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Nyheder2018november15

 

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NASA learns more about interstellar visitor 'Oumuamua

The first known interstellar object to visit our solar system — named 'Oumuamua — was detected in October 2017 by Hawaii's Pan-STARRS 1 telescope. But it was too faint for NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope to detect when it looked more than two months after the object's closest approach to Earth in early September. That 'non-detection' puts a new limit on how large the strange object can be, astron

1h

 

F.D.A. Seeks Restrictions on Teens’ Access to Flavored E-Cigarettes and a Ban on Menthol Cigarettes

The agency declined to prohibit sales of the popular vaping flavors, and will begin the process to outlaw menthol cigarettes.

9min

 

Lamme muskler, vokseværk og mareridt: Der sker underlige ting i din krop, når du sover

Scroll igennem og se, hvad der sker af spøjse ting i din krop i løbet af de fire faser af din nattesøvn.

10h

 

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LATEST

 

Climate change/biodiversity loss: Inseparable threats to humanity that must be addressed together

Demand for biofuels to fight climate change clouds the future for biodiversity, says the Executive Secretary of the Intergovernmental Platform on Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services (IPBES). The demand could cause a 10- to 30-fold expansion of green energy-related agricultural land use, adding crushing pressure on habitat for plants and animals and undermining the essential diversity of species on

6min

 

Bloomberg American Health Initiative releases special public health reports supplement

With US life expectancy now on the decline for two consecutive years, the Bloomberg American Health Initiative is releasing a supplement to Public Health Reports, the scholarly journal of the US Surgeon General. The supplement includes a series of special articles addressing five of the most complex and urgent health challenges facing the United States, specifically: addiction and overdose, violen

6min

 

Purdue cancer identity technology makes it easier to find a tumor's 'address'

Purdue University researchers have developed a technology aimed at making it easier to deliver cancer treatment to the right 'address' in the body while also easing the painful side effects of chemotherapy on patients.

6min

 

Vietnam veterans and agent orange exposure — new report

The latest in a series of congressionally mandated biennial reviews of the evidence of health problems that may be linked to exposure to Agent Orange and other herbicides used during the Vietnam War found sufficient evidence of an association for hypertension and monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS). The committee that carried out the study and wrote the report, Veterans and A

6min

 

Drug candidate may recover vocal abilities lost to ADNP syndrome

A new Tel Aviv University study finds that the drug candidate CP201, also known as NAP, may improve vocal communication abilities in patients with ADNP syndrome, a rare genetic condition.

6min

 

The Media's Week-Long Attention Span for a Mass Shooting

A gunman walked into a bar in Thousand Oaks, California, and opened fire last Wednesday night. By the time the gunfire had stopped, 13 people, including the shooter, were dead. It was one tragedy among many in recent weeks, including a shooting at a yoga studio and a massacre at a synagogue in Pittsburgh. Media coverage of these events tends to follow a familiar script. “You do the day story, and

19min

 

Protein central to immune system function new target for treating pulmonary hypertension

A protein with a role in sensing cell damage and viral infections is a new target for the treatment of pulmonary hypertension, or increased blood pressure in the lungs, according to research led by Virginia Commonwealth University and the University of Sheffield in the United Kingdom.

27min

 

New guidelines for early detection and treatment of sarcopenia

Newcastle University experts are chairing a national session on new guidelines for the early detection and treatment of sarcopenia — a loss of muscle strength that affects many older people in the UK.

27min

 

Social media is affecting the way we view our bodies — and not in a good way

Young women who actively engage with social media images of friends who they think are more attractive than themselves report feeling worse about their own appearance afterward, a York University study shows.It's no secret that social media can blur the lines on what's real and what's fantasy, but new research at York's Faculty of Health now shows how young women interact with images online can af

27min

 

Clams and cockles, sentinels of the environmental status of Nicaraguan coasts

In collaboration with the National Autonomous University of Nicaragua, a research group from the UPV/EHU's Plentzia Marine Station has studied the bivalves in the mangroves on both coasts of Nicaragua in order to analyse how they are affected by the pollution brought down by the rivers. That way, it will be possible to use them as sentinels or indicators of environmental changes. The research has

27min

 

Transition metal complexes: Mixed works better

A team at BESSY II has investigated how various iron-complex compounds process energy from incident light. They were able to show why certain compounds have the potential to convert light into electrical energy. The results are important for the development of organic solar cells. The study has now been published in the journal PCCP, and its illustration selected for the cover.

27min

 

Population of rare Stone's sheep 20 police smaller than previously thought

The already-rare Stone's sheep of the Yukon is 20 per cent less common than previously thought, according to new research by University of Alberta biologists. The study examined 123 different DNA markers in approximately 2,800 thinhorn sheep in British Columbia and the Yukon, with the goal of mapping population boundaries. Results show significant overestimation of certain subspecies of thinhorn s

27min

 

Recent study documents damage to rice crops by three fall-applied residual herbicides

Fall-applied residual herbicides are a commonly used control for glyphosate-resistant Italian ryegrass — one of the most troublesome weeds in Mid-South row crops. But research published in the journal Weed Technology shows rice growers need to be cautious. Some residual herbicides can have a negative impact on rice crop performance.

27min

 

Agile Implementation reduced central line-associated blood stream infections by 30 percent

A new study has found that Agile Implementation, an easy to localize and apply change methodology that enables fast, efficient, effective, scalable and sustainable implementation of evidence-based healthcare solutions, reduced central-line associated blood stream infections by 30 percent. Central line-associated bloodstream infections are among the most common hospital-acquired infections and can

27min

 

A bigger nose, a bigger bang: Size matters for ecoholocating toothed whales

A new study sheds light on how toothed whales adapted their sonar abilities to occupy different environments. The study shows that as animals grew bigger, they were able to put more energy into their echolocation sounds — but surprisingly, the sound energy increased much more than expected.

27min

 

Animal populations are shrinking due to their high-risk food-finding strategies

A study using animal-attached technology to measure food consumption in four very different wild vertebrates has revealed that animals using a high-risk strategy to find rarer food are particularly susceptible to becoming extinct, as they fail to gather food for their young before they starve.

27min

 

New 'SLICE' tool can massively expand immune system's cancer-fighting repertoire

UC San Francisco researchers have devised a CRISPR-based system called SLICE, which will allow scientists to rapidly assess the function of each and every gene in 'primary' immune cells — those drawn directly from patients. The new method, described in the Nov. 15 issue of Cell, provides researchers with a powerful tool that will guide their decision-making when determining how best to engineer i

27min

 

Does having 'lazy eye' affect a child's self-esteem?

Academic performance, interactions with peers, and athletic ability are factors connected to self-esteem in school children. This study of children in the third to eighth grades looked at whether the condition 'lazy eye' or amblyopia, where one eye has reduced vision due to misalignment or blur, was associated with lower self-perception by children of their competence, appearance, conduct and self

27min

 

Surgery & combination therapy optimizes results in aggressive prostate cancer management

Results published today in JAMA Oncology suggest post-operative radiation and hormone therapy, before cancer recurrence, as a new prostate cancer treatment option for men with a Gleason Score of 9 or 10.

27min

 

New maps hint at how electric fish got their big brains

Researchers from Washington University in St. Louis have mapped the regions of the brain in mormyrid fish in extremely high detail. The new measurements can help illuminate longstanding questions in neuroanatomy. As brains get bigger, do all regions of the brain scale up in a predictable way? Or does natural selection act independently on separate regions of the brain — such that certain parts of

27min

 

Anti-Malaria drugs have shown promise in treating cancer, and now researchers know why

Anti-malaria drugs known as chloroquines have been repurposed to treat cancer for decades, but until now no one knew exactly what the chloroquines were targeting when they attack a tumor. Now, researchers from the Abramson Cancer Center of the University of Pennsylvania say they have identified that target — an enzyme called PPT1.

27min

 

Brain, muscle cells found lurking in kidney organoids grown in lab

New research has identified rogue cells — namely brain and muscle cells — lurking within kidney organoids. Such cells make up only 10 to 20 percent of an organoid's cells, but their presence indicates that the 'recipes' used to coax stem cells into becoming kidney cells inadvertently are churning out other cell types.

27min

 

DICE: Immune cell atlas goes live

Scientists at La Jolla Institute for Immunology (LJI) are sharing a trove of data that will be critical for deciphering how this natural genetic variation shapes the immune system's ability to protect our health.

27min

 

Twitter use influenced by social schedules, not changing seasons and daylight

An analysis of Twitter data from the US shows that social media usage largely mirrors daily work schedules and school calendars. The data reflect the amount of 'social jet lag' caused when social demands make people wake up much earlier than their biological rhythms would prefer.

27min

 

Gut hormone and brown fat interact to tell the brain it's time to stop eating

Researchers from Germany and Finland have shown that so-called 'brown fat' interacts with the gut hormone secretin in mice to relay nutritional signals about fullness to the brain during a meal. The study, appearing Nov. 15 in the journal Cell, bolsters our understanding of a long-suspected role of brown adipose tissue (BAT) — a type of body fat known to generate heat when an animal is cold — in

27min

 

To monitor 'social jet lag,' scientists look to Twitter

Social jet lag — a syndrome related to the mismatch between the body's internal clock and the realities of our daily schedules — has been tied to obesity and other health problems. Now, researchers reporting in Current Biology on Nov. 15 have found a clever way to measure social jet lag in people all over the country: by analyzing patterns of activity on the social media platform Twitter.

27min

 

Seeing and smelling food prepares the mouse liver for digestion

The sight or smell of something delicious is often enough to get your mouth watering, but the physiological response to food perception may go well beyond your salivary glands. New research in mice shows that the sight and smell of food alone may be enough to kickstart processes in the liver that promote the digestion of food. The study appears Nov. 15 in the journal Cell.

27min

 

Hele specialer snart tømt for mandlige læger

De kvindelige dominans i lægefaget kan resulterer i, at nogle specialer stort set ikke beskæftiger mænd. Det gælder f.eks. gynops, samfundsmedicin, geriatri, patalogisk anatomi og b&u-psykiatrien. Situationen er hverken god for læger eller patienter, mener flere ledende overlæger, som vurderer, at en god balance mellem kønnene løfter behandlingen.

28min

 

Hjerte-CT i udredningen af patienter mistænkt for iskæmisk hjertelidelse

Det drejer sig ikke blot om antallet af undersøgelser, men i høj grad også om tolkningen af den enkelte undersøgelse.

28min

 

Trump Gets NATO Backwards

Returning from the World War I armistice commemoration in Paris, President Trump reemphasized his view of America’s European allies. “We pay for large portions of other countries’ military protection,” he wrote on Twitter, and “it is time that these very rich countries either pay the United States for its great military protection, or protect themselves.” Trump’s criticisms are, of course, nothin

32min

 

Amazon rules, Walmart gains in e-commerce: study

Amazon is extending its dominance in US e-commerce, but Walmart is seeing strong gains and is poised to become the number three online retailer, a market tracker said Thursday.

33min

 

Amateur Mathematician Finds Smallest Universal Cover

Philip Gibbs is not a professional mathematician. So when he wanted a problem to chew on, he looked for one where even an amateur could make a difference. What he found was a challenge that could drive even the most exacting minds mad. In a paper completed earlier this year, Gibbs achieved a major advance on a 100-year-old question that hinges on the ability to accurately measure area down to the

35min

 

37min

 

Low carb diets are still a metabolic mystery

Health Experts can't even agree on how to measure the caloric effects. Some nutrition studies, often the ones that make headlines, focus on weight loss—because it’s the reason so many of us diet.

39min

 

Fredag: Se farvellet til kilogramloddet

Fredag 16. november vil kilogram få en ny definition – følg foredrag og afstemning direkte på webcast.

40min

 

Just the Sight of Food Gets the Liver Ready for Action

In mice, seeing and smelling food causes immediate cellular changes that ready the liver to convert incoming amino acids to proteins.

44min

 

Animal populations are shrinking due to their high-risk food-finding strategies

A study using animal-attached technology to measure food consumption in four very different wild vertebrates has revealed that animals using a high-risk strategy to find rarer food are particularly susceptible to becoming extinct, as they fail to gather food for their young before they starve.

45min

 

New maps hint at how electric fish got their big brains

Helmet-heads of the freshwater fish world, African mormyrid fishes are known for having a brain-to-body size ratio that is similar to humans.

45min

 

Twitter use influenced by social schedules, not changing seasons and daylight

An analysis of Twitter data from the U.S. shows that social media usage largely mirrors daily work schedules and school calendars. The data reflect the amount of "social jet lag" caused when social demands make people wake up much earlier than their biological rhythms would prefer.

45min

 

Seeing and smelling food prepares the mouse liver for digestion

The sight or smell of something delicious is often enough to get your mouth watering, but the physiological response to food perception may go well beyond your salivary glands. New research in mice shows that the sight and smell of food alone may be enough to kickstart processes in the liver that promote the digestion of food. The study appears November 15 in the journal Cell.

45min

 

Insomniac prisoners sleeping better after one-hour therapy session

Three-quarters of prisoners struggling to sleep have reported major improvements after receiving cognitive behavioural therapy to treat their insomnia. In the first study of its kind in the world, experts from Northumbria University have found that a single one-hour session of cognitive behavioural therapy was effective in preventing the development of chronic insomnia in 73% of prisoners. Inmates

48min

 

Should you eat a low-gluten diet?

When healthy people eat a low-gluten and fiber-rich diet compared with a high-gluten diet they experience less intestinal discomfort including less bloating which researchers at University of Copenhagen show are due to changes of the composition and function of gut bacteria. The new study also shows a modest weight loss following low-gluten dieting. The researchers attribute the impact of diet on

48min

 

UB study describes presence of textile microfibers in south European marine floors

A study led by researchers of the UB quantifies the presence of textile microfibers in south European marine floors. They analysed the amount of these colored fibers, which vary between 3 to 8 mm but are extremely fine, with less than a 0.1 mm diameter, and which come mainly from washing machines. The results show the dominance of cellulosic fibers over synthetic polymers, and highlight several oc

48min

 

Toxins override key immune system check

Staphylococcus aureus bacteria can cause numerous diseases, such as skin infections, pneumonia and blood poisoning (sepsis). The strong immune response triggered by the bacteria is an aggravating factor here. One reason for this lies in specific bacterial toxins — as established by a team from the Technical University of Munich (TUM) and University of Tübingen. These toxins reduce the amount of c

48min

 

Juice displaces milk and fruit in high school lunches

High school students participating in school meal programs are less likely to select milk, whole fruit, and water when fruit juice is available, which on balance may decrease the nutritional quality of their lunches, according to a new study by the Rudd Center for Food Policy and Obesity at the University of Connecticut.

48min

 

Politics this week

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54min

 

Business this week

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54min

 

KAL’s cartoon

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54min

 

Digital Reminders of a Lost Pregnancy

Squinting at the blurry image on the sonographer’s screen, Cindy Marie Jenkins—flanked by her husband and her young son—scanned excitedly for signs of life. Her first pregnancy had been so straightforward that this seemed like a special moment the entire family could share. But as the minutes dragged on, the sonographer became very quiet, leaving to find a doctor who delivered the news: There wou

54min

 

A librarian's case against overdue book fines | Dawn Wacek

Libraries have the power to create a better world; they connect communities, promote literacy and spark lifelong learners. But there's one thing that keeps people away: the fear of overdue book fines. In this thought-provoking talk, librarian Dawn Wacek makes the case that fines don't actually do what we think they do. What if your library just … stopped asking for them altogether?

54min

 

Germany tweaks law to limit diesel car bans

The German government will ease air pollution law so as to spare cities that only slightly exceed limits on harmful nitrogen dioxide (NO2) from diesel vehicle bans, ministers agreed Thursday, sparking sharp criticsm by environmentalists.

57min

 

Video: How is leather made?

The chemical process of tanning turns animal hides into durable, supple leather.

57min

 

Fox News backs CNN in lawsuit against Trump Administration

On Tuesday, CNN filed a lawsuit against the Trump administration for allegedly violating the First and Fifth Amendments when it revoked Jim Acosta's press badge. Opinions on Acosta may vary among media professionals, though the general consensus seems to be that administrations shouldn't bar journalists from the White House based on the content of their reporting. White House Press Secretary Sara

59min

 

Why women rarely reach top positions in government

Gender stereotypes are the main reason why women rarely take up senior positions in the civil service, according to researchers from the Higher School of Economics Olga Isupova and Valeriya Utkina.

1h

 

No link between 'hypoallergenic' dogs and lower risk of childhood asthma

Growing up with dogs is linked to a lower risk of asthma, especially if the dogs are female, a new study from Karolinska Institutet and Uppsala University in Sweden shows. However, the researchers found no relation between 'allergy friendly' breeds and a lower risk of asthma. The study is published in the journal Scientific Reports.

1h

 

What did birds and insects do during the 2017 solar eclipse?

In August of 2017, millions peered through protective eyewear at the solar eclipse — the first total eclipse visible in the continental United States in nearly 40 years. During the event, researchers from the Cornell Lab of Ornithology and the University of Oxford watched radar to observe the behavior of birds and insects.

1h

 

Race plays role in regaining weight after gastric bypass surgery

African Americans and Hispanic Americans who have undergone Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) are at greater risk to regain weight as compared to Caucasians. To date, no study has addressed the effect of race on weight regain over the long term. Identifying the risk factors for weight regain is an important first step in improving the long-term clinical outcomes of bariatric surgery.

1h

 

New promising compound against heart rhythm disorders and clogged arteries

A new pharmacological agent demonstrates promising results for the prevention of a wide range of heart rhythm disorders, including both cardiac and brain injury-induced arrhythmia and the most common and malignant among them: atrial fibrillation. Furthermore, the compound demonstrates significant activity in conditions of reduced blood flow to the heart caused by obstructed arteries. The study is

1h

 

Large, good-quality, monatomic sheets of germanene grown simply using annealing

Nagoya University-led researchers have found an easier, scalable way to produce high-quality 2D sheets of germanium, possibly paving the way to industrial-scale production and the advent of the next generation of electronics.

1h

 

Patchy distribution of joint inflammation resolved

Chronic inflammatory rheumatic diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and spondylo-arthritis (SpA) are chronic disabling diseases that have a poor outcome on loco-motoric function, if left untreated. RA en SpA affect each about 1 percent of the population. The reason why certain joints are more affected than others has been a longstanding question, resolved by Isabelle Cambré and Prof. Dirk El

1h

 

Voters would have forgiven Cameron for failing to hold an EU referendum, study shows

Many voters would have forgiven David Cameron if he had failed to deliver on his campaign promise to hold an EU referendum, a study suggests.

1h

 

Stroke: Preventing the damage by acting on the neuronal environment?

To protect neurons and limit the damage after a stroke, researchers from the CNRS, the University of Caen-Normandie, University Paris-Est Créteil, and the company OTR3 have pursued an innovative path: targeting the matrix that surrounds and supports brain cells. Their results, just published in the journal Theranostics, have confirmed this strategy on rats, and will lead to a clinical study betwee

1h

 

How is leather made? (video)

The chemical process of tanning turns animal hides into durable, supple leather. Although this technology is thousands of years old, scientists are still trying to understand the exact chemical changes involved. In this video, Reactions explains how leather is made: https://youtu.be/6Cn7QqdFIxc.

1h

 

Enzymes in the cross-hairs

More and more bacteria are resistant to available antibiotics. A team of chemists from the Technical University of Munich now presents a new approach: they have identified important enzymes in the metabolism of staphylococci. Blocking these enzymes in a targeted manner would allow the pathogens to be starved.

1h

 

Songbirds set long-distance migration record

Researchers at Lund University in Sweden have studied flight routes to determine how far willow warblers migrate in the autumn. The results show that the willow warbler holds a long-distance migration record in the 10-gram weight category — with the small birds flying around 13,000 kilometers or longer to reach their destination.

1h

 

Stress of stretching solids: 3D image shows how particles distribute in metals

Observing the behavior of the particles in the composite metals helps to understand the mechanism of losing its strength and ductility, which makes possible to design the composites metals with higher strength and ductility.

1h

 

'Edited' plant-based toxin possesses anti-tumor characteristics

Researchers at Shinshu University in Japan have discovered that editing the chemical properties of fusicoccins, a kind of toxic organic compound produced by fungus to blight plants, can transform them into chemicals with anti-tumor properties in cells. "We are hoping to be able to develop a new clinically relevant anti-cancer agent based on fusicoccins, which selectively control protein-protein in

1h

 

Disrupting parasites' family planning could aid malaria fight

Malaria parasites know good times from bad and plan their offspring accordingly, scientists have found, in a development that could inform new treatments.

1h

 

Voters would have forgiven Cameron for failing to hold an EU referendum, study shows

Many voters would have forgiven David Cameron if he had failed to deliver on his campaign promise to hold an EU referendum, a study suggests.

1h

 

Poor weather delays US space cargo launch to Friday

Cloudy weather and rain pushed back until Friday the planned launch of a US cargo ship loaded with supplies for astronauts living at the International Space Station, NASA said Thursday.

1h

 

Emirates Airline half-year profit slides 86% on oil hike

Emirates Airline on Thursday posted an 86 percent drop in half-year profits as the Middle East's leading carrier was hit by a hike in oil prices and currency devaluations.

1h

 

Report details damage to ancient Yemeni archaeological sites

A prominent Yemeni rights group has documented heavy damage from ground fighting and airstrikes to at least 34 archaeological sites over the past four years and urged the international community to protect Yemenis' "collective memory."

1h

 

Walmart flexes its muscle against Amazon

Walmart, armed with grocery and other online services, is proving it can do battle with Amazon.

1h

 

Walmart US CEO talks technology, workers

When Walmart's Greg Foran took over as CEO of the discounter's U.S. division four years ago, he found messy stores with lots of items that were frequently out of stock. The 57-year-old New Zealand native dove in, making sure shelves were loaded with the most popular products and establishing controls to increase freshness in produce like strawberries.

1h

 

Disrupting parasites' family planning could aid malaria fight

Malaria parasites know good times from bad and plan their offspring accordingly, scientists have found, in a development that could inform new treatments.

1h

 

How important is the media in remote areas?

A Deakin researcher is investigating how the media shapes the way we perceive "community" in rural areas.

1h

 

Fullerene compounds made simulation-ready

What in the smart nanomaterials world is widely available, highly symmetrical and inexpensive? Hollow carbon structures, shaped like a football, called fullerenes. Their applications range from artificial photosynthesis and nonlinear optics to the production of photoactive films and nanostructures. To make them even more flexible, fullerenes can be combined with added nanostructures. In a new stud

1h

 

Women build less effective professional networks than men as they underestimate self-worth

Understanding why women are less successful at networking is vital for the development of gender equality in the work place. A study, published by SAGE Publishing today in the journal Human Relations, contributes to this ongoing discussion, revealing that it is not only exclusion by men, but also self-imposed barriers including hesitation and gendered modesty that prevent women from networking as

1h

 

Astronomers find possible elusive star behind supernova

Astronomers may have finally uncovered the long-sought progenitor to a specific type of exploding star by sifting through NASA Hubble Space Telescope archival data and conducting follow-up observations using W. M. Keck Observatory in Hawaii.

1h

 

Analysis of data sources improves ability to respond to climate change in East Africa

East Africa is one of the most vulnerable regions in the world to extreme weather and climate events and to variability and change in climate. It is also one of the hardest regions to find good climate data on. Now, thanks to recently published research from UNU-FLORES, decision-makers in hot spots in East Africa will be able to more accurately assess the impact of climate change and plan adaptati

1h

 

Sci-fi movies are the secret weapon that could help Silicon Valley grow up

If there's one line that stands the test of time in Steven Spielberg's 1993 classic Jurassic Park, it's probably Jeff Goldblum's exclamation, "Your scientists were so preoccupied with whether or not they could, they didn't stop to think if they should."

1h

 

Protecting biodiversity in palm oil

News that chocolate, bread and dried fruit all share a common ingredient with household detergents and cosmetics might sound both unlikely and unappetising.

1h

 

Freeways Are Always Soul Crushing. Now They’re on Fire.

Even when fires are not threatening them from both sides, freeways are a brutal part of California’s physical and metaphysical infrastructure, providing a map in your mind of where it’s possible to go—and raising the question: Can your bear to drive there? The roads crisscross the soul, seeming to open up all kinds of destinations but, overcrowded, under construction, whimsically closed for unsta

1h

 

Diabetic foot ulcers heal quickly with nitric oxide technology

Around the world, 425 million people live with diabetes and upwards of 15 percent develop foot ulcers, which increases their risk of death 2.5 times. A new nitric oxide-releasing technology has the potential to cut down the healing time of diabetic foot ulcers from 120 days to 21 days.

1h

 

Next step on the path towards an efficient biofuel cell

Fuel cells that work with the enzyme hydrogenase are, in principle, just as efficient as those that contain the expensive precious metal platinum as a catalyst. However, the enzymes need an aqueous environment, which makes it difficult for the starting material for the reaction — hydrogen — to reach the enzyme-loaded electrode. Researchers solved this problem by combining previously developed co

1h

 

Gun Violence Is Our Lane, and It's Time to Accelerate

As emergency physicians, we live with the nation’s epidemic of shootings, mass and otherwise, every day — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

1h

 

The Benefits of Applying Mindfulness to Exercise

If all of your workouts involve some type of distraction, it may be time to add some mindfulness into your workout regimen — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

1h

 

Human excrement efficiently converted to hydrochar

Researchers from Ben-Gurion University of the Negev (BGU) demonstrated for the first time that raw human excrement can potentially be converted to a safe, reusable fuel and a nutrient rich fertilizer, solving two major worldwide issues in advance of World Toilet Day on November 19.

1h

 

Killer whales share personality traits with humans, chimpanzees

Killer whales display personality traits similar to those of humans and chimpanzees, such as playfulness, cheerfulness and affection, according to new research published by the American Psychological Association.

1h

 

Fullerene compounds made simulation-ready

Hollow football-shaped carbon structures, called fullerenes, have applications in areas ranging from artificial photosynthesis and nonlinear optics, to the production of photoactive films and nanostructures. In a new study published in EPJ D, Kirill B. Agapev from ITMO University, St. Petersburg, Russia, and colleagues have developed a method that can be used for future simulations of fullerene co

1h

 

Women build less effective professional networks than men as they underestimate self-worth

A study, published by SAGE Publishing today in the journal Human Relations, contributes to this ongoing discussion, revealing that it is not only exclusion by men, but also self-imposed barriers including hesitation and gendered modesty that prevent women from networking as effectively as their male counterparts. The research revealed that women's tendencies to harbor moral concerns about 'exploit

1h

 

A new 'buddy system' of nurse education gets high marks from students

A new 'buddy system' of nursing education — in which two students work together as one nurse to share ideas, set priorities and make clinical decisions for patient care in the 'real world' of nursing — is effective, according to a study by Baylor University's Louise Herrington School of Nursing. It was published in the Journal of Nursing Education.

1h

 

Joint pain and swelling — when symptoms masquerade as arthritis

The article highlights several conditions presenting with similar signs and symptoms to those of arthritis which may offer diagnostic confusion.

1h

 

Devonian integrative stratigraphy and timescale of China

Studies on the Devonian of China have lasted for about 170 years, and important progress has been made recently. Based on well-studied bio- and chronostratigraphy of Devonian in South China and adjacent areas, in combination with recent achievements in carbon isotope stratigraphy, event stratigraphy and radioactive isotope ages, researchers from Nanjing briefly summarize the research history and c

1h

 

Electronic skin points the way north

Researchers at the Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR) in Germany have developed an electronic skin (e-skin) with magnetosensitive capabilities, sensitive enough to detect and digitize body motion in the Earth's magnetic field. As this e-skin is extremely thin and malleable, it can easily be affixed to human skin to create a bionic analog of a compass. This might not only help people with

1h

 

Insect antibiotic provides new way to eliminate bacteria

An antibiotic called thanatin attacks the way the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria is built. Researchers at the University of Zurich have now found out that this happens through a previously unknown mechanism. Thanatin, produced naturally by the spined soldier bug, can therefore be used to develop new classes of antibiotics.

1h

 

Infinite-dimensional symmetry opens up possibility of a new physics — and new particles

The symmetries that govern the world of elementary particles at the most elementary level could be radically different from what has so far been thought. This surprising conclusion emerges from new work published by theoreticians from Warsaw and Potsdam. The scheme they posit unifies all the forces of nature in a way that is consistent with existing observations and anticipates the existence of ne

1h

 

Nightingale's technology links chronic inflammation with disease risk and shorter lifespan

Investigating a new marker for chronic inflammation GlycA, researchers have found that chronic inflammation is linked to increased risk for shorter lifespan and several organ-related diseases. The findings were made through investigating GlycA measurements with Nightingale Health's blood testing technology. The results highlight a potential use for measuring GlycA in healthcare.

1h

 

Researchers in japan make android child's face strikingly more expressive

Android faces must express greater emotion if robots are to interact with humans more effectively. Osaka University researchers tackled this challenge as they upgraded their android child head, named Affetto. They precisely examined Affetto's facial surface points and the precise balancing of different forces necessary to achieve more humanlike motion. Through mechanical measurements and mathemati

1h

 

Resistant bacteria: Can raw vegetables and salad pose a health risk?

Salad is popular with people who want to maintain a balanced and healthy diet. Salad varieties are often offered for sale ready-cut and film-packaged. It is known that these types of fresh produce may be contaminated with bacteria that are relevant from the point of view of hygiene. A working group led by Professor Dr. Kornelia Smalla from the Julius Kühn Institute (JKI) has now shown that these b

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How sperm find their way

Researchers have found that a protein in the cell membranes of sperm plays a key role in how they find their way to eggs. The PMCA protein may also help explain how egg cells only interact with sperm from the same species. PMCA may even be a target of drug discovery.

1h

 

Scouting out bacterial defences to find new ways to counter-attack antibiotic resistance

Research led by the University of Bristol has begun to unpick an important mechanism of antibiotic resistance and suggest approaches to block this resistance.

1h

 

More realistic research needed on substances that enter the environment

Chemical substances and nanomaterials are processed on a massive scale in diverse products, while their risks have not been properly assessed. Time and again synthesised substances have been shown to pollute the environment more than lab tests predicted. This is the warning given by Professor of Ecotoxicology Martina Vijver from Leiden University in her inaugural lecture on 16 November.

1h

 

Report on seismic context measurements for induced seismicity

University of Liverpool researchers undertook a study in response to a request from the Department of Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy (BEIS) to assess induced seismicity and the associated traffic light system (TLS) which is used by hydraulic fracturing operations in the UK.

1h

 

Scorpion venom to shuttle drugs into the brain

The Peptides and Proteins lab at the Institute for Research in Biomedicine (IRB Barcelona) has published a paper in Chemical Communications describing the use of a peptide derived from chlorotoxin, found in scorpion venom to carry drugs across the blood-brain barrier (BBB).

1h

 

Social enterprise Ricult uses digital tools to empower rural farmers in developing countries

More than half of the world's poorest people live on small farms in rural areas of developing countries, accounting for over 2 billion people living on around two dollars a day.

1h

 

Adaptable, scalable and cost effective local solution to urban flooding prevention

Efforts to prevent urban flooding have often resulted in costly and complex systems based on rainfall forecasts which are often inaccurate. A new approach offers more agility, at a fraction of the investment.

1h

 

Rapid, flexible water analysis creates industry stir

The EU-funded CYTO-WATER project has developed an innovative onsite analytical system capable of rapidly detecting different microorganisms in water.

1h

 

Minority homebuyers face widespread statistical lending discrimination

Face-to-face meetings between mortgage officers and homebuyers have been rapidly replaced by online applications and algorithms, but lending discrimination hasn't gone away.

1h

 

Unearthing evidence: Researchers examine processes that support soil health

Healthy soil contains carbon—and a mystery. Some carbon remains in the soil for millennia, but some decomposes quickly and escapes into the atmosphere.

1h

 

Web tracker can follow you for months even if you delete your cookies

This internet tracker can follow your browsing for months even if you use ad blockers, by measuring variations in the quartz crystals in your device's clock

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Salmon are shrinking and it shows in their genes

Male salmon are maturing earlier and becoming smaller, and it shows in their genes. This was the discovery of a study that examined scale samples from salmon over a 40-year period, and looked at the population genetic profile of a gene that determines salmon's age of maturity and size. The results show that the 'big salmon gene version' has become rarer in the population over time, and has been re

1h

 

When Elon Musk Tunnels Under Your Home

V icky Warren feels like she’s been attacked from all sides lately. Across the street from her rental apartment in the working-class Los Angeles County city of Hawthorne, noisy planes take off and land at all hours, diverted to the local municipal airport from wealthier Santa Monica, where neighbor complaints have restricted air traffic. On the other side of her apartment, cars on the 105 Freeway

1h

 

*The Expanse* Gets Artificial Gravity Right in This Neat Trick

In a scene from season one, Jim Holden shows exquisite command of high school physics as he maneuvers himself onto a spaceship gangway.

1h

 

Songbirds set long-distance migration record

Researchers at Lund University in Sweden have studied flight routes to determine how far willow warblers migrate in the autumn. The results show that the willow warbler holds a long-distance migration record in the ten-gram weight category – with the small birds flying around 13,000 kilometres or longer to reach their destination.

1h

 

Humpback whales arrive in the Mediterranean to feed themselves

Although the presence of humpback whales in the Mediterranean has been considered unusual, it is known that their visits have increased in the last 150 years. Until now, there had been no clear reason, with various hypotheses being considered, including disorientation, the migratory routes of other species, etc. However, a recently published study by experts from the University of Seville and the

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Nu skal katastrofebro rives ned – Uvist, hvad der skal bygges bagefter

Resterne af den delvist kollapsede Morandi-bro i Genova bliver fjernet fra december. Strid mellem regeringen og bro-operatøren betyder imidlertid, at ingen ved, hvad der skal bygges bagefter – eller hvem der skal betale.

1h

 

Mediehuset Ingeniøren skifter navn

Nye medier, nye læsere og flere ambitioner giver nye muligheder.

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'Keep it in the ground': What we can learn from anti-fossil fuel campaigns

From the fossil fuel divestment movement to the Stop Adani campaign, in recent years we've seen a wave of climate activism that directly targets fossil fuels—both the infrastructure used to produce, transport and consume them, and the corporations that finance, own and operate that infrastructure.

1h

 

What does a chemical do? Addressing misconceptions about chemistry

When I introduce myself as a Ph.D. student in chemistry, I can often spot fear and incomprehension in people's eyes: chemists are often pictured as crazy scientists, like Dr. Maru in Wonder Woman, doing black magic and explosions. It appears that most of the public fears are based on misunderstandings of the science.

1h

 

Astronomers find possible elusive star behind supernova

Astronomers may have finally found a doomed star that seemed to have avoided detection before its explosive death.

1h

 

Human excrement efficiently converted to hydrochar — World Toilet Day Nov. 19

The discovery addresses two challenges prevalent in the developing world: sanitation and growing energy needs. The researchers said the reaction that creates the hydrochar sterilizes the waste material, so it becomes safe to handle. The 'coals' can potentially be utilized for household heating and cooking, while the liquid byproduct (the aqueous phase) could be used as fertilizer.

1h

 

Non-coding genetic variant could improve key vascular functions

In the current issue of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, a team of physicians, geneticists and biologists describes a previously unknown genetic factor — a common non-coding sequence of DNA — that can either raise or reduce the risk of coronary artery disease or ischemic stroke.

1h

 

Super-earth discovered orbiting the sun's famous stellar neighbor

An international team of astronomers has discovered the nearest single star to the sun hosts an exoplanet at least 3.2 times as massive as Earth — a so-called super-Earth. Data from a worldwide array of telescopes, including Keck Observatory in Hawaii, have revealed this frozen, dimly lit world. The newly discovered planet is the second closest known exoplanet to Earth and orbits the fastest movi

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African ancestry associated with risk factors for heart failure

African-Americans are known to have certain cardiac conditions that are linked to a greater occurrence of heart failure at a younger age than Caucasians. Researchers at UT Southwestern Medical Center analyzed data from the Dallas Heart Study to determine why.

1h

 

Scientists Spot Giant Crater Hidden Under Greenland's Ice

The enormous crater is among the 25 largest known on Earth, and likely came from a meteorite impact within the past 3 million years — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

1h

 

Eight science apps that turn your phone into a laboratory

DIY Monitor earthquakes, play with a virtual particle accelerator, and more. Apps can turn your smartphone into a scientific instrument. These programs let you spot birds, identify stars, learn about the elements, and more.

1h

 

What If Ernest Hemingway Wrote the Bible?

What If Ernest Hemingway Wrote the Bible? Scientists create an algorithm to translate text into different literary styles of the Bible. Bible_topNteaser.jpg Image credits: Robert via Flickr Rights information: CC BY 2.0 Culture Thursday, November 15, 2018 – 09:00 Joel Shurkin, Contributor (Inside Science) — Algorithms that computers use to translate something written in one language into another

1h

 

Drug combination makes cancer disappear in mice with neuroblastoma

Researchers investigating new treatments for neuroblastoma — one of the most common childhood cancers — have found that a combination of two drugs made tumors disappear in mice, making it more effective than any other drugs tested in these animals.

1h

 

How exercise could help fight drug addiction

The siren call of addictive drugs can be hard to resist, and returning to the environment where drugs were previously taken can make resistance that much harder. However, addicts who exercise appear to be less vulnerable to the impact of these environmental cues. Now, research with mice suggests that exercise might strengthen a drug user's resolve by altering the production of peptides in the brai

1h

 

Quantum science turns social

Researchers developed a versatile remote gaming interface that allowed experts as well as hundreds of citizen scientists all over the world through multiplayer collaboration and in real time to optimize a quantum gas experiment in a lab. Both teams quickly used the interface to dramatically improve upon the previous best solutions, that scientists had established after months of careful optimizati

1h

 

$1 test screens for diseases in less than an hour

A new easy-to-use device can quickly and accurately screen for a variety of diseases, including Zika, Ebola, hepatitis, dengue, and malaria. The portable device, called enVision (enzyme-assisted nanocomplexes for visual identification of nucleic acids), can also screen for various types of cancers and genetic diseases. EnVision takes between 30 minutes to one hour to detect the presence of diseas

1h

 

New research studies adhesiveness in ants as a way to improve synthetic adhesives

Many of us are used to encountering ants scampering across a sidewalk, a trail path or even in our kitchen floor. But in many parts of the world, like the tropical regions of Central America, ants live their lives up in trees and utilize adhesive pads and claws to scurry from their colonies to tree limbs, branches and leaves in search of food. While foraging for food, wingless worker ants encounte

1h

 

Car-free Paris? It was already a dream in 1790

The debate over the place of cars in cities may seem like a recent one, but in fact was raging well before the first automobile even saw the light of day.

1h

 

Terahertz laser pulses amplify optical phonons in solids

A study led by scientists of the Max Planck Institute for the Structure and Dynamics of Matter (MPSD) at the Center for Free-Electron Laser Science in Hamburg/Germany presents evidence of the amplification of optical phonons in a solid by intense terahertz laser pulses. These light bursts excite atomic vibrations to very large amplitudes, where their response to the driving electric field becomes

1h

 

Danmark bliver centrum for internationalt forskningscenter om antibiotikaresistens

Et nyt, stort internationalt forsknings- og videnscenter om antibiotikaresistens skal placeres i Danmark. Centeret skal have mellem 400-500 ansatte.

1h

 

ECDC calls for continued action to address antimicrobial resistance in healthcare settings

On European Antibiotic Awareness Day, the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC) publishes the results of two point-prevalence surveys of healthcare-associated infections and antimicrobial use in hospitals and in long-term care facilities in the EU/EEA. The findings show that practices in terms of antimicrobial use vary from country to country throughout Europe and that, overall

2h

 

Which physical mechanism is responsible for magnetic properties of cuprates upon doping?

The international team of researchers has identified and proved that adding impurities with a lower concentration of electrons stabilizes the antiferromagnetic state of cuprates, high-temperature superconducting compounds based on copper. The research team, led by a senior fellow at the Department of Applied Theoretical Physics and Applied Mathematics, Ural Federal University, Evgeny Stepanov, pub

2h

 

Feeling the pressure with universal tactile imaging

Osaka University researchers developed a universal tactile imaging technology for pressure distribution measurement using a coupled conductor pair. An image processing approach based on tomography was then used to relate the pressure distribution to the conductors' contact resistance. Mechatronics technology enabled development of flexible sensors using conventional conductive materials. These sen

2h

 

Taking hydrogen mobility forward in Europe

In the drive to decarbonise Europe's transport sector, fuel cell electric vehicles (FCEVs) offer crucial benefits. For one, their fuel – hydrogen – can be generated from a wide variety of local renewable energy sources, limiting reliance on energy imports. The FCEVs themselves produce no harmful exhaust emissions when driven, which has a positive impact on the environment and human health. Equally

2h

 

Low-gluten, high-fiber diet could settle your stomach

Eating a low-gluten, high-fiber diet changes bacteria in the gut, decreases gastrointestinal discomfort such as bloating, and is linked to modest weight loss, according to new research. The changes in intestinal comfort and body weight relate to changes in gut bacteria composition and function, researchers say. An increasing number of people choose a low-gluten diet, even though they’re not aller

2h

 

For the sake of kids, embrace math

Mathematics is causing headaches in schools across Canada, Australia and many other parts of the world. Teachers in both Canada and Australia feel neither competent nor confident in math and, frankly, they are the first to admit it.

2h

 

A super-Earth found in our stellar back yard

The potential discovery of a planet orbiting Barnard's Star – the second closest stellar system to the sun – was announced by researchers today in Nature.

2h

 

Dinosaurdræber, danekræ og guld værd: Seks fascinerende fakta om meteorer

Et kæmpe meteorkrater er for første gang nogensinde fundet under indlandsisen

2h

 

Rainforest vine compound starves pancreatic cancer cells

Pancreatic cancer cells are known for their ability to thrive under extreme conditions of low nutrients and oxygen, a trait known in the cancer field as 'austerity.' The cells' remarkable resistance to starvation is one reason why pancreatic cancer is so deadly. Now researchers have identified a compound from a Congolese plant that has strong "antiausterity" potential, making pancreatic cancer c

2h

 

Middle Eastern desert dust on the Tibetan plateau could affect the Indian summer monsoon

Large quantities dust from the deserts of the Middle East can settle on the Tibetan Plateau, darkening the region's snowpack and accelerating snow melt. A new atmospheric modeling study suggests that, in some years, heavy springtime dust deposition can set off a series of feedbacks that intensify the Indian summer monsoon. The findings could explain a correlation between Tibetan snowpack and the I

2h

 

Soil's history: A solution to soluble phosphorus?

New research suggests that, over time, less phosphorus fertilizer may be necessary on agricultural fields.

2h

 

Coffee or tea? The answer might be in your genes

Choice of drink linked to how we perceive bitterness of substances, researchers say Do you prefer coffee or tea? The answer to that question might in part be down to your genes, research suggests. Scientists say a genetic predisposition to perceiving the bitterness of particular substances appears to nudge us towards one beverage or the other. Continue reading…

2h

 

Environmentalists must embrace nuclear power to stem climate change

The Union of Concerned Scientists has overturned its longstanding opposition to nuclear power. Other green groups should follow suit, says Mark Lynas

2h

 

Prefer tea or coffee? It may be down to your genes for bitter tastes

People with genes that make them taste caffeine more strongly tend to be coffee-drinkers, while tea-drinkers have genetic aversions to strongly bitter tastes

2h

 

A new DNA sequencing service wants to reward you for sharing your data

Genetics pioneer George Church's new company says it will sequence your genome for free and secure it on a blockchain, so that you can choose who uses your data

2h

 

Launching new tech? How do you make data-driven decisions without any sales data?

When a tech company decides to launch a brand new, first-of-its-kind tech product, it can be hard to know how many you need to order. Order too few, and you may have to resort to more expensive manufacturing or shipping options to keep up with demand. Order too many, and you've just got a lot of wasted inventory on your shelves that you'll never sell at full price. Either way: Getting your product

2h

 

Black students who have one black teacher are more likely to go to college

The influence of having a black teacher can make a monumental difference in a black student's life, and the effect begins early in an education.

2h

 

Hemimastigotes found to represent a major new branch on evolutionary tree of life

A team of researchers at Dalhousie University has found evidence that suggests hemimastigotes represent a major new branch of evolutionary life. In their paper published in the journal Nature, the group describes their genetic study of the dirt-dwelling microbe.

2h

 

Designer emulsions

ETH material researchers are developing a method with which they can coat droplets with controlled interfacial composition and coverage on demand in an emulsion in order to stabilise them. In doing so they are fulfilling a long-held dream of researchers and industry.

2h

 

Why we shouldn't like coffee, but we do

The more sensitive people are to the bitter taste of caffeine, the more coffee they drink, reports a new study. The sensitivity is based on genetics. Bitterness is natural warning system to protect us from harmful substances, so we really shouldn't like coffee. Scientists say people with heightened ability to detect coffee's bitterness learn to associate good things with it.

2h

 

Killer whales share personality traits with humans, chimpanzees

Killer whales display personality traits similar to those of humans and chimpanzees, such as playfulness, cheerfulness and affection, according to new research published by the American Psychological Association.

2h

 

Analysis of data sources improves ability to respond to climate change in East Africa

East Africa is one of the most vulnerable regions in the world to extreme weather and climate events. This new research improves ability to accurately assess the development and impact of climate change. An analysis of several sources in the region identified the most suitable sources of high-quality climate and hydrological data. The data can be used to identify hot spots and plan adaptation and

2h

 

Forskere vil etablere national fæcesbank

Fæcestransplantation skal om få år være standardbehandling for en alvorlig tarminfektion. Det er ambitionen for et nyt forskningsprojekt for, der har oprettet en fæcesbank for at systematisere behandlingen.

2h

 

In Photos: Devastating Wildfires in California

Wildfires raging in Northern California are now considered the deadliest the state has ever endured. Here's a look at the fires and the destruction left behind.

2h

 

The Midterms Sent an Unmistakable Message to Republicans

In last week’s election, the bill came due on the defining bet placed by congressional Republicans during the Donald Trump era. Led by House Speaker Paul Ryan and Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, House and Senate Republicans made a strategic decision to lock arms around Trump over the past two years. They resolutely rejected any meaningful oversight of his administration; excused, or even

2h

 

Startup Offers To Sequence Your Genome Free Of Charge, Then Let You Profit From It

A full genome sequence costs about $1,000. But Nebula Genomics expects that companies and researchers would defray the cost in exchange for key medical information about the person involved. (Image credit: Craig Barritt/Getty Images for The New Yorker)

2h

 

Buzz, Buzz: Bitter Tasters Like Coffee Better

A genetic analysis of samples taken from a large UK health database suggest that people who are more sensitive than their peers to the bitter taste of caffeine tend to drink more coffee — not less. (Image credit: Dimitri Otis/Getty Images)

2h

 

Study of rock samples suggests Campi Flegrei could be re-entering a new phase of pressure buildup

A team of researchers from ETH Zürich, Cardiff University, Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia and Sapienza-Università di Roma has found evidence that suggests Campi Flegrei could be re-entering a phase of pressure buildup. In their paper published in the journal Science Advances, the group describes their study of rock samples collected from the area and what they found.

2h

 

A professor's study of the fictional Hogwarts faculty

Melissa C. Johnson, Ph.D., associate professor and chair of the Department of Focused Inquiry in Virginia Commonwealth University's University College, was initially skeptical of the Harry Potter phenomenon, even as her nieces and nephews eagerly ate up the first book in the series.

2h

 

The kilogram is being redefined – a physicist explains

How much is a kilogram? 1,000 grams. 2.20462 pounds. Or 0.0685 slugs based on the old Imperial gravitational system. But where does this amount actually come from and how can everyone be sure they are using the same measurement?

2h

 

Toilets of the future must be designed with people in mind, not technology

Most of you reading this article probably have a comfortable toilet that you use on a daily basis. As Steve Sugden wrote: "In more developed areas of the world we have forgotten the horrors of using a disgusting toilet and we now take for granted that toilets are comfortable, well lit, smell-free, private, pleasant places to defecate. They are places where we can go in peace."

2h

 

DTU-kamera skal afgøre om der har været liv på Mars

Nasa's Mars 2020-mission vil medbringe et avanceret kamera fra DTU Space, der kan undersøge om små fossiler gemmer sig i klipper og sten på overfladen af Mars.

2h

 

IgG food intolerance tests continue to mislead consumers into unnecessary dietary restrictions

IgG food intolerance testing is ineffective, yet it continues to be promoted to consumers. CBC Marketplace recently investigated two Canadian companies that sell these tests.

2h

 

Microsoft Surface Studio 2 Review: A Brawny, Shape-Shifting PC

Microsoft's new workstation has everything you ever wanted in a creative desktop, and costs more than you probably ever wanted to spend.

2h

 

Microsoft Surface Headphones Review: Dialed InMicrosoft Surface SH

Microsoft's first wireless headphones look, feel, and sound as premium as their price tag.

2h

 

Tinder Borrows a Page From Uber With Its New ‘Swipe Surge’

The feature, available in select cities, turns Tinder into a real time dating experience.

2h

 

Company Offers Free Whole-Genome Sequencing for Data Sharers

Nebula Genomics is among the first blockchain-based companies to reward users for contributing personal data for research.

2h

 

Feeling the pressure with universal tactile imaging

Touch, or tactile sensing, is fundamentally important for a range of real-life applications, from robotics to surgical medicine to sports science. Tactile sensors are modeled on the biological sense of touch and can help researchers to understand human perception and motion. Researchers from Osaka University have now developed a new approach to pressure distribution measurement using tactile imagi

2h

 

Insect antibiotic provides new way to eliminate bacteria

An antibiotic called thanatin attacks the way the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria is built. Researchers at the University of Zurich have now found that this happens through a previously unknown mechanism. Thanatin, produced naturally by the spined soldier bug, can therefore be used to develop new classes of antibiotics.

2h

 

Quality of sellers critical to growth, revenues for online platforms

Online shopping platforms have changed the way we shop for everything from household items to holiday gifts. These firms – think Amazon, eBay or Etsy – provide a market space for buyers and sellers, and are the growth engines of the online economy, said Ju-Yeon Lee, an assistant professor of marketing in Iowa State University's Ivy College of Business.

2h

 

California wildfires raise concerns about impacts to environment and health

It never rains in California, so instead it burns—often—with prime fire conditions likely to persist until rainstorms arrive.

2h

 

Cold neutrons used in hot pursuit of better thermoelectrics

Thermoelectric devices are highly versatile, with the ability to convert heat into electricity, and electricity into heat. They are small, lightweight, and extremely durable because they have no moving parts, which is why they have been used to power NASA spacecraft on long-term missions, including the Voyager space probes launched in 1977.

2h

 

Coffee or tea? Your preference may be written in your DNA

Coffee or tea is a bitter choice, a taste genetics study suggests.

2h

 

Reprogrammed Stem Cells Implanted into Patient with Parkinson's Disease

A man in his 50s is the first of seven patients to receive the experimental therapy — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

2h

 

Climate change likely caused migration, demise of ancient Indus Valley civilization

A new study found evidence that climate change likely drove the Harappans to resettle far away from the floodplains of the Indus.

2h

 

Breakthrough in treatment of restless legs syndrome

New research presents a breakthrough in the treatment of Restless Legs Syndrome (RLS).

2h

 

A world without brick-and-mortar stores? Even avid online shoppers say, 'no, thanks'

The majority of consumers, even those who prefer online shopping, think the extinction of brick-and-mortar stores would be bad for society, according to a new study that explores consumers' perceptions of today's transforming retail environment.

2h

 

Microgel powder fights infection and helps wounds heal

While making smart glue, a team of engineers discovered a handy byproduct: hydrogen peroxide. In microgel form, it reduces bacteria and virus ability to infect by at least 99.9 percent.

2h

 

Bias-based bullying does more harm, is harder to protect against

A new study finds that bias-based bullying does more harm to students than generalized bullying, particularly for students who are targeted because of multiple identities, such as race and gender. What's more, the study finds that efforts to mitigate these harms are less effective against bias-based bullying.

2h

 

The Empire of the Eagle: the world's most graceful bird – in pictures

The Empire of the Eagle: An Illustrated Natural History, by Mike Unwin and David Tipling, is published by Yale University Press and celebrates the world’s 68 eagle species in all their magnificence and beguiling diversity Continue reading…

2h

 

Space making the virtual a reality

What do astronauts, Pokémon, wildlife park rangers and surgeons all have in common?

2h

 

New resources support tribes in preparing for climate change

Which Pacific Northwest streams will warm the most in the next 50 years, and where would restoration work make a difference for salmon? Where will wildfires and pests be most aggressive in forests as the Earth warms, and how can better management help?

2h

 

Scouting out bacterial defences to find new ways to counter-attack antibiotic resistance

Research led by the University of Bristol has begun to unpick an important mechanism of antibiotic resistance and suggest approaches to block this resistance.

2h

 

Why macrophages rest in healthy tissue

ETH scientists have shown that the immune system's macrophages are regulated not only biochemically, but mechanically as well. This could explain why the cells are less active in healthy body tissue.

2h

 

Researchers unraveling the mystery of how sperm cells navigate

Researchers have found that a protein in the cell membranes of sperm plays a key role in how they find their way to eggs. The PMCA protein may also help explain how egg cells only interact with sperm from the same species. PMCA may even be a target of drug discovery.

2h

 

Orangutan mothers found to engage in displaced reference

A pair of researchers with the University of St Andrews has observed orangutan mothers engaging in displaced reference after observation of a perceived threat. In their paper published in the journal Science Advances, Adriano Lameira and Josep Call describe experiments they carried out with wild orangutans and what they learned from them.

2h

 

Study provides framework to measure animal and plant traits for sustainability goals

Researchers have outlined a plan to detect and report changes in global biodiversity. The monitoring of species traits will improve natural resource management.

3h

 

New publication sheds light on the power of decentralised databases for climate action initiatives

A report suggests blockchain and other decentralised systems could help unlock the much-needed funds for a successful transformation towards a zero-carbon economy.

3h

 

The weak force—life couldn't exist without it

David Armstrong studies a phenomenon that is ubiquitous in nature, yet only a few non-scientists know what it is.

3h

 

A new primer on climate change

Jason Smerdon is coauthor of the newly revised Climate Change: The Science of Global Warming and Our Energy Future. The book is a succinct, non-ideological reference for anyone who wants to understand what we know (and don't) about climate, from the basic workings of the atmosphere, oceans and solid earth through the long-term history of planetary climate, the human influence on it, and modern ene

3h

 

Harnessing artificial intelligence for sustainability goals

As ESA's ɸ-week continues to provoke and inspire participants on new ways of using Earth observation for monitoring our world to benefit the citizens of today and of the future, it is clear that artificial intelligence is set to play an important role.

3h

 

Researchers take steps towards new sustainable battery alternative

A team of researchers led by Professor Thomas Nann from Victoria University of Wellington has created a new electrolyte that could be the key to making safer and more environmentally friendly batteries.

3h

 

Research uncovers the spontaneous polarization of novel ultrathin materials

Many materials exhibit new properties when in the form of thin films composed of just a few atomic layers. Most people are familiar with graphene, the two-dimensional form of graphite, but thin film versions of other materials also have the potential to facilitate technological breakthroughs.

3h

 

Bursting bubbles launch bacteria from water to air

Wherever there's water, there's bound to be bubbles floating at the surface. From standing puddles, lakes, and streams, to swimming pools, hot tubs, public fountains, and toilets, bubbles are ubiquitous, indoors and out.

3h

 

How algae could sustainably reduce the carbon dioxide concentration in the atmosphere

In collaboration with fellow researchers, chemists at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) have developed a process that, according to initial calculations, can facilitate economically removing the greenhouse gas carbon dioxide from the atmosphere. The latest World Climate Report (IPCC Special Report on Global Warming of 1.5 ° C) acknowledges the global relevance of the process.

3h

 

Spending our carbon budgets wisely

The UN's Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) sent a clear message to the world with its last report, issued in early October in South Korea: the world needs to act immediately to cut greenhouse gas emissions. The report says that human-caused emissions of carbon dioxide (CO2) need to fall by about 45 per cent from 2010 levels by 2030, and by 100 per cent by 2050.

3h

 

Researchers discover novel 'to divide or to differentiate' switch in plants

Scientists from VIB and Ghent University under the guidance of Prof. Dr. Jenny Russinova have uncovered a novel mechanism in plants that controls an important decision step in stomatal lineage to divide asymmetrically or to differentiate. This is a decisive step for the formation of stomata, tiny pores on the plant surface, produced by asymmetric cell division. In the model plant Arabidopsis thali

3h

 

Earth's magnetic field measured using artificial stars at 90 kilometers altitude

The mesosphere, at heights between 85 and 100 kilometers above the Earth's surface, contains a layer of atomic sodium. Astronomers use laser beams to create artificial stars, or laser guide stars (LGS), in this layer for improving the quality of astronomical observations. In 2011, researchers proposed that artificial guide stars could also be used to measure the Earth's magnetic field in the mesos

3h

 

Nanotubes built from protein crystals: Breakthrough in biomolecular engineering

Researchers at Tokyo Institute of Technology (Tokyo Tech) have constructed protein nanotubes from tiny scaffolds made by cross-linking of engineered protein crystals. The achievement could accelerate the development of artificial enzymes, nano-sized carriers and delivery systems for a host of biomedical and biotechnological applications.

3h

 

Einstein Letter Warns of German Anti-Semitism 10 Years Before Nazis' Rise to Power

Einstein warned of fascism and anti-Semitism 10 years before the Nazis rose to power.

3h

 

Paris-Size Crater Found Hidden Under Greenland Ice

Earth hides its scars well; the planet has endured countless millennia of eruptions and collisions, but scientists are still stumbling upon the evidence of all that geologic drama.

3h

 

Volcanoes might have formed on Mars the same way they did in Hawaii

Space By studying Martian meteorites, scientists think they've found an explanation for ancient eruptions on the Red Planet. Most images we see of Mars make its landscape look flat and vast, but it’s actually home to some of the largest mountains in the entire solar system. And while the…

3h

 

The Ballad of Buster Scruggs Doesn’t Quite Add Up

“Things have a way of escalating out here in the West.” So explains Buster Scruggs (Tim Blake Nelson) near the beginning of the Coen brothers’ new feature, The Ballad of Buster Scruggs . A dandified, singing gunfighter whom we first meet as he’s playing guitar on horseback—we’re treated to a cunning shot from inside the guitar, peering out through the sound hole at his strumming fingers—Buster re

3h

 

The Clinton Impeachment, as Told by the People Who Lived It

I n 1998 , the Republican-led House of Representatives voted to impeach President Bill Clinton on one charge of perjury and one charge of obstruction of justice. The articles of impeachment had their origin in a relationship between the president and a 22-year-old White House intern, Monica Lewinsky. The intimate details, revealed by an independent counsel, had consumed the country for 11 months:

3h

 

Can we produce enough green hydrogen to save the world?

Around a fifth of all greenhouse gas emissions are produced by industries such as steel and cement so if we're going to work towards an emission-free society then this is a good place to start. And one promising technology may have a key role to play.

3h

 

3h

 

Oldest Known Footprints in Grand Canyon Were Left by Mysterious, Sideways-Walking Reptile

About 315 million years ago — long before dinosaurs roamed the Earth — an early reptile scuttled along in a strangely sideways jaunt, leaving its tiny footprints embedded in the landscape, new research finds.

3h

 

Yaeji's "One More" Hops Languages, and Codes, With Purpose

The New York house artist creates a succulent, danceable space where tongues and nations intersect.

3h

 

Boom Supersonic Moves to Take off With a Demonstrator Plane

Before the Colorado-based plane maker can launch its airliner, it has to see its 1/3-scale "Baby Boom" take off.

3h

 

How California Needs to Adapt to Survive Future Fires

California is burning for very good reasons, like climate change and population growth. But it doesn't have to be this way.

3h

 

Image of the Day: Single-Cell Surprises

Researchers identify a new species of Hemimastigophora protist, and suggest the group should be promoted from a phylum to a supra-kingdom.

3h

 

Life may have begun with cells made wholly from simple proteins

Crude proteins made of short chains of amino acids can form life-like “protocells” that host biological processes – hinting that life began with proteins

4h

 

We’ve got thinking all wrong. This is how your mind really works

From unconscious biases to advertising, the idea we can think fast or slow is influential, but it may be mistaken. Here’s how to think better

4h

 

Climate change: Worries over CO2 emissions from intensifying wildfires

Rising numbers of extreme wildfires could result in a significant increase in CO₂ emissions, scientists have warned.

4h

 

Chinese fusion tool pushes past 100 million degrees

The Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak (EAST), nicknamed the "Chinese artificial sun," achieved an electron temperature of over 100 million degrees in its core plasma during a four-month experiment this year. That's about seven times greater than the interior of the sun, which is about 15 million degrees C.

4h

 

Cities That Lost Amazon's HQ2 Contest Can Still End Up Ahead

Amazon is getting pounded from the left, right, and center for the outcome of its HQ2 contest. A “ sham ,” a “ stunt ”, and a “ bait-and-switch ” are just a few of the many insults used to describe the company’s decision to plant new offices in two rich areas that, as the saying goes, will now get richer. Amazon received 238 bids for HQ2. New York City, Northern Virginia, and Nashville—which is g

4h

 

Killer Tulips Hiding in Plain Sight

T he glass-walled landscaping center on the road south of Nijmegen looks like a gardener’s dream of heaven. My fingers tingle as I thread my way through stands of soaring bamboo, drifts of asters, and lanes of rhododendrons, tempted to grab a trowel and forget what I’m here for. My host has little patience for my garden dreams. Jacques Meis, a physician and microbiologist, is muscling past the gr

4h

 

The first rains in centuries in the Atacama Desert devastate its microbial life

The Atacama Desert, the driest and oldest desert on Earth, located in northern Chile, hides a hyper-arid core in which no rain has been recorded during the past 500 years. But this situation has changed in the last three years. For the first time, rainfall has been documented in the hyper-arid core of the Atacama, and contrary to what was expected, the water supply has caused a great devastation a

4h

 

Chinese scientists develop novel instrument for rapid profiling of antimicrobial resistance

Widespread antimicrobial resistance (AMR) and the associated rise of "superbugs" is a major public health threat. A leading cause is the misuse or overuse of antibiotics due to the paucity of rapid assays for clinical AMR.

4h

 

Innovative method leads to smaller, cheaper IoT sensors

Researchers from the Green IC research group at the National University of Singapore (NUS) have invented a low-cost, no-battery wake-up timer in the form of an on-chip circuit that significantly reduces power consumption of silicon chips for Internet of Things (IoT) sensor nodes. The novel wake-up timer by the NUS team demonstrates for the first time the achievement of power consumption down to tr

4h

 

Eksperter: Grantræer kan 'suge' dansk CO2

CO2-optag skal bidrage til Danmarks mål for 2050 om at være et lavemissionssamfund, men de teknologiske løsninger er stadig på fosterstadiet. Eksperter peger på douglasgran og skovrejsningsprojekter som effektiv løsning.

4h

 

Japans minister for cybersikkerhed: Jeg har aldrig brugt en computer

Cybersikkerhedschef i den japanske stat Yoshitaka Sakurada er i tvivl om hvad et USB-drev er.

4h

 

Construction Workers Toil Away in San Francisco's Toxic Air

Smoke from wildfires in Northern California blanket the city of San Francisco. Is it safe for the workers outside breathing the air all day?

4h

 

RIP, Prima Books—and Strategy Guides, a Cornerstone of Game Culture

Strategy guides have been doomed for a while. But I'm going to miss them anyway.

4h

 

Netflix’s 'Cam' Is a Horror Movie for the Influencer Age

You may not be an erotic webcam model with legions of unsettling fans, but you’ll find Cam’s dark and risky world more relatable than you’d expect.

4h

 

A 1970s Essay Predicted Silicon Valley's High-Minded Tyranny

Published in Ms. magazine, "The Tyranny of Structurelessness" observes that organizations built to avoid hierarchy develop leaders with pernicious power.

4h

 

Quantum science turns social

Researchers in a lab at Aarhus University have developed a versatile remote gaming interface that allowed external experts as well as hundreds of citizen scientists all over the world to optimize a quantum gas experiment through multiplayer collaboration and in real time. The efforts of both teams dramatically improved upon the previous best solutions established after months of careful experiment

4h

 

Trump, Zombie Deregulation and the Hawaiian Hawk

A bid to remove the bird from the Endangered Species Act has emerged once again — long after the disappearance of the organization that proposed its removal — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

4h

 

Fæcestransplantation kan måske beskytte for tidligt fødte mod dødelig tarmsygdom

For tidligt fødte børn har ofte svære problemer med mave-tarm-kanalen og derfor stor…

4h

 

Why Don't We Forget How to Ride a Bike?

The way memories are anchored in the brain plays a role, neuropsychologist Boris Suchan explains — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

5h

 

A Historic Wave of Support for American Jews

T he Sixth & I historic synagogue in Washington, D.C., could have been mistaken for a nightclub or a concert hall on the first Friday after the synagogue shootings in Pittsburgh. By 5:30 p.m., the line to get in for the 6:30 Kabbalat Shabbat service ran the full length of one block and around to the end of the next. The synagogue had prepared to seat about 700 people. Instead, 800 people packed i

5h

 

The Unsettled Place of the Gay Teen in Film History

On this past New Year’s Day, the musician Hayley Kiyoko christened the year to come as “20gayteen.” Her meaning: Queer kids were about to take over pop culture. Rising stars like Kiyoko, Troye Sivan , and Kim Petras have sung of flighty first love through an LGBTQ lens. On TV, shows like Riverdale have been extending the work of Glee to make stories about, say, girls asking girls to homecoming in

5h

 

Nyt center: Danmark skal samle viden om antibiotikaresistens

Danmark lægger jord til et nyt internationalt videnscenter, der skal forske i antibiotikaresistens og udbrede gode råd til hele verden.

5h

 

Kæmpekrater fra kilometer-stor jernmeteor fundet i Grønland

Et internationalt forskerhold under ledelse af forskere fra Center for GeoGenetik på Statens Naturhistoriske…

6h

 

How lab-on-a-chip technology is turning smartphones into food sensors

A lab-on-a-chip that fits inside a smartphone is set to change our relationship with food and the chemicals we use to make it

6h

 

New techniques may soon make designer babies a reality – are we ready?

As tests that screen embryos for complex traits become available, it's time to decide how to use these ethically – and where to draw the line

6h

 

Auroras unlock the physics of energetic processes in space

A close study of auroras has revealed new ways of understanding the physics of explosive energy releases in space, according to new UCL-led research.

6h

 

Diagnostic tool helps engineers to design better global infrastructure solutions

Designing safe bridges and water systems for low-income communities is not always easy for engineers coming from highly industrialized places. A new discipline called contextual engineering helps engineers think beyond personal values, expectations and definitions of project success when tackling global infrastructure problems.

6h

 

Farmers will benefit from a new method of monitoring pasture nutrients

Farmers can now quickly monitor changes in pasture nutrients and adapt their animals' grazing methods accordingly, using a new, real-time method to check nutrient levels in grassland. This relatively cheap and easy approach will greatly improve the sustainable management of pasture for sheep and cattle. Using this new method, the researchers show that overgrazing pasture to below 7 cm significantl

6h

 

6h

 

Norsk forsvar: Det vil tage tre uger at bjærge fregatten

Helikopterbrændstof siver ud, mens en storm nærmer sig.

6h

 

What to Know About Getting a Flu Shot This Year, No Matter Who’s Paying

Flu season is here, and there are at least six types of vaccine to choose from. It’s worth studying the options to determine which is likely to protect you the most.

6h

 

Diagnostic tool helps engineers to design better global infrastructure solutions

Designing safe bridges and water systems for low-income communities is not always easy for engineers coming from highly industrialized places. A new discipline called contextual engineering helps engineers think beyond personal values, expectations and definitions of project success when tackling global infrastructure problems.

6h

 

Auroras unlock the physics of energetic processes in space

A close study of auroras has revealed new ways of understanding the physics of explosive energy releases in space, according to new UCL-led research.

6h

 

Farmers will benefit from a new method of monitoring pasture nutrients

A fast new way of checking nutrient levels in grasslands allows farmers to quickly monitor changes in pasture nutrients and adapt their animals' grazing methods accordingly. By cutting the analysis time from around 16 hours to less than a minute, this relatively cheap and easy approach will greatly improve the sustainable management of grasslands—the main form of agriculture in many parts of the w

6h

 

'Very serious': African swine fever spreads in China

African swine fever has spread rapidly to more than half of China's provinces despite measures to contain it, the government said, warning that a situation previously described as under control had become "very serious."

7h

 

Cubs of Indian tiger shot in controversial hunt spotted alive

The orphaned cubs of a man-eating tiger killed in a state-sanctioned hunt have been spotted in a forest in western India and could be rescued and rehabilitated, officials said Thursday.

7h

 

Google-data opsporer kilden til fødevarebårne sygdomme

Et forsøg i Chicago og Las Vegas med brug af machine learning viser, at Googles datalogning er god til at finde frem til restaurationskøkkener, der ikke har styr på fødevaresikkerheden.

7h

 

Kæmpekrater fundet under indlandsisen i Nordgrønland: Det første af sin slags

Danske forskere har opdaget et krater på størrelse med Bornholm i det nordlige Grønland.

7h

 

How to mod a smartphone camera so it shoots a million frames per second

Researchers have developed an image-processing trick that allows any electronic camera to take ultra-high-speed images–but only in black and white.

7h

 

Forskere finder effektfulde indsatser mod psykisk mistrivsel

Undersøgelse fra VIVE finder 17 studier, som dokumenterer positive effekter i forebyggende indsatser over for unge med psykiske mistrivselsproblemer.

8h

 

Kristian Rørbæk Madsen er død, 43

Den fynske overlæge blev kendt for sin protest mod kritisable arbejdsforhold og den skærpede myndighedskurs mod fejl.

8h

 

En rebel af en helt særlig kaliber

MINDEORD. Kristian Rørbæk Madsen, 43 år

8h

 

The overview effect: what Earth looks like from space – in pictures

Daily Overview is a website and Instagram feed using high-resolution aerial photography from satellites and planes to mirror the phenomenon from which the project derives its name – the overview effect: the sensation experienced by astronauts when viewing Earth from space On show at The Print Space 15-26 November . Exhibited pieces and more will be available for purchase online Continue reading..

8h

 

Læger har svært ved at finde rundt i data til klynger

Efter de første klynger er blevet oprettet, er næste skridt at give de praktiserende læger redskaber til at indhente og anvende data, så de kan komme godt i gang med arbejdet ude i klyngerne.

8h

 

»Almen praksis er fedt, fordi man får det hele«

Tre yngre læger i almen praksis slår i dag på Lægedage et slag for almen praksis over for medicinstuderende, KBU-læger og introlæger. Deres budskab er, at trods øget pres rummer almen praksis mange fordele, idet man kan skræddersy sin praksis efter egne behov.

8h

 

Bedre samarbejde med radiologer kan spare tid i praksis

Flere praktiserende læger oplever udfordringer, når de skal videresende patienter til radiologiske afdelinger. Der mangler et fælles fodslag, mener professor Peter Vedsted.

8h

 

Diagnostik af lungecancer – vi har behov for et rundt bord og en plan

Silkeborgs diagnostiske center har markante resultater med lavdosis CT frem for røntgen ved diagnostik af lungecancer. Er det ikke tid at erkende, at røntgen af thorax er en usikker, farlig og forældet metode i denne diagnostik?

8h

 

Silkeborg opdager markant flere tidlige tilfælde af lungekræft

Det midtjyske hospital er gået forrest med anvendelse af lavdosis CT og finder langt flere tidlige tilfælde af lungekræft end hospitaler i resten af landet, der oftest anvender røntgen af thorax. Sidstnævnte er en usikker, farlig og forældet metode i denne diagnostik, mener professor Frede Olesen og tidl. formand for Kræftens Bekæmpelse, Leif Vestergaard.

8h

 

New air-conditioning design cools without using fossil fuels

Scientists at Stanford have developed what is essentially a fossil-free air conditioner. It absorbs solar energy, creates a heat sink, and releases that heat through radiative cooling. The device is still in development. Air conditioners have historically been a known for their impact on the Ozone layer for decades. The damage levied in the stratosphere by chlorofluorocarbons — emitted in no smal

8h

 

This place is the pits: China opens luxury hotel in quarry

A hotel development sunk into a disused quarry in China opened its doors Thursday to deep-pocketed clientele.

8h

 

Transit riders, drivers brace for influx of Amazon employees

Commuters beware: New York and Washington's clogged streets and creaky subway systems are about to feel more pain as 50,000 more people descend on the two metro areas when Amazon opens its second headquarters there.

8h

 

Pakistan goes against the grain with coal power spree

In Pakistan's bleak Thar desert, the roar of trucks is constant at a massive Chinese-backed coal power project the government sees as an answer to chronic energy shortages, but which activists warn is an environmental disaster.

8h

 

Farm animals may soon get new features through gene editing

Cows that can withstand hotter temperatures. Cows born without pesky horns. Pigs that never reach puberty.

8h

 

Nepal's first robot waiter is ready for orders

"Please enjoy your meal," says Nepal's first robot waiter, Ginger, as she delivers a plate of steaming dumplings to a table of hungry customers.

8h

 

Uber loss tops $1 bn as it seeks to diversify

Ride-share company Uber on Wednesday said that its net loss topped a billion dollars in the recently ended quarter as it pumped money into bikes, scooters, freight and food delivery.

8h

 

Does not compute: Japan cyber security minister admits shunning PCs

A Japanese minister in charge of cyber security has provoked astonishment by admitting he has never used a computer in his professional life, and appearing confused by the concept of a USB drive.

8h

 

Lockheed Martin awarded $22.7 billion Pentagon contract

The Pentagon on Wednesday announced it had awarded Lockheed Martin a $22.7 billion contract for 255 F-35 fighter jets.

8h

 

Japan's SoftBank invests in US office space-sharing WeWork

American office space-sharing company WeWork has obtained $3 billion in funding from Japanese technology conglomerate SoftBank Group Corp.

9h

 

Electronic driving systems don't always work, tests show

Testing by AAA shows that electronic driver assist systems on the road today may not keep vehicles in their lanes or spot stationary objects in time to avoid a crash.

9h

 

Study helps city ban large trucks

For decades, heavy diesel trucks taking cargo from container ships at the Port Newark-Elizabeth Marine Terminal used a residential street in Elizabeth to avoid the tolls between Exits 13 and 13A on the New Jersey Turnpike. The trucks also routinely idled on the street awaiting their next load.

9h

 

A world without brick-and-mortar stores? Even avid online shoppers say, 'no, thanks'

It has been dubbed the "retail apocalypse—the widespread shuttering of brick-and-mortar stores across America in the wake of online shopping's skyrocketing popularity. But how do consumers feel about this changing retail landscape?

9h

 

It's a harmful myth that UK science can't translate ideas into practice | David Gann and Nick Jennings

Government innovation policy is based on the idea that the UK is poor at commercialising research. But it should reflect reality Britain’s innovators are unfairly tarnished by a tired fable: that the nation’s inventiveness is matched by an unworldly lack of commercial savvy. Anecdotes abound of the proverbial inventor tinkering in his garden shed, or the academic unable to see the economic potent

9h

 

Antibiotic resistance genes are showing up in Antarctic penguins

Antibiotic resistance has spread around the world – so much so that even penguins living near Antarctic research bases have resistant bacteria in their gut

9h

 

Rigspolitiet: ANPG-data skal slettes efter 30 dage – men ikke i backup-systemet

Rigspolitiets databeskyttelseschef afviser, at det – som tidligere omtalt af Version2 – er ulovligt at gemme personoplysninger fra automatisk nummerpladegenkendelse i mere end 30 dage. Argumentet er, at data ikke anvendes men alene gemmes i et backup-system.

9h

 

Exclusive: A new test can predict IVF embryos’ risk of having a low IQ

A new genetic test that enables people having IVF to screen out embryos likely to have a low IQ or high disease risk could soon become available in the US

10h

 

Conjoined twins separated but still want to be next to each other – video

After a successful operation, Bhutanese conjoined twins Nima and Dawa are now getting used to independent life although they prefer to remain side-by-side. Dr Joe Crameri from Melbourne's Royal Children's Hospital said the 15-month-girls are 'doing very well' and 'we feel quietly confident we will have a good result'. Dr Crameri adds there was a sense of relief 'once we realised that we had the a

10h

 

Inventors of spinning wind turbine win James Dyson award

Lancaster students win £30,000 prize for O-Wind turbine after scooping UK equivalent A spinning turbine that can capture wind travelling in any direction and could transform how consumers generate electricity in cities has won its inventors a prestigious international award and £30,000 prize. Nicolas Orellana, 36, and Yaseen Noorani, 24, MSc students at Lancaster University, scooped the James Dys

10h

 

Treating the 'bubble babies'

A new study shows that the genotype of a child with severe combined immune deficiency (SCID) affects his survival rate after stem cell transplantation from an unrelated donor.

11h

 

What's next for smart homes: An 'Internet of Ears?'

A pair of electrical engineering and computer science professors in Cleveland, Ohio, have been experimenting with a new suite of smart-home sensors. Their system would read not only the vibrations, sounds — and even the specific gait, or other movements — associated with people and animals in a building, but also any subtle changes in the existing ambient electrical field. The presented their fi

11h

 

Can't exercise? A hot bath may help improve inflammation, metabolism, study suggests

Hot water treatment may help improve inflammation and blood sugar (glucose) levels in people who are unable to exercise, according to a new study. The findings are published ahead of print in the Journal of Applied Physiology.

11h

 

Dry eye syndrome slows reading rate, study suggests

Johns Hopkins researchers report that chronic dry eye, a condition in which natural tears fail to adequately lubricate the eyes, can slow reading rate and significantly disrupt day to day tasks that require visual concentration for long periods of time.

11h

 

Spending our carbon budgets wisely

Our carbon emissions are much higher than are needed for us to have happy, healthy lives. But cutting these emissions requires us to think differently about how we measure growth and progress.

11h

 

Rutgers study helps city ban large trucks

Researchers team up with residents to provide scientific evidence that heavy truck traffic impacted a neighborhood's air quality and compromised health.

11h

 

New study sheds light on norovirus outbreaks, may help efforts to develop a vaccine

Outbreaks of norovirus in health care settings and outbreaks caused by a particular genotype of the virus are more likely to make people seriously ill, according to a new study in The Journal of Infectious Diseases. Based on an analysis of nearly 3,800 US outbreaks from 2009 to 2016, the research confirms several factors that can make norovirus outbreaks more severe and may help guide efforts to d

11h

 

Marijuana use has no effect on kidney transplant outcomes

A new study published in Clinical Kidney Journal indicates that the usage of marijuana by kidney donors has no measurable effect upon the outcomes of kidney transplants for donors or recipients. This study is the first to investigate the effect of marijuana use by live kidney donors.

11h

 

Older adults' abstract reasoning ability predicts depressive symptoms over time

Age-related declines in abstract reasoning ability predict increasing depressive symptoms in subsequent years, according to data from a longitudinal study of older adults in Scotland.

11h

 

Rådgiverchef: Sparekrav i vandsektoren bremser grøn teknologi

Under de nuværende regler havde man aldrig fået den innovation, der f.eks. har givet os havnebade, påpeger forretningschef fra førende rådgiver på vandområdet.

12h

 

U.S. Immigrants Leave Country—and Microbes—Behind

Immigrants to the U.S. lose their native mix of gut microbes almost immediately after arriving in the U.S.—which researchers can't quite explain. Christopher Intagliata reports. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

12h

 

College Campuses Close as Wildfires Ravage California

Universities are still assessing the extent of the damage; field sites are at risk and some equipment has been damaged.

13h

 

Reef scientist Terry Hughes awarded prize for standing up to political ‘smears’

Coral reef scientist jointly awarded John Maddox prize weeks after his research centre lost government funding Judges have awarded an Australian scientist a prestigious international prize, saying he has battled political smears and public attempts to discredit his work in order to shine a light on the devastating effects of climate change on coral reefs. Prof Terry Hughes was jointly awarded the

13h

 

Recommending plants to benefit and attract pollinators

Pollinating insects are integral to the health of all terrestrial ecosystems and agriculture worldwide. As homeowners attempt to conserve pollinators through horticulture practices, they often seek the advice and guidance of horticulture retail employees regarding what plants they can successfully include on their properties to maximize their intended benefit to pollinators as well as to their hom

14h

 

Putting food-safety detection in the hands of consumers

Researchers have developed a wireless system that leverages the cheap RFID tags already on hundreds of billions of products to sense potential food contamination — with no hardware modifications needed. With the simple, scalable system, the researchers hope to bring food-safety detection to the general public.

14h

 

Mothers infected by dengue may have babies with higher risk of severe Zika, and vice versa

Two new studies provide evidence that previous Dengue infection in pregnant mothers may lead to increased severity of Zika in babies, and that previous Zika infection in mice mothers may increase severity of Dengue infection in their pups. The research supports that maternally acquired antibodies for one virus can assist infection by the other by a process unique to flaviviruses.

14h

 

Climate change: Report says 'cut lamb and beef'

The number of sheep and cattle in the UK should be reduced to help combat climate change, a report says.

15h

 

Breakthrough in treatment of restless legs syndrome

New research published in The Journal of Physiology presents a breakthrough in the treatment of Restless Legs Syndrome (RLS).

15h

 

New study reveals what time we burn the most calories

Seven individuals were locked inside a windowless, internetless room for 37 days. While at rest, they burned 130 more calories at 5 p.m. than at 5 a.m. Morning time again shown not to be the best time to eat. None Dualism has left a marked imprint on modern consciousness. Mind-body is an industry, including a host of philosophical protocols, physical practices, breathing exercises, juice cleanses

15h

 

The Atlantic Daily: You Must Remember This

What We’re Following Yutu: Or, what we weren’t following: A super typhoon that destroyed the U.S. Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands several weeks ago was a relative blip in U.S. media coverage. Tens of thousands of Americans were affected— what happened while few eyes were turned to the region? Deal or No Deal: The original referendum on Brexit took place more than two years ago. Since

16h

 

How the appendix may kick-start Parkinson’s

As far back as Darwin, scientists have thought the appendix was a vestigial organ, but opinions have changed in recent years. A new study found that the appendix houses Lewy bodies, abnormal protein deposits that contribute to Parkinson's disease. Researchers suggest an appendectomy may lower one's risk of Parkinson's, while other research suggests the appendix has important roles to play in our

16h

 

Alcohol ads with pro-drinking comments on Facebook boost desire to drink, study finds

Alcohol advertisements on social media sites such as Facebook can increase young adults' desire to drink if the ads contain pro-drinking comments from users, according to new research.

16h

 

Combination of two immunotherapies shows activity in non-small cell lung cancer patients

A combination of two drugs, which prompt the body's immune system to identify and kill cancer cells, is a safe treatment for patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer and has shown some signs of efficacy. The research is presented at the 30th EORTC-NCI-AACR Symposium on Molecular Targets and Cancer Therapeutics in Dublin, Ireland.

16h

 

Difficult-to-treat bowel cancers respond in first study of new drug combination

Early results from a phase I trial in a small group of patients with advanced cancer using two drugs (nivolumab and pixatimod) that stimulate the immune system report that patients with bowel cancer may benefit from the combination. The research is presented at the 30th EORTC-NCI-AACR Symposium on Molecular Targets and Cancer Therapeutics in Dublin, Ireland.

16h

 

Drug combination makes cancer disappear in mice with neuroblastoma

Researchers investigating new treatments for neuroblastoma — one of the most common childhood cancers — have found that a combination of two drugs made tumors disappear in mice, making it more effective than any other drugs tested in these animals. The research is presented at the 30th EORTC-NCI-AACR Symposium on Molecular Targets and Cancer Therapeutics in Dublin, Ireland.

16h

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