa, providing a new avenue of treatment for millions of infected dogs globally.

2h

Parents, kids actually agree about confidential medical care

Parents and their adolescent children actually agree with each other about preventive care and confidential medical services, except for abortion. Doctors, however, disagree.

2h

A world without brick-and-mortar stores? Even avid online shoppers say, 'no, thanks'

The majority of consumers, even those who prefer online shopping, think the extinction of brick-and-mortar stores would be bad for society, according to a new University of Arizona-led study that explores consumers' perceptions of today's transforming retail environment.

2h

Trilobites: Ice Age Asteroid Crater Discovered Beneath Greenland GlacierImpact Crater Greenland

It is the first impact crater discovered under one of Earth’s ice sheets, according to the scientists who found it.

2h

Dorothy Cheney, Who Studied Primates Up Close, Dies at 68

Her research with her husband, Robert Seyfarth, found that baboons and vervet monkeys had more complex social relationships than previously thought.

2h

Heavy rain brought death to arid Atacama Desert

When never-before-seen rains fell on the arid Atacama Desert three years ago, it was reasonable to expect floral blooms to follow. Instead, it wiped out most of the microbes that lived there, according to a new study. Researchers say the findings, which appear in Scientific Reports , have implications for the biology on Mars. “When the rains came to the Atacama, we were hoping for majestic blooms

2h

Next-gen batteries possible with new engineering approach

Dramatically longer-lasting, faster-charging and safer lithium metal batteries may be possible, according to Penn State research, recently published in Nature Energy.

2h

Migraines that affect vision may increase risk of irregular heartbeat

People who experience migraine with visual aura may have an increased risk of an irregular heartbeat called atrial fibrillation, according to a study published in the Nov. 14, 2018, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

2h

NASA Learns More About Interstellar Visitor 'Oumuamua

In November 2017, scientists pointed NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope toward the object known as 'Oumuamua—the first known interstellar object to visit our solar system. The infrared Spitzer was one of many telescopes pointed at 'Oumuamua in the weeks after its discovery that October.

2h

Oceans are losing a football field of seagrass every 30 minutes

Nexus Media News And with it, a vital tool for cleaning up heat-trapping carbon pollution. Seagrass is a natural carbon sink—and it's disappearing at an alarming rate.

2h

Parkinson's Patient Transplanted with Neurons Derived from iPSCs

This is the first time researchers have tested the use of the reprogrammed stem cells in the human brain.

2h

Our neurons explain why we live so long

How long humans and other warm-blooded animals live—and when they reach sexual maturity—may have more to do with their brain than their body, according to a new study. More specifically, it’s not animals with larger bodies or slower metabolic rates that live longer; it’s animals with more neurons in the cerebral cortex, whatever the body size. “Whether you’re looking at birds or primates or human

2h

Parents shouldn't worry if their infant doesn't sleep through the night by a year old

Authors of a study found that a large percentage of healthy babies don't start sleeping through the night even at a year old. The McGill-led research team also examined whether infants who didn't sleep for six or eight consecutive hours were more likely to have problems with psychomotor and mental development, and found no association. The researchers also found no correlation between infants waki

2h

Kim Kardashian's Private Firefighters Expose America’s Fault Lines

As multiple devastating wildfires raged across California, a private firefighting crew reportedly helped save Kanye West and Kim Kardashian’s home in Calabasas, TMZ reported this week. The successful defense of the $50 million mansion is the most prominent example of a trend that’s begun to receive national attention : for-hire firefighters protecting homes, usually on the payroll of an insurance

2h

Human Activities Are Making Hurricanes Worse: Study

Anthropogenic climate change and urbanization appear to boost rainfall and exacerbate flooding risks, according to two Nature papers.

2h

3h

Breeding corn for water-use efficiency may have just gotten easier

With approximately 80 percent of our nation's water supply going towards agriculture, it's fair to say it takes a lot of water to grow crops. In a climate with less predictable rainfall patterns and more intense droughts, scientists at the University of Illinois are working to reduce water consumption by developing more efficient crops.

3h

Researchers discover novel 'to divide or to differentiate' switch in plants

Scientists have uncovered a novel mechanism in plants that controls an important decision step in stomatal lineage to divide asymmetrically or to differentiate. This is a decisive step for the formation of stomata, tiny pores on the plant surface, produced by asymmetric cell division.

3h

Climate control of Earth's critical zone

New research by geoscientists shines a light on this hidden world from ridgetops to valley floors and shows how rainfall shapes the part of our planet that is just beyond where we can see.

3h

UTA awarded patent for lubricant composition for universal grease for aircraft

The University of Texas at Arlington has been awarded a patent for a lubricant composition that can be used as a universal grease for aircraft.

3h

EU to curb phone costs, set up emergency alert system

The European Parliament voted Wednesday to limit prices for phone calls and text messages between EU countries and to set up an alert system during natural disasters or terror attacks.

3h

Scores protest against new Amazon HQ in Queens, NY

Around 100 people on Wednesday protested against Amazon's impending arrival in New York's borough of Queens, condemning $3 billion in tax breaks and incentives, and worried ordinary families will be pushed out by gentrification.

3h

Study: Neanderthals faced risks, but so did our ancestors

Life as a Neanderthal was no picnic, but a new analysis says it was no more dangerous than what our own species faced in ancient times.

3h

Maybe Neanderthals Weren't Quite So Nasty And Brutish

New research finds they sustained skull injuries at about the same rate as early modern humans. "I definitely think that it's evidence these guys were not beating each other up," one expert says. (Image credit: Gleiver Prieto & Katerina Harvati)

3h

Cities Can Alter Hurricanes, Intensifying Their Rainfall

Study shows Houston’s urban landscape may have physically changed Hurricane Harvey’s structure — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

3h

The Ubiquity of Smartphones, as Captured by Photographers

According to reports issued by several market-research firms, including Forrester Research , the total number of smartphone users worldwide will reach 3 billion this year—40 percent of the human population. For many, these versatile handheld devices have become indispensable tools, providing connections to loved ones, entertainment, business applications, shopping opportunities, windows into the

3h

Study of two tribes sheds light on role of Western-influenced diet in blood pressure

A South American tribe living in near-total isolation with no Western dietary influences showed no increase in average blood pressure from age one to age 60, according to a study led by researchers at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. In comparison, a nearby tribe whose diet includes some processed foods and salt did show higher blood pressure into late middle age.

3h

Ohio University study: Fear leads people to think donating blood will make others faint

A new study showed that people who are afraid to have their blood drawn believe more people faint or have other symptoms than what statistics show actually occurs.

3h

'Hopeful technology' could change detection, diagnosis of deadly ovarian cancer

Ovarian cancer claims the lives of more than 14,000 women in the U.S. each year, ranking fifth among cancer deaths in women. A multidisciplinary team at Washington University has found an innovative way to use sound and light to diagnose ovarian tumors, which may lead to a promising new diagnostic imaging technique to improve current standard of care.

3h

Spanish Amazon workers plan 'Black Friday' strike: union

Workers at Amazon's biggest logistics centre in Spain are planning to strike for eight days in November, December and January, including on the online retailer's "Black Friday" sales bonanza, a union said Wednesday.

3h

Recommending plants to benefit and attract pollinators

A survey was conducted by the University of Nebraska to unveil the extent to which horticultural employees are knowledgeable about pollinators. Carter Westerhold, Samuel Wortman, Kim Todd, and Douglas Golick sought to determine what plant and management recommendations these employees were passing along to customers regarding pollinator conservation and to assess what other advice could be added t

3h

Competition for shrinking groundwater

Groundwater, which has been used to irrigate crops, satiate livestock and quench thirst in general for thousands of years, continues to be a vital resource around the world.

3h

Greenland ice sheet hides huge 'impact crater'Impact Crater Greenland

Scientists find evidence that an iron asteroid slammed into the Earth deep inside the Arctic Circle.

3h

AmazonBasics Microwave Review: It's a Little Undercooked

Amazon's voice assistant can do many things. Just don't ask it to defrost sausage.

3h

First tally of US-Russia polar bears finds a healthy population

Not all polar bears are in the same dire situation due to retreating sea ice, at least not right now. Off the western coast of Alaska, the Chukchi Sea is rich in marine life, but the number of polar bears in the area had never been counted. The first formal study of this population suggests that it's been healthy and relatively abundant in recent years, numbering about 3,000 animals.

3h

For arid, Mars-like Peruvian desert, rain brings death

When rains fell on the arid Atacama Desert, it was reasonable to expect floral blooms to follow. Instead, the water brought death.

3h

A new approach to detecting cancer earlier from blood tests

Cancer scientists have combined 'liquid biopsy,' epigenetic alterations and machine learning to develop a blood test to detect and classify cancer at its earliest stages.

3h

Researchers discover molecular mechanisms of an African folk medicine

Researchers in the Department of Physiology & Biophysics at the University of California, Irvine School of Medicine have discovered the molecular basis for therapeutic actions of an African folk medicine used to treat a variety of illnesses and disorders including diabetes, pain, headaches, paralysis and epilepsy.

3h

Britain Is Rushing to Seal a Brexit Deal Few Support

LONDON—With less than 140 days left before Britain leaves the European Union, negotiators have reached a provisional Brexit deal. The agreement, which was backed by U.K. Prime Minister Theresa May’s cabinet on Wednesday, marks a breakthrough in often fractious talks, and could offer businesses, officials, and private citizens a sorely-needed roadmap on what life looks like for Britain outside the

3h

Breeding corn for water-use efficiency may have just gotten easier

With approximately 80 percent of our nation's water supply going towards agriculture, it's fair to say it takes a lot of water to grow crops. In a climate with less predictable rainfall patterns and more intense droughts, scientists at the University of Illinois are working to reduce water consumption by developing more efficient crops.

3h

Victims of gun violence tell their stories: Everyday violence, 'feelings of hopelessness'

Invited to share their personal stories, victims of urban gun violence describe living with violence as a 'common everyday experience' and feeling abandoned by police and other societal institutions, reports a study in the November/December Journal of Trauma Nursing, official publication of the Society of Trauma Nurses. The journal is published in the Lippincott portfolio by Wolters Kluwer.

3h

Huge 30-kilometre wide meteorite crater found under Greenland glacier

Radar surveys have revealed a crater left when a kilometre-wide asteroid hit Greenland – and the impact could explain a climate mystery

3h

Tony’s Huge Lead Over Parker | Gold Rush

Six weeks into the season, Tony is already 500 ounces ahead of Parker. Stream Full Episodes of Gold Rush: https://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/gold-rush/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/GoldRush/ https://www.facebook.com/Discovery Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/Gold_Rush https://twitter.com/Discovery We're on Instagra

3h

Symbiosis a driver of truffle diversity

While the sight of black or white truffle being shaved over on pasta is generally considered a sign of dining extravagance, they play an important role in soil ecosystem services. Truffles are the fruiting bodies of the ectomycorrhizal (ECM) fungal symbionts residing on host plant roots. In many Ascomycota and Basidiomycota lineages, truffle-forming species have evolved independently in nearly eve

3h

Snapchat parent hands over data for US inquiry

Snapchat's parent company Snap said Wednesday US officials are looking into how forthright the company was with aspiring investors prior to its stock market debut last year.

3h

Tropical trees in the Andes are moving up — toward extinction

In the most comprehensive study of its kind, biologists have found that tropical and subtropical forests across South America's Andes Mountains are responding to warming temperatures by migrating to higher, cooler elevations, but probably not quickly enough to avoid the loss of their biodiversity, functional collapse, or even extinction.

3h

Climate simulations project wetter, windier hurricanesHouston Hurricane Harvey

New supercomputer simulations by climate scientists have shown that climate change intensified the amount of rainfall in recent hurricanes such as Katrina, Irma, and Maria by 5 to 10 percent. They further found that if those hurricanes were to occur in a future world that is warmer than present, those storms would have even more rainfall and stronger winds.

3h

Large areas of the Brazilian rainforest at risk of losing protection

Up to 15 million hectares of the Brazilian Amazon is at risk of losing its legal protection, according to a new study.

3h

Seismic study reveals huge amount of water dragged into Earth's interior

Slow-motion collisions of tectonic plates under the ocean drag about three times more water down into the deep Earth than previously estimated, according to a first-of-its-kind seismic study that spans the Mariana Trench.

3h

Russian reporters discover 101 'tortured' whales jammed in offshore pens

Russian news network discovers 101 black-market whales. Orcas and belugas are seen crammed into tiny pens. Marine parks continue to create a high-price demand for illegal captures. It's like a scene from a Hollywood thriller: Armed guards hired by some shady organization keeping watch dockside over ill-gotten goods. Except, in this case, the goods are alive. About 100 orca and beluga whales jamme

3h

A Surprise Discovery Around a Lonely Star

In the 1960s, the astronomer Peter van de Kamp announced that he had discovered a planet orbiting Barnard’s star, one of the nearest stars to Earth at just six light-years away. It was, at the time, the first credible claim of an exoplanet—a planet outside our solar system—and it riveted the astronomy community . The thought of another planetary neighborhood so close to our own fueled science-fic

3h

Researchers identify a mechanism that fuels cancer cells' growth

The study, led by UCLA professors Claudio Scafoglio and David Shackelford, suggests that a biomarker can help scientists detect lung cancer earlier, when it is much easier to treat.

3h

A frozen super-Earth is just six light years away

Space It's close, but you won't want to visit. The new exoplanet is orbiting Barnard’s star, the second closest neighboring star system to Earth.

4h

Research on imaging in radiation oncology featured in Red Journal special issue

A new special edition of the International Journal of Radiation Oncology* Biology* Physics (Red Journal) focuses on the roles of imaging in radiation oncology. The collection explores topics such as improving accuracy with patient positioning, defining radiation therapy volumes using imaging, imaging of functional biomarkers, the role of imaging in post-treatment care, machine learning and artific

4h

Part of the Answer to Climate Change May Be America’s Trees and Dirt, Scientists Say

A new study found that the United States could store enough carbon in natural landscapes to offset all the cars and trucks on the road.

4h

Trilobites: Ancient Cycle of Italy’s Giant Volcano Seems to End in a Large Eruption

Campi Flegrei has been curiously eruption-free since 1538. New research unspooled 60,000 years of its history with an eye on what it will do in the future.

4h

Naomi Breslau, Who Studied Post-Traumatic Stress, Dies at 86

She also investigated links between various disorders, like depression and smoking, and suggested that migraines could cause mental problems — and vice versa.

4h

A Solar Storm Detonated U.S. Navy Mines During the Vietnam War

Inclement space weather caused dozens of the sea bombs to explode, recently declassified documents reveal — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

4h

Cars without drivers still need a moral compass. But what kind? | David Edmonds

Humans will soon subcontract their ethical dilemmas to machines. We must be prepared to make some tough choices Loved by some philosophers, loathed by others, the so-called trolley problem is the quintessential moral puzzle. A runaway train is heading towards five people tied to a track. You can change a signal, diverting the train down a spur, so saving five lives. Unfortunately, one person is on

4h

Russian reporters discover 101 'tortured' whales jammed in offshore pens

Russian news network discovers 101 black-market whales. Orcas and belugas are seen crammed into tiny pens. Marine parks continue to create a high-price demand for illegal captures. It's like a scene from a Hollywood thriller: Armed guards hired by some shady organization keeping watch dockside over ill-gotten goods. Except, in this case, the goods are alive. About 100 orca and beluga whales jamme

4h

‘pClick’ upgrades antibodies with drug add-ons

Scientists have found a simple method to attach drugs or other substances to antibodies, the powerful proteins that are central to the body’s immune system. The technique, called pClick, uses a cross-linker that snaps to a specific site on antibodies and serves as a bridge to therapeutic molecules or nanomaterials without the need to re-engineer the antibody with harmful chemicals, enzymes, or ul

4h

Competition for shrinking groundwater

Groundwater, which has been used to irrigate crops, satiate livestock and quench thirst in general for thousands of years, continues to be a vital resource around the world.

4h

First tally of US-Russia polar bears finds a healthy population

The first scientific assessment of polar bears that live in the Chukchi Sea region that spans the US and Russia finds the population is healthy and does not yet appear to be suffering from declining sea ice.

4h

UCI researchers discover molecular mechanisms of an African folk medicine

Researchers in the Department of Physiology & Biophysics at the University of California, Irvine School of Medicine have discovered the molecular basis for therapeutic actions of an African folk medicine used to treat a variety of illnesses and disorders including diabetes, pain, headaches, paralysis and epilepsy.

4h

Natural solutions reduce global warming: Clark University + The Nature Conservancy

Christopher A. Williams, associate professor in Clark University's Graduate School of Geography and postdoctoral research scientist Huan Gu, Ph.D., worked with The Nature Conservancy and close to two dozen institutional partners on 'Natural Climate Solutions for the United States,' published today in Science Advances. The new study highlights natural solutions in the United States that offer the m

4h

Helping an oral diabetes drug go the extra mile

Stephen Buckley and colleagues have reformulated a prospective therapy for type 2 diabetes (T2D) now under clinical investigation as an oral treatment.

4h

The first impact crater found underneath the Greenland ice sheet

A 31-kilometer-wide impact crater underneath about a kilometer of the Hiawatha Glacier's ice is the first of its kind to be discovered in northwest Greenland, scientists report.

4h

New US study reveals natural solutions can reduce global warming

A new study found that 21 percentof the United States' greenhouse gas pollution (1.2 Pg CO2e year) could be removed through enhanced management of forest, grassland, agricultural, and coastal areas. An offset at this level would be the equivalent to pollution from every single US car and truck on the road.

4h

Huge crater discovered in Greenland from impact that rocked Northern Hemisphere

A survey of ice in Greenland has uncovered evidence suggesting a kilometer-wide iron asteroid slammed into that island, perhaps as recently as 12,000 years ago during the end of the Pleistocene.

4h

Precision neuroengineering enables reproduction of complex brain-like functions in vitro

Researchers from the University of Barcelona and Tohoku University design neural circuits reproducing dynamic reconfiguration behaviors of the brain.

4h

Massive impact crater from a kilometer-wide iron meteorite discovered in Greenland

An international team lead by researchers from the Centre for GeoGenetics at the Natural History Museum of Denmark, University of Copenhagen have discovered a 31-km wide meteorite impact crater buried beneath the ice-sheet in the northern Greenland. This is the first time that a crater of any size has been found under one of Earth's continental ice sheets.

4h

Study finds early career publications as likely source of NIH funding racial gap

In seeking to pinpoint why black or African-American scientists are less likely than their white counterparts to receive National Institutes of Health research funding, a group of researchers has identified early career publications as a likely contributor to the gap.

4h

Survey reveals how we use music as a possible sleep aid

Many individuals use music in the hope that it fights sleep difficulties, according to a study published Nov. 14 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Tabitha Trahan of the University of Sheffield, UK, and colleagues. As described by the authors, this is the first online survey on the use of music as a sleep aid in the general population.

4h

Late Miocene ape maxilla (upper jaw) discovered in western India

An ape maxilla (upper jaw) from the Late Miocene found in the Kutch basin, in western India, significantly extends the southern range of ancient apes in the Indian Peninsula, according to a study published in Nov. 14, 2018 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Ansuya Bhandari from the Birbal Sahni Institute of Palaeosciences, Lucknow, India, and colleagues.

4h

Stress in early life has a lasting impact on male birds' song

Male songbirds that had better early life conditions as nestlings sing more often and produce more complex songs as adults, according to a study by Lucy Magoolagan from Lancaster University, publishing Nov. 14 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE.

4h

New research offers detail and insight into deep-time evolution of animal life on islands

A paper appearing in PLOS ONE from an international team of investigators describes two new fossil relatives of marsupials that shed light on how a unique island ecosystem evolved some 43 million years ago during the Eocene.

4h

Giant Crater Found Under Greenland's Ice

Giant Crater Found Under Greenland's Ice Radar has revealed evidence of an environmentally significant impact that probably occurred during the last 2.6 million years. IceImpactTop.jpg An artist’s depiction of a possible impact into the Greenland Ice Sheet. Image credits: Carl Toft Earth Wednesday, November 14, 2018 – 14:00 Charles Q. Choi, Contributor (Inside Science) — A crater roughly as broa

4h

Former naturopath and scientist share John Maddox prize

Scientist documenting coral reef decline and whistleblower on alternative therapy industry share award A scientist who is documenting the devastating decline of the world’s coral reefs and a former naturopath turned whistleblower on the alternative therapy industry have been jointly awarded a prestigious prize for championing science in the face of hostility and legal threats. Prof Terry Hughes,

4h

Impact crater 19 miles wide found beneath Greenland glacier

Crater appears to be result of mile-wide iron meteorite just 12,000 years ago A huge impact crater has been discovered under a half-mile-thick Greenland ice sheet. The enormous bowl-shaped dent appears to be the result of a mile-wide iron meteorite slamming into the island at a speed of 12 miles per second as recently as 12,000 years ago. Continue reading…

4h

Russian reporters discover 'tortured' orcas and belugas jammed in offshore pens

Russian news network discovers 101 black-market whales. Orcas and belugas are seen crammed into tiny pens. Marine parks continue to create a high-price demand for illegal captures. It's like a scene from a Hollywood thriller: Armed guards hired by some shady organization keeping watch dockside over ill-gotten goods. Except, in this case, the goods are alive. About 100 orca and beluga whales jamme

4h

Delivering groceries with self-driving cars may be even trickier than transporting peopleFord Walmart Postmates

Cars Delivering cooked soup is easy, but it turns out delivering the ingredients to make it is hard. Three massive companies are taking on the challenge of grocery delivery with self-driving cars.

4h

A massive crater hides beneath Greenland’s ice

The discovery of a vast crater in Greenland suggests that a 1-kilometer-wide asteroid hit the Earth between 2.6 million and 11,700 years ago.

4h

31 km i diameter: Danske forskere finder enormt meteoritkrater under grønlandsk indlandsis

Meteoritkrater under Grønlands indlandsis er blandt verdens 25 største og samtidig enormt ungt. Nedslaget, der dannede krateret, kan have fundet sted under seneste istid og dermed påvirket klimaet betydeligt for fortidens mennesker.

4h

Researchers identify factors behind inflammation in immunodeficiency patients

Researchers have discovered two key factors behind the intestinal inflammation that plagues people suffering from a disorder that affects their immune system.

4h

Defense against intestinal infection in organism is affected by prostaglandin E2

Experimental inhibition of this prostanoid led to increased migration of defense cells and production of antimicrobial peptides, resulting in decreased bacterial numbers in the colon.

4h

Stress in early life has a lasting impact on male birds' song

Male songbirds that had better early life conditions as nestlings sing more often and produce more complex songs as adults, according to a study by Lucy Magoolagan from Lancaster University, publishing November 14 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE.

4h

Huge crater discovered in Greenland from impact that rocked Northern HemisphereImpact Crater Greenland

A survey of ice in Greenland has uncovered evidence suggesting a kilometer-wide iron asteroid slammed into that island, perhaps as recently as 12,000 years ago during the end of the Pleistocene. The resulting 19-mile-wide impact crater has remained hidden under a half-mile-thick ice sheet until now. It recently was exposed by an ultra-wideband chirp radar system developed at the Center for the Rem

4h

New US study reveals natural solutions can reduce global warming

Restoring the United States' lands and coastal wetlands could have a much bigger role in reducing global warming than previously thought, according to the most comprehensive national assessment to date of how greenhouse gas emissions can be reduced and stored in forests, farmland, grasslands, and wetlands.

4h

Late Miocene ape maxilla (upper jaw) discovered in western India

An ape maxilla (upper jaw) from the Late Miocene found in the Kutch basin, in western India, significantly extends the southern range of ancient apes in the Indian Peninsula, according to a study published in November 14, 2018 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Ansuya Bhandari from the Birbal Sahni Institute of Palaeosciences, Lucknow, India, and colleagues.

4h

New research offers detail and insight into deep-time evolution of animal life on islands

Islands have been vital laboratories for advancing evolutionary theory since the pioneering work of Charles Darwin and Alfred Russel Wallace in the 19th century.

4h

Study finds early career publications as likely source of NIH funding racial gap

In seeking to pinpoint why black or African-American scientists are less likely than their white counterparts to receive National Institutes of Health research funding, a group of researchers has identified early career publications as a likely contributor to the gap.

4h

Project 100,000: The Vietnam War's cruel and deadly experiment

During the Vietnam War, Robert McNamara began a program called Project 100,000. The program brought over 300,000 men to Vietnam who failed to meet minimum criteria for military service, both physically and mentally. Project 100,000 recruits were killed in disproportionate numbers and fared worse after their military service than their civilian peers, making the program one of the biggest—and poss

4h

Cold Super-Earth found orbiting closest single star to Sun

The nearest single star to the Sun hosts an exoplanet at least 3.2 times as massive as Earth — a so-called super-Earth. One of the largest observing campaigns to date using data from a world-wide array of telescopes has revealed this frozen, dimly lit world. The newly discovered planet is the second-closest known exoplanet to the Earth. Barnard's star is the fastest moving star in the night sky.

5h

How Holography Could Help Solve Quantum Gravity

How does gravity work at the particle level? The question has stumped physicists since the two bedrock theories of general relativity (Albert Einstein’s equations envisioning gravity as curves in the geometry of space-time) and quantum mechanics (equations that describe particle interactions) revolutionized the discipline about a century ago. One challenge to solving the problem lies in the relat

5h

Scientists Are '99 Percent' Sure There's a Huge Exoplanet Very Close to Our Solar System

Scientists think there's a giant new planet full of frozen water, and it's right down the cosmic street from Earth.

5h

Symbiosis a driver of truffle diversity

Truffles are the fruiting bodies of the ectomycorrhizal (ECM) fungal symbionts residing on host plant roots. In many Ascomycota and Basidiomycota lineages, truffle-forming species have evolved independently in nearly every major group. This suggests that symbiosis drives evolution of truffle diversity and selects for specific traits. As reported in Nature Ecology & Evolution, an international team

5h

For arid, Mars-like desert, rain brings death

When rains fell on the arid Atacama Desert, it was reasonable to expect floral blooms to follow. Instead, the water brought death. An international team of planetary astrobiologists has found that after encountering never-before-seen rainfall three years ago at the arid core of Peru's Atacama Desert, the heavy precipitation wiped out most of the microbes that had lived there.

5h

Urocortin 3 gene therapy increases systolic and diastolic function in heart failure

Mice with heart failure that were treated with AAV8-based gene therapy to deliver the protein urocortin 3 (UCn3) had increased blood levels of UCn3 over a 5-week period and improved heart function.

5h

California wildfires death toll climbs to 50

Hundreds of people are still missing after three wildfires spread across Northern and Southern California last week. 48 of the 50 deaths occurred after the Camp Fire blazed through the town of Paradise, north of Sacramento. On Tuesday night, a fourth wildfire broke out, though it's mostly contained. None The death toll from the California wildfires has climbed to 50 as firefighters continue to ba

5h

Is Smoke From California's Fires Getting Worse? Hard to Tell

Smoke from the Camp, Hill, and Woolsey fires has forced Californians to don air masks. But measuring air quality is more complex than you might think.

5h

Nanotubes built from protein crystals: Breakthrough in biomolecular engineering

Researchers at Tokyo Tech have succeeded in constructing protein nanotubes from tiny scaffolds made by cross-linking of engineered protein crystals. The achievement could accelerate the development of artificial enzymes, nano-sized carriers and delivery systems for a host of biomedical and biotechnological applications.

5h

Putting food-safety detection in the hands of consumers

MIT Media Lab researchers have developed a wireless system that leverages the cheap RFID tags already on hundreds of billions of products to sense potential food contamination — with no hardware modifications needed. With the simple, scalable system, the researchers hope to bring food-safety detection to the general public.

5h

Tropical trees in the Andes are moving up — toward extinction

In the most comprehensive study of its kind, an international team of scientists led by University of Miami biologists has found that tropical and subtropical forests across South America's Andes Mountains are responding to warming temperatures by migrating to higher, cooler elevations, but probably not quickly enough to avoid the loss of their biodiversity, functional collapse, or even extinction

5h

Super-Earth discovered around the second nearest stellar system

Just six light-years away, Barnard's star moves in Earth's night sky faster than any other star. This red dwarf, smaller and older than our Sun, is among the least active red dwarfs known, so it represents an ideal target to search for exoplanets. Now, an international team led by researchers from the Spanish National Research Council (CSIC) has found a cold Super-Earth orbiting around the Barnard

5h

Researchers discover novel 'to divide or to differentiate' switch in plants

Scientists from VIB and Ghent University under the guidance of professor Dr. Jenny Russinova uncovered a novel mechanism in plants that controls an important decision step in stomatal lineage to divide asymmetrically or to differentiate. This is a decisive step for the formation of stomata, tiny pores on the plant surface, produced by asymmetric cell division.

5h

Human cell atlas study reveals maternal immune system modifications in early pregnancy

The first Human Cell Atlas study of early pregnancy in humans has shown how the maternal immune system is affected by cells from the developing placenta. Researchers mapped over 70,000 single cells at the junction of the uterus and placenta, revealing how cells talk to each other to modify the immune response and enable pregnancy. Published in Nature, this will help understand successful pregnancy

5h

Seismic study reveals huge amount of water dragged into Earth's interior

Slow-motion collisions of tectonic plates under the ocean drag about three times more water down into the deep Earth than previously estimated, according to a first-of-its-kind seismic study that spans the Mariana Trench.

5h

Cold Super-Earth found orbiting second-closest star system to our own

An international team including five Carnegie astronomers has discovered a frozen Super-Earth orbiting Barnard's star, the closest single star to our own Sun. The Planet Finding Spectrograph on Carnegie's Magellan II telescope was integral to the discovery. To find this cold Super-Earth, the team combined 20 years of data from seven different instruments, all of which were 'stitched' together to f

5h

Astronomers discover super-Earth around Barnard's star

Astronomers have discovered a planet in orbit around one of the closest stars to the Sun, Barnard's star.

5h

Super-Earth orbiting Barnard's Star

The nearest single star to the Sun hosts an exoplanet at least 3.2 times as massive as Earth — a so-called super-Earth. One of the largest observing campaigns to date using data from a world-wide array of telescopes, including ESO's planet-hunting HARPS instrument, have revealed this frozen, dimly lit world. The newly discovered planet is the second-closest known exoplanet to the Earth. Barnard's

5h

Climate simulations project wetter, windier hurricanes

New supercomputer simulations by climate scientists at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory have shown that climate change intensified the amount of rainfall in recent hurricanes such as Katrina, Irma, and Maria by 5 to 10 percent. They further found that if those hurricanes were to occur in a future world that is warmer than present, those storms would have even more rainfall and stronger winds.

5h

Mosquito genome opens new avenues for reducing bug-borne disease

Researchers have assembled a new and improved DNA catalogue for the mosquito Aedes aegypti. This tool will help researchers understand the insect's biology, and may lead to new strategies for preventing diseases like Zika and dengue.

5h

Improved mosquito reference genome assembly produced using long-read sequencing

A new comprehensive map of mosquito DNA has been assembled using long-read sequencing technology from California-based Pacific Biosciences. The improved reference genome assembly, published in Nature, could help scientists combat the pest and infectious diseases it spreads, including Zika, dengue, chikungunya, and yellow fever.

5h

A new approach to detecting cancer earlier from blood tests: Study

Cancer scientists led by principal investigator Dr. Daniel De Carvalho at Princess Margaret Cancer Centre have combined 'liquid biopsy,' epigenetic alterations and machine learning to develop a blood test to detect and classify cancer at its earliest stages.

5h

Houston's urban sprawl increased rainfall, flooding during Hurricane Harvey

Princeton and University of Iowa researchers found that Houston's urban landscape directly contributed to the torrential rainfall and deadly flooding of Hurricane Harvey in 2017. They report in the journal Nature that Houston's risk for extreme flooding was 21 times greater due to urbanization. The results highlight the human role in extreme weather events and the need to consider urban and suburb

5h

The US military is testing stratospheric balloons that ride the wind so they never have to come down

A sensor that can spot the wind direction from miles away will let DARPA’s surveillance balloons hover at the very edge of space in one spot indefinitely.

5h

Massive urban expansion threatens natural habitats

City expansion has accelerated in recent decades, so much so that, by 2050, we could be creating a city the size of London every seven weeks if current trends continue, a new study warns. Urban growth presents extreme challenges to biodiversity and ecosystem services due to the ongoing loss and fragmentation of habitats, says Burak Güneralp, assistant professor of geography at Texas A&M Universit

5h

Where Are All the Aliens? 'Out There' Book Excerpt

In 'Out There' (Grand Central Publishing, 2018), Space.com senior writer Mike Wall tackles the search for alien life from many different angles and discusses humanity's drive to get off its natal rock. Read an excerpt from the new book here.

5h

Google’s takeover of health app appears to renege on DeepMind promises

DeepMind used 1.6 million patient records from the NHS to develop its Streams app. Now Google is taking over and wants to develop a digital hospital assistant

5h

The race to green domestic heating and prevent climate catastrophe

Household heating systems are huge sources of carbon emissions, but many countries are showing how existing technologies can fix the problem

5h

An AI apocalypse isn’t the problem – technology-driven inequality is

Fears of an artificial intelligence apocalypse make the news, but it's AI-fuelled inequality we should worry about, says Andrew Simms

5h

Urbanisation made flooding from Hurricane Harvey 21 times as likely

Tall buildings in Houston made hurricane Harvey dump more rain on the region, before the water ran straight off the city's hard surfaces causing epic flooding

5h

Super-Earth spotted hiding in plain sight around neighbouring star

After years of searching, a planet several times larger than Earth has been discovered orbiting Barnard’s star – the closest star to Earth after the Alpha Centauri system

5h

Mixed results for science in the US midterm elections

A climate change denier is no longer to head House science committee, but Washington state voters reject carbon tax and Arizona blocks renewable energy boost

5h

Exoplanet discovered around neighbouring star

Astronomers have discovered a planet around one of the closest stars to our Sun.

5h

Astronomers discover super-Earth around Barnard's star

Astronomers have discovered a planet in orbit around one of the closest stars to the Sun, Barnard's star.

5h

Houston's urban sprawl increased rainfall, flooding during Hurricane HarveyHouston Hurricane Harvey

Houston's urban landscape directly contributed to the torrential rainfall and deadly flooding experienced during Hurricane Harvey in August 2017, according to Princeton and University of Iowa researchers. The researchers report in the journal Nature Nov. 15 that Houston's risk for extreme flooding during the hurricane—a category 4 storm that caused an estimated $125 billion in damage and killed 68

5h

Tropical trees in the Andes are moving up—toward extinction

An international study led by University of Miami tropical biologists reveals that tropical trees are migrating upslope to escape climate change, but not fast enough.

5h

Climate simulations project wetter, windier hurricanesHouston Hurricane Harvey

New supercomputer simulations by climate scientists at the Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) have shown that climate change intensified the amount of rainfall in recent hurricanes such as Katrina, Irma, and Maria by 5 to 10 percent. They further found that if those hurricanes were to occur in a future world that is warmer than present, those storms would h

5h

Mosquito genome opens new avenues for reducing bug-borne disease

The mosquito Aedes aegypti is a powerful, plentiful species: It populates six continents, can carry deadly viruses, and bites with abandon. But until recently, its genome was in tatters.

5h

Seismic study reveals huge amount of water dragged into Earth's interior

Slow-motion collisions of tectonic plates under the ocean drag about three times more water down into the deep Earth than previously estimated, according to a first-of-its-kind seismic study that spans the Mariana Trench.

5h

Cities Cause Hurricanes to Dump Extra Rain on ThemHouston Hurricane Harvey

The literal shape of cities appears to exacerbate hurricanes' rainfall, according to new research on Hurricane Harvey.

5h

The Myth Of the Traumatized Neanderthal

The very first Neanderthal to be described in the scientific literature, back in 1856, had an old elbow injury—a fracture that had since healed, but had deformed the bone in the process. Such injuries turned out to be incredibly common. Almost every reasonably complete Neanderthal skeleton that was found during the subsequent century had at least one sign of physical trauma. Some researchers attr

5h

Skull damage suggests Neandertals led no more violent lives than humans

Neandertals’ skulls suggest they didn’t lead especially injury-prone lives.

5h

Houston Got Hammered By Hurricane Harvey — And Its Buildings Are Partly To BlameHouston Hurricane Harvey

The city itself — skyscrapers, homes and factories — snagged the moist air of Hurricane Harvey and caused more rain to fall. Two new studies detail how humans are making hurricane flooding worse. (Image credit: David J. Phillip/AP)

5h

A Frozen Super-Earth May Orbit Barnard's Star

At just six light years away, the candidate planet would be the second-closest world known beyond our solar system—and a prime target for future studies — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

5h

Recommending plants to benefit and attract pollinators

Pollinating Insects are integral to the health of all terrestrial ecosystems and agriculture worldwide. As homeowners attempt to conserve pollinators through horticulture practices, they often seek the advice and guidance of horticulture retail employees regarding what plants they can successfully include on their properties to maximize their intended benefit to pollinators as well as to their hom

5h

Older people’s organs can still save lives | Letters

Anthony Clarkson , interim director of NHS organ donation and transplantation, Sue Cartlidge and Ron Brewer respond to a previous letter from Jeanne Felmingham querying whether it’s worth having a donor card at the age of 83 Re Jeanne Felmingham’s letter (14 November), too many people mistakenly assume their age means they are too old to consider organ donation. However, people in their 50s, 60,

6h

First phase of Brazil's particle accelerator construction completed

Brazil President Michel Temer inaugurated the opening construction phase of a particle accelerator the size of the Maracana football stadium that will be used to make advances in medicine, nutrition, archeology, electronics, energy and the environment.

6h

Donor-afføring redder smågrise fra livsfarlig sygdom

Dødelig tarmsygdom kan måske forhindres hos børn, der fødes for tidligt. Det er håbet efter vellykkede forsøg med syge smågrise.

6h

Large areas of the Brazilian rainforest at risk of losing protection

Up to 15 million hectares of the Brazilian Amazon is at risk of losing its legal protection, according to a new study from researchers at Chalmers University of Technology and KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden, and the University of Sao Paulo, Brazil. This is equivalent to more than 4 times the entire forest area of the UK.

6h

Using the plant microbiome to restore native grasslands

The BioScience Talks podcast features discussions of topical issues related to the biological sciences.

6h

Volkswagen to devote 3 German plants to electric car push

German automaker Volkswagen will convert three factories in Germany to manufacture electric cars, ramping up production of zero-local emission cars ahead of tougher European emissions standards, the company said Wednesday.

6h

Tropical Cyclone Gaja approaching Southeastern India

Tropical Cyclone Gaja continued to track toward a landfall in southeastern India when NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite flew over the Bay of Bengal and provided a visible image of the storm.

6h

Who joined the Islamic State from France between 2014 and 2016?

Radicalized French citizens who adhere to Islamic State propaganda are less likely to disengage from their beliefs if they are married men with children, and from families with married parents. This is according to Nicolas Campelo of the Pitié-Salpêtrière Hospital in France, who led a study in the journal Palgrave Communications which is published by Springer Nature. The research identified import

6h

Gravitational waves from a merged hyper-massive neutron star

For the first time astronomers have detected gravitational waves from a merged, hyper-massive neutron star.

6h

Renewable Energy Is Surging, but Not Fast Enough to Stop Warming

Wind and solar costs have plummeted, but global energy demands will continue to rise — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

6h

Middle Eastern desert dust on the Tibetan plateau could affect the Indian summer monsoon

More than a century ago, British meteorologist Henry Blanford noted a connection between springtime snow cover on the Tibetan Plateau and Himalaya mountain range and the intensity of the summer monsoon season in India. Hundreds of studies have supported this relationship since Blanford first published his hypothesis in 1884, finding that less snow cover often correlates to a wetter monsoon. But so

6h

How weather and climate shape Earth's life sustaining surface

We know less about the ground beneath our feet than we do about the surface of Mars, but new research by University of Colorado Boulder geoscientists shines a light on this hidden world from ridgetops to valley floors and shows how rainfall shapes the part of our planet that is just beyond where we can see.

6h

Patient engagement as a new blockbuster drug, not quite yet, study finds

A team of researchers from The Dartmouth Institute for Health Policy and Clinical Practice and the Berkeley School of Public Health at UC Berkeley recently conducted a study designed to better understand how patient engagement and activation (PAE) practices are being integrated into clinical practice. What they found was a great deal of positive sentiment about PAE among the healthcare professiona

6h

Tiny scaffold may transplant stem cells to treat Alzheimer’s

A tiny, biodegradable scaffold may offer a way to transplant stem cells and deliver drugs, which could help treat Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s diseases, aging brain degeneration, and spinal cord and traumatic brain injuries. Low cell survival rates, incomplete differentiation of cells, and limited growth of neural connections have hampered stem cell transplantation, which shows promise as a treatm

6h

Why millions of Americans didn’t vote during the midterms

Usually, only about 40 percent of eligible voters participate in midterm elections. Political philosopher John Stuart Mill believed it would be for the collective good if everybody voted. Because of logistics, we may need to change the time of year we vote. There's something strange afoot. It's not how many people love or hate the Brioni suit-wearing man in the Oval Office. It's not even that it'

6h

CIA considered using ‘truth serum’ on terror suspects after 9/11

The 90-page report was released to the American Civil Liberties Union on Tuesday. It describes how the CIA researched past attempts by governments to find an effective 'truth serum', including the agency's infamous MK-Ultra program. Ultimately, the agency decided not to ask the Justice Department to approve drug-assisted interrogations. None The CIA considered administering a 'truth serum' drug t

6h

How Burning Captures the Toll of Extreme Inequality in South Korea

This article contains spoilers for the plot of the film Burning . Lee Chang-dong’s Burning , a promising contender in the Foreign Language Film Oscar race, takes place in two South Koreas. The first is a country of leisure, where 20- and 30-somethings stroll through elegant cafés and bob to K-pop club bangers. The second faces ongoing economic turmoil. Billions of dollars constitute average house

6h

Using social media to weaken the wrath of terror attacks

Governments and police forces around the world need to beware of the harm caused by mass and social media following terror events. In a new report, leading counter-terrorism experts from around the world—including Michigan State University faculty—offer guidance to authorities to better manage the impacts of terror attacks by harnessing media communication.

6h

On-demand biologics

Many life-saving medicines, including insulin, antibodies and vaccines, are derived from living cells. These "biologics" can be difficult to obtain and store on the battlefield or in remote areas. That's why scientists are trying to develop portable systems that can quickly manufacture small batches of protein therapeutics on demand, according to an article in Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN).

6h

Rainforest vine compound starves pancreatic cancer cells

Pancreatic cancer cells are known for their ability to thrive under extreme conditions of low nutrients and oxygen, a trait known in the cancer field as "austerity." The cells' remarkable resistance to starvation is one reason why pancreatic cancer is so deadly. Now researchers have identified a compound from a Congolese plant that has strong "antiausterity" potential, making pancreatic cancer cel

6h

How exercise could help fight drug addiction

The siren call of addictive drugs can be hard to resist, and returning to the environment where drugs were previously taken can make resistance that much harder. However, addicts who exercise appear to be less vulnerable to the impact of these environmental cues. Now, research with mice suggests that exercise might strengthen a drug user's resolve by altering the production of peptides in the brai

6h

The Mueller Investigation May Be Safe Despite Matt Whitaker

Robert Mueller's work as special counsel may seem imperiled by the acting attorney general, but there's plenty of reason for optimism.

6h

American Catholic Bishops Miss Their Big Chance to Implement Sex-Abuse Reforms

BALTIMORE—This week’s fall assembly of the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops was supposed to be the first high-profile occasion for the Church’s top leaders to take steps toward rebuilding public trust after a series of revelations this summer in the ongoing sex-abuse crisis. The assembly was slated to vote this week on a series of reforms to address the crisis, but its plans were quic

6h

Middle Eastern desert dust on the Tibetan plateau could affect the Indian summer monsoon

Large quantities dust from the deserts of the Middle East can settle on the Tibetan Plateau, darkening the region's snowpack and accelerating snow melt. A new atmospheric modeling study suggests that, in some years, heavy springtime dust deposition can set off a series of feedbacks that intensify the Indian summer monsoon. The findings could explain a correlation between Tibetan snowpack and the I

6h

The Biggest Story of the Century Needs More Coverage

Yes, the news on climate change is bad. That’s why we need more of it. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

6h

Low-Carb Diets May Burn More Calories

Keeping weight off may be about more than just "calories in and calories out."

7h

Schrödinger's Bacteria? Physics Experiment Leads to 1st Entanglement of Living Organisms

A paper published in 2017 appeared to show a limited quantum effect in bacteria. Now scientists argue that something much weirder happened.

7h

Wait for it: how schizophrenia illuminates the nature of pleasure

Schizophrenia is one of the most widely misunderstood of human maladies. The truth of the illness is far different from popular caricatures of a sufferer muttering incoherently or lashing out violently. People with schizophrenia are, in fact, not more likely to be violent than people without schizophrenia. About one per cent of the worldwide population has schizophrenia, affecting men and women,

7h

Forced examination: How the free speech of others benefits us all

A majority of Americans believe we should protect people from deleterious ideas and speech. This belief may harm us, both as individuals and as a society, by ironically strengthening the very ideas that do us harm. Forced examination provides a means by which we can strengthen our own ideas while weeding the harmful ones from society, but it only works with free expression for everyone. In a rece

7h

Can we use brain scans as lie detectors?

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7h

The Media Barely Covered One of the Worst Storms to Hit U.S. Soil

Several hours before Super Typhoon Yutu struck the morning of October 25, Harry Blanco was making final preparations for the storm. He boarded up the windows of his house, secured loose objects outside, gathered his valuables in a backpack, and locked his black Labrador, Lady, in the laundry room, where he felt she’d be safe. Then, he—along with thousands of his neighbors in the Northern Mariana

7h

Screening for hepatitis B and C: Benefit unclear due to a lack of suitable studies

There are no suitable studies for the benefit assessment of screenings of the general population. Thorough accompanying evaluation is required for hepatitis C screening of risk groups.

7h

Patient-oriented research: A collection featuring benefits, challenges and experiences

Does engaging patients in research projects improve health? A comprehensive collection — from youth involvement in mental health services to suicide prevention, Indigenous health, children with complex medical needs and more — highlights the value of patient engagement in research.

7h

Low carb diets can help maintain weight loss by increasing number of calories burned

A low carbohydrate diet could help people maintain their weight loss by increasing the number of calories burned, finds a large US feeding trial published by The BMJ today.

7h

Low-carb diets cause people to burn more calories

Most people regain the weight they lose from dieting within one or two years, in part because the body adapts by slowing metabolism and burning fewer calories. A meticulous study led by Boston Children's Hospital, in partnership with Framingham State University, now finds that eating fewer carbohydrates increases the number of calories burned. The findings, published November 14 in the BMJ, sugges

7h

Slice® Safety Cutters for Lab Work

Slice cutting tools—which feature our patent-pending safety blades—meet many lab-specific requirements. Our scalpels and craft knives are well suited for delicate work, and our utility knives are good for general use.

7h

Epoxy compound gets a graphene bump

Rice University researchers combine epoxy with a tough graphene foam and carbon nanotube scaffold to build a resilient composite that's tougher and as conductive as other compounds but as light as pure epoxy.

7h

How exercise could help fight drug addiction

The siren call of addictive drugs can be hard to resist, and returning to the environment where drugs were previously taken can make resistance that much harder. However, addicts who exercise appear to be less vulnerable to the impact of these environmental cues. Now, research with mice suggests that exercise might strengthen a drug user's resolve by altering the production of peptides in the brai

7h

Rainforest vine compound starves pancreatic cancer cells

Pancreatic cancer cells are known for their ability to thrive under extreme conditions of low nutrients and oxygen, a trait known in the cancer field as 'austerity.' The cells' remarkable resistance to starvation is one reason why pancreatic cancer is so deadly. Now researchers have identified a compound from a Congolese plant that has strong "antiausterity" potential, making pancreatic cancer cel

7h

Who joined the Islamic State from France between 2014 and 2016?

Radicalized French citizens who adhere to Islamic State propaganda are less likely to disengage from their beliefs if they are married men with children, and from families with married parents. This is according to Nicolas Campelo of the Pitié-Salpêtrière Hospital in France, who led a study in the journal Palgrave Communications which is published by Springer Nature.

7h

New way to study swallowing could one day lead to improved treatments for ALS

There is no cure for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), also known as Lou Gehrig's Disease, but new findings from the University of Missouri School of Medicine and the University of Missouri College of Veterinary Medicine are deepening researchers' understanding of a common ALS symptom: swallowing problems.

7h

Is the rise in blood pressure with age a consequence of the western lifestyle?

A common belief in cardiology is that blood pressure (BP) increases with age, although studies find little evidence of that among non-Western adults in isolated communities. But does the association between age and BP differ in two isolated communities with different levels of Westernization? In this study, researchers examined the association between age and BP in two communities in a remote area

7h

Surgery, not antibiotics, should remain first-line treatment for appendicitis

Treating appendicitis with antibiotics as an alternative to surgical removal of the inflamed organ was found to be more costly in the long term and result in higher rates of hospital readmissions, according to a study by researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine.

7h

Zika may hijack mother-fetus immunity route

Antibodies against dengue virus make it easier for Zika to infect certain immune cells in the placenta, called Hofbauer cells.

7h

Maternally acquired Zika immunity can increase dengue disease severity in mouse pups

To say that the immune system is complex is an understatement: an immune response protective in one context can turn deadly over time, as evidenced by numerous epidemiological studies on dengue infection, spanning multiple decades and countries worldwide.

7h

Mothers infected by dengue may have babies with higher risk of severe Zika, and vice versa

Two new studies provide evidence that previous Dengue infection in pregnant mothers may lead to increased severity of Zika in babies, and that previous Zika infection in mice mothers may increase severity of Dengue infection in their pups. The research, publishing Nov. 14 in the journal Cell Host & Microbe, supports that maternally acquired antibodies for one virus can assist infection by the othe

7h

Moths and magnets deliver CRISPR to fix defective genes

A new technology that relies on a moth-infecting virus and nanomagnets could edit defective genes that give rise to diseases like sickle cell, muscular dystrophy, and cystic fibrosis. Researchers have combined magnetic nanoparticles with a viral container drawn from a particular species of moth to deliver CRISPR/Cas9 payloads that modify genes in a specific tissue or organ with spatial control. B

7h

7h

Mozilla's 'Privacy Not Included' Gift Report Highlights Security Concerns

In its second annual “Privacy Not Included” guide, the nonprofit highlights internet-connected items that value your privacy—and the ones that may not.

7h

Western lifestyle may cause blood pressure to rise with age

Study of remote communities in Venezuelan rainforest sheds fresh light on hypertension A western lifestyle might be the reason blood pressure tends to rise with age, according to a study of remote tribal communities. Hypertension is a key risk factor for cardiovascular disease, and in many developed countries, including the UK, the likelihood of developing increases with age. More than a quarter

7h

Testosterone therapy could help tackle depression in men – study

Researchers find improvement in symptoms among men given hormone Treatment with testosterone could help tackle depression in men, according to a review of studies which found supplements of the hormone appear to improve mood. About 100 million men around the world are thought to have depressive disorders, and almost 17% of men in the UK are thought to have symptoms of depression or anxiety. Conti

7h

The Galapagos of the Indian Ocean: Voyage to a forgotten paradise

Celebrated for their biodiversity, the islands of Socotra could unlock secrets of humans' journey out of Africa – but war and weather hamper the journey there

7h

Here’s how much exercise you should get—and why it’s okay if you fall short

Health New guidelines for Americans emphasize physical activity at any level. More physical activity may be better, but any activity is better than none. Learn how much you need.

7h

12 år og en fiasko klogere: Nu er Rockwool klar med byggesystem til lavenergihuse

Historien om Rockshell er historien om, hvordan et nyt materiale og et helt nyt byggekoncept er omstændeligt at introducere og tilpasse til byggebranchen – selv når man er en af branchens helt store leverandører.

7h

Harvard wants to school Congress about AI

A tech boot camp will teach US politicians and policymakers about the potential, and the risks, of artificial intelligence.

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Researchers develop tool that analyzes biomedical data within minutes

Researchers at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai have developed a tool that speeds up the analysis and publication of biomedical data from many months or years to mere minutes, transforming the way researchers communicate results of their studies. Until now, the primary method available to share biomedical research data has been through print publication in scientific journals. The new t

7h

America’s Dangerous Rhetorical Games

It’s an all too familiar pattern. Every time there’s an act of political violence or threatened political violence, there’s a brief pause as both sides of our polarized nation wait to see who’s responsible. Then, the instant the attacker is identified, he becomes yet another rhetorical club in perhaps one of the most divisive debates in modern American politics. Who else is to blame? When the vio

7h

Optimization of alloy materials: Diffusion processes in nano particles decoded

A research team discovers atomic-level processes which can provide new approaches to improving material properties.

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Investigational drug shows promising results in Phase II study of aggressive, often fatal blood disorder with no approved therapies

A Phase I/II study, led by investigators at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, reports an investigational drug called tagraxofusp has demonstrated high response rates in patients with blastic plasmacytoid dendritic cell neoplasm (BPDCN), a rare but highly aggressive — and often fatal bone marrow and blood disorder — for which there are no existing approved therapies.

7h

Older adults' abstract reasoning ability predicts depressive symptoms over time

Age-related declines in abstract reasoning ability predict increasing depressive symptoms in subsequent years, according to data from a longitudinal study of older adults in Scotland. The research is published in Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science.

7h

Bias-based bullying does more harm, is harder to protect against

A new study finds that bias-based bullying does more harm to students than generalized bullying, particularly for students who are targeted because of multiple identities, such as race and gender. What's more, the study finds that efforts to mitigate these harms are less effective against bias-based bullying.

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Tropical Cyclone Gaja approaching Southeastern India

Tropical Cyclone Gaja continued to track toward a landfall in southeastern India when NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite flew over the Bay of Bengal and provided a visible image of the storm.

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Microgel powder fights infection and helps wounds heal

While making smart glue, a team of engineers discovered a handy byproduct: hydrogen peroxide. In microgel form, it reduces bacteria and virus ability to infect by at least 99.9 percent.

7h

Climate control of Earth's critical zone

New research by University of Colorado Boulder geoscientists shines a light on this hidden world from ridgetops to valley floors and shows how rainfall shapes the part of our planet that is just beyond where we can see.

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Using social media to weaken the wrath of terror attacks

Governments and police forces around the world need to beware of the harm caused by mass and social media following terror events. In a new report, leading counter-terrorism experts from around the world offer guidance to authorities to better manage the impacts of terror attacks by harnessing media communication.

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Is civility a sham? | Teresa Bejan

What exactly is civility, and what does it require? In a talk packed with historical insights, political theorist Teresa Bejan explains how civility has been used as both the foundation of tolerant societies and as a way for political partisans to silence and dismiss opposing views. Bejan suggests that we should instead try for "mere civility": the virtue of being able to disagree fundamentally wi

8h

Human evolution is still happening – possibly faster than ever

Modern medicine's ability to keep us alive makes it tempting to think human evolution may have stopped. Better healthcare disrupts a key driving force of evolution by keeping some people alive longer, making them more likely to pass on their genes. But if we look at the rate of our DNA's evolution, we can see that human evolution hasn't stopped – it may even be happening faster than before.

8h

We are heading for a New Cretaceous, not for a new normal

A lazy buzz phrase – 'Is this the new normal?' – has been doing the rounds as extreme climate events have been piling up over the past year. To which the riposte should be: it's worse than that – we're on the road to even more frequent, more extreme events than we saw this year. We have known since the 1980s what's in store for us. Action taken then to reduce emissions by 20 per cent by 2005 migh

8h

Ringling train chugs into digital world

The century-old train car known to be the site of business transactions for the Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey Circus has long been too fragile for visitors to step inside. The Wisconsin has faced conservation issues due to the discontinuation of spare train parts. Through a project led by the University of South Florida, it will no longer be limited to glancing through a window.

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Checking very preterm babies' head size can help identify long-term IQ problems

Regular early head circumference assessments add valuable information when screening for long-term neurocognitive risk – according to new research by an international research collaboration, including the University of Warwick, UK and the University of Tennessee Knoxville, US.

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Ringling train chugs into digital world

The train car dedicated to transporting John Ringling across the country, often alongside his infamous circus, is now more accessible to the public due to the 3D printing of several spare train parts.

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Advanced computer technology & software turn species identification interactive

Representing a group of successful biocontrol agents for various pest fruit flies, a parasitic wasp genus remains overlooked, with its most recent identification key dating back to 1969, even though many new species have been added since then. Through a recent study, published in the open access Biodiversity Data Journal, which also describes one new to science species, Swiss scientists demonstrat

8h

Earth's magnetic field measured using artificial stars at 90 kilometers altitude

In 2011, researchers proposed that artificial guide stars could be used to measure the Earth's magnetic field in the mesosphere. An international group of scientists has recently managed to do this with a high degree of precision. The technique may also help to identify magnetic structures in the solid Earth's lithosphere, to monitor space weather, and to measure electrical currents in the part of

8h

Not All White Women

After Democrats gained a House majority, causing most of them to celebrate the biggest check on Donald Trump’s power since he was elected, a tiny faction in the progressive coalition reacted in anger and frustration, fixating on races that would have made their “wave” even bigger: Beto O’Rourke in Texas, Andrew Gillum in Florida, Stacey Abrams in Georgia. In all these Democratic defeats, there wa

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Skipping a few thousand years: Rapid domestication of the groundcherry using gene editing

Shopping in your supermarket's produce section is like strolling through a museum of humanity's greatest inventions. Perfect ears of golden sweet corn; tomatoes of different sizes, shapes and colors; and spicy jalapeño peppers are all a testament to human ingenuity. You may not consider food an invention, but nearly all foods we eat are the product of thousands of years of constant breeding and se

8h

Spørg Fagfolket: Hvorfor skubber man ikke rumskrottet ned mod Jorden?

Ville det ikke give mening at rydde op i rummet ved at skubbe rumaffaldet ned mod Jorden, hvor det ville brænde op? Det svarer DTU Space på.

8h

Palm oil boycott could actually increase deforestation – sustainable products are the solution

Palm oil can be found in food and cosmetics everywhere: in fact, half of the world's population uses palm oil in food. But public awareness about the loss of wildlife through deforestation caused by palm oil crops is growing, and there's mounting pressure on retailers to reduce their sales of palm oil products, or boycott them altogether.

8h

Advanced computer technology and software turn species identification interactive

Representing a group of successful biocontrol agents for various pest fruit flies, a parasitic wasp genus remains largely overlooked. While its most recent identification key dates back to 1969, many new species have been added since then. As if to make matters worse, this group of visually identical species most likely contains many species yet to be described as new to science.

8h

Next step on the path towards an efficient biofuel cell

Fuel cells that work with the enzyme hydrogenase are, in principle, just as efficient as those that contain the expensive precious metal platinum as a catalyst. However, the enzymes need an aqueous environment, which makes it difficult for the starting material for the reaction — hydrogen — to reach the enzyme-loaded electrode. Researchers solved this problem by combining previously developed co

8h

Gravitational waves from a merged hyper-massive neutron star

For the first time astronomers have detected gravitational waves from a merged, hyper-massive neutron star. The scientists, Maurice van Putten of Sejong University in South Korea, and Massimo della Valle of the Osservatorio Astronomico de Capodimonte in Italy, publish their results in Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society: Letters.

8h

Salmon are shrinking and it shows in their genes

Male salmon are maturing earlier and becoming smaller, and it shows in their genes. This was the discovery of a study that examined scale samples from salmon over a 40-year period, and looked at the population genetic profile of a gene that determines salmon's age of maturity and size. The results show that the 'big salmon gene version' has become rarer in the population over time, and has been re

8h

New virtual reconstruction of a Neanderthal thorax suggests another breathing mechanism

A research team, led by Dr Asier Gómez-Olivencia, an Ikerbasque research fellow at the University of the Basque Country (UPV/EHU), and Dr Ella Been of the Ono Academic College of Tel Aviv, has carried out the first virtual reconstruction of the full fossil ribcage of the Neanderthal individual known as Kebara 2. The results show significant morphological differences pointing to a respiratory mecha

8h

Protection against Malaria: A matter of balance

A balanced production of pro and anti-inflammatory cytokines at two years of age protects against clinical malaria in early childhood, according to a study led by ISGlobal, an institution supported by "la Caixa" Foundation. The results also indicated that early exposure to the parasite does not affect the risk of developing the disease, although it could affect the parasite-specific immune respons

8h

Men want sons while women prefer daughters

A new experimental study finds that women prefer and invest more in daughters, while men favor and invest more in sons. “Our research may help people be better parents if we become aware of our unconscious biases toward different kinds of children,” says the study’s senior author Lee Cronk, an anthropology professor at Rutgers University-New Brunswick. The researchers conducted an online experime

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Intensity of bidding drives desire to win and willingness to pay in auctions

How fast a competitor counters your bid during an auction will increase your desire to win—and likely your willingness to pay for the auctioned product, according to a new study by a pair of University of Alberta business professors.

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Symbolic significance of sustainable products needs to be emphasised more among consumers

Consumers appear to embrace sustainable innovations, such as electric vehicles and smart energy systems, because it means something positive for their status and identity. Raising people's awareness of this symbolic significance can make an important contribution to the adoption of such innovations, says researcher Ernst Noppers. On 22 November 2018, he hopes to defend his doctoral thesis at the U

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Jodrell Bank Observatory release 50 year-old audio archive of Soviet Zond 6 lunar mission

Jodrell Bank is releasing audio recordings of a Soviet space mission from fifty years ago, just as the race to the moon was approaching the finish line.

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How to split the USA into two countries: Red and Blue

America's two political tribes have consolidated into 'red' and 'blue' nations, with seemingly irreconcilable differences. Perhaps the best way to stop the infighting is to go for a divorce and give the two nations a country each Based on the UN's partition plan for Israel/Palestine, this proposal provides territorial contiguity and sea access to both 'red' and 'blue' America None If more proof w

8h

Studie om bugspytkirtelkræft revses for at rumme forkerte tal

Et studie, der tyder på at øget volumen giver en bedre overlevelse for patienter med bugspytkirtelkræft, er ifølge en ledende overlæge Lone Susanne Jensen fra AUH forældet og rummer forkerte tal. I stedet for at hænge sig i studiet burde alle fokusere på at fortsætte og styrke samarbejdet mellem centrene, mener hun.

8h

Sygehuse med flest operationer for bugspytkirtelkræft klarer sig bedst

Antallet af patienter, der skal opereres for bugspytkirtelkræft, er meget ulige fordelt mellem de fire hospitaler, der løfter den opgave, viser nyt studie. Det fører tilsyneladende til store forskelle i dødelighed, vurderer forskerne, der dog ser udfordringer ved eget studie.

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Riget bedst til bugspytkirtelkræft – Aalborg dårligst

Selv om forskere bag nyt studie af bugspytkirtelkræft-kirurgi har anonymiseret de fire hospitaler, der opererer den kræftform, kan man ved at genfinde data i den kliniske kvalitetsdatabase finde frem til hospitalernes indbyrdes placering.

8h

Bugspytkirtelkræft-kirurgien trues af manglende kapacitet

Antallet af opererede patienter er ikke den eneste faktor, der betyder noget for dødelighed og behandlingskvalitet, pointerer klinikchef Jens Hillingsø, Rigshospitalet.

8h

Regioner kan spare 335 mio. kr. om året på gigtmedicin

Sygehuse kan se frem til en samlet årlig besparelse på omkring 335 mio. kr., efter Medicinrådet har anbefalet ibrugtagning af biosimilære versioner af Humira.

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Sjællandske sygehus­læger får retningslinjer for samarbejde med industrien

Region Sjælland og Lif har indgået aftale om klare retningslinjer for samarbejde mellem sygehuslæger og lægemiddelindustrien. Kommunikationen skal gå mellem sygehusledelsen og virksomhederne.

8h

John Large obituary

Consulting engineer known for his work on nuclear safety who was never afraid to take on such a powerful industry John Large’s working life was split into two halves, the first spent designing civil and military nuclear reactors and the second trying to make sure the industry was kept safe from accidents, nuclear waste and security threats. In this later role as a consulting engineer John was a da

8h

How scavengers can help forensic scientists identify human corpses

When the police recover skeletonised, burnt or heavily decomposed bodies, they need forensic experts to make sense of what they've found. One important question in such cases is: when did the person die?

8h

Should I Delete My Tweets?

Our in-house Know-It-Alls answer questions about your interactions with technology.

8h

The slower they turn, the brighter they glow

With Halloween over, ghostly decorations are now being replaced by Christmas themed ornaments, many of which glow in the dark. This glow, termed luminescence, is produced by chemical and biochemical reactions or when electrons in a material are excited to higher energy states upon exposure to light. Luminescence of the latter kind is called photoluminescence and is widely used in fluorescence micr

8h

Researchers overcome challenges to collect new typhoon observations

As field researchers know, sometimes the science you set out to do is not what you end up doing. But the drive for knowledge is unwavering, and scientists find a way to get the job done, even if it means changing course, maneuvering bureaucratic hurdles and waiting out setbacks. Flexibility is key to field campaigns, and sometimes the reward is in the unexpected discoveries.

8h

The Closest of All Possible Encounters

By Heart is a series in which authors share and discuss their all-time favorite passages in literature. See entries from Jonathan Franzen, Amy Tan, Khaled Hosseini, and more. Doug McLean John Wray might never have finished his new novel, Godsend, if he hadn’t stumbled across a technical manual on bear attacks, abandoned on a Brooklyn street. A harrowing primer intended more for wilderness backpac

8h

The first rains in centuries in the Atacama Desert devastate its microbial life

The Atacama Desert, the driest and oldest desert on Earth, located in northern Chile, hides a hyper-arid core in which no rain has been recorded during the past 500 years. But this situation has changed in the last three years: for the first time, rainfall has been documented in the hyper-arid core of the Atacama and, contrary to what was expected, the water supply has caused a great devastation a

8h

Nanotubes built from protein crystals: Breakthrough in biomolecular engineering

Researchers at Tokyo Tech have succeeded in constructing protein nanotubes from tiny scaffolds made by cross-linking of engineered protein crystals. The achievement could accelerate the development of artificial enzymes, nano-sized carriers and delivery systems for a host of biomedical and biotechnological applications.

8h

Microgel powder fights infection and helps wounds heal

While making smart glue, a team of engineers discovered a handy byproduct: hydrogen peroxide. In microgel form, it reduces bacteria and virus ability to infect by at least 99 percent.

9h

Discovery of high geothermal heat at South Pole

Scientists have discovered an area near the South Pole where the base of the Antarctic Ice Sheet is melting unexpectedly quickly. Using radar to look through three km of ice, the team found that some of the ice – covering an area that's twice the size of Greater London – appeared to be missing. The results are published this week in the journal Scientific Reports.

9h

Extended life for ESA's science missions

After a comprehensive review of their scientific merits and technical status, the SPC has decided to extend the operation of the five missions led by ESA's Science Programme: Cluster, Gaia, INTEGRAL, Mars Express, and XMM-Newton. The SPC also confirmed the Agency's contributions to the extended operations of Hinode, Hubble, IRIS, SOHO, and ExoMars TGO.

9h

Scientists combine graphene foam, epoxy into tough, conductive composite

Rice University scientists have built a better epoxy for electronic applications.

9h

Next step on the path towards an efficient biofuel cell

Fuel cells that work with the enzyme hydrogenase are, in principle, just as efficient as those that contain the expensive precious metal platinum as a catalyst. However, the enzymes need an aqueous environment, which makes it difficult for the starting material for the reaction – hydrogen – to reach the enzyme-loaded electrode. Researchers solved this problem by combining previously developed conc

9h

Salmon are shrinking, and it shows in their genes

Male salmon are maturing earlier and becoming smaller, and it shows in their genes. This was the discovery of a study that examined scale samples from salmon in the River Teno in Northern Finland over a 40-year period, and looked at the population genetic profile of a gene that determines salmon's age of maturity and size. The results show that the 'big salmon gene version' has become rarer in the

9h

Popular science helps to discover the abundance of this jellyfish

When the Rhizostoma luteum jellyfish was discovered at the beginning of the 19th century in the waters of the Strait of Gibraltar, only nine specimens were identified. For years, it was so inconspicuous that in the 20th century, it failed to turn up for six decades. A team of scientists with the help of a citizen initiative has now confirmed that it is not really as difficult to find as previously

9h

Partial mycoheterotrophs: The green plants that feed on fungi

You probably learned this basic lesson of biology in elementary school: Plants are self-feeders. These so-called autotrophs use the sun's energy and water to turn carbon dioxide from the air into food through the process known as photosynthesis. Autotrophic organisms sit at the base of every food chain on Earth and sustain all levels of life as we know it.

9h

Two genomic tests identify groups of patients most likely to benefit from new drugs

New results from a long-running trial to identify which new drugs or combinations of drugs are most effective in which types of breast cancer, show that two genomic tests are bringing the era of truly personalised medicine ever nearer.

9h

Scientists engineer a functional optical lens out of 2D materials

In a paper published Oct. 8 in the journal Nano Letters, a team from the University of Washington and the National Tsing Hua University in Taiwan announced that it has constructed functional metalenses that are one-tenth to one-half the thickness of the wavelengths of light that they focus. Their metalenses, which were constructed out of layered 2D materials, were as thin as 190 nanometers — less

9h

New anisotropic conductive film for ultra-fine pitch assembly applications

High-resolution display devices increasingly need ultra-fine pitch assemblies. On that account, display driver interconnection technology has become a major challenge for upscaling display electronics.

9h

Rare conservation win: Mountain gorilla population ticks up

There are more gorillas in the mist—a rare conservation success story, scientists say.

9h

Gravitational waves from a merged hyper-massive neutron star

For the first time astronomers have detected gravitational waves from a merged, hyper-massive neutron star. The scientists, Maurice van Putten of Sejong University in South Korea, and Massimo della Valle of the Osservatorio Astronomico de Capodimonte in Italy, publish their results in Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society: Letters.

9h

Catching asteroid 3 Juno at its best

Not all oppositions are created equal. This week's sky target offers a good case in point, as asteroid 3 Juno reaches its most favorable viewing position for the decade.

9h

Police officers 'open up' about body-worn cameras in a post-Ferguson era

The fatal shooting of Michael Brown by a police officer in Ferguson, Missouri, generated political and media backlash that continues to erode law enforcement legitimacy today. As a result, the Taskforce on Twenty-first Century Policing was mandated to reduce crime and build trust between law enforcement and the communities they serve.

9h

Solcelleudbud gav lave priser – men kun halvt så mange solceller som forventet

19 solcelleanlæg under 1 MW vandt solcelleudbud med pristillæg på i gennemsnit 12,97 øre pr. kWh. Men puljen blev kun halvt brugt op, fordi der manglede ansøgninger.

9h

When boy fish build castles to impress girls, boy genes get 'turned on' and 'tuned in'

Call it instinct, but something compels some animals to behave in certain ways, perhaps programs in their genes. Researchers have directly connected activities of genes with instinctive behavior in little male fish that make patterns in the sand to attract their mates.

9h

Stretchable thermoelectric coils for energy harvesting in miniature flexible wearable devices

Miniaturized semiconductor devices with energy harvesting features have paved the way to wearable technologies and sensors. Although thermoelectric systems have attractive features in this context, the ability to maintain large temperature differences across device terminals remains increasingly difficult to achieve with accelerated trends in device miniaturization. As a result, a group of scienti

9h

Large areas of the Brazilian rainforest at risk of losing protection

Up to 15 million hectares of the Brazilian Amazon is at risk of losing its legal protection, according to a new study from researchers at Chalmers University of Technology and KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden, and the University of Sao Paulo, Brazil. This is equivalent to more than 4 times the entire forest area of the UK.

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Maldives: Climate change could actually help coral islands rise again – but they're still at risk

At the southern tip of the Maldives, on the tiny island of Villingili, a patch of ground rises to tower a whole 2.4m above the sea. It's the world's lowest high point.

9h

Astronomers detect once-in-a-lifetime gamma rays

Scientists have discovered something amazing.

9h

Fin whale, mountain gorilla populations rise amid conservation action

The fin whale and mountain gorilla populations grew significantly due to efforts by conservationists to halt their descent towards extinction, the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) said Wednesday.

9h

Keep your friends close

Online social networks, such as the well-known Facebook, allow users to form connections with each other quickly and easily. A user might invite another to become their "friend," "like" a page they have created on the system, or join a group that forms a community within the overarching community. Of course, it is implicit that one should only "friend" people one knows. But, there are millions if

9h

How birds and insects reacted to the solar eclipse

A team of researchers with Cornell University and the University of Oxford has found that birds and insects reacted in some surprising ways to the 2017 U.S. total solar eclipse. In their paper published in the journal Biology Letters, the group describes their study of birds and insects during the solar eclipse using Doppler radar data and what they found.

9h

Chinese satellites provide advanced solutions to modeling small particles

The assimilation of aerosol optical depth (AOD) observational data from the Chinese satellite Fengyun-3A (FY-3A) can significantly improve the ability to model aerosol mass, according to Prof. Jinzhong Min, Vice President at Nanjing University of Information Science and Technology.

9h

The dawn of a new era for genebanks

Biodiversity goes beyond species diversity. Another important aspect of biodiversity is genetic variation within species. A notable example is the immense variety of cultivars and landraces of crop plants and their wild progenitors. An international research consortium led by the of the Leibniz Institute of Plant Genetics and Crop Plant Research (IPK Gatersleben) and supported by the iDiv research

9h

Direct observations of a planet orbiting a star 63 light-years away

In the past 30 years, the number of planets discovered beyond our solar system has grown exponentially. Unfortunately, due to the limitations of our technology, the vast majority of these exoplanets have been discovered by indirect means, often by detecting the transits of planets in front of their stars (the Transit Method) or by the gravitational influence they exert on their star (the Radial Ve

9h

Physicists discover new way of resonance tuning for nonlinear optics

A research team from ITMO University and the Australian National University has discovered that different metasurfaces exhibit the same behavior provided a symmetry breaking is introduced to their unit cells 'meta-atoms'. Asymmetry of meta-atoms results in high-quality (high Q) resonances in the transmittance spectra of metasurfaces. It opens the way to control an optical response, which is highly

9h

Photo recognition that keeps personal interests private

Photo-based information services that use image recognition can identify a user's location and other private information, such as personal interests and tendencies. Osaka University researchers developed an encryption-free framework called EnfPire to preserve users' privacy. EnfPire transforms a visual feature extracted from a photo so that it cannot be uniquely identified. The photo-based informa

9h

Quantum science turns social

Researchers developed a versatile remote gaming interface that allowed experts as well as hundreds of citizen scientists all over the world through multiplayer collaboration and in real time to optimize a quantum gas experiment in a lab at Aarhus University. Both teams quickly used the interface to dramatically improve upon the previous best solutions, that scientists had established after months

9h

When electric fields make spins swirl

IBS research group in collaboration with the University of Science and Technology of China, has reported the discovery of small and ferroelectrically tunable skyrmions. Published in Nature Materials, this work introduces new compelling advantages that bring skyrmion research a step closer to application.

9h

Police officers 'open up' about body-worn cameras in a post-ferguson era

A study is the first to use qualitative research to gain deeper insight into law enforcement officers' personal experiences and perspectives on the use of body-worn cameras in a post-Ferguson era. Based on a long and deep immersion in the field, researchers have generated insider knowledge on one of the most overt strategic changes to modern American policing.

9h

When boy fish build castles to impress girls, boy genes get 'turned on' and 'tuned in'

What if we could observe genes firing off signals to cause some behaviors? We're getting closer. Researchers were able to directly match gene regulation with ritual mating behavior in fish. Their research field may also give some insight into autism spectrum disorder.

9h

Studying Komodo dragons to better understand reduced dispersal in island species

A team of researchers from Australia, Indonesia, Italy and Denmark has learned more about Komodo dragons in their search to better understand reduced island dispersal in island species. In their paper published in Proceedings of the Royal Society B, the group describes their study of the world's largest lizard and what they found.

9h

Pressure helps to make better Li-ion batteries

Lithium titanium oxide (Li4Ti5O12, LTO), a "zero-strain" anode material for Li-ion batteries (LIBs), exhibits excellent cycling performance. However, it shows poor conductivity, which is the major drawback and limits its applications. In a recent paper published in National Science Review, it is reported that static compression can highly improve the conductivity of LTO by pressure-induced amorphi

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'Humongous fungus': 25 years later, this Armillaria gallica is bigger than first thought, says researcher

A giant individual of the fungus, Armillaria gallica, or honey mushroom, first studied 25 years ago by James B. Anderson, a professor emeritus of biology at the University of Toronto Mississauga, is not only alive and well but is older and larger than Anderson originally estimated.

9h

Sticker shock: Conservation costs and policy complications

Earlier this year, a heartbreaking drama played out near Vancouver Island. An endangered orca named J35 carried her dead calf for weeks in an apparent mourning ritual captivating onlookers around the world.

9h

Identification of mechanisms of pesticide resistance in cattle ticks

The cattle tick is controlled by pesticides, invariably leading to the selection of resistant strains. In Brazil, this parasite is currently resistant to a greater or lesser extent to all the commercial pesticides used by cattle farmers. The antiparasitic drug most widely used to control cattle tick populations (as well as human parasites) is ivermectin, a broad-spectrum anthelmintic, acaricide, a

9h

Physicists discover new way of resonance tuning for nonlinear optics

A research team from ITMO University and the Australian National University has discovered that different metasurfaces exhibit the same behavior provided a symmetry breaking is introduced to their unit cells "meta-atoms." Asymmetry of meta-atoms results in high-quality (high Q) resonances in the transmittance spectra of metasurfaces. Such resonances are capable of multiple amplification of externa

9h

Uber Rewards Loyalty Program Gives Perks to Power Users

Rack up enough points and a real life human will answer your customer support call.

9h

Best iPads for 2018: Which New Models Should You Actually Buy?

Choosing an iPad is more complicated than it needs to be, but we're here to help.

9h

How sex and gender influence how we vote

Leading up to the recent midterm elections in the United States, pundits predicted women voters and candidates would alter the race.

9h

Hospital discharges to 'no fixed address' – here's a much better way

Why treat people and send them back to the conditions that made them sick? – Michael Marmot, The Health Gap, 2015

10h

Why is everyone talking about natural sequence farming?

On the eve of the recent National Drought Summit, prime minister Scott Morrison and deputy prime minister Michael McCormack visited Mulloon Creek near Canberra, shown recently on the ABC's Australian Story. They were there to see a creek that was still flowing, and green with vegetation, despite seven months of drought.

10h

The bitter lesson of the Californian fires

California is burning, again. Dozens of people have been killed and thousands of buildings destroyed in several fires, the most destructive in the state's history.

10h

The Significance of Michelle Obama’s Fertility Story

“Did you hear about Michelle Obama?” my mother asked me last Friday morning. “Her girls were born through in vitro.” Despite the awkwardness of her phrasing— born through in vitro —I knew my mother was pleased by this connection to the former first lady. Two of her own favorite people, my daughters, were also born through IVF. I hadn’t heard, and was as surprised as many others were by the news r

10h

2 Days Left to Vote for Your Favorite Sticker Design!

There are only two days left to vote for your favorite Brain Awareness Week 2019 sticker design! The winner will be featured on the 2019 Brain Awareness Week sticker used by partners across the US. We have narrowed the choices to five wonderful designs and now it’s up to you! Cast your vote now through November 16. Our top five finalists are Leonor Braga, Joni Lahr-Moore, Luis Orazi, Brenda Ramos

10h

Zoologist outlines how humans have altered evolution over past century

Zoologist Sarah Otto, with the University of British Columbia, has published a report in the journal Proceedings of the Royal Society B regarding human influence on evolution over the past century. She notes that the number of changes that have occurred over such a short span of time is unprecedented.

10h

Image: Hubble spots a lonely blue dwarf

This captivating image from the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope's Wide Field Camera 3 shows a lonely dwarf galaxy 100 million light-years away from Earth. This image depicts the blue compact dwarf galaxy ESO 338-4, which can be found in the constellation of Corona Australis (the Southern Crown).

10h

How Earth volcanoes offer a window into the evolution of life and the solar system

Violent and destructive, active volcanoes ought to be feared and avoided. Yet, these geological cauldrons expose the pulse of many planets and moons, offering clues to how these bodies evolved from chemical soups to the complex systems of gases and rocks we see today.

10h

The dance of the small galaxies that surround the Milky Way

An international team led by researchers from the IAC used data from the ESA satellite Gaia to measure the motion of 39 dwarf galaxies. This data gives information on the dynamics of these galaxies, their histories and their interactions with the Milky Way.

10h

Solution in fight against fake graphene

A new study has uncovered a major problem – a lack of graphene production standards has led to many cases of poor quality products from suppliers. Such practices can impede the progress of research that depend fundamentally on the use of high-quality graphene.

10h

Moving forward with microplastics research

Microplastics have been recorded in a range of zooplankton species, and they are already causing problems for these tiny – but vitally important – animals, even before the plastic particles make their way through the food web. A new review suggests that, to further our understanding of when and why zooplankton munch on microplastics, experiments need to better represent the tiny plastic particles

10h

Putting the squeeze on soot

Running diesel engines and gas turbines at high pressure to boost power output and efficiency is harmful for the environment. Burning fuel at high pressure can significantly change the soot particles that are produced, William Roberts from the KAUST Clean Combustion Research Center and his team have shown. Studying the factors affecting soot formation should lead to new ways to curb soot emissions

10h

Plankton communities' warm response to nutrient availability

Microbial plankton communities will be boosted in productivity and biomass from warmer water temperatures provided sufficient nutrients are also readily available, suggest KAUST researchers.

10h

'Conservation successes' bring hope for mountain gorilla

Mountain gorilla: Conservation efforts appear to be paying off for large, charismatic animals.

10h

Air pollution might make it harder to get pregnant

Health Public health researchers across the country have found growing evidence of a relationship between air pollution and fertility. Air pollution kills millions annually, and has been linked to health problems ranging from cardiovascular disease to Alzheimer’s. The World Health Organization considers…

10h

Concrete printing in 3-D will put an end to boring buildings

Construction is one of the largest industries in the world economy – worth A$10 trillion globally (equivalent to 13% of GDP).

10h

The culture of silence that allows sexual harassment in the workplace to continue

(All names have been changed to protect the identities of the interviewees mentioned)

10h

X-rays show how periods of stress changed an ice age hyena to the bone

A few hundred thousand years ago during Earth's most recent ice age, a beefy subspecies of spotted hyena that was more than double the weight of its modern relative roamed Eurasia's snow-glazed terrain. Until their extinction about 11,000 years ago, these animals, now known as cave hyenas, would drag their prey into dens and devour them with bone-crushing jaws.

10h

Why People Deny Science

A new study further shows that people are inconsistent in how they justify their beliefs.

10h

When electric fields make spins swirl

We are reaching the limits of silicon capabilities in terms of data storage density and speed of memory devices. One of the potential next-generation data storage elements is the magnetic skyrmion. A team at the Center for Correlated Electron Systems, within the Institute for Basic Science (IBS, South Korea), in collaboration with the University of Science and Technology of China, have reported th

10h

Robots in sewers will save society millions

In the future the country's sewer systems will be inhabited by surveillance robots. Using robots, big data and artificial intelligence (AI), a new Danish research project will save hundreds of millions of kroner on maintaining sewers.

10h

Photo recognition that keeps personal interests private

From just a quick snapshot on a smartphone, image recognition technology can provide a wealth of information to help shoppers find in-store bargains and inform tourists of the name of a landmark. But these photos may be giving away more information about users' preferences and tendencies than they want to share.

10h

Improved method to identify salt tolerant crops

Soil salinity is affecting large areas in the world and millions of farmers are faced with decreasing yields and many are even forced to migrate. Dutch scientists (Prof Dr. Gerrit van Straten (Wageningen University), Prof. Dr. Peter van Bodegom (Leiden University), Prof. Dr. Jelte Rozema (VU University Amsterdam), Dr. Arjen de Vos (Salt Farm Texel) and Dr. Bas Bruning (Salt Farm Texel, Salt Farm F

10h

Open database encapsulates worldwide knowledge of human metabolism

An international research consortium, spearheaded by the Luxembourg Centre for Systems Biomedicine (LCSB) of the University of Luxembourg, has developed a database that is unique in the world: the Virtual Metabolic Human Database (VMH). VMH is a collection of knowledge that researchers from all around the world have generated about human metabolism in the last 60 years.

10h

Lenovo Yoga C930 Review: A Solid 2-in-1 Laptop With Outstanding Battery Life

Thoughtful design puts the Yoga C930 in a class of its own.

10h

Tesla, GM, and Nissan Unite to Save Their EV Tax Credits

The EV Drive Coalition will push Congress to extend the $7,500 federal tax credit for electric cars, but advocates say it could do much more.

10h

Letters: ‘Even If We Follow All Instructions, We Are Not Heard’

I Still Don’t Know Whether My Vote Will Be Counted in Florida When Jemele Hill went to vote, she discovered that her name had been removed from the rolls over something she’d tweeted. “In another election year, this incident would just be a funny story for me to repeat at parties,” she wrote , “but this was the most serious election of my lifetime.” I am 21 years old, a university student, and a

10h

The ‘Madman’ Behind Trump’s Trade Theory

“N o one’s more careful about what they buy,” Peter Navarro told me recently. The director of the Office of Trade and Manufacturing Policy was explaining that he reads labels closely and avoids products made in China. “People need to be mindful of the high cost of low prices,” he said. In Navarro’s telling, those cheap flip-flops are supporting an authoritarian state, and that cut-rate washing ma

10h

Image of the Day: Acoustic Camouflage

Moths' scales vibrate in the frequency range of bats' echolocation calls, perhaps helping the insects to avoid predation.

11h

There is no fundamental difference between male and female brains

A lasting desire to find differences in how male and female brains work serves to affirm gender stereotypes, not explain them, says Dean Burnett

11h

Karina Longworth Makes Old Hollywood New

These days, the closest thing Los Angeles gets to Old Hollywood magic comes from a converted closet in a guest house in Los Feliz. There, in a space swaddled with thick black padding, using just a microphone and an iMac balanced precariously atop a pile of wooden crates, Karina Longworth conjures cinematic ghosts back into existence. The ritual always begins the same way. Longworth once compared

11h

Colonizing Mars Means Contaminating Mars — And Never Knowing For Sure If It Had Its Own Native Life

Before that happens, we need to recognize that a very real possibility exists that the first human steps on the Martian surface will lead to a collision between terrestrial life and biota native to Mars.

11h

South Pole: Rock 'hotspot' causes ice sheet to sag

A large area of warm rock is melting the base of the Antarctic Ice Sheet at the South Pole.

11h

New scheduling system could help reduce flight delays

Scheduling and coordinating air traffic can be difficult, but taking the airlines' and passengers' delay costs into account can actually save airlines money and result in fewer delays, according to a new study.

11h

11h

This Octogenarian Is the Oldest Fish in Captivity. And She Likes Belly Rubs.

The world's oldest fish lives a comfortable life at the Steinhart Aquarium in California.

11h

Invisible Stew of Plastic Pollution Found in Fur Seal Poop

First humans, now seals: Microplastics are in everyone's digestive tract.

11h

Modern lifestyles shaped our evolution only a few thousand years ago

Two new studies reveal recent evolutionary changes in Europe and East Asia, suggesting that modern living can change our immune systems and metabolism

11h

Einstein was wrong: Why ‘normal’ physics can’t explain reality

The most ambitious experiments yet show that the quantum weirdness Einstein famously hated rules the roost – not just here, but across the entire universe

11h

Water quality changes set to make a splash

Environmental water quality is set to improve in Australia and New Zealand thanks to research transforming water quality guidelines.

11h

Colder, darker climates increase alcohol consumption and liver disease

People living in colder regions with less sunlight consume more alcohol and experience more alcoholic liver disease.

11h

Scientists engineer a functional optical lens out of 2-D materials

In optics, the era of glass lenses may be waning.

11h

Team determines how cholesterol moves inside cells

Researchers have found that high-density lipoprotein, or HDL, sometimes referred to as "good" cholesterol, is transported from the outer wall to the interior of cells by a protein that helps create a "bridge" between the two areas.

11h

What you need to know about the latest U.N. climate change report

The United Nations scientific panel on climate change recently released a major report that examined the benefits of trying to limit global warming to 1.5 degrees Celsius above nineteenth-century temperatures and described the consequences of failing to meet that goal. The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) concluded that the benefits of limiting global warming to well below the thre

11h

Migration critical to survival of dolphin populations, genetic study shows

An analysis of dolphin genes has revealed information about their past migrations, showing just how crucial migrants might be for other populations.

11h

Regioner begrænser adgang til Sundhedsstyrelsens ekspertpanel

Fremover vil færre patienter med livstruende sygdom få anmodninger om eksperimentel behandling igennem til vurdering af Sundhedsstyrelsens ekspertpanel for eksperimentel behandling. Dette sker for at undgå uoverensstemmelser med Medicinrådets vurderinger.

11h

14 pct. tungere: Større mennesker får brug for mere mad

Det er ikke bare antallet af munde, der spiller ind, når man skal lave en prognose for, hvor meget mad verden skal skaffe om godt 30 år for at mætte alle, viser norsk forskning.

11h

DARPA's Hail Mary Plan to Restart a Hacked US Electric Grid

On tiny Plum Island, DARPA stages a real-life blackout to put its grid recovery tools to the test.

11h

This Chemical Is So Hot It Destroys Nerve Fibers—in a Good Way

Resiniferatoxin is 10,000 times hotter than the hottest pepper, and has features that make it promising as a painkiller of last resort.

11h

This US Firm Wants to Help Build China’s Surveillance State

The owner of Bikini.com is using open source software to create artificial-intelligence image-recognition systems for Chinese companies and authorities.

11h

New rules and new technology are giving California farmers and managers a better look at groundwater supplies

Most areas of California farm country have a significant lack of information about their groundwater use. The water managers responsible for putting California's depleted aquifers on the path to sustainability now need to get the data to do the job. Running the new agencies created under the state's Sustainable Groundwater Management Act, these managers must first decide what they need to know, an

11h

Image: Mapping the night

Imaging Earth from space is a favourite pastime for astronauts on the International space Station. They can set their cameras to automatically snap photos while they work, but often make time to Earth-gaze and take photos of their own.

11h

Optimization of alloy materials: Diffusion processes in nano particles decoded

aluminum alloys have unique material properties and are indispensable materials in aircraft manufacturing and space technology. With the help of high-resolution electron tomography, researchers at TU Graz have for the first time decoded mechanisms crucial for understanding these properties. The research results have recently been published in Nature Materials.

11h

The unintended consequences of dams and reservoirs

An international team of drought scientists reports that many dams and reservoirs can paradoxically worsen water shortages they're intended to alleviate. The study is published in Nature Sustainability.

11h

Electro-sensing ability of African elephantnose fish shows acuteness of vision

The African elephantnose fish generates weak electrical pulses to navigate its environment. This localization sense bears an astonishing similarity to vision, as a study by the University of Bonn now shows. The study demonstrates that different objects have different electrical "colors." Fish use these colors to distinguish such things as their favorite food, mosquito larvae, from other small anim

11h

First microarrayed 3-D neuronal culture platform developed

Neuronal development is often regulated by the graded distribution of guidance molecules, which can either attract or repel the neuronal migration or neurite projection when presented in a format of concentration gradients, or chemotaxis. However, many details about the process are largely unexplored.

11h

How can we design electronic devices that don't overheat?

You've felt the heat before—the smartphone that warms while running a navigation app or the laptop that gets too hot for your lap.

11h

Brazil’s presidential election could mean billions of tons of additional greenhouse gases

Policies leading to more destruction of the Amazon and Cerrado would have a huge impact on climate change.

11h

Do We Actually Experience the Flow of Time?

Subjective experience must inform physics and philosophy, but it should be assessed carefully — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

11h

Stealth-cap technology for light-emitting nanoparticles

A team of scientists from the Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR), in collaboration with researchers from Monash University Australia, has succeeded in significantly increasing the stability and biocompatibility of special light-transducing nanoparticles. The team has developed the so-called "upconverting" nanoparticles that not only convert infrared light into UV-visible light, but also a

12h

Scientists shed light on semiconductor degradation mechanism

Scientists at Nagoya Institute of Technology (NITech) and collaborating universities in Japan have gained new insight into the mechanisms behind degradation of a semiconductor material that is used in electronic devices. By highlighting the specific science behind how the material degrades, they are making way for potential discoveries that may prevent the performance degradation of the material.

12h

Wind Turbines Can Act Like Apex Predators

Wind farms can cause a cascade of ecological effects, but are still needed to provided cleaner energy supplies — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

12h

Venom shape untangles scorpion family tree

University of Wisconsin-Madison scientists have made a fresh attempt to untangle the scorpion family tree using not the shape and structure of the arachnids' bodies, but the shape of their venom.

12h

Preserving truth: How to confront and correct fake news

"[T]o have a democracy that thrives and actually that manages to stay alive at all, you need regular citizens being able to get good, solid information," says Craig Newmark. The only constructive way to deal with fake news? Support trustworthy media. In 2018, Newmark was announced as a major donor of two new media organizations, The City , which will report on New York City-area stories which may

12h

Lægeklinik i Tønder bliver til udbudsklinik

2.200 borgere i Tønder skal have ny læge. Virksomheden Alles Lægehus, der for halvanden måned siden købte Falcks 12 lægeklinikker, vandt det offentlige udbud og skal stå for driften.

12h

L’Oréal’s New Clip-on Sensor Tracks Your Exposure to UV Rays

You can buy the $60 sensor exclusively at the Apple Store.

12h

Venom shape untangles scorpion family tree

As a child growing up in Mexico, Carlos Santibanez-Lopez feared the scorpions that would often decorate the walls and ceilings of his home in search of a warm place with plenty of food.

12h

Sound-absorbent wings and fur help some moths evade bats

Tiny ultrathin scales on some moth wings absorb sound waves sent out by bats on the hunt.

12h

Varmelager skal give elbilen ekstra vinter-rækkevidde

Tyske forskere har udviklet et batteri, der kan undvære aktiv opvarmning i de kolde vintermåneder ved at optage og lagre overskudsvarme.

12h

»Danske politikere er bange for digitalisering«

Med GDPR har borgerne fået magten og retten til egne data, men de vil også kræve, at data bliver brugt til noget, der kommer dem til gavn, mener Mogens Nørgaard.

12h

Did Minority Voters Dethrone Scott Walker?

Scott Walker was elected governor of Wisconsin eight years ago. He’s survived a recall attempt, a reelection bid, a brief flirtation with running for the GOP nomination for president, and years of bitter opposition from Wisconsinites who fought against his hard-line policies on voting rights, health care, education, and the state safety net. He’s led what might be considered the model of a Republ

12h

The New GOP Coalition Is Emerging

There was a time when Charlie Baker, the popular Republican governor of Massachusetts, who won his bid for reelection by a wider margin than did the stalwart progressive Senator Elizabeth Warren, might have been considered one of the GOP’s leading lights. As it stands, he is an oddity. Though the Republican Party still commands the allegiance of some secular, college-educated, upper-middle-income

12h

California Democrats Are Still Claiming House Seats

LOS ANGELES —Democrats had already reclaimed the House of Representatives before California’s election returns came in last week, but since Election Day, the party has racked up a nice bonus here: After the counting of vote-by-mail ballots, Democrats appear to have won four of the state’s six most competitive congressional races. In the remaining two, a Democrat has just taken a slim lead in one,

12h

Why Young Pakistanis Are Learning Chinese

GILGIT, Pakistan—On a July morning, Saqlain Abbas, 26 years old, stood before rows of students, Mandarin textbook in hand, while a Pakistani soldier sat silently at the back of the classroom with a gun at his side. Hanging on the wall was a collection of idyllic Chinese landscapes—the reddish-orange mountains of Gansu, the placid waters of a lake in Xinjiang. Here, at Karakoram International Univ

12h

Stjerner i Mælkevejens halo stammer fra ældgammel kollision

Mælkevejen kolliderede for 10 milliarder år siden med en mindre galakse, der satte bestandigt præg på mælkevejens galaktiske halo og tykke skive, tyder ny undersøgelse på.

13h

NIH scientists combine technologies to view the retina in unprecedented detail

By combining two imaging modalities — adaptive optics and angiography — investigators at the National Eye Institute (NEI) can see live neurons, epithelial cells, and blood vessels deep in the eye's light-sensing retina. Resolving these tissues and cells in the outermost region of the retina in such unprecedented detail promises to transform the detection and treatment of diseases such as age-rel

13h

Big jobs: Safety, planning key to increasing production performance at Spallation Neutron Source

For many species, winter serves as a time to rest and recuperate to return stronger in the year ahead. In many respects, so is it also for certain large-scale science facilities.

14h

UK budget carrier FlyBe says for sale

Struggling British no-frills airline FlyBe on Wednesday put itself up for sale, adding it was in talks with potential buyers in the face of a challenging market.

14h

Jet Airways shares rise on Tata investment speculation

Shares in India's second-largest airline Jet Airways jumped almost three percent Wednesday following reports that salt-to-steel conglomerate Tata Group might invest in it.

14h

Kaffe-elskende ingeniør rejste verden rundt for at skrive en unik bog

Kaffeproducenters misundelse på vinproducenter var udgangspunktet for dansk civilingeniørs omfattende værk med fakta og anek­doter fra begge verdener.

14h

Hospital får fem mio. kr. til at rydde op i ældres medicinforbrug

Nordsjællands Hospital åbner klinik, der skal rydde op i ældre multisyge patienters forbrug af medicin. Hospitalet vil give mulighed for at blive indlagt til ’medicinsk detox’.

15h

When Hospitals Merge to Save Money, Patients Often Pay More

Rapid consolidation has created powerful groups of hospitals, with organizations dictating prices and fueling health spending in some areas of the country.

15h

Youth-oriented mental health campaign shows evidence of success

Most people who face mental health problems either do not seek treatment or delay seeking help, a problem that California is targeting with a wide-ranging campaign to change public attitudes. A new study finds that a community engagement campaign in Los Angeles County to address mental health barriers — a part of the statewide efforts — had an impressive reach with the younger audience it target

15h

Cathay apologises over data breach but denies cover-up

The top two executives at Hong Kong carrier Cathay Pacific on Wednesday apologised for the firm's handling of the world's biggest airline hack that saw millions of customers' data breached but denied trying to cover it up.

15h

Bør man spise kost med lavt glutenniveau

Når raske voksne spiser mad med et mindre indhold af gluten, oplever de større velvære…

15h

Resources giants ramp up calls for Australia carbon tax

Energy giant Woodside has joined the world's largest miners in calling for Australia to re-introduce a tax on carbon emissions as pressure mounts on the conservative government to act on climate change by curbing pollution.

15h

Vietnam's top telecom bosses face arrest over loss-making TV deal

Vietnam on Wednesday issued arrest warrants and placed two top telecom bosses under investigation for suspected involvement in a loss-making private TV deal, authorities said, as a crackdown on graft gathers pace.

15h

Soil's history: A solution to soluble phosphorus?

The Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations estimates that around 45 million tons of phosphorus fertilizers will be used around the world in 2018.

16h

Hopper, de Kooning hit new auction records in New York

Paintings by Edward Hopper and Willem de Kooning sold for nearly $92 million and $69 million respectively in New York on Tuesday, setting new world record auction prices for each artist, Christie's said.

16h

The man who battled the flames to save his corner of Paradise

By all accounts, retired carpenter Brad Weldon should have evacuated his home in Paradise as the flames approached.

16h

Wolves at the door, Alpine shepherd can't imagine any other life

He sleeps fully dressed, dreading a midnight wolf attack on the flock of sheep penned in close by his hut, high up in the French Alps.

16h

Amazon ends suspense over HQ by picking New York, DC suburb

For more than a year, cities around the country waited in suspense over whether they'd be chosen as Amazon's second home.

16h

Gene-edited food is coming, but will shoppers buy?

The next generation of biotech food is headed for the grocery aisles, and first up may be salad dressings or granola bars made with soybean oil genetically tweaked to be good for your heart.

16h

'Incomparable' $50 mn pink diamond smashes record at Geneva auction

An exceptionally rare pink diamond of nearly 19 carats fetched 50.3 million Swiss francs ($50 million, 44 million euros) at auction in Geneva Tuesday, Christie's said, setting a new per-carat record for a stone of its kind.

16h

World's next supercollider design report released

Scientists working on the Circular Electron Positron Collider (CEPC), a planned next-generation particle collider in China, released its Conceptual Design Report (CDR) on Nov. 14 in Beijing.

16h

Patienter med søvnapnø venter mange måneder på behandling: I Viborg står 120 i kø

På søvnklinikken i Viborg kommer der hver måned 30 nye patienter til.

16h

Medie: Webtrafik til Google blev for en stund sendt til Rusland og Kina

Forbindelser til Googles tjenester blev fejlagtigt sendt til Rusland og Kina.

16h

Tæt brugerinvolvering i jysk EPJ-udvikling: Men der er ingen systematisk måling af gevinster

Jyske Systematics EPJ-system har snart indtaget tre af landets fem regioner, og historien står i skarp kontrast til Sundhedsplatformen. Systemet har ingen business case – til gengæld er det lægerne, der bygger det, fortæller den it-ansvarlige.

16h

Løkke regner baglæns: Her er matematikken bag en million grønne biler

Kom med på et interessant matematisk eksperiment i jagten på en grøn profil.

17h

Blege koralrev gør fisk sløve og underernærerede

Når koralrev bliver afbleget af for eksempel klimaforandringer, får det fanefisk til at opføre sig anderledes. Det starter en ond cirkel, der accelererer afblegningen.

18h

Soil's history: A solution to soluble phosphorus?

New research suggests that, over time, less phosphorus fertilizer may be necessary on agricultural fields.

18h

Surgical menopause leads to increased sleep issues

Insomnia is one of the most common symptoms of menopause, with nearly 20 percent of postmenopausal women reporting sleep disturbances. A new study from Korea demonstrates that sleep quality is often worse for women who undergo surgical menopause compared with those who transition through menopause naturally. The study results are published online today in Menopause, the journal of The North Americ

18h

Vaginal problems diminish quality of life but often go unreported

With symptoms such as dryness, burning, or itching of the vagina, vulvovaginal atrophy is estimated to affect up to 98 percent of postmenopausal women, many of whom will fail to report symptoms to their healthcare providers or seek help. A new survey demonstrates the negative effect of these symptoms on quality of life. The study results are published online today in Menopause, the journal of The

18h

Alcohol ads with pro-drinking comments on Facebook boost desire to drink

Alcohol advertisements on social media sites such as Facebook can increase young adults' desire to drink if the ads contain pro-drinking comments from users. That's according to new research in the current issue of the Journal of Studies on Alcohol and Drugs.

18h

Researchers find inhibiting one protein destroys toxic clumps seen in Parkinson's disease

A team of neurologists at Georgetown University Medical Center has found that inhibiting the USP13 molecule may be a therapeutic target in Parkinson's disease and other similar forms of neurodegeneration.

18h

Recommendations to reduce recidivism in transgender women

Previously incarcerated transgender women can find themselves caught in a cycle that leads to repeat jail time. A new analysis of Allegheny County by University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public Health researchers identifies potential solutions that could lead to transgender women being more successfully reintegrated into society.

18h

Forskere: Mindre gluten giver vægttab og sunde tarme

Professor er selv overrasket over virkningen af en kost med mindre gluten.

18h

A Sikorsky Veteran on Marine One in the Rain

I imagine this will be the last installment in the “weather flying with Marine One” series. Two previous entries here and here . (On the other hand, who knows that the incoming email inbox will hold.) A person who has worked at the company that makes the current Marine One helicopter, aka VH-1, has this to say: On your recent piece addressing the ability of the Presidential VH-1 to fly in bad wea

20h

Pain can be a self-fulfilling prophecy

A new brain imaging study of 34 people found that when people expect to feel intense pain, they do, even if they aren't subjected to painful stimuli. Surprisingly, these false expectations can persist even when reality demonstrates otherwise, the study found.

20h

If your diet fails, try again; your heart will thank you

Risk factors for cardiovascular disease closely track with changes in eating patterns, even only after a month or so.

20h

Visualizing 'unfurling' microtubule growth

Living cells depend absolutely on microtubules that form a scaffolding for moving materials inside the cell. Microtubule fibers are hollow rods made of much smaller tubulin subunits that spontaneously assemble at one end of the rod, but exactly how they do this inside the crowded environment of living cells has been a mystery. Now researchers have uncovered the mechanism that puts these blocks in

20h

Synthetic DNA-delivered antibodies protect against Ebola in preclinical studies

Scientists have successfully engineered novel DNA-encoded monoclonal antibodies (DMAbs) targeting Zaire Ebolavirus that were effective in preclinical models. Study results showed that DMAbs were expressed over a wide window of time and offered complete and long-term protection against lethal virus challenges. DMAbs may also provide a novel powerful platform for rapid screening of monoclonal antibo

20h

Carbon emissions will start to dictate stock prices

Companies that fail to curb their carbon output may eventually face the consequences of asset devaluation and stock price depreciation, according to a new study.

20h

Your heart hates air pollution; portable filters could help

The fifth-leading risk factor for mortality worldwide, air pollution presents a major heart health risk. A simple intervention could help people breathe easier at home.

20h

Weightlifting is good for your heart and it doesn't take much

Lifting weights for less than an hour a week may reduce your risk for a heart attack or stroke by 40 to 70 percent, according to a new study. Spending more than an hour in the weight room did not yield any additional benefit, the researchers found. The results show benefits of strength training are independent of running, walking or other aerobic activity.

20h

So, you think you're good at remembering faces, but terrible with names?

The cringe-worthy experience of not being able to remember an acquaintance's name leads many of us to believe we are terrible with names. However, new research has revealed this intuition is misleading; we are actually better at remembering names than faces.

20h

Genetic Predisposition to Obesity Linked with Depression

The variants associated with the mood disorder included those without metabolic risks, suggesting it is the psychological effects of obesity at play.

21h

Juul Pledges Big Changes, but the Impact May Be Small

The e-cigarette maker says it will discontinue some flavors at retail outlets and shut down social media accounts ahead of an expected FDA crackdown.

21h

Science News Briefs from All over

A few very brief reports about international science and technology from Alaska to Indonesia, including one on offshore dairy farming from the Netherlands. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

21h

Vapers do not undermine desire to quit smoking

Smokers who regularly spend time with vapers (people who use e-cigarettes) are more likely to try quitting smoking, according to a new study carried out by UCL. The study, published today in BMC Medicine and funded by Cancer Research UK, found that smokers who were regularly exposed to vapers (as opposed to other smokers) were around 20 percent more likely to have reported both a high current moti

22h

Captive-breeding will not save wild Asian Houbara without regulation of hunting

The survival of the heavily exploited Asian Houbara depends on the regulation of trapping and hunting, according to research led by the University of East Anglia (UEA). New findings published today reveal that trying to stabilise populations solely through captive breeding will require the release of such large numbers it will inevitably compromise wild populations.

22h

Captive-breeding will not save wild Asian Houbara without regulation of hunting

The survival of the heavily exploited Asian Houbara depends on the regulation of trapping and hunting, according to research led by the University of East Anglia (UEA).

22h

More adults using complementary and alternative medicine in England but access is unequal

Use of practitioner-led complementary and alternative medicine (CAM), such as acupuncture, massage, osteopathy and chiropractic treatment, rose from 12 per cent of the population in 2005 to 16 per cent of the population in 2015, according to a survey led by researchers at the University of Bristol. However, access to these treatments was unequal, with women, those who are better off and those in t

23h

Trilobites: Why Komodo Dragons Haven’t Conquered the World

The razor-toothed predators are fierce, but scientists found that they’re real homebodies.

23h

The Atlantic Daily: No Control

What We’re Following Take Two: It was never going to be any of the other more than 230 cities across the U.S. that bid for a chance to host Amazon’s so-called HQ2, now officially planting its flag just outside New York and D.C., Annie Lowrey argues. (Opening big offices in New York and D.C. makes sense from the company’s perspective. What inequalities will it widen in these cities? ) And Derek Th

23h

Gadgets for the Climate Hellscape

As the red sun hung in the smoke-filled air outside, as the exhaust from the Camp Fire swept over the Bay Area, I was inside, looking at my phone, like everyone else. I was dying to go running, but the air quality index numbers, and my own eyes and lungs, told me that I shouldn’t. So I was scrolling Instagram when it served me an ad for Vent Performance Filtration Breathing Trainer , from the com

23h

So, you think you're good at remembering faces, but terrible with names?

The cringe-worthy experience of not being able to remember an acquaintance's name leads many of us to believe we are terrible with names. However, new research has revealed this intuition is misleading; we are actually better at remembering names than faces.

23h

Research suggests coffee associated with approx 25 percent lower risk of type 2 diabetes

A report from the Institute for Scientific Information on Coffee (ISIC) titled ' Coffee and type 2 diabetes: A review of the latest research' highlights the potential role of coffee consumption on the reduced risk of developing type 2 diabetes, and the potential mechanisms involved.

23h

Drug designed to boost radiotherapy for hard-to-treat cancers taken safely by patients

A new drug designed to make radiotherapy more effective in treating cancer has been given to patients while they are receiving radiation and shown to be safe, according to research presented at the 30th EORTC-NCI-AACR Symposium on Molecular Targets and Cancer Therapeutics in Dublin, Ireland.

23h

Patients with cancers of the gullet, stomach and bowel respond well to new anti-HER2 drug

An antibody that binds simultaneously to two distinct regions of the HER2 receptor to block the growth of cancer cells has shown promising signs of anti-tumor activity in a number of cancers including those of the gullet (esophagus), stomach and bowel.

23h

How 'dark horses' flip the script of success and happiness

When we first set the Dark Horse Project in motion, fulfillment was the last thing on our minds. We were hoping to uncover specific and possibly idiosyncratic study methods, learning techniques, and rehearsal regimes that dark horses used to attain excellence. Our training made us resistant to ambiguous variables that were difficult to quantify, and personal fulfillment seemed downright foggy. Bu

23h

United Nations considers a test ban on evolution-warping gene drives

Debate over a new idea for stopping malaria is pitting some environmental groups against Bill Gates.

23h

Scientists divided over new research method to combat malaria

Work on engineered gene used to modify DNA of mosquitoes ‘could be stifled’ by perceived risk to environment Research on a radical new way to combat malaria and other devastating diseases could be knocked off track if a UN biodiversity conference imposes a moratorium on the work, a group of scientists have said. Some scientists believe the different approach has the potential to transform the bat

23h

Facing UK Regulation, Big Tech Sends a Lobbyist to London

The Internet Association is taking its case to Whitehall, where members like Facebook, Twitter, and Google face increasing scrutiny.

23h

Amazon’s HQ2 Will Only Worsen America’s ‘Great Divergence’

On the long list of things that New York City desperately needs— money for the subway , for affordable housing , for schools and public hospitals and universal pre-K —more high-paying, high-skilled jobs is not at the top of the list. It could be argued, in fact, that many of New York’s ills are caused by the explosion of high-paying jobs in a city where the construction of affordable housing and

23h

Meningitis progress lags substantially behind that of other preventable diseases

The global disease burden of meningitis remains unacceptably high, and progress lags substantially behind that of other vaccine-preventable diseases. The Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation (IHME) Global Burden of Disease study showed that meningitis deaths reduced by just 21 percent globally between 1990-2016, whereas other preventable diseases such as measles, tetanus, and diarrhea due t

1d

The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: Putting on Ayers

Written by Elaine Godfrey ( @elainejgodfrey ) and Madeleine Carlisle ( @maddiecarlisle2 ) Today in 5 Lines President Donald Trump is reportedly considering replacements for several senior-level administration officials, including Homeland Security Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen and Chief of Staff John Kelly. One name being floated as Kelly’s replacement is Nick Ayers, Vice President Mike Pence’s curr

1d

Large babies born to mothers with diabetes have a near-trebled risk of obesity

New research published in Diabetologia (the journal of the European Association for the Study of Diabetes [EASD]) shows that children who are larger than average at birth (large for gestational age or LGA) and born to mothers with gestational diabetes are almost three times as likely to be obese as children born a normal size to diabetes-free mothers.

1d

That time a bunch of underwater mines exploded and the sun was the only suspect

Space Some serious space weather at play. On that day in 1972, over the course of 30 seconds, American troops flying near North Vietnam witnessed between 20 and 25 explosions in the water.

1d

Watch The Leonid Meteor Shower This Weekend

Hopefully you don't have anything planned between late Saturday night and 3 a.m. Sunday, because with a clear calendar and clear skies, you should be able to catch a glimpse of a few meteors. (Image credit: NASA/Getty Images)

1d

Photo editing presets make big money for influencers, but you're better off making your own

Technology Ever wonder why many Instagram photos look the same? The answer is presets. Make your own photo editing presets and sell them if you're already famous.

1d

U.S. cases of a polio-like illness rise, but there are few clues to its cause

A total of 90 cases of acute flaccid myelitis have been confirmed so far this year, out of 252 under investigation.

1d

Can scientists change mucus to make it easier to clear, limiting harm to lungs?

For people with conditions such as cystic fibrosis and COPD, mucus can get too thick and sticky; coughing alone can't clear it. Infections develop, leading to severe chronic disease and early death. Now, for the first time, scientists have shown why coughing often cannot tear mucus apart and away from the airway lining. And they showed how to make mucus thinner and less sticky so coughing can beco

1d

Juul to stop selling most e-cigarettes in stores, leave social media

Juul makes flavored e-cigarettes and currently dominates the vaping industry, with 70% of the market share. The FDA is planning to ban the sale of flavored e-cigarettes in gas stations and convenient stores this week. Some have called teenage vaping an epidemic. Data from 2018 show that about 20% of high school students had used an e-cigarette in the past 30 days. None Juul, maker of the most pop

1d

CNN files lawsuit against Trump administration

CNN reporter Jim Acosta's press credentials were revoked following a heated exchange with President Donald Trump on November 8. The network filed a lawsuit against the administration on Tuesday, claiming the administration has violated multiple amendments. The White House may only revoke the press credentials of journalists for "compelling reasons," not for reasons involving content. None CNN has

1d

The Looming Legal Battle Over Jim Acosta's Press Pass

Unable to resolve matters behind closed doors, CNN and its chief White House correspondent, Jim Acosta, filed suit in D.C. district court on Tuesday to reinstate Acosta’s permanent credentials to cover the White House. Acosta and CNN claim that the White House’s revocation of his press credentials after a heated presidential press conference Wednesday violates Acosta’s First Amendment right of fr

1d

The Conversation

Is Democracy Dying? The Atlantic ’s October issue examined the current democratic crisis—in America, and in the world. October’s special edition asks whether democracy is dying. Reading of the challenges we face, it is hard not to feel a sense of despair. However, I would like to offer some hope from a part of the world where democracy is far from a given: the countries of the former Soviet Union

1d

If your diet fails, try again; your heart will thank you

Risk factors for cardiovascular disease closely track with changes in eating patterns, even only after a month or so.

1d

Low-Gluten Diet Alters the Human Microbiome

A study of Danish adults reveals moderate changes in the abundance of multiple gut bacteria species, but the results might not be due to reduced gluten per se.

1d

Affordable health care means better access to diabetes prevention, management

OHSU study compares rates of health care utilization at Community Health Centers in states with, without Medicaid expansion programs.

1d

Giant 'Pink Legacy' Diamond Fetches Over $44 Million at Auction

Do you have $45 million lying around? This "fancy vivid" diamond could be yours.

1d

Microorganisms help production

Oil is still the most economically attractive resource for fuels and basic chemicals that can be used to manufacture everyday products such as plastic bottles and detergent. New biotechnological processes aim to simplify the use of renewable biomass as an alternative to the fossil raw material and make it more cost-effective.

1d

The first cave-dwelling centipede from southern China

Scientists report the first cave-dwelling centipede so far known from southern China. Collected last year during a survey in Gaofeng village, Guizhou Province, the species turned out to not only had been successfully hiding away from biologists in the subterranean darkness, but that it also represented the first in its whole order to be discovered underground in the country.

1d

Trilobites: Male Insect Fertility Plummets After Heat Waves

Researchers say that temperature’s effects on sperm production could be one factor behind the decline in the world’s insect populations.

1d

'Rare' jellyfish not so rare

When the Rhizostoma luteum jellyfish was discovered at the beginning of the 19th century in the waters of the Strait of Gibraltar, only nine specimens were identified. For years, it was so inconspicuous that later, in the 20th century, it failed to turn up for six decades. A team of scientists, with the help of a citizen initiative, has now confirmed that it is not really as difficult to find as p

1d

The dawn of a new era for genebanks

One important aspect of biodiversity is genetic variation within species. A notable example is the variety of cultivars of crop plants. Scientists have now characterized at the molecular level a world collection of barley, comprising seed samples from more than 22,000 varieties.

1d

Stealth-cap technology for light-emitting nanoparticles

Scientists have succeeded in significantly increasing the stability and biocompatibility of special light-transducing nanoparticles. They have developed so-called "upconverting" nanoparticles that not only convert infrared light into UV-visible light, but also are water-soluble, remain stable in complex body fluids, and can be used to store medications. They have created a tool that could potent

1d

Arctic sea ice: Simulation versus observation

As an indicator of the impacts of climate change, Arctic sea ice is hard to beat. Scientists have observed the frozen polar ocean advance and retreat at this most sensitive region of the Earth over decades for insight on the potential ripple effects on assorted natural systems: global ocean circulation, surrounding habitats and ecosystems, food sources, sea levels and more.

1d

Emotional intelligence: A new criterion for hiring?

The cognitive skills of a future employee are examined during a job interview. However, qualifications and a nice character don't necessarily mean that the interviewee will be a competent colleague. The individual's emotional intelligence has to be factored in, that is, his capacity to understand, regulate and manage emotions in the specific context of the work environment. Researchers have now de

1d

Doubly-excited electrons reach new energy states

Scientists have now characterized the higher energy levels reached by electrons in resonance in three-particle systems, which are too complex to be described using simple equations. This theoretical model is intended to offer guidance for experimentalists interested in observing these resonant structures in positronium ions.

1d

Tailoring the surface of carbon may hold the key to monitoring patient blood in real-time

Machine learning is increasing the pace of development of customised carbon surfaces with a wide variety of applications.

1d

Hacking in Movies: That 'Hackers' Scene May Not Be So Dumb After All

As Samy Kamkar points out in this episode of 'Technique Critique,' it's certainly not the worst depiction of hacking we've seen in pop culture.

1d

Pain can be a self-fulfilling prophecy

A new brain imaging study of 34 people found that when people expect to feel intense pain, they do, even if they aren't subjected to painful stimuli. Surprisingly, these false expectations can persist even when reality demonstrates otherwise, the study found.

1d

New methane fuel cell fixes temperature issue

Researchers have created a new fuel cell that runs on cheap fuel at temperatures comparable to automobile engines and could slash materials costs. Fuel cells have not been particularly known for their practicality and affordability, but that may have just changed. Though the cell is in the lab, it has high potential to someday electrically power homes and perhaps cars, the researchers say. In a n

1d

Trump, Marine One, and the Rain: Pilots and Other Readers Weigh In

Last night I posted an item about weather conditions this past weekend in Paris, when Donald Trump joined other world leaders there, and on how rain and clouds affected helicopters, including Marine One. (For the record, like “Air Force One,” “Marine One” isn’t a fixed name for any particular aircraft. Whatever Air Force airplane is carrying a sitting U.S. president is, at that moment, known by t

1d

The Simple Reason That Humans Can’t Control Wildfires

Seven years ago, Park Williams took an hour-long drive with a couple of friends to see a wildfire. He remembers it now as a revelation. At the time, Williams was researching the scraggly pine forests that dot the southwestern United States. He worked at a national laboratory that overlooks more than 1 million acres of protected desert forest. On June 26, 2011, the wind knocked down an aspen somew

1d

Warmer winter temperatures linked to increased crime

Milder winter weather increased regional crime rates in the United States over the past several decades, according to new research that suggests crime is related to temperature's effect on daily activities.

1d

Compelling speakers do these 4 things every single time

The ability to communicate effectively can make or break a person's assessment of your intelligence, competence, and authenticity. President Donald Trump, for example, is frequently noted for his every-man communication style, and the way he "tells it like it is." In contrast, former President Barack Obama is often hailed as one of our nation's greatest orators for his poise and eloquence. Robert

1d

Washboard and fluted terrains on Pluto as evidence for ancient glaciation

A letter authored by SETI Institute scientist Oliver White was published by Nature Astronomy today. Co-authors included researchers Jeff Moore, Tanguy Bertrand and Kimberly Ennico at NASA's Ames Research Center in Silicon Valley.

1d

Bombardier clings to its last commercial aircraft line

Canadian manufacturer Bombardier said Tuesday it planned to hold onto its last commercial aircraft line—the Canadair Regional Jet or CRJ—after recent divestitures of its others.

1d

EPA seeks new truck pollution rules; says air won't suffer

The Trump administration's Environmental Protection Agency is proposing to rewrite rules that limit pollution from heavy trucks but that the EPA says slow the economy.

1d

Visualizing 'unfurling' microtubule growth

Living cells depend absolutely on tubulin, a protein that forms hollow tube-like polymers, called microtubules, that form scaffolding for moving materials inside the cell. Tubulin-based microtubule scaffolding allows cells to move, keeps things in place or moves them around. When cells divide, microtubule fibers pull the chromosomes apart into new cells. Cells with defects in tubulin polymerizatio

1d

Synthetic DNA-delivered antibodies protect against Ebola in preclinical studies

Wistar scientists and collaborators have successfully engineered novel DNA-encoded monoclonal antibodies (DMAbs) targeting Zaire Ebolavirus that were effective in preclinical models. Study results, published online in Cell Reports, showed that DMAbs were expressed over a wide window of time and offered complete and long-term protection against lethal virus challenges. DMAbs may also provide a nove

1d

Unintended consequences of dams and reservoirs

An international team of drought scientists show that while many dams and reservoirs are built, or expanded, to alleviate droughts and water shortages, they can paradoxically contribute to making them worse.

1d

Overlooked trends in annual precipitation reveal underestimated risks worldwide

Researchers have reanalyzed global annual precipitation using quantile regression to reveal overlooked trends. Linear trends in US and global climate assessments reflect changes in mean annual precipitation, but these may not reflect changes across other quantiles in the precipitation probability distribution, including tails (very high and low precipitation levels), leading to systematic mischara

1d

Why your number of romantic partners mirrors your mother

A new national study shows that people whose mothers had more partners — married or cohabiting — often follow the same path. Results suggest that mothers may pass on personality traits and relationship skills that make their children more or less likely to form stable relationships.

1d

Carbon goes with the flow

Many people see the carbon cycle as vertical — CO2 moving up and down between soil, plants and the atmosphere. However, new research adds a dimension to the vertical perspective by showing how water moves massive amounts of carbon laterally through ecosystems — especially during floods. These findings — which analyzed more than 1,000 watersheds, covering about 75 percent of the contiguous US —

1d

Scientists shed light on semiconductor degradation mechanism

SiC-based electrical devices degrading will be improved by controlling the semiconductor material deformation with atomic level.

1d

Back-to-the-future plants give climate change insights

If you were to take a seed and zap it into the future to see how it will respond to climate change, how realistic might that prediction be? More so than was previously realized, according to a new study.

1d

As temps rise, Lyme disease will get worse

Rising temperatures may boost the number of cases of Lyme disease—already the most common tick-borne disease in North America—by more than 20 percent by the middle of the century, according to a new study. Lyme disease is the most common tick-borne disease in North America and its incidence has risen sharply in the last decade. Since its progression depends on environmental factors, increases in

1d

In This Issue [This Week in PNAS]

Cesarean birth and brain development Dying neurons (black) in the hippocampus of a newborn mouse. Previous studies have reported behavioral and cognitive differences between children delivered vaginally versus by cesarean section (C-section), suggesting that birth mode affects brain development. However, medical complications, altered birth timing, and maternal factors associated with…

1d

CFI-400945 is not a selective cellular PLK4 inhibitor [Biological Sciences]

In the PNAS paper “Polo-like kinase 4 inhibition produces polyploidy and apoptotic death of lung cancers,” Kawakami et al. (1) treat lung cancer cell lines and mouse tumor models with the small molecule CFI-400945 and interpret its effects as being solely due to inhibition of Polo-like kinase 4 (PLK4), the…

1d

Reply to Oegema et al.: CFI-400945 and Polo-like kinase 4 inhibition [Biological Sciences]

In “CFI-400945 is not a selective cellular PLK4 inhibitor,” Oegema et al. (1) raise thoughtful comments about our article (2). We appreciate their interest and critique. They propose that CFI-400945 activity was not from Polo-like kinase (PLK4) inhibition and argue that antineoplastic activity was through Aurora B kinase (1), rather…

1d

QnAs with Helmut Schwarz [QnAs]

In the early 1900s, German chemists Fritz Haber and Carl Bosch developed a way to synthesize ammonia from atmospheric nitrogen and methane-derived hydrogen. The method became a vital step in manufacturing not only fertilizers but also explosives. Haber likened the process to making “bread from air” (Haber and Bosch are…

1d

A role of OsROS1 in aleurone development and nutrient improvement in rice [Plant Biology]

DNA methylation is a conserved epigenetic mark in eukaryotes involved in many important biological processes, such as genome integrity, gene imprinting, and gene regulation (1). In genomes, DNA methylation marks can be added through the DNA methylation pathway and can be removed through the DNA demethylation pathway (1). The REPRESSOR…

1d

Top-down causation and quantum physics [Physics]

The nature of emergence of complexity out of the underlying physics is a key issue in understanding the world around us (1). Genuine emergence can be claimed (2–4) to depend on top-down causation, which enables higher emergent levels to direct the outcomes of causation at lower levels to fulfill higher-level…

1d

Consequences of cesarean delivery for neural development [Neuroscience]

For over 50 million years, every single mammal on Earth had to enter the world through a harrowing passage: the birth canal. The hazards of this journey, short in distance but potentially prolonged in duration, may have peaked in our own species, where the evolution of larger and larger brains…

1d

Catalytic enzymes are active matter [Applied Physical Sciences]

Using a microscopic theory to analyze experiments, we demonstrate that enzymes are active matter. Superresolution fluorescence measurements—performed across four orders of magnitude of substrate concentration, with emphasis on the biologically relevant regime around or below the Michaelis–Menten constant—show that catalysis boosts the motion of enzymes to be superdiffusive for a…

1d

Structural consequences of hereditary spastic paraplegia disease-related mutations in kinesin [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

A wide range of mutations in the kinesin motor Kif5A have been linked to a neuronal disorder called hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP). The position of these mutations can vary, and a range of different motile behaviors have been observed, indicating that the HSP mutants can alter distinct aspects of kinesin…

1d

Microfluidics in structured multimaterial fibers [Engineering]

Traditional fabrication techniques for microfluidic devices utilize a planar chip format that possesses limited control over the geometry of and materials placement around microchannel cross-sections. This imposes restrictions on the design of flow fields and external forces (electric, magnetic, piezoelectric, etc.) that can be imposed onto fluids and particles. Here…

1d

Bifunctional amyloid-reactive peptide promotes binding of antibody 11-1F4 to diverse amyloid types and enhances therapeutic efficacy [Applied Biological Sciences]

Amyloidosis is a malignant pathology associated with the formation of proteinaceous amyloid fibrils that deposit in organs and tissues, leading to dysfunction and severe morbidity. More than 25 proteins have been identified as components of amyloid, but the most common form of systemic amyloidosis is associated with the deposition of…

1d

microRNA-378 promotes autophagy and inhibits apoptosis in skeletal muscle [Cell Biology]

The metabolic regulation of cell death is sophisticated. A growing body of evidence suggests the existence of multiple metabolic checkpoints that dictate cell fate in response to metabolic fluctuations. However, whether microRNAs (miRNAs) are able to respond to metabolic stress, reset the threshold of cell death, and attempt to reestablish…

1d

Discs large 1 controls daughter-cell polarity after cytokinesis in vertebrate morphogenesis [Cell Biology]

Vertebrate embryogenesis and organogenesis are driven by cell biological processes, ranging from mitosis and migration to changes in cell size and polarity, but their control and causal relationships are not fully defined. Here, we use the developing limb skeleton to better define the relationships between mitosis and cell polarity. We…

1d

p53 mutants cooperate with HIF-1 in transcriptional regulation of extracellular matrix components to promote tumor progression [Cell Biology]

Mutations in the TP53 gene and microenvironmentally driven activation of hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) typically occur in later stages of tumorigenesis. An ongoing challenge is the identification of molecular determinants of advanced cancer pathogenesis to design alternative last-line therapeutic options. Here, we report that p53 mutants influence the tumor microenvironment by…

1d

Role of sexual imprinting in assortative mating and premating isolation in Darwin’s finches [Evolution]

Global biodiversity is being degraded at an unprecedented rate, so it is important to preserve the potential for future speciation. Providing for the future requires understanding speciation as a contemporary ecological process. Phylogenetically young adaptive radiations are a good choice for detailed study because diversification is ongoing. A key question…

1d

Caspase-8 induces cleavage of gasdermin D to elicit pyroptosis during Yersinia infection [Immunology and Inflammation]

Cell death and inflammation are intimately linked during Yersinia infection. Pathogenic Yersinia inhibits the MAP kinase TGFβ-activated kinase 1 (TAK1) via the effector YopJ, thereby silencing cytokine expression while activating caspase-8–mediated cell death. Here, using Yersinia pseudotuberculosis in corroboration with costimulation of lipopolysaccharide and (5Z)-7-Oxozeaenol, a small-molecule i

1d

Switchable control over in vivo CAR T expansion, B cell depletion, and induction of memory [Immunology and Inflammation]

Chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cells with a long-lived memory phenotype are correlated with durable, complete remissions in patients with leukemia. However, not all CAR T cell products form robust memory populations, and those that do can induce chronic B cell aplasia in patients. To address these challenges, we previously…

1d

Cell engineering with microfluidic squeezing preserves functionality of primary immune cells in vivo [Medical Sciences]

The translational potential of cell-based therapies is often limited by complications related to effectively engineering and manufacturing functional cells. While the use of electroporation is widespread, the impact of electroporation on cell state and function has yet to be fully characterized. Here, we use a genome-wide approach to study optimized…

1d

IL-15 enhanced antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity mediated by NK cells and macrophages [Medical Sciences]

The goal of cancer immunotherapy is to stimulate the host immune system to attack malignant cells. Antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) is a pivotal mechanism of antitumor action of clinically employed antitumor antibodies. IL-15 administered to patients with metastatic malignancy by continuous i.v. infusion at 2 μg/kg/d for 10 days was…

1d

Preferred end coordinates and somatic variants as signatures of circulating tumor DNA associated with hepatocellular carcinoma [Medical Sciences]

Circulating tumor-derived cell-free DNA (ctDNA) analysis offers an attractive noninvasive means for detection and monitoring of cancers. Evidence for the presence of cancer is dependent on the ability to detect features in the peripheral circulation that are deemed as cancer-associated. We explored approaches to improve the chance of detecting the…

1d

Structural basis for anthrax toxin receptor 1 recognition by Seneca Valley Virus [Microbiology]

Recently, the use of oncolytic viruses in cancer therapy has become a realistic therapeutic option. Seneca Valley Virus (SVV) is a newly discovered picornavirus, which has earned a significant reputation as a potent oncolytic agent. Anthrax toxin receptor 1 (ANTXR1), one of the cellular receptors for the protective antigen secreted…

1d

Cell-autonomous requirement of TDP-43, an ALS/FTD signature protein, for oligodendrocyte survival and myelination [Neuroscience]

TDP-43 aggregates in neurons and glia are the defining pathological hallmark of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal dementia (FTD), raising the possibility of glial damage in the disease pathogenesis. However, the normal physiological functions of TDP-43 in glia are largely unknown. To address how TDP-43 may be required for…

1d

Anterograde and retrograde signaling by an Aplysia neurotrophin forms a transsynaptic functional unit [Neuroscience]

Whereas short-term synaptic plasticity is often either pre- or postsynaptic, intermediate- and long-term plasticity generally require coordinated pre- and postsynaptic mechanisms. Thus, the transition from presynaptic short-term facilitation (STF) to intermediate-term facilitation (ITF) induced by 5HT at Aplysia sensory-to-motor neuron synapses requires the recruitment of postsynaptic mechanisms a

1d

Gene-guided discovery and engineering of branched cyclic peptides in plants [Plant Biology]

The plant kingdom contains vastly untapped natural product chemistry, which has been traditionally explored through the activity-guided approach. Here, we describe a gene-guided approach to discover and engineer a class of plant ribosomal peptides, the branched cyclic lyciumins. Initially isolated from the Chinese wolfberry Lycium barbarum, lyciumins are protease-inhibiting peptides…

1d

Functional and evolutionary genomic inferences in Populus through genome and population sequencing of American and European aspen [Plant Biology]

The Populus genus is one of the major plant model systems, but genomic resources have thus far primarily been available for poplar species, and primarily Populus trichocarpa (Torr. & Gray), which was the first tree with a whole-genome assembly. To further advance evolutionary and functional genomic analyses in Populus, we…

1d

NRG1 functions downstream of EDS1 to regulate TIR-NLR-mediated plant immunity in Nicotiana benthamiana [Plant Biology]

Effector-triggered immunity (ETI) in plants involves a large family of nucleotide-binding leucine-rich repeat (NLR) immune receptors, including Toll/IL-1 receptor-NLRs (TNLs) and coiled-coil NLRs (CNLs). Although various NLR immune receptors are known, a mechanistic understanding of NLR function in ETI remains unclear. The TNL Recognition of XopQ 1 (Roq1) recognizes the…

1d

The in silico human surfaceome [Systems Biology]

Cell-surface proteins are of great biomedical importance, as demonstrated by the fact that 66% of approved human drugs listed in the DrugBank database target a cell-surface protein. Despite this biomedical relevance, there has been no comprehensive assessment of the human surfaceome, and only a fraction of the predicted 5,000 human…

1d

Limiting the high impacts of Amazon forest dieback with no-regrets science and policy action [Environmental Sciences]

Large uncertainties still dominate the hypothesis of an abrupt large-scale shift of the Amazon forest caused by climate change [Amazonian forest dieback (AFD)] even though observational evidence shows the forest and regional climate changing. Here, we assess whether mitigation or adaptation action should be taken now, later, or not at…

1d

Dominant point mutation in a tetraspanin gene associated with field-evolved resistance of cotton bollworm to transgenic Bt cotton [Agricultural Sciences]

Extensive planting of crops genetically engineered to produce insecticidal proteins from the bacterium Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) has suppressed some major pests, reduced insecticide sprays, enhanced pest control by natural enemies, and increased grower profits. However, rapid evolution of resistance in pests is reducing these benefits. Better understanding of the genetic…

1d

Biomolecular archaeology reveals ancient origins of indigenous tobacco smoking in North American Plateau [Anthropology]

Chemical analysis of residues contained in the matrix of stone smoking pipes reveal a substantial direct biomolecular record of ancient tobacco (Nicotiana) smoking practices in the North American interior northwest (Plateau), in an area where tobacco was often portrayed as a Euro-American–introduced postcontact trade commodity. Nicotine, a stimulant alkaloid and…

1d

Ab initio structure determination from experimental fluctuation X-ray scattering data [Applied Mathematics]

Fluctuation X-ray scattering (FXS) is an emerging experimental technique in which X-ray solution scattering data are collected from particles in solution using ultrashort X-ray exposures generated by a free-electron laser (FEL). FXS experiments overcome the low data-to-parameter ratios associated with traditional solution scattering measurements by providing several orders of magnitude…

1d

KDM3A histone demethylase functions as an essential factor for activation of JAK2-STAT3 signaling pathway [Biochemistry]

Janus tyrosine kinase 2 (JAK2)−signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) signaling pathway is essential for modulating cellular development, differentiation, and homeostasis. Thus, dysregulation of JAK2−STAT3 signaling pathway is frequently associated with human malignancies. Here, we provide evidence that lysine-specific demethylase 3A (KDM3A) functions as an essential epigenetic

1d

Single-molecule force spectroscopy reveals folding steps associated with hormone binding and activation of the glucocorticoid receptor [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

The glucocorticoid receptor (GR) is a prominent nuclear receptor linked to a variety of diseases and an important drug target. Binding of hormone to its ligand binding domain (GR-LBD) is the key activation step to induce signaling. This process is tightly regulated by the molecular chaperones Hsp70 and Hsp90 in…

1d

Marginal protein stability drives subcellular proteome isoelectric point [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

There exists a positive correlation between the pH of subcellular compartments and the median isoelectric point (pI) for the associated proteomes. Proteins in the human lysosome—a highly acidic compartment in the cell—have a median pI of ∼6.5, whereas proteins in the more basic mitochondria have a median pI of ∼8.0….

1d

Fork pausing allows centromere DNA loop formation and kinetochore assembly [Cell Biology]

De novo kinetochore assembly, but not template-directed assembly, is dependent on COMA, the kinetochore complex engaged in cohesin recruitment. The slowing of replication fork progression by treatment with phleomycin (PHL), hydroxyurea, or deletion of the replication fork protection protein Csm3 can activate de novo kinetochore assembly in COMA mutants. Centromere…

1d

Ta2+-mediated ammonia synthesis from N2 and H2 at ambient temperature [Chemistry]

In a full catalytic cycle, bare Ta2+ in the highly diluted gas phase is able to mediate the formation of ammonia in a Haber–Bosch-like process starting from N2 and H2 at ambient temperature. This finding is the result of extensive quantum chemical calculations supported by experiments using Fourier transform ion…

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Nickel-hydrogen batteries for large-scale energy storage [Chemistry]

Large-scale energy storage is of significance to the integration of renewable energy into electric grid. Despite the dominance of pumped hydroelectricity in the market of grid energy storage, it is limited by the suitable site selection and footprint impact. Rechargeable batteries show increasing interests in the large-scale energy storage; however,…

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Opinion: Soil carbon sequestration is an elusive climate mitigation tool [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]

The need to stabilize the greenhouse gas concentrations of the atmosphere is the great environmental challenge of this century. To control these concentrations, humanity can reduce fossil fuel emissions and/or identify mechanisms to remove greenhouse gases once they have been emitted. The scope of the problem is challenging because of…

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Current CaCO3 dissolution at the seafloor caused by anthropogenic CO2 [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]

Oceanic uptake of anthropogenic CO2 leads to decreased pH, carbonate ion concentration, and saturation state with respect to CaCO3 minerals, causing increased dissolution of these minerals at the deep seafloor. This additional dissolution will figure prominently in the neutralization of man-made CO2. However, there has been no concerted assessment of…

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Shear heating reconciles thermal models with the metamorphic rock record of subduction [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]

Some commonly referenced thermal-mechanical models of current subduction zones imply temperatures that are 100–500 °C colder at 30–80-km depth than pressure–temperature conditions determined thermobarometrically from exhumed metamorphic rocks. Accurately inferring subduction zone thermal structure, whether from models or rocks, is crucial for predicting metamorphic reactions and associated fluid r

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Temporal variability largely explains top-down/bottom-up difference in methane emission estimates from a natural gas production region [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]

This study spatially and temporally aligns top-down and bottom-up methane emission estimates for a natural gas production basin, using multiscale emission measurements and detailed activity data reporting. We show that episodic venting from manual liquid unloadings, which occur at a small fraction of natural gas well pads, drives a factor-of-two…

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Estimating species distribution and abundance in river networks using environmental DNA [Ecology]

All organisms leave traces of DNA in their environment. This environmental DNA (eDNA) is often used to track occurrence patterns of target species. Applications are especially promising in rivers, where eDNA can integrate information about populations upstream. The dispersion of eDNA in rivers is modulated by complex processes of transport…

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Plant-feeding phlebotomine sand flies, vectors of leishmaniasis, prefer Cannabis sativa [Ecology]

Blood-sucking phlebotomine sand flies (Diptera: Psychodidae) transmit leishmaniasis as well as arboviral diseases and bartonellosis. Sand fly females become infected with Leishmania parasites and transmit them while imbibing vertebrates’ blood, required as a source of protein for maturation of eggs. In addition, both females and males consume plant-derived sugar meals…

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Soft conductive micropillar electrode arrays for biologically relevant electrophysiological recording [Engineering]

Multielectrode arrays (MEAs) are essential tools in neural and cardiac research as they provide a means for noninvasive, multiplexed recording of extracellular field potentials with high temporal resolution. To date, the mechanical properties of the electrode material, e.g., its Young’s modulus, have not been taken into consideration in most MEA…

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Engineering yeast endosymbionts as a step toward the evolution of mitochondria [Evolution]

It has been hypothesized that mitochondria evolved from a bacterial ancestor that initially became established in an archaeal host cell as an endosymbiont. Here we model this first stage of mitochondrial evolution by engineering endosymbiosis between Escherichia coli and Saccharomyces cerevisiae. An ADP/ATP translocase-expressing E. coli provided ATP to a…

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Humanized cereblon mice revealed two distinct therapeutic pathways of immunomodulatory drugs [Immunology and Inflammation]

Immunomodulatory drugs (IMiDs), including thalidomide derivatives such as lenalidomide and pomalidomide, offer therapeutic benefit in several hematopoietic malignancies and autoimmune/inflammatory diseases. However, it is difficult to study the IMiD mechanism of action in murine disease models because murine cereblon (CRBN), the substrate receptor for IMiD action, is resistant to some…

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Modulation of NKG2D, NKp46, and Ly49C/I facilitates natural killer cell-mediated control of lung cancer [Immunology and Inflammation]

Natural killer (NK) cells play a critical role in controlling malignancies. Susceptibility or resistance to lung cancer, for example, specifically depends on NK cell function. Nevertheless, intrinsic factors that control NK cell-mediated clearance of lung cancer are unknown. Here we report that NK cells exposed to exogenous major histocompatibility class…

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In vivo 3'-to-5' exoribonuclease targetomes of Streptococcus pyogenes [Microbiology]

mRNA decay plays an essential role in the control of gene expression in bacteria. Exoribonucleases (exoRNases), which trim transcripts starting from the 5′ or 3′ end, are particularly important to fully degrade unwanted transcripts and renew the pool of nucleotides available in the cell. While recent techniques have allowed genome-wide…

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A bet-hedging strategy for denitrifying bacteria curtails their release of N2O [Microbiology]

When oxygen becomes limiting, denitrifying bacteria must prepare for anaerobic respiration by synthesizing the reductases NAR (NO3− → NO2−), NIR (NO2− → NO), NOR (2NO → N2O), and NOS (N2O → N2), either en bloc or sequentially, to avoid entrapment in anoxia without energy. Minimizing the metabolic burden of this…

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Birth delivery mode alters perinatal cell death in the mouse brain [Neuroscience]

Labor and a vaginal delivery trigger changes in peripheral organs that prepare the mammalian fetus to survive ex utero. Surprisingly little attention has been given to whether birth also influences the brain, and to how alterations in birth mode affect neonatal brain development. These are important questions, given the high…

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Regulation of myelin structure and conduction velocity by perinodal astrocytes [Neuroscience]

The speed of impulse transmission is critical for optimal neural circuit function, but it is unclear how the appropriate conduction velocity is established in individual axons. The velocity of impulse transmission is influenced by the thickness of the myelin sheath and the morphology of electrogenic nodes of Ranvier along axons….

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Completely top-down hierarchical structure in quantum mechanics [Physics]

Can a large system be fully characterized using its subsystems via inductive reasoning? Is it possible to completely reduce the behavior of a complex system to the behavior of its simplest “atoms”? In this paper we answer these questions in the negative for a specific class of systems and measurements….

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Universality of jamming of nonspherical particles [Physics]

Amorphous packings of nonspherical particles such as ellipsoids and spherocylinders are known to be hypostatic: The number of mechanical contacts between particles is smaller than the number of degrees of freedom, thus violating Maxwell’s mechanical stability criterion. In this work, we propose a general theory of hypostatic amorphous packings and…

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BRI1 controls vascular cell fate in the Arabidopsis root through RLP44 and phytosulfokine signaling [Plant Biology]

Multicellularity arose independently in plants and animals, but invariably requires a robust determination and maintenance of cell fate that is adaptive to the environment. This is exemplified by the highly specialized water- and nutrient-conducting cells of the plant vasculature, the organization of which is already prepatterned close to the stem-cell…

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Functional structures of US state governments [Political Sciences]

Governments in modern societies undertake an array of complex functions that shape politics and economics, individual and group behavior, and the natural, social, and built environment. How are governments structured to execute these diverse responsibilities? How do those structures vary, and what explains the differences? To examine these longstanding questions,…

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REM sleep in naps differentially relates to memory consolidation in typical preschoolers and children with Down syndrome [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]

Sleep is recognized as a physiological state associated with learning, with studies showing that knowledge acquisition improves with naps. Little work has examined sleep-dependent learning in people with developmental disorders, for whom sleep quality is often impaired. We examined the effect of natural, in-home naps on word learning in typical…

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Role of income mobility for the measurement of inequality in life expectancy [Social Sciences]

This work proposes a method to compute the income gradient in period life expectancy that accounts for income mobility. Using income and mortality records of the Danish population over the period 1980–2013, we validate the method and provide estimates of the income gradient. The period life expectancy of individuals at…

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Haiti’s biodiversity threatened by nearly complete loss of primary forest [Sustainability Science]

Tropical forests hold most of Earth’s biodiversity. Their continued loss through deforestation and agriculture is the main threat to species globally, more than disease, invasive species, and climate change. However, not all tropical forests have the same ability to sustain biodiversity. Those that have been disturbed by humans, including forests…

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Correction for Belsky et al., Genetic analysis of social-class mobility in five longitudinal studies [Corrections]

SOCIAL SCIENCES Correction for “Genetic analysis of social-class mobility in five longitudinal studies,” by Daniel W. Belsky, Benjamin W. Domingue, Robbee Wedow, Louise Arseneault, Jason D. Boardman, Avshalom Caspi, Dalton Conley, Jason M. Fletcher, Jeremy Freese, Pamela Herd, Terrie E. Moffitt, Richie Poulton, Kamil Sicinski, Jasmin Wertz, and Kathleen Mullan…

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Carbon goes with the flow

Many people see the carbon cycle as vertical—CO2 moving up and down between soil, plants and the atmosphere.

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DNA structure impacts rate and accuracy of DNA synthesis

The speed and error rate of DNA synthesis is influenced by the three-dimensional structure of the DNA. Using "third-generation" genome-wide DNA sequencing data, a team of researchers from Penn State and the Czech Academy of Sciences showed that sequences with the potential to form unusual DNA conformations, which are frequently associated with cancer and neurological diseases, can in fact slow dow

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5 of the worst inventions in modern history

Some inventions can be celebrated during their time, but are proven to be devastating in the long run. The inventions doesn't have to be physical. Complex mathematical creations that create money for Wall Street can do as much damage, in theory, as a gas that destroys the ozone layer. Inventors can even see their creations be used for purposes far different than they had intended. Thomas Midgely

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Visualizing 'unfurling' microtubule growth

Living cells depend absolutely on microtubules that form a scaffolding for moving materials inside the cell. Microtubule fibers are hollow rods made of much smaller tubulin subunits that spontaneously assemble at one end of the rod, but exactly how they do this inside the crowded environment of living cells has been a mystery. Now researchers at UC Davis have uncovered the mechanism that puts thes

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Carbon emissions will start to dictate stock prices

Companies that fail to curb their carbon output may eventually face the consequences of asset devaluation and stock price depreciation, according to a new study out of the University of Waterloo.

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Researchers find cheaper, less energy-intensive way to purify ethylene

Researchers at The University of Texas at Arlington have filed a provisional patent application on a new copper compound that can be used to purify ethylene for use as a raw material in the production of plastics such as polyethylene or PVC, as well as other industrial compounds.

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Increasing CD and microchip storage capacity 100-fold

Research by Pierre Lucas could lead to computer memories that work more like human memories.

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Custom Photo Filters Are the New Instagram Gold Mine

“Influencers” are people who have established credibility in a specific realm or industry, and who leverage a social-media following to exert influence and, usually, make money . Scroll through many of their Instagram feeds, and you’ll begin to notice something: The photos all look vaguely the same. Maybe every image seems washed in pink, or the blues are all the same, or every image is just the

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Doctors Revolt After N.R.A. Tells Them to ‘Stay in Their Lane’ on Gun Policy

The uproar highlighted decades-old tension over an effective ban on federal research of the public health effects of gun violence.

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Amazon's growing pains in Seattle offer lessons to new hosts

As Amazon turns its attention to setting up new homes in Long Island City, New York and Arlington, Virginia, experts and historians in Seattle say both places can expect a delicate relationship with the world's hottest online retailer.

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Waymo to expand fledgling self-driving car service

A self-driving car service being tested by Alphabet-owned Waymo will be opened up to more people in the Phoenix, Arizona, area, chief John Krafcik said Tuesday.

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How the Midnight Sun Gave This Man 'Rotten Zombie Skin'

A midnight sun can evoke many images, including those of an endless night and a beautiful, soft light — but a really awful sunburn probably isn't one of them.

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Biblical-Era Etchings of Ships Discovered in Israeli Desert

The carvings are realistically proportioned and show details consistent with the ship-building of the day.

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Photos: Biblical-Era Cistern and Carvings Discovered in Israel

A 2,000-year-old cistern in Israel has yielded carvings of ships and zoomorphs.

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Data overload hinders mission to ID bacterial threats

New research may chart a path toward improved accuracy and sensitivity for identifying specific species of bacteria. There are many ways to slice and dice genomic data to identify bacteria, or at least find its close relatives. But fast techniques to sequence genomes have flooded the public databases and in a biased fashion, containing lots of genomic data about some species and not enough about

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Optimization of alloy materials: Diffusion processes in nano particles decoded

Research team at TU Graz discovers atomic-level processes which can provide new approaches to improving material properties.

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NIH scientists illuminate causes of hepatitis b virus-associated acute liver failure

National Institutes of Health scientists and their collaborators found that hepatitis B virus (HBV)-associated acute liver failure (ALF) — a rare condition that can turn fatal within days without liver transplantation — results from an uncommon encounter between a highly mutated HBV variant and an unusual immune response in the patient's liver that is mainly sustained by antibody-producing B cel

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New methods to identify Alzheimer's drug candidates with anti-aging properties

Old age is the greatest risk factor for many diseases, including Alzheimer's disease (AD) and cancer. Geroprotectors are a recently identified class of anti-aging compounds. New research has now identified a unique subclass of these compounds, dubbed geroneuroprotectors (GNPs), which are AD drug candidates and slow the aging process in mice.

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Deepwater Horizon oil spill's dramatic effect on stingrays' sensory abilities

Marine fishes rely on their sensory systems to survive. A study is the first to quantify the physiological effects of whole crude oil on the olfactory function of a marine vertebrate — the Atlantic stingray. Results of the study, confirm that exposure to crude oil, at concentrations mimicking those measured in coastal areas following the Deepwater Horizon oil spill in 2010, significantly impaired

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Making Sense of the Paris Attacks: Three Years Later

PARIS—Three years ago, on November 13, 2015, terrorists claiming allegiance to the Islamic State opened fire in coordinated attacks across Paris, killing 130 people and wounding 494 others at the Bataclan concert hall and nearby cafés. Earlier that evening, two suicide bombers had blown themselves up outside the Stade de France, Paris’s main sports arena, where 80,000 people, including then-Presi

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How can hospitals keep doctors positively engaged with their work?

Individual and work-related factors may be helpful in promoting positive engagement with work among hospital physicians, according to a study in the December issue of Medical Care. The journal is published in the Lippincott portfolio by Wolters Kluwer.

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Identification of mechanisms of pesticide resistance in cattle ticks

Losses to herds due to parasites correspond to more than double the value of Brazil's annual beef exports, according to a study by Brazilian researchers published in Scientific Reports.

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UTA researchers find cheaper, less energy-intensive way to purify ethylene

Researchers at The University of Texas at Arlington have filed a provisional patent application on a new copper compound that can be used to purify ethylene for use as a raw material in the production of plastics such as polyethylene or PVC, as well as other industrial compounds.

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Hands-only CPR training kiosks can increase bystander intervention, improve survival

Hands-Only CPR training kiosks are becoming more widespread and are an effective training tool, a new analysis finds.

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Fish recognize their prey by electric colors

The African elephantnose fish generates weak electrical pulses to navigate its environment. This localization sense apparently shows an astonishing similarity to vision, as a study now shows. The study demonstrates that different objects have different electrical "colors". Fish use these colors for instance to distinguish their favorite food – mosquito larvae – from other small animals or plants

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'Waltzing' nanoparticles could advance search for better drug delivery methods

Scientists paired drug-delivering nanoparticles like dance partners to reveal that molecules attach to targets on cells differently based upon their position in time. The discovery could improve methods for screening drugs for therapeutic effectiveness.

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The illusion of multitasking boosts performance

Our ability to do things well suffers when we try to complete several tasks at once, but a series of experiments suggests that merely believing that we're multitasking may boost our performance by making us more engaged in the tasks at hand.

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Detecting light in a 'different dimension'

Scientists have dramatically improved the response of graphene to light through self-assembling wire-like nanostructures that conduct electricity.

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Autism behaviors show unique brain network fingerprints in infants

A new study has identified unique functional brain networks associated with characteristic behaviors of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) in 12- and 24-month old children at risk for developing ASD.

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Rising sea levels may build, rather than destroy, coral reef islands

Rising global sea levels may actually be beneficial to the long-term future of coral reef islands, such as the Maldives, according to new research. Low-lying coral reef islands are typically less than three meters above sea level, making them highly vulnerable to rising sea levels associated with climate change. However, research has found new evidence that the Maldives — the world's lowest count

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Nyt forsøg: PTSD-patienter kureret med MDMA

De 25 forsøgspersoner i undersøgelsen led af posttraumatisk stress. Selvom studiet er lille, er resultaterne interessante, mener dansk rusmiddelforsker.

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Carbon emissions will start to dictate stock prices

Companies that fail to curb their carbon output may eventually face the consequences of asset devaluation and stock price depreciation, according to a new study out of the University of Waterloo.

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DNA structure impacts rate and accuracy of DNA synthesis

DNA sequences with the potential to form unusual conformations, which are frequently associated with cancer and neurological diseases, can in fact slow down or speed up the DNA synthesis process and cause more or fewer sequencing errors.

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Your heart hates air pollution; portable filters could help

The fifth-leading risk factor for mortality worldwide, air pollution presents a major heart health risk. A simple intervention could help people breathe easier at home.

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Wildfires can hurt you from miles away

Health Only one kind of mask can truly protect you from the smoke. As wildfires ravage large sections of both Northern and Southern California, smoke continues to grow and blow into residential neighborhoods, parks, and cities. In both…

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Your Mother’s Romantic Past Affects Your Own Dating Adventures

Some people have their mother’s eyes. And some, it turns out, grow up to have their mother’s romantic history. People whose mothers have been married multiple times or have lived with multiple romantic partners are more likely to do so themselves, according to a new study published Tuesday in the journal PLoSOne . The longer people are exposed to their mother’s cohabitation, the more sexual partn

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What should Jewish kids learn about Israel?

Not much research has been done on how Jewish children’s views on Israel have changed over time. A new project is trying to change that. What should parents and teachers teach Jewish elementary school kids about Israel? What concepts and ideas can they understand? How do their views and perceptions change over time? “We know an awful lot about how younger kids typically think about subjects like

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Amazon chooses New York and Virginia for its HQ2

Amazon will receive more than $2 billion in incentives from the two states. The company plans to create a total of 50,000 jobs at an average wage of $150,000. The announcement has caused controversy, raising concerns about rising rent prices and potentially lost resources in communities surrounding the upcoming developments. None Amazon announced Tuesday its plans to split its second headquarters

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The 2018 National Geographic Photo Contest

National Geographic magazine’s annual photo contest is still open for entries for just a couple more days, with the deadline for submissions coming up on November 15. The grand-prize winner this year will receive $5,000—all winners will be announced in December. The folks at National Geographic were once again kind enough to let me choose among the contest entries so far and share them here with

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Carbon goes with the flow

Many people see the carbon cycle as vertical — CO2 moving up and down between soil, plants and the atmosphere.However, new Michigan State University research published in the current issue of Geophysical Research Letters, adds a dimension to the vertical perspective by showing how water moves massive amounts of carbon laterally through ecosystems — especially during floods. These findings — whi

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Why your number of romantic partners mirrors your mother

A new national study shows that people whose mothers had more partners — married or cohabiting — often follow the same path. Results suggest that mothers may pass on personality traits and relationship skills that make their children more or less likely to form stable relationships.

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Moths and magnets could save lives

Bioengineers have combined a virus that infects moths with magnetic nanoparticles to create a potential new therapy for inherited genetic diseases like muscular dystrophy, sickle cell, cystic fibrosis, spinal muscular atrophy and some forms of cancer.

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Why You Can Blame Your Mom If You're Still Single

Traits passed down by Mom could explain your relationship patterns.

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Juul Suspends Selling Most E-Cigarette Flavors in Stores

Juul will restrict sales of nearly all its flavored pods to the internet, and stop most social media promotion to combat youth vaping, bowing to government and public pressure.

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Papua New Guinea Is Rich in Resources but Poor in Health

The Pacific nation hoped that hosting the APEC summit meeting would elevate its international profile, but a national health crisis threatens to overshadow it.

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"The New Abnormal": Wildfires And Climate Change

Human activity is making wildfires more frequent and more severe. (Image credit: Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)

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California Wildfires Now Deadliest On Record

The wildfires in California have matched the deadliest on record. And the president weighed in on Twitter about the cause of the fire. There is no reason for these massive, (Image credit: Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)

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Why your number of romantic partners mirrors your mother

A new national study shows that people whose mothers had more partners—married or cohabiting—often follow the same path.

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Whitaker’s Appointment Is Unconstitutional

President Donald Trump appointed Matthew Whitaker as acting attorney general last week, despite the fact that he cannot legally hold the office. While the president could fix his mistake with any lesser official and in any normal time, the attorney general is no lesser official and this is no normal time. Whitaker takes office during a time of extreme constitutional conflict involving investigati

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ID specialist input improves outcomes for outpatient parenteral antimicrobial therapy

An infectious diseases specialist should review all orders for outpatient IV antimicrobial therapy and adjust as needed, suggest new guidelines released by the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA).

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Canon's long-awaited EOS-R camera is easy on the eyes and tough on your thumb

Gadgets Design tweaks aside, the EOS-R is an impressive camera. Sample images and hands-on impressions with a landmark camera…

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NASA-NOAA Satellite finds a large Tropical Cyclone Gaja

NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite passed over the Bay of Bengal, Northern Indian Ocean and captured a visible image of Tropical Cyclone Gaja.

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California wildfires hit Hollywood celebrities, too

As wildfires rage these days in southern California, burning glitzy towns like Malibu, the roster of evacuees reads like the guest list at the Oscars.

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NASA-NOAA Satellite finds a large Tropical Cyclone Gaja

NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite passed over the Bay of Bengal, Northern Indian Ocean and captured a visible image of Tropical Cyclone Gaja.

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Michelle Obama’s College Experience Is All Too Familiar for Minority Students

Michelle Robinson didn’t shy away from her background in her application essay for Princeton University. The Chicago native wrote about the lack of college degrees in her family, and her father’s struggle with multiple sclerosis. While she was in the top 10 percent of her high-school class, a member of the National Honor Society, and the class treasurer—not to mention that her older brother was a

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Climate change likely caused migration, demise of ancient Indus Valley civilization

More than 4,000 years ago, the Harappa culture thrived in the Indus River Valley of what is now modern Pakistan and northwestern India, where they built sophisticated cities, invented sewage systems that predated ancient Rome's, and engaged in long-distance trade with settlements in Mesopotamia. Yet by 1800 BCE, this advanced culture had abandoned their cities, moving instead to smaller villages i

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NASA-NOAA satellite catches short-lived Tropical Cyclone Bouchra

Tropical Cyclone Bouchra formed on Nov. 10 in the Southern Indian Ocean and was already on its way to dissipation when NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite passed overhead on Nov. 13.

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Social relationships more important than hard evidence in partisan politics: study

The basic human need to get along with others results in the formation of extreme political groupings, according to a study from Dartmouth College.

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'Scaring' soybeans into defensive mode yields better plants a generation later

By temporarily silencing the expression of a critical gene, researchers fooled soybean plants into sensing they were under siege, encountering a wide range of stresses. Then, after selectively cross breeding those plants with the original stock, the progeny "remember" the stress-induced responses to become more vigorous, resilient and productive plants, according to a team of researchers.

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