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Nyheder2018november16

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Infinite-dimensional symmetry opens up possibility of a new physics—and new particles

The symmetries that govern the world of elementary particles at the most elementary level could be radically different from what has so far been thought. This surprising conclusion emerges from new work published by theoreticians from Warsaw and Potsdam. The scheme they posit unifies all the forces of nature in a way that is consistent with existing observations and anticipates the existence of ne

3h

Kilogram, ampere, kelvin and mole redefined

In a landmark decision, representatives from 60 countries voted to redefine the International System of Units (SI), changing the world's definition of the kilogram, the ampere, the kelvin and the mole, forever.

1h

EU nærmer sig lovkrav om DAB i biler

DAB-modtagelse skal fremover være et lovkrav for nye bilradioer, mener Europaparlamentet. Ministerrådet mangler stadig at godkende kravet, der kan træde i kraft fra 2021.

7h

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Spotted Seatrout Continued to Spawn During and After Hurricane Harvey

Researchers recovered audio recordings of the fish's mating calls in the eye of the storm.

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Communal rearing gives mice a competitive edge

Research by scientists at the University of Liverpool suggests that being raised communally makes mice more competitive when they're older.

3min

PNW woodlands will be less vulnerable to drought, fire than Rocky Mountain, Sierra forests

Forests in the Pacific Northwest will be less vulnerable to drought and fire over the next three decades than those in the Rocky Mountains and Sierra Nevada, computer modeling by researchers in Oregon State University's College of Forestry shows.

3min

Cargo ship launch clears crewed mission to space station

A Russian Soyuz rocket has put a cargo ship en route to the International Space Station, clearing the way for the next crewed mission.

3min

New discovery shows glass made from exploding stars

The next time you're gazing out of the window in search of inspiration, keep in mind the material you're looking through was forged inside the heart of an exploding ancient star.

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San Francisco chokes on toxic air as wildfires rage

Schools and tourist attractions across the San Francisco Bay Area were shut Friday as smoke from California's deadliest ever wildfire a three hour drive away produced air quality levels worse than in polluted megacities in South Asia.

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Trump’s Attorney General Plan ‘Threatens the Rule of Law’

“The Trump years have cast a hard light on many of the ancient flaws in American democracy,” says writer David Frum in a new Atlantic Argument. One of these flaws, Frum argues, is the fact that the 93 U.S.-government attorneys, including the attorney general, are politically appointed. Legal experts have long worried about the potential for abuse in these arrangements. Just after the midterms, Do

3min

Surprising Nobody, Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez’s Clothing Gets Used Against Her

Earlier this week, Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez posted a tweet : At Congressional events, she shared—the representative-elect of New York’s 14th district is currently in Washington for a series of orientations on the workings of the House—she keeps being mistaken for an intern. Or, sometimes, for the spouse of the person who must be the true new member of Congress. Ocasio-Cortez, a young woman who is

3min

Dietary fat is good? Dietary fat is bad? Coming to consensus

Which is better, a low-fat/high-carbohydrate diet or a high-fat/low-carbohydrate diet — or is it the type of fat that matters? In a new paper, researchers with diverse expertise and perspectives on the issues laid out the case for each position and came to a consensus and a future research agenda.

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Airbnb says revenue for 3Q was best ever, topping $1 billion

Airbnb says it had its best quarter ever, even as cities across the U.S. have started clamping down on the short-term rental market.

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SpaceX gets nod to put 12,000 satellites in orbit

SpaceX got the green light this week from US authorities to put a constellation of nearly 12,000 satellites into orbit in order to boost cheap, wireless internet access by the 2020s.

9min

How to make AI less biased

MIT researchers have demonstrated an approach for identifying and quantifying the ways that a specific algorithm is biased, and actually showing how changing the data collection methods can reduce the bias while still preserving predictive accuracy.

13min

Different types of physical activity offer varying protection against heart disease

While it is well known that physical activity is important for heart health, neither research nor recommendations consistently differentiate between the benefits of different types of physical activity. New research, presented at the ACC Latin America Conference 2018 in Lima, Peru, found that while all physical activity is beneficial, static activities — such as strength training– were more stro

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14min

See Wildlife's Sillier Side, Captured by Photo Contest Finalists

Whimsical images showcase wild animals in unintentionally hilarious poses.

14min

A Bronze Age game called 58 holes was found chiseled into stone in Azerbaijan

A pattern on a rock in Azerbaijan suggests that a game called 58 holes traveled fast from the Near East to Eurasia thousands of years ago.

17min

Likely New House Science Chair Seeks to Move Away from "Suspicion" of Science

If elected, Rep. Eddie Bernice Johnson will, among other things, bring a different attitude toward climate science — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

23min

FDA restricts the sale of some flavored e-cigarettes as teen use soars

The Food and Drug Administration announced restrictions on the sale of some e-cigarette flavors in response to a drastic rise in teen’s use of e-cigs.

25min

Thanksgiving cookware essentials you can still get by Wednesday

Gadgets Amazon Prime is your only hope, lazybones. Sometimes you forget some Thanksgiving cookware essentials. Amazon Prime is your only hope, lazybones. You can still get these items by Wednesday.

27min

Kilogram to be defined by Planck constant instead of a lump of metal

Scientists from around the world have unanimously voted for a new definition of the kilogram – one based on fundamental constants instead of “Le Grand K”

33min

PNW woodlands will be less vulnerable to drought, fire than Rocky Mountain, Sierra forests

Forests in the Pacific Northwest will be less vulnerable to drought and fire over the next three decades than those in the Rocky Mountains and Sierra Nevada, computer modeling shows.

35min

The Fight Over Jim Acosta’s Press Pass Is Only Beginning

First Amendment advocates hailed Friday’s ruling by a federal court judge that will result in at least a temporary return of CNN Chief White House Correspondent Jim Acosta’s press credentials, which were yanked over a week ago following a news conference dust-up between Acosta and President Trump. Since then, Fox News and over a dozen other news organizations have joined ranks with CNN to argue t

40min

Astronomers find possible elusive star behind supernova

Astronomers may have finally uncovered the long-sought progenitor to a specific type of exploding star by sifting through NASA Hubble Space Telescope archival data. The supernova, called a Type Ic, is thought to detonate after its massive star has shed or been stripped of its outer layers of hydrogen and helium.

43min

Establishment of the immortalized cell line derived from Okinawa rail (endangered species)

As part of the cellular conservation of endangered species, our group initiated a primary cell culture project aimed at preserving endangered avian species in Japan, such as the Okinawa rail. However, primary cells cannot be cultured indefinitely because of cellular senescence and stresses caused by cell culture. To overcome these cell culture limitations, primary cells must be immortalized. As a

57min

The Gorgeous Savagery of My Brilliant Friend

When Lila Cerullo disappears at the beginning of Elena Ferrante’s first Neapolitan novel, My Brilliant Friend , it’s not a passive act but a violent one. Lila doesn’t vanish, she doesn’t evaporate; she erases herself, cutting her image out of family photographs as determinedly as she removes clothes from her closet. It isn’t enough for Lila to make herself disappear, Ferrante writes; she has to “

1h

How Sheryl Sandberg Lost Her Feminist Street Cred

Back in 2013, many women of a certain ideological stripe and geographic location (D.C., New York, or basically any big city) wanted to be just like a woman most of us had only recently heard of: Sheryl Sandberg, the chief operating officer of Facebook. With her blockbuster book, Lean In , she seemed to offer women a way—as long as we had nannies, an education, and smart biz-cazh attire—to finally

1h

The Books Briefing: What to Read on Your Holiday Trip

It’s the time of year, again, for holiday travel—those annual treks that can be routine, eye-opening, fraught, heartwarming, or all of the above. To the authors below, literal journeys are opportunities for deeper metaphorical explorations. Jesmyn Ward traces a history of injustice through a family’s road trip through the Deep South, while Carol Bensimon uses a woman’s vacation in Brazil as a win

1h

Dimser under dynen: Radiovært bruger gadgets til at sove bedre

Vært på P1-programmet Digitalt, Esben Hardenberg, tog app- og fitness tracker i brug for at få styr på sin søvn.

1h

Copy of How might electrical signaling in bacteria inform neuroscience?

A swarm of Bacillus subtilis , whose electrical activity can force distant neighbors to join a biofilm. Image courtesy Wikimedia Commons. For years, scientists have known that bacteria living in communities known as biofilms can communicate with one another by passing chemical messages. Bacteria use this communication to help each other survive by coordinating their metabolism based on the amount

1h

3D chemical maps of single bacteria

Researchers used ultrabright x-rays to generate 3D nanoscale maps of a single bacteria's chemical composition with unparalleled spatial resolution.

1h

Predatory behavior of Florida's skull-collecting ant

New research describes the behavioral and chemical strategies of a Florida ant, Formica archboldi, that decorates its nest with the dismembered body parts of other ant species.

1h

Human pharmaceuticals change cricket personality

Crickets that are exposed to human drugs that alter serotonin levels in the brain are less active and less aggressive than crickets that have had no drug exposure, according to a new study.

1h

Milk allergy affects half of US food-allergic kids under age 1

New research found that over two percent of all US children under the age of 5 have a milk allergy, and 53 percent of food-allergic infants under age 1 have a cow's milk allergy.

1h

Sucking your baby's pacifier to clean it may prevent allergies

New research suggests a link between parental sucking on a pacifier and a lower allergic response among young children.

1h

There’s an enormous ghost galaxy hiding at the edge of the Milky Way

The Gaia satellite has spotted a ghost galaxy with a lower surface brightness than any stellar system we’ve ever seen – but the discovery is being questioned

1h

Microbots made from mushroom spores could clean polluted water

Water contaminated with heavy metals, such as lead, could be cleaned up by thousands of microbots built from mushroom spores

1h

Communal rearing gives mice a competitive edge

Research by scientists at the University of Liverpool suggests that being raised communally makes mice more competitive when they're older.It is well known that in many animals, including humans, early-life experiences have long-lasting effects on the development of behaviours later in life.In a new study published in Scientific Reports, researchers have investigated the effects of communal rearin

1h

Youth dating violence shaped by parents' conflict-handling views, study finds

Parents who talk to their children about nonviolent ways of resolving conflict may reduce children's likelihood of physically or psychologically abusing their dating partners later – even when parents give contradictory messages indicating that violence is acceptable in certain circumstances, University of Illinois social work professor Rachel Garthe found.

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The weight is over: kilogram redefined at 'emotional' conference

Historic vote means unit of measurement will no longer be defined by a piece of metal first conceived in 1889 The weight is finally over. Nearly 130 years after the kilogram was first defined by a lump of metal in a vault in Paris, scientists have voted for change and a new system that redefines the global measure of mass in terms of a fundamental constant of nature. Following a historic vote on

1h

Medierne misforstår: Du bliver ikke sundere af at undgå gluten

"Mindre gluten kan give bedre tarme", skrev flere medier forleden. Men det passer ikke helt, siger forsker bag studie.

1h

NASA accepts delivery of European powerhouse for moonship

NASA has accepted delivery of a key European part needed to power the world's next-generation moonship.

1h

House passes bill to drop legal protections for gray wolves

The Republican-controlled House has passed a bill to drop legal protections for gray wolves across the lower 48 states, reopening a lengthy battle over the predator species.

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Volkswagen to spend 44 bn euros on 'electric offensive'

German auto giant Volkswagen said Friday it will invest 44 billion euros by 2023 in the smarter, greener cars of the future as it ramps up efforts to shake off the "dieselgate" emissions cheating scandal.

1h

Space-inspired speed breeding for crop improvement

Technology first used by NASA to grow plants extra-terrestrially is fast tracking improvements in a range of crops. Scientists at John Innes Centre and the University of Queensland have improved the technique, known as speed breeding, adapting it to work in vast glass houses and in scaled-down desktop growth chambers.

1h

Proteins cooperate to break up energy structures in oxygen starved heart cells

Researchers found that the filamin A-Drp1 complex mediates mitochondrial fission in a mouse model of hypoxic heart cells. Results show that hypoxic stress brought about the interaction of filamin A with Drp1 and increased Drp1 activity in heart cells. This process led to mitochondrial fragmentation and cell senescence. Further investigation demonstrated that the drug cilnidipine suppressed Drp1-fi

1h

Universal laws in impact dynamics of dust agglomerates under microgravity conditions

Scientists have found evidence that when projectiles hit soft clumps of dust or hard clumps of loose glass beads, the scaling laws for energy dissipation and energy transfer are the same in each case. This helps us understand how granular clumps stick together, and how planets are formed.

1h

Affordable catalyst for CO2 recycling

A catalyst for carbon dioxide recycling, Mineral pentlandite may also be a conceivable alternative to expensive precious metal catalysts. Pentlandite had previously been known as a catalyst for hydrogen production. By adding a suitable solvent, the researchers successfully utilised it to convert carbon dioxide into carbon monoxide. The latter is a common source material in the chemical industry.

1h

The engineering work of ants can influence paleoclimatic studies

The paleontological site of Somosaguas (Madrid) hosts a large colony of ants of the species Messor barbarus. A study has now revealed that the daily activity of these insects modifies soil composition and therefore influences the results obtained in paleoclimatic studies. The researchers also found that the ants transport fossils.

1h

Long-term exposure to road traffic noise may increase the risk of obesity

Long term exposure to road traffic noise is associated with increased risk of obesity.

1h

Eleven seal species narrowly escaped extinction

Population geneticists have found that eleven seal species only narrowly escaped extinction.

1h

Controlling organ growth with light

In optogenetics, researchers use light to control protein activity. This technique allows them to alter the shape of embryonic tissue and to inhibit the development of abnormalities. Now, scientists have enhanced the technique to stop organ-shaping processes in fruit fly embryos. Their results allow control over a crucial step in embryonic development.

1h

Channels for the supply of energy

Scientists elucidate the mechanism for the transport of water-insoluble protein molecules in mitochondria.

1h

Parker Rides the Struggle Dozer | Gold Rush

Parker has set an ambitious 6000 ounce season goal. Seven weeks in, he's only dug up a third of what he had last year. Stream Full Episodes of Gold Rush: https://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/gold-rush/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/GoldRush/ https://www.facebook.com/Discovery Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/Gold_Rush

1h

Half of the world's annual precipitation falls in just 12 days

Currently, half of the world's measured precipitation that falls in a year falls in just 12 days, according to a new analysis of data collected at weather stations across the globe. By century's end, climate models project that this lopsided distribution of rain and snow is likely to become even more skewed, with half of annual precipitation falling in 11 days.

1h

Playing high school football changes the teenage brain

A single season of high school football may cause microscopic changes in the structure of the brain, according to a new study. A new type of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed significant changes in the structure of the grey matter in the front and rear of the brain and changes to structures deep inside the brain.

1h

Social isolation linked to higher risk of death

A large study links social isolation with a higher risk of death from all causes combined and heart disease for all races studied, and with increased cancer mortality in white men and women.

1h

Artificial intelligence predicts treatment effectiveness

How can a doctor predict the treatment outcome of an individual patient? Traditionally, the effectiveness of medical treatments is studied by randomized trials, but is this really the only reliable way to evaluate treatment effectiveness, or could something be done differently? How can the effectiveness of a treatment method be evaluated in practice? Could some patients benefit from a treatment th

1h

A Blue Tide, Not a Blue Wave

Thursday was a bad day for House Republicans. In the morning, Maine officials declared that Democrat Jared Golden had defeated Representative Bruce Poliquin, the last Republican in Congress from New England, with the aid of the state’s new instant-runoff voting system. Then, in the evening, the Associated Press projected that Democrat Katie Porter would unseat Representative Mimi Walters, yet ano

2h

Cleveland Clinic genetic analysis links obesity with diabetes, coronary artery disease

A Cleveland Clinic genetic analysis has found that obesity itself, not just the adverse health effects associated with it, significantly increases the risk of Type 2 diabetes and coronary artery disease. The paper was published today in the Journal of the American Medical Association Network Open.

2h

Are recreational marijuana companies' social media posts compliant with regulations?

Recreational marijuana use was legalized in the state of Washington in 2012 and there are regulations about posting product promotion messages on social media, while direct advertising of marijuana on social media remains illegal. Under state regulations, marijuana companies can't advertise using language that promotes overconsumption, describes marijuana's curative or therapeutic benefits, or is

2h

What is value-based pricing amount for self-injectable epinephrine devices?

For children and adults with food allergies, personal self-injectable epinephrine devices are crucial to treating severe reactions such as anaphylaxis if there is unintended exposure to allergens. Autoinjectors have become very expensive, although the drug they inject is cheap. In this study of simulated children with peanut allergy, researchers estimated value-based pricing for the devices, which

2h

Weight history may be important for determining risk of early death

A patient's weight history could help identify those at increased risk of dying. Using data for nearly 6,200 people from the Framingham Heart Study, this study incorporated weight history to examine the association between obesity and risk of death because many studies typically rely on weight status at a single point in time.

2h

Space-inspired speed breeding for crop improvement

Technology first used by NASA to grow plants extra-terrestrially is fast tracking improvements in a range of crops. Scientists at John Innes Centre and the University of Queensland have improved the technique, known as speed breeding, adapting it to work in vast glass houses and in scaled-down desktop growth chambers.

2h

Rapid response inpatient education boosts use of needed blood-thinning drugs

A new study designed to reach hospitalized patients at risk shows that a 'real-time' educational conversation, video or leaflet can lower the missed dose rates of drugs that can prevent potentially lethal blood clots in their veins.

2h

When your brain won't hang up: Sustained connections associated with symptoms of autism

For decades, scientists have examined how regions of the brain communicate to understand autism. Researchers at University of Utah Health believe the symptoms of autism may result from sustained connections between regions of the brain.

2h

How black women push back on ‘postracial’ myth

A new book explores how African-American women celebrities, producers, and even audiences use “postracial” discourse to refute the idea of postracialism itself. Postracialism is the thinking that American society has evolved beyond racial discrimination and strife, according to author Ralina Joseph, a communications professor at the University of Washington, in Postracial Resistance: Black Women,

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EPFL/Chuv Paralysis Treatment Video 3 – Patient Mobility In A Park – Human Brain Project

See Press Release Here: https://www.humanbrainproject.eu/en/follow-hbp/news/hbp-supports-breakthrough-neurotechnology-for-treating-paralysis/ AFTER 6 MONTHS TRAINING THE PATIENT SHOW CONTINOUS IMPROVEMENT IN THE CONTROL OF THEIR LEGS WITH AND WITHOUT STIMUALTION THE BRAINS LEARNS TO USE THE STIMULATION TO MOVE THE LEGS VOLOUNTARLY TO THE POINT THAT THE PATIENTS ARE ABLE TO WALK USING THE STIMULAT

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EPFL/Chuv Paralysis Treatment Video 2 – Patient Mobility Within A Harness – Human Brain Project

See Press Release Here: https://www.humanbrainproject.eu/en/follow-hbp/news/hbp-supports-breakthrough-neurotechnology-for-treating-paralysis/ THE MODEL ALSO GUIDED THE DESIGN OF THE STIMULATION CONFIGURATIONS TARGETING SPECIFIC SPINAL SEGMENTS THE STIMULATION IS DELIVERED TO THE SPINAL CORD IN BURSTS THAT TARGET DIFFERENT SPINAL SEGMENTS AT DIFFERENT MOMENTS IN THE GAIT CYCLE. FOR EXAMPLE WE TRIG

2h

EPFL/Chuv Paralysis Treatment Video 1 – Spinal Cord Visualisation – Human Brain Project

See Press Release Here: https://www.humanbrainproject.eu/en/follow-hbp/news/hbp-supports-breakthrough-neurotechnology-for-treating-paralysis/ EPIDURAL STIMULATION RECRUITS LARGE AFFERNT FIBERS IN THE DORSAL ROOTS DORSAL ROOTS ANATOMY IS VARIABLE AND PATIENT SPECIFIC WE BUILT PERSONALIZED FINITE ELEMENT MODELS TO COMPUTE THE ELECTRIC FIELDS GENERATED BY THE ELECTRODES AND OPTIMIZE THE PLACEMENT OF

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Cleaning your baby’s pacifier with spit might have surprising benefits

Health Saliva seems to help babies avoid allergies. Spit is gloopy and sticky and it has a very distinctive smell. It’s also antibacterial.

2h

VW wants to storm car market with cheaper electric model

Volkswagen intends to invest 44 billion euros ($50 billion) in the electric and autonomous car technologies expected to reshape the industry—and said it would make battery-powered vehicles more accessible to mass-market auto buyers by selling its new I.D. compact for about what a Golf diesel costs.

2h

What is augmented reality, anyway?

Augmented reality systems show virtual objects in the real world – like cat ears and whiskers on a Snapchat selfie, or how well a particular chair might fit in a room. The first big break for AR was the "Pokémon GO" game, released in 2016 with a feature that let players see virtual Pokémon standing in front of them, ready to be captured and played with. Now, technology companies like Microsoft and

2h

Newly published model of FSHD and a potential gene therapy to improve functional outcomes

Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) is the most prevalent dominantly inherited muscular dystrophy in the world. To date, there are no pharmacologic treatments available for the more than 850,000 people affected worldwide. Developing models to use for testing potential therapeutics has been a challenge for the research community.

2h

Small satellites tackle big scientific questions

CU Boulder will soon have new eyes on the sun. Two miniature satellites designed by researchers at the Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics (LASP) are scheduled to launch later this month on Spaceflight's SSO-A: SmallSat Express mission onboard a SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket from Vandenberg Air Force Base in California.

2h

A scar that the Woolsey Fire left behind

Fire destroys and decimates. It takes out almost everything in its path. In the wake of a fire, a burn scar appears which takes a long time to heal. The mountains of San Bernardino County in Southern California were in a healing pattern for ten years after the Paradise and Cedar wildfires burned hundreds of thousands of acres north and east of San Diego in 2003, according to Weather.com. The scar

2h

How a long-forgotten virus could help us solve the antibiotics crisis | Alexander Belcredi

Viruses have a bad reputation — but some of them could one day save your life, says biotech entrepreneur Alexander Belcredi. In this fascinating talk, he introduces us to phages, naturally-occurring viruses that hunt and kill harmful bacteria with deadly precision, and shows how these once-forgotten organisms could provide new hope against the growing threat of antibiotic-resistant superbugs.

2h

Half of the world's annual precipitation falls in just 12 days, new study finds

Currently, half of the world's measured precipitation that falls in a year falls in just 12 days, according to a new analysis of data collected at weather stations across the globe.

2h

New research uncovers the predatory behavior of Florida's skull-collecting ant

"Add 'skull-collecting ant' to the list of strange creatures in Florida," says Adrian Smith a scientist at the North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences and North Carolina State University. His new research describes the behavioral and chemical strategies of a Florida ant, Formica archboldi, that decorates its nest with the dismembered body parts of other ant species.

2h

Natural constants as the main protagonists

On the occasion of their 26th General Conference on Weights and Measures (CGPM) on 16 November 2018 in Versailles, the signatory states of the Metre Convention resolved to fundamentally reform the International System of Units (SI). This resolution stipulates that, in the future, all SI units will be based on the values laid down for seven selected natural constants.

2h

Human pharmaceuticals change cricket personality

Crickets that are exposed to human drugs that alter serotonin levels in the brain are less active and less aggressive than crickets that have had no drug exposure, according to a new study led by researchers from Linköping University. The findings have been published in Scientific Reports.

2h

Why I quit my day job researching happiness and started cycling to Bhutan

I'd had enough. It was October 2017, and I'd been wondering what the point of my job was for far too long, and while I'm sure there was something meaningful somewhere and to someone in what I was doing day-to-day, it had certainly lost meaning for me. For all the good that writing another academic research paper would do, I thought I might as well be cycling to Bhutan.

2h

Logging must stop in Melbourne's biggest water supply catchment

Continued logging in Melbourne's water catchments could reduce the city's water supply by the equivalent of 600,000 people's annual water use every year by 2050, according to our analysis.

2h

How fierce fall and winter winds fuel California fires

It doesn't take long in California to develop a feel for "fire weather." When it's hot and dry and the winds blow a certain way, there can be no doubt that, as in the past, landscapes will continue to be forged in fire.

2h

Record-breaking Alps postcard sends message against climate change

A massive collage of 125,000 drawings and messages from children around the world about climate change was rolled out on a shrinking Swiss glacier Friday, smashing the world record for giant postcards.

2h

‘Smart skin’ warns of strain in bridges and airplanes

Thanks to one peculiar characteristic of carbon nanotubes, engineers will soon be able to measure the accumulated strain in an airplane, a bridge, or a pipeline—or just about anything—over the entire surface or down to microscopic levels, according to new research. They’ll do so by shining a light onto structures coated with a two-layer nanotube film and protective polymer. Strain in the surface

2h

Årsfest med kærlig hilsen til 1968

Det er 50 år siden, studenteroprøret satte sit varige præg på Københavns…

3h

Scientists produce 3-D chemical maps of single bacteria

Scientists at the National Synchrotron Light Source II (NSLS-II)—a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science User Facility at DOE's Brookhaven National Laboratory—have used ultrabright x-rays to image single bacteria with higher spatial resolution than ever before. Their work, published in Scientific Reports, demonstrates an X-ray imaging technique, called X-ray fluorescence microscopy (XR

3h

Tiny raptor tracks lead to big discovery

Tracks made by dinosaurs the size of sparrows have been discovered in South Korea by an international team of palaeontologists.

3h

How the Antarctic Circumpolar Current helps keep Antarctica frozen

The Antarctic Circumpolar Current, or ACC, is the strongest ocean current on our planet. It extends from the sea surface to the bottom of the ocean, and encircles Antarctica.

3h

Non-antibiotic drugs also speed up the spread of antibiotic resistance

New research from The University of Queensland has found non-antibiotic pharmaceuticals can significantly promote the spread of antibiotic resistance via bacterial mating.

3h

You can't characterize human nature if studies overlook 85 percent of people on Earth

Over the last century, behavioral researchers have revealed the biases and prejudices that shape how people see the world and the carrots and sticks that influence our daily actions. Their discoveries have filled psychology textbooks and inspired generations of students. They've also informed how businesses manage their employees, how educators develop new curricula and how political campaigns per

3h

Teacher training helps kids rein in emotions

When teachers participated in a training program focused on pro-social classroom behavior, their students were better able to control their emotions, a new study shows. Previous research has shown that children who can regulate emotion are more likely to be academically successful. For the study, which appears in Prevention Science , researchers looked at more than 100 teachers and 1,817 students

3h

Cohousing is an inclusive approach to smart, sustainable cities

The idea that technology will fix complex and systemic problems like climate change, poverty, the housing crisis or health care is simplistic to say the least. We need a radical shift in how we live, and designing for environmental and social sustainability cannot simply be about applying new technologies to our existing models of living.

3h

Cars bad for children and the planet

Children today spend more time in cars than previous generations. They also spend less time playing on the streets and in unstructured and unsupervised activity outdoors. The lack of opportunities for physical activity and the loss of freedom to explore their local neighbourhood is bad news for children's physical, social and mental well-being.

3h

New way to look at cell membranes could change the way we study disease

Researchers have developed a new technique to analyse cell membrane proteins in situ which could revolutionise the way in which we study diseases, such as cancer, metabolic and heart diseases.

3h

Scientists produce 3D chemical maps of single bacteria

Researchers at NSLS-II used ultrabright x-rays to generate 3D nanoscale maps of a single bacteria's chemical composition with unparalleled spatial resolution.

3h

Eleven seal species narrowly escaped extinction

Population geneticists at Bielefeld University and the British Antarctic Survey have found that eleven seal species only narrowly escaped extinction. Their study has been published today (16.11.2018) in 'Nature Communications'.

3h

Earthquake researchers finalists for supercomputing prize

A team of researchers from the University of Tokyo and RIKEN in Japan were finalists for the coveted Gordon Bell Prize for outstanding achievements in high-performance computing, praised for their simulation of earthquake physics in complex urban environments.

3h

Astronomers spot another star that flickers like Tabby’s star

The irregular flickering of star VVV-WIT-07 is reminiscent of Tabby’s star, which brought speculation of alien megastructures.

3h

Optogenetics drives structure changes in tissues

In optogenetics, researchers use light to control protein activity. This technique allows them to alter the shape of embryonic tissue and to inhibit the development of abnormalities. Now, scientists in EMBL's De Renzis group have enhanced the technique to stop organ-shaping processes in fruit fly embryos. Their results, published in the EMBO Journal, allow control over a crucial step in embryonic

3h

How can the rest of the country prepare for wildfires like those in California?

Firefighters, legislators, and residents on the East Coast should watch carefully the way their California counterparts are dealing with wildfires tearing through the state. The combined forces that brought about the blaze are growing more and more present in the Northeast, said Stephen Flynn, founding director of Northeastern's Global Resilience Institute.

3h

Eleven seal species narrowly escape extinction

Population geneticists at Bielefeld University and the British Antarctic Survey have found that eleven seal species only narrowly escaped extinction. Their study has been published today in Nature Communications.

3h

Cells decide when to divide based on their internal clocks

Cells replicate by dividing, but scientists still don't know exactly how they decide when to split. Deciding the right time and the right size to divide is critical for cells – if something goes wrong it can have a big impact, such as with cancer, which is basically a disease of uncontrolled cell division.

3h

Future wheat harvests very vulnerable to disease, warn experts

Scientists have predicted that within two years a viral disease outbreak will likely hit European wheat harvests, leading to a hike in food prices across the continent.

3h

How vultures use each other as guides through the turbulent skies

How would you move through a space when you can't see the obstacles ahead? For example, how would you find your way out of a maze if you were blindfolded? You could either use your other senses, such as touch, to find your way out – or better yet, you could get someone who can see the way out to direct you. But either way you need information.

3h

Reclamation releases reservoir operations pilot study for Washita Basin in Oklahoma

The Bureau of Reclamation has released a report that identifies innovative approaches to improve drought resiliency within the Washita Basin in Oklahoma. It specifically looked at Foss and Fort Cobb Reservoirs. The study showed that a repeat of paleo droughts could have far greater impacts on reservoir yield than the observed drought of record. The study also quantified the risks of a reservoir no

3h

Gene editing possible for kidney disease

For the first time scientists have identified how to halt kidney disease in a life-limiting genetic condition, which may pave the way for personalised treatment in the future.

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Channels for the supply of energy

Freiburg scientists elucidate the mechanism for the transport of water-insoluble protein molecules in mitochondria

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The keys to advancing research in family medicine

Research is an important component of academic medicine, but many family medicine departments have struggled with barriers ranging from departmental culture to the lack of resources needed to advance the field. A paper published in Family Medicine reports that key factors to boost the creation of knowledge include leadership commitment to research and building a team approach to research that is r

3h

Structural study of antibiotic opens the way for new TB treatments

New analysis of the structure and function of the naturally-occurring antimicrobial agent tunicamycin has revealed ways to produce new, safe antibiotics for Mycobacterium tuberculosis and other disease-causing bacteria.

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Electric blue thrusters propelling BepiColombo to Mercury

In mid-December, twin discs will begin glowing blue on the underside of a minibus-sized spacecraft in deep space. At that moment Europe and Japan's BepiColombo mission will have just come a crucial step closer to Mercury.

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App to the moon

It is magnificently quiet at the rim of the lunar crater. Nearly 400 000 km away from Earth, the silence and vastness of the unknown terrain can be overwhelming. Yet our moonwalker does not feel alone.

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New way to look at cell membranes could change the way we study disease

A new technique to study intact parts of cell membranes could revolutionise studies of cancer, metabolic and heart diseases.

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Image: Finding an elusive star behind a supernova

Located 65 million light-years away is a blue supergiant star that once existed inside a cluster of young stars in the spiral galaxy NGC 3938, as shown in this artist's concept. It exploded as a supernova in 2017 and Hubble Space Telescope archival photos were used to locate the doomed progenitor star, as it looked in 2007.

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Toward urban air mobility: Air taxis with side-by-side rotors

In this high-resolution visualization of NASA's side-by-side, intermeshing rotor air taxi concept, researchers are working to understand complex rotor air flow interactions, simulated using high-fidelity computational fluid dynamics methods. The image/video shows the vortex wake, colored according to pressure. Intermeshing rotors offer the advantage of being more compact while being more efficient

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Orcas thrive in a land to the north. Why are Puget Sound's dying?

Bigger and bigger, with a puff and a blow, the orca surfaces, supreme in his kingdom of green.

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Researchers make android child's face strikingly more expressive

Japan's affection for robots is no secret. But is the feeling mutual in the country's amazing androids? Roboticists are now a step closer to giving androids greater facial expressions to communicate with.

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Next-generation composites may monitor their own structural health

Carbon fiber composites—lightweight and strong—are great structural materials for automobiles, aircraft and other transportation vehicles. They consist of a polymer matrix, such as epoxy, into which reinforcing carbon fibers have been embedded. Because of differences in the mechanical properties of these two materials, the fibers can detach from the matrix under excessive stresses or fatigue. That

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From Pine Cones to Hobbit Holes, Mimicking Nature Can Help Humans Adapt to Wildfires

Looking to fire-adapted trees and animals could reduce the impacts of California’s deadly blazes — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Don’t be a juggins – why some words deserve to fall out of use | Sam Leith

We shouldn’t worry when a word falls into obscurity. There’s usually a good reason, and a new one will always fill its place Conservationists are all around us, forever appearing on our televisions with their pleas for this noble, endangered mountain lion or that cute, imperilled subspecies of vole. But 70-year-old Edward Allhusen is one of a slightly different stripe. Instead of trying to prevent

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By solving a mystery of gene repair, scientists uncover an exception to biology's rules

About 15 years ago, UNC Lineberger's Dale Ramsden, Ph.D., was looking through a textbook with one of his students when they stumbled upon a scientific mystery.

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Is it a bird? Is it a plane?

It may not be your actual Superman, but participants to ESA's ɸ-week are certainly embracing some 'superhero' ideas for the future of Earth observation, including high-flying platforms – something between a satellite and an aircraft.

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Metallic nanoparticles light up another path towards eco-friendly catalysts

Scientists at Tokyo Institute of Technology produced subnano-sized metallic particles that are as much as 50 times more effective than well-known Au-Pd bimetallic nanocatalysts.

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Study describes presence of textile microfibers in south European marine floors

A study led by researchers of the University of Barcelona quantifies the presence of textile microfibers in south European marine floors from the Cantabrian Sea to the Black Sea. The study has analysed the amount of these colored fibers, which vary between three to eight millimeters but are extremely fine, less than a 0.1 mm diameter, and which come mainly from home and industrial washing machines

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Laser technology uncovers medieval secrets locked in Alpine ice core

A new study has found ground-breaking evidence from an ice core in the Swiss-Italian Alps that proves the 7th century switch from gold to silver currencies in western Europe actually occurred a quarter of a century earlier than previously thought.

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New targets in the battle against antibiotic resistance

Bacteria are increasingly resistant to available antibiotics. A team of chemists from the Technical University of Munich (TUM) have now identified important enzymes in the metabolism of staphylococci. Blocking these enzymes in a targeted manner starves them.

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A bigger nose, a bigger bang: Size matters for ecoholocating toothed whales

A new study sheds light on how toothed whales adapted their sonar abilities to occupy different environments. The study shows that as animals grew bigger, they were able to put more energy into their echolocation sounds—but surprisingly, the sound energy increased much more than expected.

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Controlling the gene for the 'immortalizing enzyme'

Revealing how a gene is activated in cancer cells to produce an enzyme that helps the cells thrive could lead to new treatments.

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Establishment of the immortalized cell line derived from endangered Okinawa rail

As part of the cellular conservation of endangered species, a research group initiated a primary cell culture project aimed at preserving endangered avian species in Japan, such as the Okinawa rail. However, primary cells cannot be cultured indefinitely because of cellular senescence and stresses caused by cell culture. To overcome these cell culture limitations, primary cells must be immortalized

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Peptide coatings boost iron oxide-based particles for diagnostic magnetic resonance imaging

Cancer will become easier to detect and diagnose early using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) thanks to A*STAR researchers who have engineered biocompatible iron oxide nanoparticle contrast agents¹.

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Controlling organ growth with light

In optogenetics, researchers use light to control protein activity. This technique allows them to alter the shape of embryonic tissue and to inhibit the development of abnormalities. Now, scientists in EMBL's De Renzis group have enhanced the technique to stop organ-shaping processes in fruit fly embryos. Their results, published in The EMBO Journal, allow control over a crucial step in embryonic

3h

Review on dynamical downscaling methods

Dynamical downscaling is one of the major approaches to obtain finer-scale climate information. A recent paper published in Science China Earth Sciences reviewed dynamical downscaling methods.

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Long-term exposure to road traffic noise may increase the risk of obesity

Long term exposure to road traffic noise is associated with increased risk of obesity. This was the conclusion of a study involving the participation of the Barcelona Institute for Global Health (ISGlobal). The study has been published in Environment International.

3h

The Coulomb interaction in van der Waals heterostructures

A recent research has unraveled the evolution of electronic structures of a set of vdW heterostructures under an applied vertical electric field.

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Playing high school football changes the teenage brain

A single season of high school football may cause microscopic changes in the structure of the brain, according to a new study by researchers at the University of California, Berkeley, Duke University and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. A new type of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed significant changes in the structure of the grey matter in the front and rear of the brain

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The common ancestor of species was rod-shaped

There are two major shapes of bacteria, i.e., rod-shape and spherical shape. The genus Deinococcus consists of rod-shape and spherical shape species.

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Vine compound starves cancer cells

Researchers from Würzburg and Toyama have discovered that a compound isolated from tropical rainforest vines inhibits the growth of pancreatic cancer cells in the lab.

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Artificial intelligence predicts treatment effectiveness

How can a doctor predict the treatment outcome of an individual patient? Traditionally, the effectiveness of medical treatments is studied by randomized trials, but is this really the only reliable way to evaluate treatment effectiveness, or could something be done differently? How can the effectiveness of a treatment method be evaluated in practice? Could some patients benefit from a treatment th

3h

Sarcopenic obesity: The ignored phenotype

A new condition, that occurs in the presence of both sarcopenia and obesity and termed as "sarcopenic obesity", and that describes under the same phenotype the increase in body fat mass deposition, and the reduction in lean mass and muscle strength.

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Afsløret: Sponseret studie skjulte skadevirkninger ved verdens mest udbredte insektgift

Toksikologer søgte aktindsigt: Chlorpyrifos blev oprindeligt godkendt på tvivlsomt grundlag. Miljømediciner ønsker større åbenhed i forskningsresultaterne og ny godkendelsesprocedure.

3h

Development of a humanoid robot prototype, HRP-5P, capable of heavy labor

Researchers have developed a humanoid robot prototype, HRP-5P, intended to autonomously perform heavy labor or work in hazardous environments.

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Solving mazes with single-molecule DNA navigators

The field of intelligent nanorobotics is based on the great promise of molecular devices with information processing capabilities. In a new study that supports the trend of DNA-based information carriers, scientists have engineered a DNA navigator system that can perform single-molecule, parallel, depth-first search operations on a two-dimensional origami platform.

3h

What happens when high achievers retire?

When we think of retirement, we usually conjure images of silver-haired folks playing golf, going on long vacations or taking daytime naps as a reward for a lifetime of work.

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This unique Andean ecosystem is warming almost as fast as the Arctic

Daniel Ruiz-Carrascal stands on a mound of jagged rocks that seem out of place in the otherwise smooth and grassy landscape. "The glacier was here in the mid-1500s," he explains. The white peak of Nevado Santa Isabel looms a mile ahead and about 1,300 feet taller than our own dizzyingly high elevation. It's hard to picture that white stretching all the way down to this rocky hill, burying the enti

3h

Abell 1033: To boldly go into colliding galaxy clusters

Hidden in a distant galaxy cluster collision are wisps of gas resembling the starship Enterprise—an iconic spaceship from the "Star Trek" franchise.

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AI heralds new frontiers for predicting enzyme activity

Researchers from the Departments of Chemistry and Engineering Science at the University of Oxford have found a general way of predicting enzyme activity. Enzymes are the protein catalysts that perform most of the key functions in Biology. Published in Nature Chemical Biology, the researchers' novel AI approach is based on the enzyme's sequence, together with the screening of a defined 'training se

3h

The Fleeting Magic of Scholastic Book Fairs

In the early 1980s, the world of school book fairs was “a highly competitive and very secretive industry,” according to a New York Times article at the time . The fairs numbered in the thousands and spanned the United States. They were put on by a mix of organizers: A few national corporations, about 25 to 30 regional companies, and assorted bookstores. By the 1990s, one organizer reigned: the Sc

4h

Climate contrarian uncovers scientific error, upends major ocean warming study

Researchers with the University of California, San Diego's Scripps Institution of Oceanography and Princeton University recently walked back scientific findings published last month that showed oceans have been heating up dramatically faster than previously thought as a result of climate change.

4h

Scientists are using artificial intelligence to see inside stars using sound waves

How in the world could you possibly look inside a star? You could break out the scalpels and other tools of the surgical trade, but good luck getting within a few million kilometers of the surface before your skin melts off. The stars of our universe hide their secrets very well, but astronomers can outmatch their cleverness and have found ways to peer into their hearts using, of all things, sound

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Transition metal complexes: Mixed works better

A team at BESSY II has investigated how various iron-complex compounds process energy from incident light. They were able to show why certain compounds have the potential to convert light into electrical energy. The results are important for the development of organic solar cells. The study has now been published in the journal Physical Chemistry Chemical Physics.

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Er du et snorkemonster? Sådan undgår du at vække kæresten

Undgå alkohol før sengetid og sy en tennisbold i nattrøjen. Her er fem råd mod snorken.

4h

A computer game’s edible controller lets you play it with your gut

Players of a video game must kill a virtual parasite by changing the temperature of their gut, which is measured by an ingestible sensor

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Scientists discover new way to prevent spacecraft errors

Scientists from the National Research Nuclear University MEPhI (Russia) and the Scientific Research Institute of System Analysis of the Russian Academy of Sciences have recently developed components for designing fault-tolerant asynchronous circuits, which can be used in space vehicles.

4h

David Baron: Why Should You Experience A Total Solar Eclipse?

The moment David Baron saw his first total solar eclipse in 1998, he was hooked. He's spent the last 20 years chasing them across the globe—all for a few minutes of joy, wonder and awe. (Image credit: David Baron)

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Ingrid Fetell Lee: How Can We Design More Joy Into Our Surroundings?

Ingrid Fetell Lee discovered that certain elements–like bright color, abundance, round shapes–are universally joyful. She says designing more joyful spaces can actually change how we feel and act. (Image credit: Ryan Lash/TED)

4h

These U.S.-Russia polar bears are doing just fine

Not all polar bears are in the same dire situation as they face retreating sea ice, at least not right now, a new study shows. Those that hang out in the Chukchi Sea off the western coast of Alaska are doing well. But they’ve never been counted. Until now. The first formal study of this population, which appears in Scientific Reports , suggests it’s been healthy and relatively abundant in recent

4h

New materials: Growing polymer pelts

Polymer pelts made of the finest of fibers are suitable for many different applications, from coatings that adhere well and are easy to remove to highly sensitive biological detectors. Researchers at KIT together with scientists in the United States have now developed a cost-effective process to allow customized polymer nanofibers to grow on a solid substrate through vapor deposition of a liquid c

4h

Cells decide when to divide based on their internal clocks

The time of day, determined by a cell's internal clock, has a stronger influence on cell division than previously thought, reveals a new study.

4h

Study links social isolation to higher risk of death

A large American Cancer Society study links social isolation with a higher risk of death from all causes combined and heart disease for all races studied, and with increased cancer mortality in white men and women.

4h

Proteins cooperate to break up energy structures in oxygen starved heart cells

Researchers at the National Institute for Physiological Sciences found that the filamin A-Drp1 complex mediates mitochondrial fission in a mouse model of hypoxic heart cells. Results show that hypoxic stress brought about the interaction of filamin A with Drp1 and increased Drp1 activity in heart cells. This process led to mitochondrial fragmentation and cell senescence. Further investigation demo

4h

New research uncovers the predatory behavior of Florida's skull-collecting ant

New research describes the behavioral and chemical strategies of a Florida ant, Formica archboldi, that decorates its nest with the dismembered body parts of other ant species.

4h

Novel strategy to transform a commercially available iboga alkaloid to post-iboga alkaloids

KAIST chemists have synthesized seven different iboga and post-iboga natural products from commercially available catharanthine by mirroring nature's biosynthetic post-modification of the iboga skeleton. They devised a novel strategy to biosynthesize the natural products via a series of selective and efficient oxidation and rearrangement reactions.

4h

Half of the world's annual precipitation falls in just 12 days, new study finds

Currently, half of the world's measured precipitation that falls in a year falls in just 12 days, according to a new analysis of data collected at weather stations across the globe. By century's end, climate models project that this lopsided distribution of rain and snow is likely to become even more skewed, with half of annual precipitation falling in 11 days.

4h

Infants born to obese mothers risk developing liver disease, obesity

Infant gut microbes altered by their mother's obesity can cause inflammation and other major changes within the baby, increasing the risk of obesity and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease later in life, according to researchers at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus.

4h

Clams and cockles, sentinels of the environmental status of Nicaraguan coasts

In collaboration with the National Autonomous University of Nicaragua, a research group from the UPV/EHU's Plentzia Marine Station has studied the bivalves in the mangroves on both coasts of Nicaragua in order to analyse how they are affected by the pollution carried by rivers. It could be possible to use them as sentinels or indicators of environmental changes. The research has been published by

4h

Phenyl addition made a poison useful for a chemical reaction in catalysis

Scientists from Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology (TUAT), Japan, have discovered that a catalyst poison, which deactivates homogeneous catalysts, can be "reborn" as an efficient ligand by introduction of a substituent, in chemical reactions. This finding is of service to expand the ligand design in homogeneous catalysts. This research was published online in the journal Organometallic

4h

How to dance to a synthetic band

Music plays an important role in most people's lives regardless of the genre and in a wide variety of contexts from celebrations and parties to simply providing background while a task is being performed. Until very recently, music was only heard when musicians played it live, the ability to record music displaced that live performance to some degree, and then the invention of electronic musical i

4h

Harnessing body heat to power electronic devices

If thermoelectric materials can convert low-grade heat into electricity, we may never need to charge wearable technology at home again.

4h

A way to make batteries almost any shape desired

A team of researchers from Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Harvard University and Korea Research Institute of Chemical Technology has developed a way to make batteries in almost any shape that can be imagined. In their paper published in the journal ACS Nano, the researchers describe the process used to make the batteries and the device they created to prove the concept sound.

4h

Surveillance Kills Freedom By Killing Experimentation

When we're being watched, we conform. We don't speak freely or try new things. But social progress happens in the gap between what’s legal and what’s moral.

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A New *Overwatch* Hero and Telltale’s Death Throes Top the Week in Gaming News

Also, an indie gem makes a surprising showing on the Game Awards' shortlist.

4h

Researcher discovers new pathway for heat transport in the ocean

Heat is transported through the ocean by a deep-ocean circulation system, known as the global heat conveyor belt, which constantly circulates water around the globe and helps to balance the earth's climate.

4h

Devonian integrative stratigraphy and timescale of China

Studies on the Devonian of China have lasted for about 170 years, and important progress has been made recently. Based on well-studied bio- and chronostratigraphy of the Devonian in South China and adjacent areas, in combination with recent achievements in carbon isotope stratigraphy, event stratigraphy and radioactive isotope ages, researchers from Nanjing briefly summarize the research history a

4h

Smart data enhances atomic force microscopy

In this work, researchers use scanning probe microscopy (SPM) as an example to demonstrate deep data methodology for nanosciences, transitioning from brute-force analytics such as data mining, correlation analysis and unsupervised classification to informed and/or targeted causative data analytics built on sound physical understanding.

4h

Universal laws in impact dynamics of dust agglomerates under microgravity conditions

A collaboration between Nagoya University and TU Braunschweig finds evidence that when projectiles hit soft clumps of dust or hard clumps of loose glass beads, the scaling laws for energy dissipation and energy transfer are the same in each case. This helps us understand how granular clumps stick together, and how planets are formed.

4h

SFU scientists described the course of reactions in two-layer thin metal films

A team of researchers from Siberian Federal University (SFU) obtained thin copper/gold and iron/palladium films and studied the reactions that take place in them upon heating. Knowing these processes, scientists will be able to improve the properties of materials currently used in microelectronics. The article of the scientists was published in the Journal of Solid State Chemistry.

4h

Affordable catalyst for CO2 recycling

A catalyst for carbon dioxide recycling, Mineral pentlandite may also be a conceivable alternative to expensive precious metal catalysts. This is the result of a study conducted by researchers from Ruhr-Universität Bochum (RUB), Fritz-Haber Institute Berlin and Fraunhofer Umsicht in Oberhausen. Pentlandite had previously been known as a catalyst for hydrogen production. By adding a suitable solven

4h

The engineering work of ants can influence paleoclimatic studies

The paleontological site of Somosaguas (Madrid) hosts a large colony of ants of the species Messor barbarus. A study conducted by researchers from the Complutense University of Madrid, the National Museum of Natural Sciences, the Institute of Geosciences and the Doñana Biological Station has revealed that the daily activity of these insects modifies soil composition and therefore influences the re

4h

Identification of LZTR1 leads to novel insights into RAS-driven diseases

Mutations in RAS proteins initiate many of the most aggressive tumors, and the search for pharmacological inhibitors of these proteins has become a priority in the battle against cancer. Michail Steklov, Francesca Baietti, and colleagues from the Anna Sablina lab (VIB-KU Leuven Center for Cancer Biology) identified LZTR1 as an evolutionarily conserved component of the RAS pathway.

4h

When not seeing is believing

A year ago, astronomers identified the first interstellar visitor to our solar system. 'Oumuamua was studied by nearly every telescope available, including the ultra-sensitive Spitzer infrared space telescope. Despite a whopping 33 hours of observation time, 'Oumuamua proved too faint for Spitzer to see. Nevertheless, this allowed the observation team to draw significant conclusions. Their analysi

4h

Edited plant-based toxin possesses anti-tumor characteristics

Researchers at Shinshu University in Japan have discovered that editing the chemical properties of fusicoccins, a kind of toxic organic compound produced by fungus to blight plants, can transform them into chemicals with anti-tumor properties in cells. The results of the study were published in Chemistry—A European Journal in September of 2018.

4h

Regioner sikrer ikke patienters adgang til hurtig udredning i tilstrækkelig grad

I en ny rapport konkluderer Rigsrevisionen, at regionerne sikrer lige adgang til hurtig udredning af patienterne. Regionerne efterspørger mere vejledning fra Sundhedsministeriet.

4h

Which physical mechanism is responsible for magnetic properties of cuprates upon doping?

An international team of researchers has identified and proved that adding impurities with a lower concentration of electrons stabilizes the antiferromagnetic state of cuprates, high-temperature superconducting compounds based on copper. The research team, led by a senior fellow at Ural Federal University, Evgeny Stepanov, has published the results of the study in npj Quantum Materials.

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Hybrid nanoantenna designed to manipulate visible light

A nanoscale optical antenna developed by researchers at A*STAR allows the manipulation of visible light waves on the scale of microchips. Such nanoantennae may enable the development of high-resolution imaging systems in small mobile devices.

4h

Stabilizing silver films for high-efficiency fuel cells

Solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) offer a stable and efficient way to generate clean electrochemical power, but are impractical for use in portable devices because of their high operating temperatures. A new design and production strategy developed by Florencia Edith Wiria of the A*STAR Singapore Institute of Manufacturing Technology and Pei-Chen Su at Nanyang Technological University could help prop

4h

Honeycomb-like frameworks with unusual rippled shapes can produce buckle-resistant architectures

Composite panels that sandwich a porous inner core between two solid outer sheets are increasingly being used in aircraft to reduce weight while maintaining structural rigidity. A study led by A*STAR may help other industries exploit the benefits of sandwich panels by using three-dimensional (3-D) printing to generate core structures optimized for different mechanical loads.

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How are dinosaurs named?

Science New species get identified and named every year, even though you've probably never heard of them. From Tyrannosaurus rex to Stegosaurus , some dinosaurs are household names. But have you ever heard of Lingwulong shenqi or Caihong juji ? If not, it’s probably because…

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Evidence of aliens? What to make of research and reporting on 'Oumuamua, our visitor from space

As an astrophysicist, probably the most common question I get asked is: "Are we alone in the universe and do aliens exist?"

5h

European Researchers Baked Fake Moon Dust into Money and Screws

Why did the European Space Agency create a whole bunch of fake moon dust and use it to 3D print small screws, gears and even a fake coin?

5h

What Elvis and Babe Ruth Say About Donald Trump

The presidency of the United States may be the most powerful post in the world, but it doesn’t offer much room for self-expression. The duties and requirements mean that the president is often fairly constrained in his choices. The Presidential Medal of Freedom is one of the few areas where he has full creative control. As a result, the honorees, though typically deserving, tend to say less about

5h

Mariah Carey on the Warpath

“If you run your mouth and brag about this secret rendezvous / I will hunt you down .” So went Mariah Carey’s last No. 1 hit, 2008’s “Touch My Body,” a great example of Carey’s secret talent. Her voice constructs skyscrapers in gossamer; her projected self-image evokes a bubblebath of butterflies; her actual public image is a comedy of scandal and shambles . But those who worship her songs know t

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Science Is Getting Less Bang for Its Buck

The writer Stewart Brand once wrote that “science is the only news.” While news headlines are dominated by politics, the economy, and gossip, it’s science and technology that underpin much of the advance of human welfare and the long-term progress of our civilization. This is reflected in an extraordinary growth in public investment in science: Today, there are more scientists, more funding for s

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How Hackers Are Stealing High-Profile Instagram Accounts

In early October, a publicist received an irresistible message via email. The publicist’s client is a top “influencer”—someone who leverages a social media following to exert influence and, usually, make money , often by selling sponsored posts. “We would be extremely interested in a business partnership,” a man calling himself “Joshua Brooks” wrote. His pitch was eye-popping: He was offering “80

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The Great Virginia Grape Heist

T uesday, September 11, 2018, was supposed to be harvest day for David Dunkenberger, a co-owner of Firefly Hill Vineyards, in Elliston, Virginia. He got to the fields early, eager to get this year’s grapes picked before the backwash of Hurricane Florence rolled in. As he scanned the vines, though, he began to feel queasy. His entire crop, about 2.5 tons of grapes , had vanished. In the days that

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Minority groups face greater wildfire threat

Massive wildfires, which may be getting more intense due to climate change and a long history of fire-suppression policies, have strikingly unequal effects on minority communities, a new study shows. Researchers used census data to develop a “vulnerability index” to assess wildfire risk in communities across the US. Their results, which appear in the journal PLOS ONE , show that racial and ethnic

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A tougher conductive ceramic at lower cost

By systematically refining standard processing techniques, A*STAR researchers have developed a low-cost method for manufacturing an electrically conductive aluminum oxide ceramic composite—a hard-wearing material used in many industrial applications.

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800 universiteter: Vestager skal stække forlags-giganterne

Danske universitet bruger 200 millioner på faglige tidsskrifter. Men nu skal der gribes ind over for få forlag med de-facto-monopol på publicering af forskning.

5h

Air taxis – why they're no longer pie in the sky

Imagine a taxi service that picked you up (into the sky) and then dropped you off after an exciting journey, completely free of road works and traffic lights. It has been claimed that air taxis could be flying us through the air in just a few years' time – and it's true that some big companies are speeding ahead with the idea.

5h

Quantum artificial life created on the cloud

A project by the UPV/EHU-University of the Basque Country has for the first time implemented a model of quantum artificial life on a quantum computer.

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What Is a Bot?

Our in-house Know-It-Alls answer questions about your interactions with technology.

5h

Your Drone Can Give Cops a Surprising Amount of Your Data

Crime investigators are gleaning a host of personal information from a recovered drone, such as where its owner lives, credit card numbers, and email addresses.

5h

FilmStruck Is Shutting Down: Stream These 10 Movies Now

Get a little more art-house in your house with a final binge of the streaming platform’s gems.

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Dual-function protein switch can be tweaked to improve the effectiveness of cellular reprogramming

Toggling the functions of a protein that regulates gene expression during cellular reprogramming ensures cell fate conversion, an A*STAR study has found.

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Image of the Day: Interloper Cells

In kidney organoids, brain and muscle cells also develop.

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Scientist–Politicians Rack Up Wins on Election Day

In races for U.S. Congress, these candidates won 10 races and lost five — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Green energy subsidies fuel rise of Northern Ireland mega-farms

Huge expansion of agri-food industry is harming environment, say investigators Green energy subsidies are fuelling the rise of poultry mega-farms across Northern Ireland, with owners accused of contaminating sensitive habitats with emissions from chicken faeces. An alliance of agri-food companies enlisted the support of Northern Ireland politicians to unlock an estimated £800m in subsidies for co

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Global Health: Rapid Cure Approved for Sleeping Sickness, a Horrific Illness

Parasites transmitted by tsetse flies travel to the brain, causing paranoia, fury and death. Until now, killing them required hospitalization and harsh drugs.

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Bubbles: Sure, They Look Innocent, But They Can Be Bacteria-Spreading Menaces

Innocent-looking bubbles can serve as a launching pad to spread bacteria from water into the air, according to a new study.

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Lab-Grown Mini Kidneys 'Go Rogue,' Sprout Brain and Muscle Cells

Miniature kidneys produced in the lab were hiding something from the researchers that grew them.

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Receptfejl i Sundheds­platformen: »Vi troede, en bruger havde gjort noget forkert«

Der gik fire måneder fra en fejl i Sundhedsplatformen blev indberettet, til den blev løst. Først da en ny indberetning dukkede op, fandt man årsagen til fejlen og rettede den. Koncerndirektør i Region Hovedstaden, Svend Hartling mener ikke, at nogen har fejlet.

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It’s official: We’re redefining the kilogram

In May 2019, the system of measurement will be upgraded to rely on fundamental constants.

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The New Politics of Climate Change

There were some elections last week in the United States. The results were pretty good for the climate-concerned. Democrats swept into the House of Representatives, winning nearly 40 seats in the chamber. For the first time since 2010, the chair of the House Science Committee will affirm the reality of human-caused climate change . It was a fine Tuesday, in other words, for the day-to-day climate

6h

The Influence of Kinesiology Tape Color on Athletic Performance: An Actual Published Study…Seriously

Does the color of kinesiology tape effect athletic performance or neuromuscular function? This serious research, published in a legitimate medical journal, asks this non-satirical question. The answer is pretty much what you would expect. No, it doesn't.

6h

These DNA Startups Want to Put Your Whole Genome on the Blockchain

Two different marketplaces for genetic data, Nebula and EncrypGen, recently launched with the promise of better protections for their users.

6h

Gifts Ideas for Travelers 2017: Luggage, Bags, Sleep Aids, Entertainment

Make somebody's trip a little easier with these suitcases, headphones, cameras—even a Land Cruiser.

6h

We Need to Change the Trajectory of Mental Health Research

The first order of business: break down research silos and move toward open science — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Hør ugens podcast: Privat byggesagsbehandling truer sikkerheden

Folketinget har besluttet at fratage kommunerne den tekniske kontrol med byggeprojekter og overlade den til privatansatte statikere og brandrådgivere – og det er de private firmaer selv, der skal certificere rådgiverne. Det kan give store habilitetsproblemer.

6h

Ny forskning kortlægger dilemmaer ved viden om risiko for alvorlige sygdomme

Fuld kortlægning af arvematerialet hos en patient betyder kendskab til en hel families risiko for…

7h

Antifascists Are Practicing Authoritarianism

Last Saturday night, a Fox News contributor named Kat Timpf was at a bar in Brooklyn. As she recounted the incident to National Review , a man asked her where she worked. A while later, she said, a woman began “screaming at me to get out.” Timpf walked away, but the woman followed her around the bar while other patrons laughed. Fearing physical attack, Timpf left. She told National Review and The

7h

Absolutely No One Enjoys Election Recounts

Here’s the first fact you need to know about recounts: Whatever the president or anyone else says, they’re a legitimate part of vote-counting and the electoral process. Here’s the second fact you need to know about recounts: It is vanishingly rare that they actually change the initial result. Those are both important to recall as several notable elections drag on. In Georgia, it’s still not clear

7h

Green Book: A Flimsy Tale Elevated by Two Great Performances

Ebony and ivory live together in perfect harmony / Side by side on my piano keyboard, / Oh Lord, why don’ t we? Cultural veterans of the early 1980s will recall—as much as they might prefer not to—the lyrics of Paul McCartney and Stevie Wonder’s chart-topping ode to interracial fellowship, which, it’s safe to say, was not a career high point for either artist. That song’s facile moral architectur

7h

When Families Un-Adopt a Child

The little girl in the photograph squints and smiles broadly in the sunlight. According to a now-deleted public post on Second Chance Adoptions’ Facebook page, the girl, who the agency calls “Reese” to protect her privacy, is 10 years old, and she has been a member of her family since she was born—first in foster care, then legally adopted just before her first birthday. She loves to laugh, her a

7h

How to make a black hole

There's more than one way to make a black hole, says NASA's Michelle Thaller. They're not always formed from dead stars. For example, there are teeny tiny black holes all around us, the result of high-energy cosmic rays slamming into our atmosphere with enough force to cram matter together so densely that no light can escape. CERN is trying to create artificial black holes right now, but don't wo

7h

The rare form of machine learning that can spot hackers who have already broken in

Darktrace’s unsupervised-learning models sound the alarm before intruders can cause serious damage.

7h

She Couldn’t Quit Smoking. Then She Tried Juul.

Millions embrace e-cigarettes as smoking cessation aids. Will restricting the devices for teenagers put former adult smokers who vape at risk to start again?

7h

Regnefejl på piloters flyvetimer med nye kampfly

Usikkerhed om, hvor mange fly der egentligt er brug for.

7h

Nye regler skaber dilemma: Brandrådgiver vil godkende sine egne folk

Branchefolk er uenige om, hvordan de skal håndtere nye certificeringsregler.

7h

Sådan har ansøger til lægespecialer fordelt sig i 2018

De kvindedominerede specialer er næsten renset for mænd, mens de mandligt dominerede også oplever mange kvindelige ansøgere.

8h

#51 Stamceller med potens

Stetoskopet har talt med læge Martha Haahr fra Odense Universitetshospital, der har injiceret stamceller direkte i svulmelegemerne på 21 mænd med impotens.

8h

Repurposing FDA-approved drugs can help fight back breast cancer

Screening Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved compounds for their ability to stop cancer growth in the lab led to the finding that the drug flunarizine can slow down the growth of triple-negative breast cancer in an animal model of the disease.

8h

Droner skal sprede nyttedyr på danske rapsmarker

Håbet er, at løbebiller og snyltehveps er så effektive til at bekæmpe rapsens skadedyr, at de kan erstatte sprøjtning og hjælpe økologer uden værn.

8h

Policies of China, Russia and Canada threaten 5C climate change, study finds

Ranking of countries’ goals shows even EU on course for more than double safe level of warming China, Russia and Canada’s current climate policies would drive the world above a catastrophic 5C of warming by the end of the century, according to a study that ranks the climate goals of different countries. The US and Australia are only slightly behind with both pushing the global temperature rise da

8h

Take a weight off: 'Grand K' kilo being retired

In a historic vote, nations on Friday unanimously approved a ground-breaking overhaul to the international system of measurements that underpins global trade and other vital human endeavors, uniting together behind new scientific definitions for the kilogram and other units in a way that they have failed to do on so many other issues.

8h

Neutron pinhole magnifies discoveries at ORNL

Advanced materials are vital ingredients in products that we rely on like batteries, jet engine blades, 3-D-printed components in cars. Scientists and engineers use information about the structure and motion of atoms in these materials to design components that make these products more reliable, efficient and safe to use.

8h

After the storm: Lower-cost air quality monitors measured pollutants in Puerto Rico after Hurricane Maria

In late September 2017, Hurricane Maria devastated Puerto Rico. Shortly after the hurricane hit, more than 90 percent of the US territory lacked access to electricity. Even three months later, half of the island still did not have power, and power outages were frequent, forcing many people to rely on power generators. In a recent study, Carnegie Mellon University and University of Puerto Rico-Rio

8h

Graphene flickers at 400Hz in 2500ppi displays

With virtual reality (VR) sizzling in every electronic fair, there is a need for displays with higher resolution, frame rates and power efficiency. Now, a joint collaboration of researchers from SCALE Nanotech, Graphenea and TU Delft have used graphene to make reflective-type displays that operate faster and at much higher resolution than existing technologies.

8h

Forskere går i rette med alkoholkritisk studie: Så skadeligt er alkohol ikke

De angriber studiet for misvisende konklusion om effekten af moderat alkoholindtag.

8h

Living laboratories

This living laboratory could hold the key to controlling malaria and other conditions.

8h

Dr persistence

Sophia Jex-Blake was a pioneer of women's education on her way to be Scotland's first female doctor.

8h

'Miniature suns'

Is much-heralded nuclear fusion finally ready to fulfil its promise of abundant energy for all?

9h

Læger skal spørge mere ind til slappe stråler og våde bukser

Praktiserende læger skal have større fokus på inkontinens og være bedre til at spørge ind til patienters tissevaner, mener praktiserende læge.

9h

Læger skal kunne navigere i kosttilskud og kure

Praktiserende læger skal kende til junglen af kosttilskud og populære kure, patienterne anvender. På den måde kan de bedre vejlede patienterne, mener praksislæge.

9h

Drought-hit Cape Town should cut down 'alien' trees: study

The South African city of Cape Town, which nearly ran out of water this year, could beat future droughts by cutting down non-native trees including pine, acacia and eucalyptus, according to a study released Friday.

9h

Hjertepatienter med indvandrerbaggrund dropper ud af behandling

Hjertepatienter med ikke-vestlig baggrund stopper med at tage deres medicin, når de bliver udskrevet fra hospital og deltager i mindre grad i patientuddannelse.

9h

Anerkendelse kan øge motivation blandt personale og patienter

Praksislæger kan med fordel forbedre deres evne til aktiv lytning, for det øger chancerne for, at personale og patienter bliver mere handlekraftige, mener ledelses- og organisationskonsulent.

9h

S.Africa coding clubs plug township youth into future

It's Wednesday, 2:00 pm sharp in the densely-populated South African township of Ivory Park on the outskirts of Midrand—time for about 60 11-year-olds to duel at their local coding club.

9h

Tajikistan launches giant dam to end power shortage

Tajikistan on Friday inaugurates a $3.9 billion hydro-electric power plant, a mega project that will enable the impoverished country to eliminate domestic energy shortages and export electricity to Afghanistan and Pakistan.

9h

Cyclone batters east India coastline

Powerful winds felled trees, destroyed homes and forced thousands to flee to safety as Cyclone Gaja barrelled into India's eastern coast Friday.

10h

New study reveals connection between climate, life and the movement of continents

A new study by The University of Texas at Austin has demonstrated a possible link between life on Earth and the movement of continents. The findings show that sediment, which is often comprised from pieces of dead organisms, could play a key role in determining the speed of continental drift. In addition to challenging existing ideas about how plates interact, the findings are important because th

11h

Walking backwards can boost your short-term memory

Moving backwards – or simply imagining doing it – can be enough to improve scores on memory tests, but we don't know why

11h

The UK's strength in science is because of the EU – not in spite of it | Anthony Forster

Maintaining a close relationship with the remaining EU countries is crucial to the continued success of UK universities Brexit negotiations may be in turmoil , but UK universities need the government to encourage even stronger links with the remaining 27 member states in the European Union, no matter how we finally decide to leave. We must ensure the UK remains a beacon of scientific excellence,

11h

Ekspert i persondataret: Politiets ANPG-backup var i strid med lovens hensigt

Det er ikke sort/hvidt, om 60 dage gamle ANPG-data i backup-system var ulovlige eller ej, fortæller advokat med speciale i persondataret. Men hun er ikke i tvivl om, at det var lovgivernes intention, at »slette« også skulle gælde i backups.

11h

12h

I am creating a religion. Prophet applications are welcomed.

submitted by /u/blueandgreencat [link] [comments]

12h

Treating cancer: what role could our diet play? – Science Weekly podcast

Food is an essential part of everyone’s life but how does what we eat affect our health? Could we eat to treat our illnesses? Top oncologists from around the world are beginning to study the role of diet in cancer treatment and early results look promising. Hannah Devlin investigates. Food is an essential part of everyone’s life but how does what we eat affect our health? For a long time, we’ve k

12h

Treating cancer: what role could our diet play? – Science Weekly podcast

Food is an essential part of everyone’s life but how does what we eat affect our health? Could we eat to treat our illnesses? Top oncologists from around the world are beginning to study the role of diet in cancer treatment and early results look promising. Hannah Devlin investigates.

12h

Børnefamilier siger 'ja tak' til at kende deres arvelige sygdomme

Vi vil gerne kende vores risiko for at udvikle kræft eller hjertesygdomme. Det viser en mindre, dansk undersøgelse. Men ikke alle kan håndtere svarene, siger forsker.

13h

Synliggørelse af hjertefejl hos børn giver bedre liv

Dansk forskningsprojekt viser, at det har betydning, at børn hjertefejl bliver gjort synlige.

13h

Establishment of the immortalized cell line derived from Okinawa rail (endangered species)

As part of the cellular conservation of endangered species, our group initiated a primary cell culture project aimed at preserving endangered avian species in Japan, such as the Okinawa rail. However, primary cells cannot be cultured indefinitely because of cellular senescence and stresses caused by cell culture. To overcome these cell culture limitations, primary cells must be immortalized. As a

13h

New research provides guidance on how to successfully motivate California's Medicaid population to quit smoking

New research shows improved smoking cessation outcomes can be achieved within the Medi-Cal (California's Medicaid program) population by supplementing telephone counseling with access to nicotine-replacement patches and moderate financial incentives that are not contingent on outcomes. The group that received these additional services was more likely to make a quit attempt and remain smoke-free, b

13h

Sucking your baby's pacifier may benefit their health

Many parents probably think nothing of sucking on their baby's pacifier to clean it after it falls to the ground. Turns out, doing so may benefit their child's health. A Henry Ford Health System study found that babies whose parents sucked on their pacifier to clean it had a lower level of the antibody that is linked to the development of allergies and asthma.

13h

Milk allergy affects half of US food-allergic kids under age 1

New research found that over two percent of all US children under the age of 5 have a milk allergy, and 53 percent of food-allergic infants under age 1 have a cow's milk allergy.

13h

Secondhand marijuana smoke causes asthma symptoms in child allergic to cannabis

New research shows it's possible for both children and adults with uncontrolled asthma to find their symptoms worsening due to cannabis allergy and exposure to marijuana smoke.

13h

Sucking your baby's pacifier to clean it may prevent allergies

New research suggests a link between parental sucking on a pacifier and a lower allergic response among young children.

13h

Caregiver's poor knowledge of asthma means longer hospital stay for child

New research shows children of caregivers with poor asthma knowledge were four times more likely to have a prolonged hospital stay. A 'prolonged' stay was defined as more than two days.

13h

Your severe eczema may best be treated by allergy shots

A medically-challenging case found that allergy shots provided significant benefits to the eczema symptoms suffered by a 48-year-old man.

13h

Will your epinephrine auto injector still work if it gets frozen?

New research shows that even if your epinephrine auto injector become frozen from being left in a car, it will still work.

13h

Safest way to dine out for those with food allergies is using up to 15 strategies

New research examined what tools people who have food allergies use to prevent allergic reactions at restaurants.

13h

Analyse: Privat kontrol kan sætte bygningssikkerhed over styr

Teknisk byggesagsbehandling i Danmark er på vej på private hænder. Det vil stille uhørt store krav til de involveredes integritet og standhaftighed, mener kritikere.

14h

Venom shape untangles scorpion family tree

Scientists have made a fresh attempt to untangle the scorpion family tree using not the shape and structure of the arachnids' bodies, but the shape of their venom.

15h

Colder, darker climates increase alcohol consumption and liver disease

People living in colder regions with less sunlight consume more alcohol and experience more alcoholic liver disease.

15h

Scientists engineer a functional optical lens out of 2D materials

Scientists have constructed functional metalenses that are one-tenth to one-half the thickness of the wavelengths of light that they focus. Their metalenses, which were constructed out of layered 2D materials, were as thin as 190 nanometers — less than 1/100,000ths of an inch thick.

16h

Flaws in industry-funded pesticide evaluation

Academic researchers have examined raw data from a company-funded safety evaluation of the pesticide chlorpyrifos. They discovered an effect on the brain architecture of the exposed laboratory animals at all tested doses, which was not included in the reported conclusions. Karolinska Institutet in Sweden led this independent study, which is published in the scientific journal Environmental Health.

17h

Bagsiden: Hvad har tangens kæber lukket sig om?

Loppemarkedsfund: Fjedertang med gummiknopper

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17h

Kilogram gets a new definition

Scientists take the massive decision to change the definition of the kilogram.

18h

The Atlantic Daily: Overshadowing

What We’re Following Mid-Midterms: The U.S. midterm elections are still ongoing—multiple House races have yet to be called, though in the week since November 6, several more Democratic candidates have been swept into office , many in Republican-leaning districts. Turns out, writes Ronald Brownstein, that the GOP strategy of aligning itself closely with Donald Trump is very limiting: Here’s the el

18h

China’s artificial sun reaches fusion temperature: 100 million degrees

The EAST reactor was able to heat hydrogen to temperatures exceeding 100 million degrees Celsius. Nuclear fusion could someday provide the planet with a virtually limitless supply of clean energy. Still, scientists have many other obstacles to pass before fusion technology becomes a viable energy source. None Scientists in China have reported a major breakthrough in the quest for nuclear fusion t

18h

Friends and family increase the risk of children becoming smokers in the UK

Teenagers whose mothers smoked during pregnancy, or whose parents or friends smoke, are more likely to smoke themselves.

18h

Patients with rare, incurable digestive tract cancers respond to new drug combination

Patients with rare, but incurable cancers of the digestive tract have responded well to a combination of two drugs that block the MEK and BRAF pathways, which drive the disease in some cases. They have survived for longer without the disease progressing than the usual average time of less than five months, even though their cancer was advanced and had not responded to previous therapies. The resea

18h

Læge skal undersøge leddegigts udvikling som kronisk sygdom

I en postdoc skal læge Stinne Ravn Greisen undersøge, hvorfor leddegigt næsten altid udvikler sig som kronisk sygdom.

18h

Juul Can Breathe After Dodging Full FDA Ban on Flavored E-Cigs

The FDA proposed restrictions on the sale of e-cigarettes that are similar to policies that Juul adopted earlier this week.

18h

Here's how diverse the 116th Congress is set to become

Women and nonwhite candidates made record gains in the 2018 midterms. In total, almost half of the newly elected Congressional representatives are not white men. Those changes come almost entirely from Democrats; Republican members-elect are all white men except for one woman. It's clear from Wednesday's freshman class photo of the 116th Congress that the members-elect are set to change the compo

18h

Stockdale Paradox: Why confronting reality is vital to success

The Stockdale Paradox is a concept that was popularized by Jim Collins in his book Good to Great . It was named after James Stockdale, former vice presidential candidate, naval officer and Vietnam prisoner of war. The main gist of the idea is that you need to balance realism with optimism. In paradox we often find some of the greatest bits of wisdom. The difficulty in understanding a paradox come

18h

Earth's magnetic field measured using artificial stars at 90 kilometers altitude

In 2011, researchers proposed that artificial guide stars could be used to measure the Earth's magnetic field in the mesosphere. An international group of scientists has recently managed to do this with a high degree of precision. The technique may also help to identify magnetic structures in the solid Earth's lithosphere, to monitor space weather, and to measure electrical currents in the part of

18h

When electric fields make spins swirl

Scientists have reported the discovery of small and ferroelectrically tunable skyrmions. Published in Nature Materials, this work introduces new compelling advantages that bring skyrmion research a step closer to application.

18h

Checking very preterm babies' head size can help identify long-term IQ problems

Regular early head circumference assessments add valuable information when screening for long-term neurocognitive risk – according to new research.

18h

What did birds and insects do during the 2017 solar eclipse?

In August of 2017, millions peered through protective eyewear at the solar eclipse — the first total eclipse visible in the continental United States in nearly 40 years. During the event, researchers watched radar to observe the behavior of birds and insects.

19h

Facebook Moves to Limit Hate Speech as ‘Times’ Scandal Swirls

Mark Zuckerberg announced a series of major changes to Facebook while defending his company against a scathing New York Times report.

19h

Flops, brought to you by A.I.

About 3.1 million individuals could lose their job to self-driving cars. A.I. is not a monolith. It makes a lot of mistakes. To better understand how to navigate our economic future, we should pay attention to these mistakes. Artificial intelligence can drive a car, buy and sell stocks, and perform healthcare tasks , amongst numerous other tasks as the technology grows and changes each day. Despi

19h

There's a giant crater the size of a city hiding under Greenland

Space But not everyone agrees it's from an asteroid impact. It’s one of the biggest asteroid craters to ever sear itself into Earth’s surface—or is it?

19h

From symptoms to biology: shifting definitions of Alzheimer’s disease

As a neuroscientist studying Alzheimer’s, I’m reminded of its far-reaching impact each time a barista, cashier, or Lyft driver makes small talk by asking what I do for a living. Unfortunately, this devastating disease needs no introduction. Considering its ubiquity, it’s surprising that a debate broke out recently among leaders in the field over the […]

19h

Warning: Chemical weapons risk during a period of very rapid scientific change

Alarming examples of the dangers from chemical weapons have been seen recently in the use of industrial chemicals and the nerve agent sarin against civilians in Syria, and in the targeted assassination operations using VX nerve agent in Malaysia and novichok nerve agent in the UK.

19h

Trans-galactic streamers feeding most luminous galaxy in the universe

ALMA data show the most luminous galaxy in the universe has been caught in the act of stripping away nearly half the mass from at least three of its smaller neighbors.

19h

No link between 'hypoallergenic' dogs and lower risk of childhood asthma

Growing up with dogs is linked to a lower risk of asthma, especially if the dogs are female, a new study shows. However, the researchers found no relation between 'allergy friendly' breeds and a lower risk of asthma.

19h

The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: Florida Man Extends Recount

Written by Elaine Godfrey ( @elainejgodfrey ), Olivia Paschal ( @oliviacpaschal ), and Madeleine Carlisle ( @maddiecarlisle2 ) Today in 5 Lines A federal judge in Florida ordered the state’s deadline to validate votes be extended until Saturday . Senate candidate Rick Scott’s campaign, whose race is in a recount, said it would appeal the decision. Democrat Jared Golden beat Republican Representat

19h

Nanofiber carpet could lead to new sticky or insulating surfaces

Inspired by the extraordinary characteristics of polar bear fur, lotus leaves and gecko feet, engineering researchers have developed a new way to make arrays of nanofibers that could bring us coatings that are sticky, repellent, insulating or light emitting, among other possibilities.

20h

Google's Past Data Use Could Impede Its Health Care Push

Privacy researchers raise concerns about the planned transfer of a DeepMind project in the UK to corporate sister Google.

20h

Bringing Up Baby

This week we focus on the behavior of the youngest members of the human race. We try to translate the mysterious language of babies. And we ask, when should we step back and just let our children be? (Image credit: Fabio Consoli for NPR)

20h

Age-Based Justice System Approach Overlooks That Adolescence Extends Beyond Age 18, Scientists Say

Age-Based Justice System Approach Overlooks That Adolescence Extends Beyond Age 18, Scientists Say Psychological and brain development extends years beyond the end of puberty, new research shows. Judge.jpg Image credits: Mr. Yanukit/ Shutterstock Culture Thursday, November 15, 2018 – 16:45 Ramin Skibba, Contributor (Inside Science) – In the U.S. when a person reaches 18 years old, they enjoy new

20h

Solar panels for yeast cell biofactories

Scientists presents a highly adaptable solution to creating yeast biohybrids with enhanced metabolism driven by light energy.

20h

Lyme and other tickborne diseases are on the rise in the U.S. Here’s what that means.

A record number of tickborne diseases were reported in the United States in 2017. An infectious disease physician discusses that result and others.

20h

Choose Your Weapon: Hoofed Mammal Edition

Choose Your Weapon: Hoofed Mammal Edition New research may explain why some cloven-hoofed animals have tusks instead of horns or antlers. muntjac-cropped.jpg Indian muntjac deer have both fangs short antlers. Image credits: Mauro Rodrigues/ Shutterstock Creature Thursday, November 15, 2018 – 16:15 Nala Rogers, Staff Writer (Inside Science) — When do you need a broadsword, and when would you be b

20h

Spacewatch: landing site for ExoMars mission chosen

European-Russian mission’s rover will land on Mars in 2021 at Oxia Planum, north of equator A preferred landing site for the European-Russian 2020 ExoMars mission has been chosen. Known as Oxia Planum , the landing site is just north of Mars’ equator. The 2020 ExoMars rover is being built in the UK by Airbus Defence and Space for the European Space Agency. It will launch on a Russian rocket in 20

20h

Has Silicon Valley Lost Its Soul? The Case for and Against

Intelligence Squared U.S., the long-running debate show, took on the Valley in a recent episode.

20h

What would happen if America defaulted on its debt?

At the press time, the value was $21.7 trillion dollars. Lots of people know that a default would be bad, but not everybody seems to get how horrible it would be. While the risk is low, knowing what would happen if a default did occur is important information for all voters. The United States government has a lot of debt. I mean a ton of it. At the time of writing, the value was 21.7 trillion dol

20h

New study reveals connection between climate, life and the movement of continents

A new study by The University of Texas at Austin has demonstrated a possible link between life on Earth and the movement of continents. The findings show that sediment, which is often comprised from pieces of dead organisms, could play a key role in determining the speed of continental drift.

20h

College of Medicine at NEOMED takes first place at Directors of Clinical Skills Conference

Northeast Ohio Medical University earned top honors for its poster presentation, 'Teaching and Fostering Empathetic Touch and Eye Gaze,' at the Directors of Clinical Skills (DOCS) Annual Meeting held in Austin, Texas, Nov. 2, 2018.The poster was presented by Paul Lecat, M.D., professor and internal medicine clerkship clinical experience director, who led a team of University representatives in the

20h

Phenyl addition made a poison useful for a chemical reaction in catalysis

Scientists from Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology (TUAT), Japan, have discovered that a catalyst poison, which deactivates homogeneous catalysts, can be converted into an efficient ligand by introduction of a substituent. This indicates that the catalyst poison is not "Born This Way" but can be "Reborn" as an efficient ligand. This finding is of service to expand the ligand design in

20h

Drop your weapons!

It takes energy to make weapons, but it may take even more energy to maintain them. Because leaf-footed bugs drop their legs, it is possible to measure how much energy they allocate to maintaining this appendage that males use to fight other males.

20h

Drop your weapons! Autotomy, the shedding of a body part, reveals the hidden cost of conflict

Animal weapons such as antlers, tusks and limbs specialized for fighting require a large energy expenditure to produce and may cost even more to maintain. Because the leaf-footed bug sheds its large hind limbs, used as weapons in male-male battles, scientists working at the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute (STRI) in Panama could measure energy use of live bugs with and without hind legs to

20h

When the Tech Mythology Collapses

Think back a few years, before the Amazon HQ2 sweepstakes, before Susan Fowler’s viral blog post , before the #MeToo movement, before the 2016 election. Across the nation, Silicon Valley was the crown jewel of the economy. The companies were youthful and ambitious. The culture was loose and exciting. The capabilities they put into the world’s pockets were astonishing: talk to anyone, know everyth

21h

All 141 'League of Legends' Champions, Explained

From Aatrox to Zyra, no one knows more about the multiplayer juggernaut than the folks at Riot Games—and they’re here to help.

21h

Coffee Tastes Bitter, So Why Do People Drink It?

It may sound counterintuitive, but people who are supersensitive to coffee's bitter taste actually drink more of it, a new study finds.

21h

New inflammation inhibitor discovered

A multidisciplinary team of researchers have developed an anti-inflammatory drug molecule with a new mechanism of action. By inhibiting a certain protein, the researchers were able to reduce the signals that trigger an inflammation.

21h

DNA-encoded PCSK9 inhibitors may provide alternative for treating high cholesterol

Wistar researchers have developed novel synthetic DNA-encoded monoclonal antibodies (DMAbs) directed against PCSK9, a protein key to regulating cholesterol levels in the bloodstream. Results of preclinical studies showed a significant cholesterol decrease, opening the door for further development of this approach as a simple, less frequent and cost-effective therapy, as reported in a paper publish

21h

PTSD Researcher Naomi Breslau Dies

Breslau found that interpersonal traumas, not just combat or natural disasters, can cause post-traumatic stress disorder.

21h

Mr. Brexit

This story was updated on November 16, 2018, at 10:15 a.m. President Donald Trump commits outrage after outrage that no previous U.S. president has done before. But at the same time, he also omits to do things that every previous president has done or would do. America’s close friend Great Britain has thrust itself into desperate trouble. In a tight referendum marred by aggressive disinformation

21h

Isabel Allende’s Unconventional Advice for Finding Writing Inspiration

Isabel Allende doesn’t take anything for granted. The celebrated author grew up moving from place to place as the child of a diplomat; as an adult, she was forced out of her native Chile by political upheaval. On Wednesday night, Allende was honored by the National Book Foundation for her distinguished contribution to American letters—the first such award given to a Spanish-language writer. In he

21h

Earth's magnetotail: First-ever views of elusive energy explosion

Researchers have captured a difficult-to-view singular event involving 'magnetic reconnection' — the process by which sparse particles and energy around Earth collide producing a quick but mighty explosion — in the Earth's magnetotail, the magnetic environment that trails behind the planet.

21h

California must reinvent its practices and policies for a deadly new fire reality

Reducing the escalating destruction from fires will mean rethinking development patterns, forest management, early warning systems, and more.

21h

November Marathon: Results!

Amazeballs. Check out that first 672-cube cell! You completed it in 8 hours 59 minutes. As for the second 689-cube cell, you completed it in 10 hours 14 minutes. We’ll later have some delicious bonuses for you to feast upon, and do please join us next week after Happy Hour for the cell renaming ceremony! Players qualified to nominate a name or vote will receive notification(s) between now and Mon

21h

Sex ed before college can prevent student experiences of sexual assault

Students who receive sexuality education, including refusal skills training, before college matriculation are at lower risk of experiencing sexual assault during college. New research from Columbia University's Sexual Health Initiative to Foster Transformation (SHIFT) project suggests that sexuality education during high school may have a lasting and protective effect for adolescents.

21h

'Smart skin' simplifies spotting strain in structures

Thanks to one peculiar characteristic of carbon nanotubes, engineers will soon be able to measure the accumulated strain in an airplane, a bridge or a pipeline – or just about anything – over the entire surface or down to microscopic levels.

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New research finds omega-3 fatty acids reduce the risk of premature birth

A new Cochrane Review published today has found that increasing the intake of omega-3 long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LCPUFA) during pregnancy reduces the risk of premature births.

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'Smart skin' simplifies spotting strain in structures

A 'smart skin' developed at Rice University employs the unique fluorescent characteristics of carbon nanotubes to quickly assess strain in materials. The method is intended for aircraft, spacecraft and critical infrastructures in which mechanical strain needs to be monitored.

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SwRI scientists map magnetic reconnection in Earth's magnetotail

Analyzing data from NASA's Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) mission, a team led by Southwest Research Institute (SwRI) has found that the small regions in the Earth's magnetosphere that energize the polar aurora are remarkably calm and nonturbulent.

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An evidence-based way to help fix our broken politics

It is an idea for repairing our broken political system that is so promising that new members of Congress will learn about it before taking office in January.

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Smoke spreading from California fires sparks health concerns

Smoke masks. Eye drops. No outdoor exercise. This is how Californians are trying to cope with wildfires choking the state, but experts say an increase in serious health problems may be almost inevitable for vulnerable residents as the disasters become more commonplace.

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Population of rare Stone's sheep 20% smaller than previously thought

The already-rare Stone's sheep of the Yukon is 20 per cent less common than previously thought, according to new research by University of Alberta biologists.

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Herbert Fingarette, Contrarian Philosopher on Alcoholism, Dies at 97

Mr. Fingarette concluded that heavy drinking was willful behavior, not a disease, and that moderate use of alcohol was an acceptable treatment goal.

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Facebook says it's getting better at removing hate speechMark Zuckerberg Facebook

Facebook said it's making progress on detecting hate speech, graphic violence and other violations of its rules, even before users see and report them.

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What Trump’s Latest Outburst About Mueller Could Mean

With his former personal lawyer Michael Cohen meeting with Special Counsel Robert Mueller’s team this week, and with his son, Donald Trump Jr., speculating that he himself will soon be indicted, President Donald Trump apparently couldn’t contain himself anymore. “The inner workings of the Mueller investigation are a total mess,” he tweeted on Thursday morning. “They have found no collusion and ha

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The Photograph That Changed How We See the World

When NASA launched Apollo 8 on December 21, 1968, the manned spaceflight mission had one objective: “To go around the moon and get back alive,” remembers the astronaut Bill Anders in a new short documentary, Earthrise , directed by Emmanuel Vaughan-Lee. “There was essentially zero interest in images of the Earth from space. It was just one more thing to divert the crew from actually completing th

22h

Turkey Battle: Wild vs. Domestic

Turkey Battle: Wild vs. Domestic Scientists delve deep into why and how the turkey — that ends up on our plates — turned out the way it is. Turkey Battle: Wild vs. Domestic Video of Turkey Battle: Wild vs. Domestic Creature Thursday, November 15, 2018 – 15:15 Emilie Lorditch, Staff Writer (Inside Science) — They may sound the same, but wild and domestic turkeys do have their differences, from

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Metallic nanoparticles light up another path towards eco-friendly catalysts

Scientists at Tokyo Technology produced subnano-sized metallic particles that are very effective as catalysts for the oxidation of hydrocarbons. These catalysts can be as much as 50 times more effective than well-known Au-Pd bimetallic nanocatalysts.

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Trans-galactic streamers feeding most luminous galaxy in the universe

The most luminous galaxy ever discovered is cannibalizing not one, not two, but at least three of its smaller neighbors, according to a new study published today (Nov. 15) in the journal Science and coauthored by scientists from NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California. The material that the galaxy is stealing from its neighbors is likely contributing to its uber-brightness, the st

22h

Can artificial intelligence help victims of abuse to disclose traumatic testimony?

When children are victims of crimes, the legal testimony they provide is known as forensic interviews. However, since victims are often traumatized and potentially abused by their caregivers they can be reluctant to come forward with accusations or disclose relevant information.

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Cotton-based hybrid biofuel cell could power implantable medical devices

A glucose-powered biofuel cell that uses electrodes made from cotton fiber could someday help power implantable medical devices such as pacemakers and sensors. The new fuel cell, which provides twice as much power as conventional biofuel cells, could be paired with batteries or supercapacitors to provide a hybrid power source for the medical devices.

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Five nanosecond decision-making: New chip design to make speedy calculations for researchers

Computer scientists develop algorithms that control everything from unmanned aerial vehicles to desktop computers to the cellphones in our pockets. But it can be complicated to match the code they develop to hardware systems that vary so widely.

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Scientists provide first-ever views of elusive energy explosion

Researchers at the University of New Hampshire have captured a difficult-to-view singular event involving "magnetic reconnection"—the process by which sparse particles and energy around Earth collide producing a quick but mighty explosion—in the Earth's magnetotail, the magnetic environment that trails behind the planet.

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'Fantastic Beasts' Is About to Make Grindelwads of Cash (and Other Culture News)

Plus: Guillermo del Toro's Bleak House is fine, directors are rallying to save FilmStruck, and a *Dumbo* trailer dropped.

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The Bogus Science Behind Instagram’s New Glasses Trend

Recently on Instagram, the former Bachelor contestant Lauren Bushnell had an important message for her 1.1 million followers. Perched on her bed in loungewear, she grasped a new pair of glasses. In the caption, she warned of what might happen to her—and to you—without them: headaches, blurred vision, fatigue, and long-term retinal damage. The glasses are from Diff Eyewear, a brand that had made o

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Dizzying Heights: Vertical Tourism in China

In recent years, Chinese developers have opened a series of new tourist attractions in some very lofty places. Glass-bottomed bridges span deep canyons, narrow walkways cling to sheer cliffs, observation decks and “skywalks” top skyscrapers, and massive platforms cantilever out into thin air—all designed to entice the slightly adventurous traveler. Collected below, images of a few of these mounta

22h

Dartmouth Faces Lawsuit Over Sexual Misconduct by Professors

Seven women are suing the university over alleged assault, harassment, and discrimination by three prominent scientists.

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What Lurks beneath the Surface?

Trying to understand natural toxins in remote environments — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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6 Questions From *The New York Times*' Facebook Bombshell

Facebook has a lot of explaining to do: For starters, there's Sheryl Sandberg’s next steps and the accusations about George Soros.

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During floods, carbon in rivers is ‘like making tea’

During floods, water moves massive amounts of carbon laterally through ecosystems, according to a study that could have implications for climate change and water quality. The discovery runs counter to how many people see the carbon cycle as vertical—CO2 moving up and down between soil, plants, and the atmosphere. Researchers based their findings, which appear in Geophysical Research Letters , on

22h

Online birth control is safe—and the only option for some women

Health Getting the pill from online sites could make the contraception method far more accessible. The number of platforms allowing patients to get birth control online has grown in recent years. Getting the drug off the web also means skipping out on an in-person…

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UMN researchers discover important connection between cells in the liver

University of Minnesota Medical School researchers have made a discovery which could lead to a new way of thinking about how disease pathogenesis in the liver is regulated, which is important for understanding the condition nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), which is incredibly common and growing. It is apparent that about 30 percent of Americans and are at risk to advance to more severe co

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NASA keeps watch over space explosions

NASA's Magnetospheric Multiscale mission has been observing a type of space explosion called magnetic reconnection for three years. MMS just witnessed such an explosion in a unique location: the part of Earth's magnetic environment trailing behind the planet, away from the Sun — with enough resolution to reveal its true nature more clearly.

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Can artificial intelligence help victims of abuse to disclose traumatic testimony?

Can artificial intelligence be a useful tool to help young victims tell their stories? What if AI could support forensic interviewers with tools to help gather information in an appropriate manner? This is paper documents what is believed to be the first attempt to develop and apply custom software to automatically detect and categorize speech patterns in the course of forensic interviews.

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Development near natural areas puts more Californians in the path of wildfires

As urbanization extends its reach into once-natural areas, more homes and people are at risk from wildfires.

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Trans-galactic streamers feeding most luminous galaxy in the universe

ALMA data show the most luminous galaxy in the universe has been caught in the act of stripping away nearly half the mass from at least three of its smaller neighbors.

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UNH scientists help provide first-ever views of elusive energy explosion

Researchers at the University of New Hampshire have captured a difficult-to-view singular event involving 'magnetic reconnection' — the process by which sparse particles and energy around Earth collide producing a quick but mighty explosion — in the Earth's magnetotail, the magnetic environment that trails behind the planet.

23h

New inflammation inhibitor discovered

A multidisciplinary team of researchers led from Karolinska Institutet in Sweden have developed an anti-inflammatory drug molecule with a new mechanism of action. By inhibiting a certain protein, the researchers were able to reduce the signals that trigger an inflammation. The study is published in Science and was done in collaboration with the University of Texas Medical Branch, Uppsala Universit

23h

Solar panels for yeast cell biofactories

In a study in Science, a multidisciplinary team led by Core Faculty member Neel Joshi and Postdoctoral Fellows Junling Guo and Miguel Suástegui at Harvard's Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering and John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS) presents a highly adaptable solution to creating yeast biohybrids with enhanced metabolism driven by light energy.

23h

Arming drug hunters, chemists design new reaction for drug discovery

Colorado State University organic chemists have forged a powerful new tool for drug hunters — a simple, elegantly designed chemical reaction that could fling open an underexplored wing of biologically relevant chemistry.

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Nanofiber carpet could lead to new sticky or insulating surfaces

Inspired by the extraordinary characteristics of polar bear fur, lotus leaves and gecko feet, engineering researchers have developed a new way to make arrays of nanofibers that could bring us coatings that are sticky, repellant, insulating or light emitting, among other possibilities.

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Dietary fat is good? Dietary fat is bad? Coming to consensus

Which is better, a low-fat/high-carbohydrate diet or a high-fat/low-carbohydrate diet — or is it the type of fat that matters? In a new paper featured on the cover of Science magazine's special issue on nutrition, researchers from Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston Children's Hospital, and colleagues with diverse expertise and perspectives on the issues laid out the case for each p

23h

How science can inform chemical weapons arms control

In 2013, the Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons (OPCW) was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize for its work in eliminating many of the declared chemical weapons stockpiles worldwide.

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Brewing high-value chemicals using yeast fueled by light-harvesting nanoparticles

A genetically programable strain of yeast powered by light-harvesting nanoparticles can make high-value chemicals from simple and renewable carbon sources, according to a new report.

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Mergers drive a powerful dusty quasar

A galaxy merger provided the raw materials to form a bright and powerful dust-obscured quasar in the early Universe, according to a new imaging analysis.

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Special issue: Diet and Health

Diet has major effects on human health. In this special issue of Science, 'Diet and Health,' four Reviews explore the connections between what we eat and our well-being, as well as the continuing controversies in this space.

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Preventing chemical weapons as sciences converge

Scientists from Bradford warn of increased chemical weapons risk during a period of very rapid scientific change.

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Variance in gut microbiome in Himalayan populations linked to dietary lifestyle

The gut bacteria of four Himalayan populations differ based on their dietary lifestyles, according to a new study by researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine and their collaborators.

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HIV latency differs across tissues in the body

Mechanisms that govern HIV transcription and latency differ in the gut and blood, according to a study published Nov. 15 in the open-access journal PLOS Pathogens by Steven Yukl of San Francisco Veterans Affairs Medical Center and the University of California, San Francisco, and colleagues. According to the authors, the findings could inform new therapies aimed at curing HIV.

23h

Human activity may influence the distribution and transmission of Bartonella bacteria

A study in PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases by Hannah Frank and colleagues at Stanford University, California suggests that humans play an important role in disease risk, infection patterns, and distribution of Bartonella, advancing current understanding of Bartonella's evolutionary history and how the bacteria may be transmitted between humans and other animal species.

23h

Even online shopping fans want to save retail stores

In a new survey, most respondents said that retail stores disappearing would have a negative effect on jobs, socializing, and crime. It has been dubbed the “retail apocalypse”—the widespread shuttering of brick-and-mortar stores across America in the wake of online shopping’s skyrocketing popularity. But how do consumers feel about this changing retail landscape? To find out, Sabrina Helm and her

23h

The Beauty and Danger of Australia's Salt Lakes

Perth-based photographer Leah Kennedy captures the duality of Australia's salinization crisis in a series of extraordinary images.

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News at a glance

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Ice age impact

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Optimizing the diet

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Dietary fat: From foe to friend?

For decades, dietary advice was based on the premise that high intakes of fat cause obesity, diabetes, heart disease, and possibly cancer. Recently, evidence for the adverse metabolic effects of processed carbohydrate has led to a resurgence in interest in lower-carbohydrate and ketogenic diets with high fat content. However, some argue that the relative quantity of dietary fat and carbohydrate h

23h

A time to fast

Nutrient composition and caloric intake have traditionally been used to devise optimized diets for various phases of life. Adjustment of meal size and frequency have emerged as powerful tools to ameliorate and postpone the onset of disease and delay aging, whereas periods of fasting, with or without reduced energy intake, can have profound health benefits. The underlying physiological processes i

23h

The gut microbiota at the intersection of diet and human health

Diet affects multiple facets of human health and is inextricably linked to chronic metabolic conditions such as obesity, type 2 diabetes, and cardiovascular disease. Dietary nutrients are essential not only for human health but also for the health and survival of the trillions of microbes that reside within the human intestines. Diet is a key component of the relationship between humans and their

23h

Swifter, higher, stronger: Whats on the menu?

The exploits of elite athletes delight, frustrate, and confound us as they strive to reach their physiological, psychological, and biomechanical limits. We dissect nutritional approaches to optimal performance, showcasing the contribution of modern sports science to gold medals and world titles. Despite an enduring belief in a single, superior "athletic diet," diversity in sports nutrition practi

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Hybrid history

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Dominant effect of relative tropical Atlantic warming on major hurricane occurrence

Here we explore factors potentially linked to the enhanced major hurricane activity in the Atlantic Ocean during 2017. Using a suite of high-resolution model experiments, we show that the increase in 2017 major hurricanes was not primarily caused by La Niña conditions in the Pacific Ocean but rather triggered mainly by pronounced warm sea surface conditions in the tropical North Atlantic. Further

23h

Heterobiaryl synthesis by contractive C-C coupling via P(V) intermediates

Heterobiaryls composed of pyridine and diazine rings are key components of pharmaceuticals and are often central to pharmacological function. We present an alternative approach to metal-catalyzed cross-coupling to make heterobiaryls using contractive phosphorus C–C couplings, also termed phosphorus ligand coupling reactions. The process starts by regioselective phosphorus substitution of the C–H

23h

Templated nanofiber synthesis via chemical vapor polymerization into liquid crystalline films

Extrusion, electrospinning, and microdrawing are widely used to create fibrous polymer mats, but these approaches offer limited access to oriented arrays of nanometer-scale fibers with controlled size, shape, and lateral organization. We show that chemical vapor polymerization can be performed on surfaces coated with thin films of liquid crystals to synthesize organized assemblies of end-attached

23h

Reversible self-assembly of superstructured networks

Soft structures in nature, such as protein assemblies, can organize reversibly into functional and often hierarchical architectures through noncovalent interactions. Molecularly encoding this dynamic capability in synthetic materials has remained an elusive goal. We report on hydrogels of peptide-DNA conjugates and peptides that organize into superstructures of intertwined filaments that disassem

23h

Light-driven fine chemical production in yeast biohybrids

Inorganic-biological hybrid systems have potential to be sustainable, efficient, and versatile chemical synthesis platforms by integrating the light-harvesting properties of semiconductors with the synthetic potential of biological cells. We have developed a modular bioinorganic hybrid platform that consists of highly efficient light-harvesting indium phosphide nanoparticles and genetically engin

23h

Wafer-scale single-crystal hexagonal boron nitride film via self-collimated grain formation

Although polycrystalline hexagonal boron nitride (PC-hBN) has been realized, defects and grain boundaries still cause charge scatterings and trap sites, impeding high-performance electronics. Here, we report a method of synthesizing wafer-scale single-crystalline hBN (SC-hBN) monolayer films by chemical vapor deposition. The limited solubility of boron (B) and nitrogen (N) atoms in liquid gold pr

23h

Beyond the molecular movie: Dynamics of bands and bonds during a photoinduced phase transition

Ultrafast nonequilibrium dynamics offer a route to study the microscopic interactions that govern macroscopic behavior. In particular, photoinduced phase transitions (PIPTs) in solids provide a test case for how forces, and the resulting atomic motion along a reaction coordinate, originate from a nonequilibrium population of excited electronic states. Using femtosecond photoemission, we obtain ac

23h

Quantifying reputation and success in art

In areas of human activity where performance is difficult to quantify in an objective fashion, reputation and networks of influence play a key role in determining access to resources and rewards. To understand the role of these factors, we reconstructed the exhibition history of half a million artists, mapping out the coexhibition network that captures the movement of art between institutions. Ce

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Protein assemblies ejected directly from native membranes yield complexes for mass spectrometry

Membrane proteins reside in lipid bilayers and are typically extracted from this environment for study, which often compromises their integrity. In this work, we ejected intact assemblies from membranes, without chemical disruption, and used mass spectrometry to define their composition. From Escherichia coli outer membranes, we identified a chaperone-porin association and lipid interactions in t

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Small-molecule inhibitor of OGG1 suppresses proinflammatory gene expression and inflammation

The onset of inflammation is associated with reactive oxygen species and oxidative damage to macromolecules like 7,8-dihydro-8-oxoguanine (8-oxoG) in DNA. Because 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase 1 (OGG1) binds 8-oxoG and because Ogg1 -deficient mice are resistant to acute and systemic inflammation, we hypothesized that OGG1 inhibition may represent a strategy for the prevention and treatment of infl

23h

Programmed DNA destruction by miniature CRISPR-Cas14 enzymes

CRISPR-Cas systems provide microbes with adaptive immunity to infectious nucleic acids and are widely employed as genome editing tools. These tools use RNA-guided Cas proteins whose large size (950 to 1400 amino acids) has been considered essential to their specific DNA- or RNA-targeting activities. Here we present a set of CRISPR-Cas systems from uncultivated archaea that contain Cas14, a family

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New Products

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In vivo modeling of human neuron dynamics and Down syndrome

Harnessing the potential of human stem cells for modeling the physiology and diseases of cortical circuitry requires monitoring cellular dynamics in vivo. We show that human induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC)–derived cortical neurons transplanted into the adult mouse cortex consistently organized into large (up to ~100 mm 3 ) vascularized neuron-glia territories with complex cytoarchitecture. L

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Molecular, spatial, and functional single-cell profiling of the hypothalamic preoptic region

The hypothalamus controls essential social behaviors and homeostatic functions. However, the cellular architecture of hypothalamic nuclei—including the molecular identity, spatial organization, and function of distinct cell types—is poorly understood. Here, we developed an imaging-based in situ cell-type identification and mapping method and combined it with single-cell RNA-sequencing to create a

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Comment on "Predicting reaction performance in C-N cross-coupling using machine learning"

Ahneman et al . (Reports, 13 April 2018) applied machine learning models to predict C–N cross-coupling reaction yields. The models use atomic, electronic, and vibrational descriptors as input features. However, the experimental design is insufficient to distinguish models trained on chemical features from those trained solely on random-valued features in retrospective and prospective test scenari

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Response to Comment on "Predicting reaction performance in C-N cross-coupling using machine learning"

We demonstrate that the chemical-feature model described in our original paper is distinguishable from the nongeneralizable models introduced by Chuang and Keiser. Furthermore, the chemical-feature model significantly outperforms these models in out-of-sample predictions, justifying the use of chemical featurization from which machine learning models can extract meaningful patterns in the dataset

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SFXN1 is a mitochondrial serine transporter required for one-carbon metabolism

One-carbon metabolism generates the one-carbon units required to synthesize many critical metabolites, including nucleotides. The pathway has cytosolic and mitochondrial branches, and a key step is the entry, through an unknown mechanism, of serine into mitochondria, where it is converted into glycine and formate. In a CRISPR-based genetic screen in human cells for genes of the mitochondrial path

23h

NYTimes exposé reveals how Facebook handled scandalsFacebook George Soros

The exhaustive report is based on interviews with more than 50 people with ties to the company. It outlines how senior executives misled the public and lawmakers in regards to what it had discovered about privacy breaches and Russian interference in U.S. politics. On Thursday, Facebook cut ties with one of the companies, Definers Public Relations, listed in the report. None A new report from The

23h

US researchers seek to end carbs v fat 'diet wars'

Review seeks to find common ground, arguing that what matters for most people is quality A group of scientists is trying to end the “diet wars” raging over how much fat and carbohydrate we should eat, arguing that what matters for most people is quality. A review by US researchers with diverse perspectives on the fraught fat v carbs question attempts to find the common ground. Above all, they say

23h

Arming drug hunters, chemists design new reaction for drug discovery

If pharmaceutical chemists are the drug hunters who discover new medicines, scientists like Andrew McNally and Robert Paton are the armorers—the deft creators who arm drug hunters with the sharpest tools.

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Variance in gut microbiome in Himalayan populations linked to dietary lifestyle

The gut bacteria of four Himalayan populations differ based on their dietary lifestyles, according to a new study by researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine and their collaborators.

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Preventing chemical weapons as sciences converge

Alarming examples of the dangers from chemical weapons have been seen recently in the use of industrial chemicals and the nerve agent sarin against civilians in Syria, and in the targeted assassination operations using VX nerve agent in Malaysia and novichok nerve agent in the UK.

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Nanofiber carpet could lead to new sticky or insulating surfaces

Inspired by the extraordinary characteristics of polar bear fur, lotus leaves and gecko feet, engineering researchers have developed a new way to make arrays of nanofibers that could bring us coatings that are sticky, repellant, insulating or light emitting, among other possibilities.

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Solar panels for yeast cell biofactories

Genetically engineered microbes such as bacteria and yeasts have long been used as living factories to produce drugs and fine chemicals. More recently, researchers have started to combine bacteria with semiconductor technology that, similar to solar panels on the roof of a house, harvests energy from light and, when coupled to the microbes' surface, can boost their biosynthetic potential.

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Q&A: The ABCs of E-Cigarettes

As vaping grows more popular, especially among teens, here are answers to some basic questions about its health effects.

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Solar-Powered Yeast Are More Efficient Drug Factories

Researchers have outfitted brewer's yeast with light-harvesting semiconductors to boost chemical productivity.

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Here’s what a manufacturing skills gap of more than 2 million people will look like

Unless manufacturers start exploring new strategies, they won’t be able to find enough people qualified to work in their specialized factories.

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Ford wants to launch a fleet of thousands of self-driving cars in 2021

The automaker believes sponsorship and ride-sharing will be key to making its nascent autonomous-car business take off.

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Mini ‘solar panels’ help yeast shine at churning out drug ingredients

Microbes equipped with light-harvesting semiconductor particles generate useful chemicals much more efficiently than ordinary microbes.

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Here’s what you need to know about Samsung’s new folding phone concept

Technology A gadget that opens to reveal a bigger display answers an age-old screen-size issue. The skinny on devices that fold.

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Cotton-based hybrid biofuel cell could power implantable medical devices

A glucose-powered biofuel cell that uses electrodes made from cotton fiber could someday help power implantable medical devices such as pacemakers and sensors. The new fuel cell, which provides twice as much power as conventional biofuel cells, could be paired with batteries or supercapacitors to provide a hybrid power source for the medical devices.

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What Turkey Stands to Gain from the Khashoggi Investigation

Saudi authorities said Thursday that they charged 11 people in connection with the killing of Jamal Khashoggi. Five of the 11 were charged with murder. Turkey’s response? It’s not enough. The journalist’s killing has cast Turkey, which under President Recep Tayyip Erdo ğ an has stifled dissent, in an unusual role—that of a defender of human rights and a free press. So what does Turkey hope to get

23h

The Kominsky Method Is a Strange, Slapdash Show

Acting, Sandy Kominsky (Michael Douglas) tells his students in the second episode of The Kominsky Method , is how we explore what it means to be human. “Experience the feelings that come up, no matter how painful,” he urges them, “because that grief, that unrelenting sorrow—that’s the raw material. That’s the gold an actor mines to create great performances.” It’s a persuasive speech, and it’s co

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Weight-loss surgery data reveals 4 types of obesity

Understanding the very different characteristics of subgroups of obese patients may hold the key to devising more effective weight-loss treatments and interventions, according to new research. Analyzing data from more than 2,400 obese patients who underwent bariatric weight-loss surgery, researchers identified at least four different patient subgroups that diverge significantly in eating behavior

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Ice Age Cave Art Found Under Layers of Centuries-Old Graffiti

Newfound cave carvings from the ice age were obscured for centuries by graffiti.

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Unraveling the mystery behind dogs' floppy ears

Nearly all domestic animals share several key traits in addition to friendliness to humans, traits such as floppy ears, a spotted coat, a shorter snout, and so on. Researchers have been puzzled as to why these traits keep showing up in disparate species, even when they aren't being bred for those qualities. This is known as "domestication syndrome." Now, researchers are pointing to a group of a c

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Fishermen Sue Oil Companies Over Rising Ocean Temperatures

The plaintiffs are seeking compensation for losses linked to algal blooms fueled by warmer waters — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Bacteria May Live (Harmlessly) in Your Brain

In the latest example of bacteria being "literally everywhere," scientists appear to have found evidence of microbes living harmlessly in our brains.

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Cosmic fireworks

It's not every day you get to observe a gamma-ray binary system. In fact, it's a once-in-a-lifetime experience comparable to seeing Halley's Comet or a solar eclipse. Here's what a UD team saw.

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Folkevandringens dna

Gang på gang omskriver Eske Willerslev menneskets forhistorie med dna-studier, men nogle gange giver de anledning til flere spørgsmål, end de besvarer.

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Astronomers find possible elusive star behind supernova

Astronomers may have finally uncovered the long-sought progenitor to a specific type of exploding star by sifting through NASA Hubble Space Telescope archival data. The supernova, called a Type Ic, is thought to detonate after its massive star has shed or been stripped of its outer layers of hydrogen and helium.

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Bursting bubbles launch bacteria from water to air

A new MIT study shows how bubbles contaminated with bacteria can act as tiny microbial grenades, bursting and launching microorganisms, including potential pathogens, out of the water and into the air.

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Experts seek ways to boost extreme wildfire survival rates

Creating fire buffers between housing and dry brush, burying spark-prone power lines and lighting more controlled burns to keep vegetation in check could give people a better chance of surviving wildfires, according to experts searching for ways to reduce growing death tolls from blazes in California and across the U.S. West.

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Forskere beslutter sig endelig: Efter 129 år vejer et kilo faktisk et kilo

I Frankrig står der en særlig metalklods i en boks, som i årtier har været standarden for, hvad der præcist var et kilogram. Nu er afløseren klar.

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It Took 17 Years to Catch the Unabomber, but 5 Days to Find Cesar Sayoc

The man law enforcement believes briefly terrorized the country with a series of mail bombs appeared in court on Thursday, pleading not guilty to a 30-count indictment including charges of mailing weapons of mass destruction. What he’s accused of was perhaps the largest attempted mass political assassination through the mail since anarchists mailed more than 30 bombs to public figures in 1919. Wh

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California recommends restrictions for popular pesticide

California regulators recommended new restrictions Thursday on a widely used pesticide blamed for harming the brains of babies.

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Scientists find mysterious family of proteins are cellular pressure sensors

Scientists at Scripps Research have discovered that a mysterious family of cellular proteins called OSCAs and TMEM63s are a novel class of mechanosensitive ion channels.

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Historian tells new story about England's venerated 'Domesday book'

Nearly a thousand years ago, a famous king created a famous book, later given the title "Domesday" (pronounced "doomsday").

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Ulcers from diabetes? New shoe insole could provide healing on-the-go

Purdue University researchers have developed a shoe insole that could help make the healing process more portable for the 15 percent of Americans who develop ulcers as a result of diabetes.

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Targeted delivery: Cancer identity technology makes it easier to find a tumor's 'address'

Purdue University researchers have developed a technology aimed at making it easier to deliver cancer treatment to the right "address" in the body while also easing the painful side effects of chemotherapy on patients.

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NASA finds a cloud-filled eye in Tropical Cyclone Gaja

Tropical Cyclone Gaja continued to organize in the Bay of Bengal as it made its approach to southeastern India when NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite passed overhead and captured an image. The image revealed that Gaja had developed a cloud-filled eye.

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Recent study documents damage to rice crops by three fall-applied residual herbicides

Fall-applied residual herbicides are a commonly used control for glyphosate-resistant Italian ryegrass—one of the most troublesome weeds in Mid-South row crops. But research published in the journal Weed Technology shows rice growers need to be cautious. Some residual herbicides can have a negative impact on rice crop performance.

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Trilobites: Hurricane Harvey Passed Over, but These Fish Kept Making Babies

Underwater audio recordings rescued from Hurricane Harvey showed that the urge to spawn was more powerful than a category 4 storm.

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Population of rare Stone's sheep 20 police smaller than previously thought

The already-rare Stone's sheep of the Yukon is 20 per cent less common than previously thought, according to new research by University of Alberta biologists.

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Engineering with Alex Rossi | In the Pit

Get technical with Alex Rossi's right-hand man: his engineer. Stream Full Episodes of In the Pit: https://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/in-the-pit/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Discovery Follow on Twitter: https://twitter.com/Discovery We're on Instagram! https://instagram.com/DiscoveryChannel From: Discovery

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Songbirds set long-distance migration record

Researchers have studied flight routes to determine how far willow warblers migrate in the autumn. The results show that the willow warbler holds a long-distance migration record in the 10-gram weight category — with the small birds flying around 13,000 kilometers or longer to reach their destination.

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‘Memory’ plays vital role in cell development

Developing cells retain a memory of the chemical signals they encounter, according to a new research. Embryos that fail to form these memories remain a clump of clones, never realizing their unique biological potential. We all start out as a clump of identical cells. As these cells divide and multiply, they gradually take on distinct identities, acquiring the traits necessary to form, for instanc

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Amazon didn’t pick your city for its HQ2, but it sure gathered a lot of data about it

Technology Everything the company knows about your town after its year-long search. Amazon learned everything there is to know about your city through its year-long HQ2 search.

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Scientists find mysterious family of proteins are cellular pressure sensors

Scientists at Scripps Research have discovered that a mysterious family of cellular proteins called OSCAs and TMEM63s are a novel class of mechanosensitive ion channels. The scientists also deciphered the atomic structure of one member of the OSCA protein family, an advance that will allow them to study how these ion channels do their jobs, information that could be critical to identifying how dys

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Historian tells new story about England's venerated 'Domesday book'

Nearly a thousand years ago, a famous king created a famous book, later given the title 'Domesday' (pronounced 'doomsday'). It's among the most famous documents in English history, but its origins had not been thoroughly investigated. University of Illinois history professor Carol Symes makes the case that it came years later than the 1087 date to which it's attributed. The process that produced i

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Catching up on sleep at weekends may aggravate period pain

Getting up early on weekdays and sleeping in on weekends to compensate may cause period pain by disrupting the circadian rhythms that control hormone cycles

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Violence in childhood speeds up aging

Violence, psychological or emotional abuse, and deprivation or neglect during childhood can affect both cellular aging and biological development, according to a new study. Further, the study shows that different forms of adversity during childhood have different impacts on the aging process. “Exposure to violence in childhood accelerates biological aging in children as young as 8 years old,” say

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Brexit Crisis. Theresa May in Trouble. Rinse. Repeat.

Less than 24 hours after U.K. Prime Minister Theresa May’s cabinet backed the text of her provisional Brexit deal, the walkouts began. On Thursday morning, Brexit Secretary Dominic Raab submitted his resignation, noting he could not “ in good conscience ” support the government’s Brexit deal. Through the course of the day, six others followed. The string of departures from May’s cabinet reaffirm

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Staten forærer omstridt motortrafikvej til København og Frederiksberg

Hvis ellers København og Frederiksberg kommuner kan finde pengene, står det dem nu frit for at tunnellægge Bispeengbuen og genåbne Ladegårdsåen ovenpå.

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Should you eat a low-gluten diet?

When healthy people eat a low-gluten and fiber-rich diet compared with a high-gluten diet they experience less intestinal discomfort including less bloating which researchers show are due to changes of the composition and function of gut bacteria. The new study also shows a modest weight loss following low-gluten dieting. The researchers attribute the impact of diet on healthy adults more to chang

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Population of rare Stone's sheep 20% smaller than previously thought

The already-rare Stone's sheep of the Yukon is 20 per cent less common than previously thought, according to new research by biologists. The study examined 123 different DNA markers in approximately 2,800 thinhorn sheep in British Columbia and the Yukon, with the goal of mapping population boundaries. Results show significant overestimation of certain subspecies of thinhorn sheep, like Stone's she

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Ashkenazi Jewish founder mutation identified for Leigh Syndrome

Decades after two brothers died in childhood of a mitochondrial disease, researchers pinpointed the exact cause in a founder mutation among Ashkenazi Jews. The discoverers say the mutation should be added to prenatal carrier screening programs for prospective parents.

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NASA finds a cloud-filled eye in Tropical Cyclone Gaja

Tropical Cyclone Gaja continued to organize in the Bay of Bengal as it made its approach to southeastern India when NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite passed overhead and captured an image. The image revealed that Gaja had developed a cloud-filled eye.

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Making moves and memories, are they connected?

Researchers report the first direct evidence that the cerebellum does more than just control muscle activity. It also plays a role in cognitive functions.

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Faecal transplant may protect premature babies from fatal bowel disease

Children born prematurely often experience serious problems with the gastrointestinal tract and therefore have increased risk of developing life-threatening bowel infection. Now researchers from the University of Copenhagen have shown, in a study on pigs, that transplantation of faeces from healthy pigs changes the bowel's bacterial composition in those born prematurely and protects them from the

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Scorpion venom to shuttle drugs into the brain

The Peptides and Proteins lab at the Institute for Research in Biomedicine (IRB Barcelona) has published a paper in Chemical Communications describing the capacity of a small protein (a peptide) derived from chlorotoxin, found in scorpion venom (Giant Yellow Israeli scorpion), to carry drugs across the blood-brain barrier (BBB).

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Humpback whales arrive in the Mediterranean to feed themselves

Although the presence of humpback whales in the Mediterranean has been considered unusual, it is known that their visits have increased in the last 150 years. A recent study indicates that what motivates these cetacean mammals to enter these waters is the search for food.

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Grønlandsk kæmpekrater kan (måske) forklare mammuttens forsvinden

Forskere har i årevis ledt efter bevis på et nedslag, der ændrede Jordens klima for ca. 12.000 år siden. Nu er beviset der måske – og det kan omskrive historien.

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How Friendsgiving Took Over Millennial Culture

Every year for the past five or so, the Emily Post Institute—long considered the leading authority on matters of manners and courtesy—fields at least one or two etiquette questions about “Friendsgiving.” Usually they come from people in their 20s and 30s, says Lizzie Post, the co-president of the institute and the eponymous etiquette authority’s great-great-granddaughter. The advice seekers are o

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Steve McQueen’s Widows Is the Smartest Blockbuster of the Year

Widows is all about theft. That might seem like a trite thing to say about a heist film bookended by two armed-robbery sequences that might be the best action set pieces of 2018. But Steve McQueen’s follow-up to 12 Years a Slave isn’t only concerned with stealing money. It’s an astounding crime epic that digs through every layer of its cops-and-robbers narrative, from the personal to the municipa

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A Bold New Strategy for Stopping the Rise of Superbugs

The British chemist Leslie Orgel reputedly once said that “evolution is cleverer than you are.” This maxim, now known as Orgel’s Second Rule, isn’t meant to imply that evolution is intelligent or conscious, but simply that it’s inventive beyond the scope of human imagination . That’s something that people who fight infectious diseases have been forced to learn again and again. For the past 90 yea

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