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Nyheder2018november17

 

A molecule for fighting muscular paralysis

Myotubular myopathy is a severe genetic disease that leads to muscle paralysis. Although no treatment currently exists, researchers from the UNIGE-with the University of Strasbourg,- have identified a molecule that not only greatly reduces the progression of the disease but also boosts life expectancy in animal models by a factor of seven. Since the molecule — known as tamoxifen — is already use

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Signal peptides' novel role in glutamate receptor trafficking and neural synaptic activity

Dr. SHENG Nengyin at the Kunming Institute of Zoology of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, in collaboration with Dr. SHI Yun's Lab at the Model Animal Research Center of Nanjing University, revealed a signal peptide function for glutamate receptor trafficking and uncovered a novel trafficking mechanism for glutamate receptors.

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Rare and diverse giant viruses unexpectedly found in a forest soil ecosystem

Until recently, scientists thought of viruses as mostly small infectious agents, tiny compared to typical bacteria and human cells. So imagine the surprise when biologist Jeff Blanchard and Ph.D. student Lauren Alteio at the University of Massachusetts Amherst, with others at the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Joint Genome Institute (JGI), discovered giant viruses — relatively speaking the size

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Common tactics for health promotion at work may be detrimental to employees with obesity

Workplace health promotion programs often emphasize personal responsibility for weight loss. However, this approach can have detrimental effects for employees with obesity. These include increased workplace weight stigma and weight discrimination. Worryingly, such programs also resulted in a catch-22 where employees feel increasingly responsible for their weight but less in control of it. Focusing

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Shoulder 'brightness' on ultrasound may be a sign of diabetes

A shoulder muscle that appears unusually bright on ultrasound may be a warning sign of diabetes, according to a new study.

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As Insurers Offer Discounts For Fitness Trackers, Wearers Should Step With Caution

Millions of Americans use wearable devices to monitor their diet and fitness. Some insurance companies offer incentives to use them, but privacy advocates caution customers not to share too much data. (Image credit: Morgan Walker for NPR)

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Rapport: Vindenergi bliver primær energikilde om mindre end 10 år

Men selvom vinden vinder, vil møllerne slet ikke kunne følge med klodens stigende energibehov.

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Residual inflammation risk affects outcomes after percutaneous coronary intervention

Patients who have persistently high levels of inflammation following percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) for coronary artery disease are significantly more likely to die from any cause or to have a heart attack within a year, according to a study of 7,026 patients published in the European Heart Journal.

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Can you solve it? Five shady puzzles

Shine your inner light bulb on these geometrical gems UPDATE: Read the solutions here Hi guzzlers. Today’s puzzles are about the shade, by which I mean the shaded areas in the geometrical diagrams below. The images are to be studied and contemplated, until the pleasurable moment of insight arrives… Continue reading…

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Scientists create atomic scale, 2-D electronic kagome lattice

Scientists from the University of Wollongong (UOW), working with colleagues at China's Beihang University, Nankai University, and Institute of Physics at Chinese Academy of Sciences, have successfully created an atomic scale, two-dimensional electronic kagome lattice with potential applications in electronics and quantum computing.

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Nyt ambitiøst forskningscenter skal sikre international topposition inden for forskning i hudsygdomme

Det nye center ’LEO Foundation Skin Immunology Research Center’ vil skabe international…

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China expands ban on waste imports

China will expand its ban on imports of solid waste, local media reported Monday, almost a year after its first curbs caused havoc in countries that sent their rubbish to the Asian giant.

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Evacuations urged near Guatemala's erupting Volcano of Fire

Disaster coordination authorities have asked 10 communities in Guatemala to evacuate and go to safe areas after an increased eruption of the Volcano of Fire.

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Study on economic impact of border wall finds high costs and few benefits to US

A new Dartmouth-Stanford study examining the economic impact of a border wall expansion between the U.S. and Mexico between 2007 to 2010 finds that the expansion minimally reduced unauthorized Mexican migration and was largely harmful to U.S. workers.

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Be careful what you wish for…

A "naturopathic oncologist" on Twitter challenged me to examine the work of his two "naturopathic oncology" mentors. It did not go well…for him.

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Researchers have created a virtual reality simulation of a supermassive black hole

The black hole at the centre of our galaxy, Sagittarius A*, has been visualised in virtual reality for the first time. The details are described in an article published in the open access journal Computational Astrophysics and Cosmology.

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Swarmlike collective behavior in bicycling

Whether it's the acrobatics of a flock of starlings or the synchronized swimming of a school of fish, nature is full of examples of large-scale collective behavior. Humans also exhibit this behavior, most notably in pelotons, the mass of riders in bicycle races.

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Researchers propose solutions for urine sample splash dilemma

Urinating into a cup may be a medical necessity for monitoring the health of the kidney and other issues, but it's often uncomfortable, embarrassing and messy—especially for women. But what if there were a way to comfortably provide a sample without the splashback?

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Nordisk ingeniør-forening: Udviklere skal tage ansvar for etik i kunstig intelligens

For få fagfolk udtaler sig om kunstig intelligens og etik. For at styrke den offentlige debat er det på tide at eksperternes stemmer kommer frem. Og så er der brug for et etisk ingeniør-løfte på linje med lægeløftet, mener Nordens ingeniørforening.

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Does an 'echo chamber' of information impede flu vaccination for children?

Nearly a third of parents say they are not planning to get their child the vaccine this year, according to the C.S. Mott Children's Hospital National Poll on Children's Health at the University of Michigan.

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Space: how far have we gone – and where are we going?

Billionaire entrepreneurs are trying to create rockets fit for human travel, while government agencies spend billions furthering their explorations. But we are still a long way off from making our way to the red planet Space flight is now a venerable industry. Humanity’s first space explorer, Soviet cosmonaut Yuri Gagarin, orbited around the globe on 12 April 1961, more than half a century ago, w

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Ny teori: Dele af Jordens vand stammer fra en gigantisk støvsky

Prøver fra Jordens indre viser, at vandet på kloden kan være kommet fra både et asteroide-borbardement og den stjernetåge, der opstod, efter Solens dannelse.

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Preserving shoulder function, quality of life, in breast cancer patients

After a prophylactic double mastectomy in 2015, Tina Harrison discovered that she did, indeed, have breast cancer — it just hadn't been detected.

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Spanking in developing countries does more harm than good

Spanking may be increasingly harmful for children on a more global scale than previously known, a new University of Michigan study indicates.

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Sexual orientation identified as a risk factor in opioid misuse

Men and women who identify as lesbian, gay, or bisexual are more likely to misuse opioids when compared with those who identify as heterosexual, a new study shows.

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One in 5 kids with food allergies treated in emergency department in past year

Researchers from Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children's Hospital of Chicago and colleagues estimate that nearly 8 percent of US children (about 5.6 million) have food allergies, with nearly 40 percent allergic to more than one food.

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Growing number of state laws limit local government control over food and nutrition

In recent years, more than a dozen states have passed laws limiting local governments' ability to create food and nutrition policies and more than two dozen states previously enacted laws preventing obesity-related lawsuits against food businesses, finds a new analysis led by NYU College of Global Public Health. These laws are examples of preemption, a legal mechanism in which a higher level of go

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Negligible risk of transmitting HIV during sex when viral load is suppressed

There is a negligible risk of transmitting HIV during sex when a person living with HIV is on antiretroviral therapy and maintains a viral load under a specific threshold, according to a study in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal).

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Selvflyvende droner skal finde fejl på højspændingsnettet

Et dansk forsknings­projekt skal udvikle sværme af autonome droner, der i samarbejde kan inspicere luftledninger for fejl. Strøm til deres batterier får de direkte fra ledningerne.

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Lentivirus 101: Simple Gene Delivery

Lentiviruses are powerful tools in molecular biology. Download this eBook to learn about the basics of lentivirus preparation and production, working with lentiviruses, and counting and storing lentiviruses.

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Researchers have created a virtual reality simulation of a supermassive black hole

The black hole at the centre of our galaxy, Sagittarius A*, has been visualised in virtual reality for the first time. The details are described in an article published in the open access journal Computational Astrophysics and Cosmology.

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Scientists claim the Bible is written in code that predicts future events

Mathematicians claim to see a predictive pattern in the ancient Torah texts. The code is revealed by a method found with special computer software. Some events described by reading the code took place after the code was written. None Searching for patterns is how we make sense of the world. We look for meaning in the often-overwhelming chaos by making connections between symbols and events. Some

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UK needs to redesign health policies for men

While lots of attention has been given to women's increasing presence in the labor market, there has been less focus on male workers. By studying recent evidence through a 'male lens', this report calls on Government to commission more 'gendered' research to understand the different ways men and women engage with health services, arguing that work should be recognized as a health outcome due to th

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Bullying and violence at work increases the risk of cardiovascular disease

People who are bullied at work or experience violence at work are at higher risk of heart and brain blood vessel problems, including heart attacks and stroke, according to the largest prospective study to investigate the link, which is published in the European Heart Journal.

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Noise pollution in hospitals — a rising problem

Noise in hospitals is a common concern among patients, families and staff. In the UK, 40 percent of hospital patients are bothered by noise at night.

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New dual-action cancer-killing virus

Scientists have equipped a virus that kills carcinoma cells with a protein so it can also target and kill adjacent cells that are tricked into shielding the cancer from the immune system. It is the first time that cancer-associated fibroblasts within solid tumors — healthy cells that are tricked into protecting the cancer from the immune system and supplying it with growth factors and nutrients –

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Women more resilient to extreme physical activity than previously reported

Women that underwent extreme physical training and completed a transantarctic expedition did not show any more negative health effects than would be expected in men, according to a study presented at the Society for Endocrinology annual conference in Glasgow. The study is the first to suggest that women are not more susceptible to the negative effects of physical exertion and, that with appropriat

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Debate: Is the gut or the brain more important in regulating appetite and metabolism?

Whether gut or brain hormones are more important for the regulation of appetite and metabolism is not clearly defined. Imbalances in the control of appetite and metabolism can lead to obesity and diabetes, which have a negative impact on people's health and healthcare costs. In a live debate to be held at the Society for Endocrinology annual conference in Glasgow, leading experts will debate this

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New tech regulation 'inevitable,' Apple CEO says

Apple CEO Tim Cook predicts that new regulations of tech companies and social networks to protect personal data are "inevitable."

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Scientists explain how wombats drop cubed poop

Wombats, the chubby and beloved, short-legged marsupials native to Australia, are central to a biological mystery in the animal kingdom: How do they produce cube-shaped poop? Patricia Yang, a postdoctoral fellow in mechanical engineering at the Georgia Institute of Technology, set out to investigate.

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Helping Marvel superheroes to breathe

Marvel comics superheroes Ant-Man and the Wasp—nom de guerre stars of the eponymous 2018 film—possess the ability to temporarily shrink down to the size of insects, while retaining the mass and strength of their normal human bodies. But a new study suggests that, when bug-sized, Ant-Man and the Wasp would face serious challenges, including oxygen deprivation.

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Researchers propose solutions for urine sample splash dilemma

Urinating into a cup may sometimes be a medical necessity, but it's often uncomfortable, embarrassing and messy — especially for women. But what if there were a way to comfortably provide a sample without the splashback? Researchers created experiments using an anatomically correct female urethra that produced a jet of water with pressure and flow equivalent to what a human bladder produces. Duri

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Swarmlike collective behavior in bicycling

Nature is full of examples of large-scale collective behavior; humans also exhibit this behavior, most notably in pelotons, the mass of riders in bicycle races. Using aerial video footage of bicycle races, researchers analyzed peloton motion to determine what causes changes in the group's large-scale collective behavior and found that riders move through the peloton in a manner similar to circulat

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Explaining a fastball's unexpected twist

An unexpected twist from a four-seam or a two-seam fastball can make the difference in a baseball team winning or losing the World Series. However, "some explanations regarding the different pitches are flat-out wrong," said Barton Smith, a professor of mechanical and aerospace engineering at Utah State University who considers himself a big fan of the game.

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Scientists unravel secret of cube-shaped wombat faeces

Researchers investigate why excrement emerges in awkward-shaped blocks Of all the many mysteries that surround the common wombat, it is hard to find one as baffling as its ability – broadly acknowledged as unique in the natural world – to produce faeces shaped like cubes. Why the pudgy marsupials might benefit from six-faced faeces is generally agreed upon: wombats mark their territorial borders

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An 'Exceptionally Rare' 2-Headed Snake Found In Virginia Has Died

Two-headed snakes don't live very long in the wild, so when one was found in a Northern Virginia yard, the discovery got the attention of scientists and social media alike. (Image credit: J.D. Kleopfer/Virginia Dept. of Game and Inland Fisheries)

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Helping Marvel superheroes to breathe

Marvel comics superheroes Ant-Man and the Wasp possess the ability to temporarily shrink down to the size of insects, while retaining the mass and strength of their normal human bodies. But a new study suggests that, when bug-sized, Ant-Man and the Wasp would face serious challenges, including oxygen deprivation. Those challenges, along with their solution-microfluidic technologies, will be descri

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Explaining a fastball's unexpected twist

An unexpected twist from fastball can make the difference in winning or losing the World Series. However, 'some explanations regarding the different pitches are flat-out wrong,' said Barton Smith, a professor of mechanical and aerospace engineering at Utah State University who considers himself a big fan of the game. He and Nazmus Sakib are conducting experiments to explain how baseballs move. Sak

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Scientists explain how wombats drop cubed poop

How do wombats produce cube-shaped poop? Patricia Yang at Georgia Tech set out to investigate. Yang studies the hydrodynamics of fluids, including blood, processed food and urine, in the bodies of animals. She was curious how the differences in wombats' digestive processes and soft tissue structures might explain their oddly shaped scat. During the APS Division of Fluid Dynamics 71st Annual Meetin

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New treatment to protect people with peanut allergies ready for FDA review

The final research results for a new treatment for protection against accidental exposure to peanut was presented today at the American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology (ACAAI) Annual Scientific Meeting and published in the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Peanut allergy treatment around the corner but cost raises concerns

Scientists think treatment in which children take increasing doses of peanut protein will be approved next year The first medical treatment for children with peanut allergies is likely to be approved next year but there are concerns about its affordability, even though it consists essentially of peanut flour. A study in the US and at the UK’s Evelina children’s hospital shows that gradually incre

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Wombats are the only animals whose poop is a cube. Here’s how they do it.

The elasticity of wombats’ intestines helps the creatures shape their distinctive poops.

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Small doses of peanut protein can turn allergies around

After a year of careful peanut protein exposure, most kids in a clinical trial could tolerate the equivalent of two large peanuts.

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Starwatch: how to find the south galactic pole

You will not be able to see it, no star marks its position. But exercise your intellectual curiosity this week by locating one of the points on the celestial sphere farthest from the galactic plane Finding the south galactic pole (SGP) is not spectacular but it is an intellectually satisfying piece of celestial geography . Many of us are familiar with the Milky Way, that misty band of starlight t

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Consensual Hugs Seem to Reduce Stress

People who had a conflict in a given day but also got hugged were not as affected by the negative interaction as were their unhugged counterparts. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Trump Says California Can Learn From Finland on Fires. Is He Right?Finland Trump California

Like his earlier comments about California’s forest management, President Trump’s remarks about how Finland prepares for wildfires were somewhat misleading.

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Fanworms, "Nature's Eye Factories," Stick Them Pretty Much Anywhere

Necessity is the mother of invention — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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12 dead in Vietnam floods, landslides

Flash floods and landslides killed at least 12 people in central Vietnam, officials said Sunday, as hundreds of troops were dispatched to clean up destroyed villages and washed out roads.

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Dig resurrects a feud over which town is a state's oldest

An archaeological dig is rekindling a feud between two towns over which was the first in Connecticut.

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Climate change/biodiversity loss: Inseparable threats to humanity that must be addressed together

Demand for biofuels to fight climate change clouds the future for biodiversity. The demand could cause a 10- to 30-fold expansion of green energy-related agricultural land use, adding crushing pressure on habitat for plants and animals and undermining the essential diversity of species on Earth.

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Ulcers from diabetes? New shoe insole could provide healing on-the-go

Researchers have developed a shoe insole that could help make the healing process more portable for the 15 percent of Americans who develop ulcers as a result of diabetes.

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Mysterious family of proteins are cellular pressure sensors

Scientists have discovered that a mysterious family of cellular proteins called OSCAs and TMEM63s are a novel class of mechanosensitive ion channels. The scientists also deciphered the atomic structure of one member of the OSCA protein family, an advance that will allow them to study how these ion channels do their jobs, information that could be critical to identifying how dysfunctions in mechano

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Stress of stretching solids: 3D image shows how particles distribute in metals

Observing the behavior of the particles in the composite metals helps to understand the mechanism of losing its strength and ductility, which makes possible to design the composites metals with higher strength and ductility.

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Orangutans exhibit awareness of the past

Orangutan mothers wait to sound a danger alarm to avoid tipping off predators to their location It took a couple of researchers crawling around the Sumatran jungle to discover the phenomenon This ability may come from a common ancestor One of the great animal mysteries has been whether or not they experience time as we do, or are aware of past, present, and future at all. Of course, we can't ask

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Do You Have a Healthy Personality?

New research identifies the personality profile that is most conducive to psychological health — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Saturday Night Live’s Confusing Celebration of Jeff Bezos

Satire is difficult in the Trump era. The president himself can be a tough target to exaggerate, given his outsize personality and the total media obsession with all of his mannerisms, which is why it’s unsurprising that Alec Baldwin’s Donald Trump has barely appeared on Saturday Night Live this season. In his absence (which might also be due to Baldwin’s current trouble with the law ), the show

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Rich, Ancient City Is Unearthed in Greece

Archaeologists unearthed Tenea, which is thought to have been founded by Trojans. They also found tombs, coins and urns, among other items, in and around the city.

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Divers Surprised by Gorgeous 'Feather Boa' of the Sea. And the Video Is Glorious.

An undulating ribbon of silver surprised divers near northern New Zealand in October — but not so much that they couldn't get it on video.

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Rumkunst – er det skrot eller flot?

Opdateret: På lørdag får kunstneren Trevor Paglen sendt sit værk ’Orbital Reflector’ op i knap 600 km højde om bord på en SpaceX-raket.

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Best Cookbooks (Fall 2018): José Andrés, Anissa Helou, Simone Klabin

This year's best food books reflect the importance of community, whether it's about saving the world or just understanding it a little better.

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A Deadly Tsunami of Fire

Seventy-six people are dead. At least 1,276 are missing. And more than 7 million have been confined to their homes, as a cloud of toxic, corrosive ash darkens their windows and creeps under their doors. The Camp Fire—which is still burning across some 232 square miles of Northern California—now ranks among the worst natural disasters to hit the United States this century. Only a handful of hurric

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Smartphones aren’t designed for seniors, but these tweaks make them more accessible

DIY Bigger text, hands-free controls, and read-aloud options. For people with shaky hands or visual impairments, smartphones are fraught with blurry text and hard-to-press buttons. Here’s how to make these devices easier to use.

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Brain, muscle cells found lurking in kidney organoids grown in lab

New research has identified rogue cells — namely brain and muscle cells — lurking within kidney organoids. Such cells make up only 10 to 20 percent of an organoid's cells, but their presence indicates that the 'recipes' used to coax stem cells into becoming kidney cells inadvertently are churning out other cell types.

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New 'SLICE' tool can massively expand immune system's cancer-fighting repertoire

Researchers have devised a CRISPR-based system called SLICE, which will allow scientists to rapidly assess the function of each and every gene in 'primary' immune cells — those drawn directly from patients. The new method, described in the Nov. 15 issue of Cell, provides researchers with a powerful tool that will guide their decision-making when determining how best to engineer immune cells to fi

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Trump's Apparent Aquaphobia Tops This Week's Internet News Roundup

Don't look now, but there's a sequel to the horror movie known as Last Week.

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Women Pay More for Transit: This Week's Future of Cars News

Tesla, GM, and Nissan want to restore the fading tax credit for EVs; Waymo is almost ready to go; the Mustang gets electrified; and more car news.

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An Open Letter to Elena Ferrante—Whoever You Are

Dear Elena Ferrante, It’s been a while. We haven’t been in touch since I interviewed you for The New York Times in December 2014—by email via your publisher, of course, because you are an artist of absence as well as a literary presence. I’ve always been impressed that back in 1992, when you published your first novel— Troubling Love , a vexing exploration of the female psyche—you made clear to y

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Putting Yourself on a Map

Even the most familiar place can feel new when you get the chance to zoom out or way, way in — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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‘Philosophically speaking, we can never fully trust our memory’

Sisters Hilde and Ylva Østby, a neuropsychologist and a novelist, have written a book exploring the true nature of memory. What can their findings tell us? Of all the mysteries of the mind, perhaps none is greater than memory. Why do we remember some things and forget others? What is memory’s relationship to consciousness and our identities? Where and how is memory stored? How reliable are our me

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HIV latency differs across tissues in the body

Mechanisms that govern HIV transcription and latency differ in the gut and blood, according to a new study. The findings could inform new therapies aimed at curing HIV.

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DICE: Immune cell atlas goes live

Scientists are sharing a trove of data that will be critical for deciphering how a natural genetic variation shapes the immune system's ability to protect our health.

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How electric fish got their big brains

Researchers have mapped the regions of the brain in mormyrid fish in extremely high detail. The new measurements can help illuminate longstanding questions in neuroanatomy. As brains get bigger, do all regions of the brain scale up in a predictable way? Or does natural selection act independently on separate regions of the brain — such that certain parts of the brain become enlarged in animals th

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Wild With: Horses (360 Video)

Get a front row seat to the spectacle of stampeding mustang! Feel their breath and the ground shake as their hooves strike the earth. VR360 is best viewed in a headset. On your phone: (1) tap the cardboard icon on the bottom right (2) place your phone into any VR viewer (3) Enjoy! For a more immersive experience download and watch on the Discovery VR app – now available on Google Daydream! Visit

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From gaslighting to gammon, 2018’s buzzwords reflect our toxic times | Emma Brockes

Forget the neutral ‘glamping’ and ‘vape’ – Oxford Dictionaries’ new words of the year are products of our heightened politics In the space of a single week I have, without overly noticing at the time, accused someone of “gaslighting” me for being excessively cheerful on the phone when I thought sobriety was required; described to someone else an intention to do a “hard reset on my boundaries” afte

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Gear for Running a Faster Marathon: Shoes, Trackers, Sensors

These sensors and shoes—and a beet juice elixir—gave speed back to a slowing runner.

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The Evolutionary Importance of Neutral vs. Adaptive Genes

For 50 years, evolutionary theory has emphasized the importance of neutral mutations over adaptive ones in DNA. Real genomic data challenge that assumption.

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The Fax Is Not Yet Obsolete

Nicole Follmann arrived at the Brooklyn House of Detention last spring to post bail by fax. This is how it works: You can post someone’s bail from any jail or courthouse, but you have to send a fax to wherever the person is housed. Follmann is an attorney for the Brooklyn Community Bail Fund, so she’s used to the inflow and outflow of documents. That day, she was posting bail for someone housed i

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The Quality More Important Than Confidence

When Joshua Johnson, the host of WAMU 88.5’s 1A, was growing up, West Palm Beach was a “big town trying to work its way up to being a small city.” It was, and still is, largely built on tourism and real estate. He grew up middle-class, surrounded by supportive family members who never pushed him in any particular direction, but made being successful an imperative. He participated in career-relate

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Understand your own mind and goals via bullet journaling

Organizing your thoughts can help you plan and achieve goals that might otherwise seen unobtainable. The Bullet Journal method, in particular, can reduce clutter in your life by helping you visualize your future. One way to view your journal might be less of a narrative and more of a timeline of decisions. The Bullet Journal Method: Track the Past, Order the Present, Design the Future List Price:

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Using Airport and Hotel Wi-Fi Is Much Safer Than It Used to Be

You were right not to trust hotel and airport Wi-Fi a few years ago. But these days, it's (probably) fine.

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Inside the Pricey War to Influence Your Instagram Feed

Instagram, YouTube—you name it. Influencers are being paid handsome sums to pitch you products in natural settings. That video you just watched? $50,000.

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Science, Technology, Math, Engineering And Now Congress

"Somebody with a technical background might think in a little bit different than the way, for instance, that a lawyer would think," says Chrissy Houlahan, a new lawmaker with a STEM background. (Image credit: Matt Rourke/AP)

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Tiny satellites will relay news of InSight’s Mars landing in minutes, not hours

NASA’s InSight Mars lander brought along two tiny CubeSats to send details about the spacecraft’s landing to Earth in almost real time.

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One of the Best Fantasy Novels Ever Is Nothing Like The Lord of the Rings

I encountered the cover of Peter S. Beagle’s fantasy novel The Last Unicorn years before I read the book. On the front of the Ballantine paperback edition that once sat on my parents’ shelf, there’s a white unicorn running in a forest as a small red sun sets behind the mountains. Where was this majestic creature going? I wondered. It’s now been 50 years since the novel’s publication, and the unic

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Fremtidens psykolog: Kunstig intelligens opdager, om du er deprimeret

Gennem genkendelse af ord og toneleje kan teknologien i fremtiden hjælpe med at udpege patienter med depression.

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Forskere oversætter 5.000 solopgange på Mars til musikstykke

Billeder fra Mars-roveren Opportunity er blevet til en langsom harmoni, hvor lysstyrke, farve og terrænhøjde har bestemt musikken.

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How the Democrats Won

Nearly every day, Americans are given fresh reasons to be horrified by Donald Trump. The president’s tweets are written to exacerbate social divisions, and his policy agenda is designed more to score political points than to solve actual problems. But beneath progressive outrage sits a deep unease, fueled by a gnawing question: How could America have elected both Barack Obama and a man so prone t

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How the Democrats Took Back Michigan

D ETROIT—Gretchen Whitmer had her red water bottle with the Wonder Woman logo. Debbie Stabenow was touching up her makeup. Dana Nessel was up front, sitting with her wife, right behind the stack of boxed salads that was the food for the day. The top of the Democratic ticket in Michigan—candidates for governor, Senate, and attorney general—were rolling along to the 77th and final stop of a statewi

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Want to enjoy a longer, happier life? Just keep on working

Life expectancy is rising but Britons are being encouraged to retire early. That’s both ridiculous and costly, says an expert Sarah Harper has a personal take on early retirement. “My father stopped work at 54,” says Professor Harper, founder of the Institute for Population Ageing at Oxford University. “His employers, IBM, offered him early retirement. He was really excited at the prospect.” But t

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Elizabeth Stokoe: ‘We all talk, but we don’t really know how’

The conversation analyst on how to calm someone threatening suicide, how comedy works and Donald Trump’s take on reality Elizabeth Stokoe is a professor of social interaction at Loughborough University. She studies conversation, often working with organisations such as the police or the NHS to improve interaction with users. What does a conversation analyst do? We collect recordings of talk in th

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Romania could challenge Russian grip on Europe's energy

Romania, one of the EU's poorest members, could emerge as an unlikely challenger to Russia's iron grip on eastern Europe's energy supply thanks to vast oil and gas reserves waiting to be tapped, experts say.

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Argentine submarine wreck found one year after disappearance

The crushed wreck of an Argentine submarine has been located one year after it vanished into the depths of the Atlantic Ocean with 44 crew members, in the country's worst naval disaster in decades.

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At what cost? Debate swirls on 'giveaways' after Amazon HQ deal

As the winners of the biggest corporate prize in decades—the new Amazon headquarters—relished their victory, debate was still raging over the billions of dollars in incentives offered to attract the fast-growing US technology colossus.

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Undersea gas fires Egypt's regional energy dreams

Egypt is looking to use its vast, newly tapped undersea gas reserves to establish itself as a key energy exporter and revive its flagging economy.

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Looters plunder Albania's sunken treasures

Albania's long underexplored coastal waters have become a hotspot for treasure hunters scooping up ancient pottery, sunken ship parts and other shell-encrusted relics that have lain on the seabed for centuries.

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Spørg Fagfolket: Bliver bakterier frostsprængt i fryseren?

En læser undrer sig over, om bakterier kan blive frostsprængt. Det svarer professor ved Københavns Universitet på.

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Har jeg set dig før? Du husker navne bedre end ansigter

Resultaterne af et mindre eksperiment viser, at vi er bedre til at genkende navne end ansigter.

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Enough of the neurosexist bilge. It’s not all pink and blue when it comes to our brains | Catherine Bennett

There’s no genetic reason women should be disadvantaged in the workplace – unless someone is looking for it In a week of dismaying news, there was a ray of sunshine: a scientific breakthrough with the potential to change lives. Men and women’s brains have finally been proved, by actual scientists, in a massive study, to be completely different! This, you gathered, was the substance of a prominent

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Every time a word disappears, we lose a little of our spirit and wit | Rachel Cooke

A new book gathers words that face extinction. Surely they’re worth saving News stories about language and the way we use it are rarely edifying, and usually intensely vexatious: the custodians of grammar merrily set about their showing off; the more liberal-minded do their best to convince us that the likes of “ cakeism ” and “gammon” – two of the words of 2018 , according to the Oxford Dictiona

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America’s opioid crisis is a warning to the NHS | Chris McGreal

The US watchdog that is supposed to protect patients is in thrall to an industry profiting from addiction Years into America’s opioid epidemic , as the death toll climbed into the hundreds of thousands, the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) held a hearing to consider a drug company application to approve a new high-strength painkiller. The FDA assembles advisory committees of doctors and scie

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California’s Fires Wrecked Its Air Quality: Here’s How to Protect Yourself

Here are some ways to stay healthy amid the smoke and smog from California’s wildfires.

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Palm oil: One woman's fight to save 'the last place on Earth'

Farwiza Farhan on efforts to protect the forests where orangutan, rhinos, elephants and tigers co-exist.

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To monitor 'social jet lag,' scientists look to Twitter

Social jet lag — a syndrome related to the mismatch between the body's internal clock and the realities of our daily schedules — has been tied to obesity and other health problems. Now, researchers have found a clever way to measure social jet lag in people all over the country: by analyzing patterns of activity on the social media platform Twitter.

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Gut hormone and brown fat interact to tell the brain it's time to stop eating

Researchers have shown that so-called 'brown fat' interacts with the gut hormone secretin in mice to relay nutritional signals about fullness to the brain during a meal. The study bolsters our understanding of a long-suspected role of brown adipose tissue (BAT) — a type of body fat known to generate heat when an animal is cold — in the control of food intake.

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Tales From The Bering Sea: Josh Harris’ First Fish Fight | Deadliest Catch

Josh Harris has been getting his butt kicked on fishing boats since he was 10 years old. Stream Full Episodes of Deadliest Catch: https://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/deadliest-catch/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/DeadliestCatch https://www.facebook.com/Discovery Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/DeadliestCatch https:/

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When Beer Becomes the Burden

AA is not the answer to alcohol addiction for many secular scientists, but there are great alternatives — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Kæmpeplanet fundet ved stjerne nær vores solsystem

Engelske forskere har opdaget en ny planet kun seks lysår væk fra Jorden.

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World's Largest Organism Faces Bleak Future

The single organism that is the Utah aspen grove known as Pando is on the decline due to herbivores wiping out its youngest tree outgrowths — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Echo

The gold inside this ring was once the sap of two colliding stars, a gravitational rippling flower, a thousand times our local sun, that flung its nectar on the dark and silent emptiness, across the curving light-years to become a cooling planet with this ore inside the veins of rock to be dug out and then refined and formed to wrap around your finger as a sign of bond and permanence, as eons of

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The Radical Evolution of WikiLeaks

Before the WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange was an international fugitive, he was running a little-noticed experiment in radical transparency. In the early 2000s, his then-obscure site WikiLeaks was mainly concerned with posting small batches of previously private documents ranging from Swiss bank documents to Sarah Palin’s emails. Then, in 2010, WikiLeaks posted a graphic video depicting the kil

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Car culture and suburban sprawl create rifts in society, claims study

Canadian researchers find that excessive reliance on cars changes political views. Decades of car-centric urban planning normalized unsustainable lifestyles. People who prefer personal comfort elect politicians who represent such views. None Want more things to blame for the ever-growing political divide in the United States? A new study pins cars and dangerous urban planning as a duo of socially

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Increased air travel may decrease the chances of a global pandemic

The more exposed we are to each other, the less surprising a pathogen will be to our bodies. Terrorism, high blood pressure, and staffing issues threaten to derail progress. Pursuing global health has to be an active choice. None Part of the anxiety in watching the 2011 film Contagion hinges on members of the CDC watching the map of the world itself: the world is so large and filled with so much

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The Lost World of Prehistoric Parasites

Paleontologists are still searching to uncover the deep history of nature's hitchhikers. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Metallic nanoparticles light up another path towards eco-friendly catalysts

Scientists have produced subnano-sized metallic particles that are very effective as catalysts for the oxidation of hydrocarbons. These catalysts can be as much as 50 times more effective than well-known Au-Pd bimetallic nanocatalysts.

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Seeing and smelling food prepares the mouse liver for digestion

The sight or smell of something delicious is often enough to get your mouth watering, but the physiological response to food perception may go well beyond your salivary glands. New research in mice shows that the sight and smell of food alone may be enough to kickstart processes in the liver that promote the digestion of food.

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Selling plants on Amazon: A forest of untapped opportunity

The purpose of this study was to determine the extent to which horticultural businesses were directly selling live plant products online, either through Amazon, Ebay, or from their own websites.

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Cells decide when to divide based on their internal clocks

The time of day, determined by a cell's internal clock, has a stronger influence on cell division than previously thought, reveals a new study.

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Gene editing possible for kidney disease

For the first time scientists have identified how to halt kidney disease in a life-limiting genetic condition, which may pave the way for personalised treatment in the future.

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Climate, life and the movement of continents: New connections

A new study has demonstrated a possible link between life on Earth and the movement of continents. The findings show that sediment, which is often comprised from pieces of dead organisms, could play a key role in determining the speed of continental drift.

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Arming drug hunters, chemists design new reaction for drug discovery

Organic chemists have forged a powerful new tool for drug hunters — a simple, elegantly designed chemical reaction that could fling open an underexplored wing of biologically relevant chemistry.

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7 scientists we are thankful for this Thanksgiving

We admire people who make a big show of their altruism, but some of the most praiseworthy accomplishments occur outside popular attention. This Thanksgiving, we give thanks to seven scientists who made the world a safer, healthier place to live. While there is still a lot of progress to make, the combination of science and humanism continues to improve the world and our lot in it at an unpreceden

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The Abrams Machine Is Not Done Yet

Stacey Abrams is not conceding. That’s what she said at a press conference in Atlanta on Friday. “This is not a speech of concession,” she told supporters and reporters, “because concession means an action is right, true, or proper. As a woman of conscience and faith, I cannot concede that.” But the former Georgia state representative and Democratic nominee for governor did essentially end her ca

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Julian Assange Charges, Japan's Top Cybersecurity Official, and More Security News This Week

Safer browsing, more bitcoin scams, and the rest of the week's top security news.

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Ugens debat: Hvorfor får datacentrene lov at ligge, hvor de vil?

Ingeniøren skrev i sidste uge, at overskudsvarme fra de kommende datacentre på dansk jord trods politikernes løfter ikke vil blive sendt ud i fjernvarmenettet. Den melding skabte bred forargelse blandt læserne på ing.dk, som efterlyste politiske krav til it-giganterne.

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Matt Haig: 'I wanted to end it all, but surviving and thriving is the lesson I pass on'

At 24, he wanted to kill himself. Now a novelist, he teaches the readers of his books – and his children – how to get through when the future looks bleak On a September day in Ibiza, the air scented with sea and pine, Matt Haig – then 24 – walked to a cliff edge planning to kill himself. He stopped one step away. Reasons to Stay Alive , his account of this unravelling, the strange hell of depress

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How to eat healthy when the munchies strike

DIY Keep snacking under control. A desire to eat well can’t stand up against the munchies, a marijuana-induced craving for unhealthy foods. Here’s how to control your snacking when that urge hits.

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How Can Science Help Reverse Blindness?

From bionic eyes to gene editing, how can we use science to bring back sight? — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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The 30-Year Reign of Lunchables

Lunchables have existed on this Earth for far longer than the young children who devour them. In fact, if Lunchables were people, they would be old enough to be those children’s parents. This year, Lunchables turns 30, and the widely beloved (if sub-optimally nutritious) compartmentalized meals are as popular as ever. Though the brand started as a clever way to repurpose bologna, which began losi

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How to Almost Learn Italian

Late one chilly evening last September, I excused myself from a small group huddled around a campfire to peck at and mumble into my phone. No way was a camping trip going to make me miss my Italian lesson. For most of the preceding year, I had religiously attended to my 15-minute-or-so daily encounters with the language-learning app Duolingo. I used it on trains, while walking across town, during

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Does 'Maniac' Really Need So Many Dream Sequences?

They're fun, but they're also a bit much.

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The 13 Best STEM Toys for Kids That Will Make Learning Fun

We found math-filled and science-rich books, puzzles, coding kits, and more from brands including Amazon, Crayola, and Lego.

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Don't Make Me One with Everything

The mystical doctrine of oneness has creepy implications — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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How Do Squirrels Remember Where They Buried Their Nuts?

Nut-obsessed squirrels might be smarter than you think.

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Smoke Days Are Now California's Snow Days

The particulates in smoke don’t destroy homes. They don’t down trees. But in the case of wildfires, smoke’s impacts—and dangers—can reach hundreds of miles further than the flames themselves. As of Friday evening, the Camp Fire raging in Butte County, north of the San Francisco Bay Area, has a death toll of 71 and has left more than 1,000 people unaccounted for. The fire’s smoke, meanwhile, has b

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When Losing Your Job Is a Blessing

Tim Chen had recently been laid off from his job as a financial analyst at a hedge fund, during the recession of 2008, when his sister asked him for help finding a good credit card. Much of the information he found online was confusing and disorganized, so he decided to start a personal-finance website; it would go on to become NerdWallet, which is now worth $500 million and employs almost 350 pe

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NASA astronomer Michelle Thaller on ​the multiple dimensions of space and human sexuality

Why can't we have a human-sized cat tree? What would happen if you got a spoonful of a neutron star? Why do we insist on dividing our wonderfully complex selves into boring little boxes None This morning on the way to the school bus, my almost 11 year old son was explaining to me that if you shrunk an elephant down to the size of a mouse, it would shiver, then die, because of its slow mitochondri

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15 Early Black Friday (2018) Tech Deals: Echo, Dyson, OLED

Whet your appetite for holiday shopping with some of our favorite early Black Friday picks, from TVs and tablets to vacuums and more.

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The Best of the Physics arXiv (week ending November 17, 2018

This week’s most thought-provoking papers from the Physics arXiv.

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Genetics Start-Up Wants to Sequence People's Genomes for Free

The new service lets consumers contribute to medical research, but still poses privacy concerns — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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The Family Weekly: Why Everyone You Know Is Hosting a ‘Friendsgiving’

This Week in Family For most of the history of American Thanksgiving, it’s been considered a day to spend with family, but in recent years, a twist on the centuries-old holiday has exploded in popularity among young adults: “Friendsgiving.” On the weekend before Thanksgiving, or perhaps the weekend prior, a group of friends convene for a potluck-style meal. As the Atlantic staff writer Ashley Fet

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Sumatran elephant found dead with missing tusks in Indonesia

A Sumatran elephant has been found dead with its tusks removed in an apparent poaching case targeting the critically endangered animal, an Indonesian conservation official said Friday.

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Italy's 'anti-Netflix' law to protect film industry

Italy is to introduce an obligatory delay between Italian films screening in cinemas and being shown on streaming services like Netflix, in a bid to protect its domestic film industry.

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Rare Sumatran tiger rescued from beneath shop in Indonesia

A rare Sumatran tiger that was trapped beneath the floor of a shop for three days has been rescued, an Indonesian official said Saturday.

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Vale ordered to pay tribes $26.8 mn over river contamination

A Brazil appeals court on Friday ordered mining giant Vale to pay two indigenous tribes $26.8 million over river contamination that harmed public health, the prosecutors' office said Friday.

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Excavators find tombs buried in Bolivia 500 years ago

Archaeologists say they found tombs at a Bolivian quarry containing remains from more than 500 years ago that give an insight into the interaction of various peoples with the expanding Inca empire.

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Fight over dinosaur fossils comes down to what's a mineral

About 66 million years after two dinosaurs died apparently locked in battle on the plains of modern-day Montana, an unusual fight over who owns the entangled fossils has become a multimillion-dollar issue that hinges on the legal definition of "mineral."

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Space station supplies launched, 2nd shipment in 2 days

A load of space station supplies rocketed into orbit from Virginia on Saturday, the second shipment in two days.

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New space industry emerges: on-orbit servicing

Imagine an airport where thousands of planes, empty of fuel, are left abandoned on the tarmac. That is what has been happening for decades with satellites that circle the Earth.

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The Next Data Mine Is Your Bedroom

It’s a familiar feeling: Type something into Google’s search bar, and then start seeing ads for it everywhere. Sometimes, you don’t even need to search—Google’s already triangulated your desires based on your emails, your demographics, your location. Now, that familiarity stands to get a lot more intimate. With a fascinating pair of new patents for smart home technology, Google is hoping users wi

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How America’s First Women Voters Lost the Franchise

In an interview Wednesday with the Daily Caller , President Trump made two startling assertions regarding voter fraud. The first was that you need a voter ID card to buy cereal. It’s the kind of claim that is called “unsubstantiated” when it is made by the president, and would be called “absolutely bananas” if it were made by your uncle instead. (Bananas, incidentally, are something else the pres

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Make Thanksgiving Taste Like the Future With This Freeze-Dried Apple Pie

Rising-star chef Eric Rivera has an easy way to up your holiday game: using powdered freeze-dried foods to amplify the flavors in your favorite recipes.

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Machine Learning Can Create Fake ‘Master Key’ Fingerprints

Researchers have refined a technique to create so-called DeepMasterPrints, fake fingerprints designed to get past security.

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The Promise of (Practically) ‘Serverless Computing’

There still servers, but this cloud computing approach lets you turn services on and off more quickly and pay only for what you use.

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One of the fathers of AI is worried about its future

Yoshua Bengio wants to stop talk of an AI arms race and make the technology more accessible to the developing world.

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Scores arrested as thousands block London bridges in climate rebellion

Protesters close five main bridges across Thames over extinction crisis in huge act of peaceful civil disobedience Forty-five people have been arrested as thousands of demonstrators occupied five bridges in central London to voice their concern over the looming climate crisis. Protesters including families and pensioners began massing on five of London’s main bridges from 10am on Saturday. An hou

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Eyeing echidnas: Study models echidna forelimbs to help shed new light on mammal evolution

These days, mammals can use their forelimbs to swim, jump, fly, climb, dig and just about everything in between, but the question of how all that diversity evolved has remained a vexing one for scientists.

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Jorden er våd fra yderst til inderst

Jorden indeholder mange gange mere vand, end der findes i oceanerne. Det meste stammer fra proto­planeter og asteroider, en mindre del fra den overskydende gassky efter dannelsen af Solen.

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Ideology drives us apart. Neuroscience can bring us back together.

How can we reach out to people on the other side of the divide? Get to know the other person as a human being before you get to know them as a set of tribal political beliefs, says Sarah Ruger. Don't launch straight into the difficult topics—connect on a more basic level first. To bond, use icebreakers backed by neuroscience and psychology: Share a meal, watch some comedy, see awe-inspiring art,

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Betsy DeVos’s Sexual-Assault Rules Would Let the Accused Cross-Examine Accusers

On Friday, the Education Department released its heavily anticipated proposal that would revamp the way colleges deal with accusations of sexual misconduct on campus. Many of the details in the proposed regulation did not come as a surprise. Still, one feature of the rules in particular stood out: Colleges will be required to allow students accused of sexual assault to cross-examine their accuser

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What a New Crop of Veteran-Lawmakers Means for Democrats

Freshman orientation on Capitol Hill can be a blur: There’s the class photo, the rundown of ethics rules, the caucus meetings, the dinners. But after a grueling election season, there are highlights, too—and for Chrissy Houlahan, it was spending time with her “badasses.” That’s the moniker Houlahan and some of her fellow military and intelligence veterans in the freshman class gave to their text-

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Is a Spreadsheet’s Creator Liable for the Allegations It Contains?

Last month, the journalist Stephen Elliott filed a lawsuit against Moira Donegan. A year before, Donegan had created a shared Google spreadsheet that she titled “Shitty Media Men.” Then she invited women in her industry to add names to it; Elliott was among those named on the list. In “ A Lawsuit Tests the Limits of Anonymous Speech ,” I probed one question raised by the defamation case: Should E

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Mike Pence's Faith-Based Foreign Policy

As he sat beside the leader of a government that committed suspected genocide and jailed journalists who dared investigate the massacre, Mike Pence did something remarkable. Rather than speaking in Trumpian terms of narrow American interests, he employed the seemingly bygone, more universalist language of American values. With the cameras rolling, the U.S. vice president told Myanmar State Counse

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Statsbanernes nye isbryder er også passagerdamper

Med sin maskinkraft på 6.000 HK gør isbryderen ‘Holger Danske’ det muligt at forcere selv de største istykkelser, vi kan komme ud for i de danske farvande.

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Mindre forurening kan give københavnere et leveår mere i 2040

Københavnerne kan i gennemsnit få et helt leveår mere i 2040, hvis luftforureningen…

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En sjælden natursucces: Flere bjerggorillaer i tågeskovene

Efter at have været tæt på at blive udslettet bliver der nu stadig flere af de store menneskeaber.

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Rar støj, uldsokker og havregryn: Hack dine sanser og sov bedre

Ved at manipulere med dine fem sanser, kan du få en bedre nattesøvn, forklarer forsker.

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New inhibitor which blocks inflammation could also treat sepsis

Scientists from the University of Sheffield have discovered a new inhibitor which decreases lung inflammation and could hold the key to treating Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome — a life-threatening disease which affects thousands of people in the UK.

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Omega-3 fatty acids reduce the risk of premature birth

A new review has found that increasing the intake of omega-3 long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LCPUFA) during pregnancy reduces the risk of premature births.

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Scientists just voted to change the definition of a kilogram

The new definition of a kilogram is based on a physical constant in quantum physics. Unlike the current definition of a kilogram, this measurement will never change. Scientists also voted to update the definitions of several other measurements in physics. Since 1889, the definition of a kilogram has been the mass of one particular chunk of platinum-iridium alloy called the International Prototype

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Majority of HIV persistence during ART due to infected cell proliferation

Study confirms biological mechanism responsible for latent HIV reservoirs; suggests strategies for a functional HIV cure.

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New way to look at cell membranes could change the way we study disease

Researchers have developed a new technique to analyze cell membrane proteins in situ which could revolutionize the way in which we study diseases, such as cancer, metabolic and heart diseases.

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Severe eczema may best be treated by allergy shots

A medically-challenging case found that allergy shots provided significant benefits to the eczema symptoms suffered by a 48-year-old man.

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Safest way to dine out for those with food allergies is using up to 15 strategies

New research examined what tools people who have food allergies use to prevent allergic reactions at restaurants.

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The Kilogram Is Dead. Long Live the Kilogram!

After a vote (and a century of research), the standard measure for mass is redefined, and the long reign of Le Grand K is ended.

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How Did the 'Freedom From Facebook' Campaign Get Its Start?

Facebook hired an opposition firm to fight the initiative, which was funded by hedge fund millionaire David Magerman.

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Why Jim Acosta Got His Pass Back

The books have undoubtedly been taken down from the shelves of Island Trees High School and Island Trees Junior High: well-thumbed copies of popular 1960s books including The Fixer by Bernard Malamud and Soul on Ice by Eldridge Cleaver, they were probably sold long ago to a used-book outlet. But they (or rather the empty spaces on library shelves they left) stand for a principle that is important

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The Atlantic Daily: Nobody Enjoys Recounts. But Here’s Why They’re Important.

What We’re Following Delayed Gratification: Confused about the recounts ongoing for the Senate and agricultural-commissioner races in Florida? First, know that recounts, however painful, are a legitimate part of the electoral process, and it’s rare that recounts reverse the initial result— though such reversals have happened. Speaking of things that are ongoing: Democratic candidates have been fl

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Cool Description of How to Collect Neural Signals for Experiments

submitted by /u/ScienTecht [link] [comments]

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PNW woodlands will be less vulnerable to drought, fire than Rocky Mountain, Sierra forests

Forests in the Pacific Northwest will be less vulnerable to drought and fire over the next three decades than those in the Rocky Mountains and Sierra Nevada, computer modeling shows.

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Newborn babies' brain responses to being touched on the face measured for the first time

A newborn baby's brain responds to being touched on the face, according to new research. Babies use this sense of touch — facial somatosensation — to find and latch onto their mother's nipple, and should have this ability from birth. Premature babies often have difficulty feeding, and underdevelopment of their facial sensitivity may be one of the main causes.

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Color coded: Matching taste with color

Color can impact the taste of food, and our experiences and expectations can affect how we taste food, according to Penn State researchers, who suggest this may have implications for how food and beverage industries should market their products.

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Google Maps data could help you avoid Thanksgiving crowds on the road—and at the liquor store

Technology Go get the cake before you get that bottle of wine. Google knows how you spent last Thanksgiving.

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Treated superalloys demonstrate unprecedented heat resistance

Researchers have discovered how to make 'superalloys' even more super, extending useful life by thousands of hours. The discovery could improve materials performance for electrical generators and nuclear reactors.

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Different types of physical activity offer varying protection against heart disease

While it is well known that physical activity is important for heart health, neither research nor recommendations consistently differentiate between the benefits of different types of physical activity. New research found that while all physical activity is beneficial, static activities — such as strength training– were more strongly associated with reducing heart disease risks than dynamic acti

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Radio Atlantic: Florida Flashbacks

Subscribe to Radio Atlantic: Apple Podcasts | Spotify | Stitcher | Google Play The midterms were over a week ago, but a number of races have yet to be called. In Florida, the senate and governor elections have both come down to a recount, and accusations of vote-tampering are flying. On this week’s show, Alex Wagner sat down with staff writer Isaac Dovere to understand what’s going on, and then t

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Space Photos of the Week: A Star Is Born After Gases Crash

Stellar nurseries seem cute, but they’re actually mini-Big Bangs.

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How Parents Influence Kids’ Gender Roles

“In our home, I take on a lot of responsibilities that previous generations would have scoffed at,” says Whit Honea, a co-founder of Dads 4 Change . In a new episode of Home School , The Atlantic ’s animated series about parenting, Honea explains why, in a culture where outdated gender stereotypes are “very much alive,” parents shouldn’t dictate gender roles to their children. “By no means do I w

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Dodging antibiotic resistance by curbing bacterial evolution

Lowering mutation rates in harmful bacteria might be an as yet untried way to hinder the emergence of antimicrobial pathogens. One target for drug development might be a protein factor, DNA translocase Mfd, that enables bacteria to evolve rapidly by promoting mutations in many different bacterial species. This action speeds antibiotic resistance, including multi-drug resistance. Working on drugs t

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A new lead on a 50-year-old radiation damage mystery

For half a century, researchers have seen loops of displaced atoms appearing inside nuclear reactor steel after exposure to radiation, but no one could work out how.

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Forced examination: How the free speech of others benefits us all

A majority of Americans believe we should protect people from deleterious ideas and speech. This belief may harm us, both as individuals and as a society, by ironically strengthening the very ideas that do us harm. Forced examination provides a means by which we can strengthen our own ideas while weeding the harmful ones from society, but it only works with free expression for everyone. In a rece

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What Diane Greene's Departure Means for Google Cloud

Google trails Amazon and Microsoft in the business of renting computing power to other businesses.

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Eyeing echidnas

Using a highly-detailed musculoskeletal model of an echidna forelimb, Harvard scientists are not only shedding new light on how the little-studied echidna's forelimb works, but are also opening a window into understanding how extinct mammals might have used their forelimbs.

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From the ashes of a failed pain drug, a new therapeutic path emerges

A surprising discovery about a failed pain drug — and specifically, the pathway it targets, BH4 — could have implications for autoimmunity and cancer. Neuroscientists report that BH4 also functions as a kind of immunological thermostat, raising and lowering the activity levels of T cells. Inhibiting BH4 could relieve atopic dermatitis, psoriasis, lupus, polyarthritis and inflammatory bowel disea

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Overflowing crater lakes carved canyons across Mars

Today, most of the water on Mars is locked away in frozen ice caps. But billions of years ago it flowed freely across the surface, forming rushing rivers that emptied into craters, forming lakes and seas. New research has found evidence that sometimes the lakes would take on so much water that they overflowed and burst from the sides of their basins, creating catastrophic floods that carved canyon

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Why a federal judge ordered White House to restore Jim Acosta's press badge

Acosta will be allowed to return to the White House on Friday. The judge described the ruling as narrow, and didn't rule one way or the other on violations of the First Amendment. The case is still open, and the administration may choose to appeal the ruling. A federal judge has ordered the White House to reinstate the press credentials of CNN reporter Jim Acosta, marking a legal victory for the

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Zhores Medvedev, 93, Dissident Scientist Who Felt Moscow’s Boot, Is Dead

A biologist and writer who dared to challenge Soviet pseudoscience, he was declared insane, confined to an institution and stripped of his citizenship.

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Voyager 2 Creeps Closer to the Edge of the Solar System

Going, going — nope, it's still just going, NASA says of its Voyager 2 probe, which the agency realized was approaching the edge of the solar system back in early October.

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The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: Acosta’d

Written by Elaine Godfrey ( @elainejgodfrey ) and Olivia Paschal ( @oliviacpaschal ) Today in 5 Lines President Donald Trump told reporters that he has finished writing answers to questions from Special Counsel Robert Mueller, and said he wasn’t “agitated” by the probe. A federal judge ruled that the Trump administration must reinstate the CNN correspondent Jim Acosta’s press pass, but did not ex

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The 2018 Leonid Meteor Shower Peaks This Weekend! Here's What to Expect

Come early Sunday morning (Nov. 18), the famous Leonid meteor shower will reach its peak, with lesser numbers expected on the preceding and following mornings.

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California's Deadliest Fire Is Seen Engulfing Paradise in 'Astonishing' Satellite Images

Only 4 hours after it started, the Camp Fire was ravaging Paradise, California.

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Trump to Nominate Andrew Wheeler for EPA Head

If confirmed, the acting administrator and former coal lobbyist will permanently replace former boss Scott Pruitt.

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Voting is Open to Name Ganglion Type 5to!

Today the ballots were sent to 3,000 Eyewirers who contributed at least 50 cubes that led to the discovery of six new types of Ganglion Cells! Right now, players around the world are choosing the official name for a third type of new neuron. The contending names are… The first neuron type named by Eyewirers is named Theia, after the Titaness of the shining blue light of the sky. The second is nam

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Machine learning, meet quantum computing

A quantum version of the building block behind neural networks could be exponentially more powerful.

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Majority of HIV persistence during ART due to infected cell proliferation

Study confirms biological mechanism responsible for latent HIV reservoirs; suggests strategies for a functional HIV cure.

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What's next for smart homes: An 'Internet of Ears?'

A pair of electrical engineering and computer science professors have been experimenting with a new suite of smart-home sensors. Their system would read not only the vibrations, sounds — and even the specific gait, or other movements — associated with people and animals in a building, but also any subtle changes in the existing ambient electrical field.

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Auroras unlock the physics of energetic processes in space

A close study of auroras has revealed new ways of understanding the physics of explosive energy releases in space.

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Eyewire Release Report 11/16/2018

Happy Friday! To give you a comprehensive picture of everything new on Eyewire, here are all changes since the last report a few weeks ago. Scythes: there is now a new tab for you in your completed cell notifications. Click “Cubes” on the top left (next to “Stats”), and you can view more detailed information about your reaped cubes, reaping accuracy, and any nuked SCs. We’ve fixed a bug where run

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Dry cleaning is dirtier than you think. Meet the neurotoxin hiding in your winter coat.

Health Freshly-laundered clothes mask an environmental and social blight. Many American dry cleaners are still dependent on PERC, a dangerous chemical linked to cancer, neurological issues, and environmental damage.

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Mexico says 48 manatee deaths due to heat, algae blooms

Mexican environmental authorities say a combination of hot weather, drought and toxic algae blooms contributed to the deaths of 48 manatees in the Gulf coast state of Tabasco this summer.

12d

From the ashes of a failed pain drug, a new therapeutic path emerges

A surprising discovery about a failed pain drug — and specifically, the pathway it targets, BH4 — could have implications for autoimmunity and cancer. Neuroscientists at Boston Children's Hospital and immunologists from IMBA in Vienna report that BH4 also functions as a kind of immunological thermostat, raising and lowering the activity levels of T cells. Inhibiting BH4 could relieve atopic derm

12d

How head injuries lead to serious brain diseases

Biologists reveal the hidden molecular basis of brain disorders and provide the first cell atlas of the hippocampus — the part of the brain that helps regulate learning and memory — as it is affected by traumatic brain injury. The researchers propose gene candidates for treating brain diseases associated with traumatic brain injury such as Alzheimer's disease and post-traumatic stress disorder.

12d

Why we shouldn't like coffee, but we do

The more sensitive people are to the bitter taste of caffeine, the more coffee they drink, reports a new study. The sensitivity is based on genetics. Bitterness is natural warning system to protect us from harmful substances, so we really shouldn't like coffee. Scientists say people with heightened ability to detect coffee's bitterness learn to associate good things with it.

12d

Electronic skin points the way north

Researchers have developed an electronic skin (e-skin) with magnetosensitive capabilities, sensitive enough to detect and digitize body motion in the Earth's magnetic field. As this e-skin is extremely thin and malleable, it can easily be affixed to human skin to create a bionic analog of a compass. This might not only help people with orientation issues, but also facilitate interaction with objec

12d

Better ways to improve the chances of survival of children with a rare immune deficiency

A new study shows that the genotype of a child with severe combined immune deficiency (SCID) affects his survival rate after stem cell transplantation from an unrelated donor.

12d

Photos of the Week: Metal Bull, First Snow, Raging Wildfires

A fireworks festival in Burma, a rocket launch in India, political turmoil in Sri Lanka, early Christmas decorations, Central American immigrants trek north through Mexico, observations of the 100th anniversary of the end of World War I, starlings over Rome, an Allosaurus in Paris, wintry scenes in northern China, and much more

12d

Kilogram Redefined. The Metric System Overhaul Is Complete

The platinum-iridium cylinder has been scrapped, and the kilogram will now be determined by the Planck constant.

12d

Communal rearing gives mice a competitive edge

Scientists suggest that being raised communally makes mice more competitive when they're older. It is well known that in many animals, including humans, early-life experiences have long-lasting effects on the development of behaviors later in life. Researchers have investigated the effects of communal rearing on competitive and exploratory behaviors in adult male house mice.

12d

Scorpion venom to shuttle drugs into the brain

Biologists have described the capacity of a small protein (a peptide) derived from chlorotoxin, found in scorpion venom (Giant Yellow Israeli scorpion), to carry drugs across the blood-brain barrier (BBB).

12d

Android child's face strikingly expressive

Android faces must express greater emotion if robots are to interact with humans more effectively. Researchers tackled this challenge as they upgraded their android child head, named Affetto. They precisely examined Affetto's facial surface points and the precise balancing of different forces necessary to achieve more human-like motion. Through mechanical measurements and mathematical modeling, th

12d

Insect antibiotic provides new way to eliminate bacteria

An antibiotic called thanatin attacks the way the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria is built. Researchers have now found out that this happens through a previously unknown mechanism. Thanatin, produced naturally by the spined soldier bug, can therefore be used to develop new classes of antibiotics.

12d

Resistant bacteria: Can raw vegetables and salad pose a health risk?

Salad is popular with people who want to maintain a balanced and healthy diet. Salad varieties are often offered for sale ready-cut and film-packaged. It is known that these types of fresh produce may be contaminated with bacteria that are relevant from the point of view of hygiene. Researchers have now shown that these bacteria may also harbor bacteria that are resistant to antibiotics.

12d

Killer whales share personality traits with humans, chimpanzees

Killer whales display personality traits similar to those of humans and chimpanzees, such as playfulness, cheerfulness and affection, according to new research.

12d

Feeling the pressure with universal tactile imaging

Researchers developed a universal tactile imaging technology for pressure distribution measurement using a coupled conductor pair. An image processing approach based on tomography was then used to relate the pressure distribution to the conductors' contact resistance. Mechatronics technology enabled development of flexible sensors using conventional conductive materials. These sensors undergo simp

12d

A new lead on a 50-year-old radiation damage mystery

For half a century, researchers have seen loops of displaced atoms appearing inside nuclear reactor steel after exposure to radiation, but no one could work out how.

12d

Drug resistant infections associated with higher in-hospital mortality rates in India

In one of the largest studies to measure the burden of antibiotic resistance in a low- or middle-income country, researchers at the Center for Disease Dynamics, Economics & Policy report that in-hospital mortality is significantly higher among patients infected with multi-drug resistant (MDR) or extensively drug resistant (XDR) pathogens including Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, Klebsiell

12d

Russia stages first Soyuz launch since accident

A Russian Soyuz rocket with a cargo vessel blasted off Friday in the first launch to the International Space Station (ISS) since a manned accident last month.

12d

A new lead on a 50-year-old radiation damage mystery

For half a century, researchers have seen loops of displaced atoms appearing inside nuclear reactor steel after exposure to radiation, but no one could work out how.

12d

Organizations with broad social ties help recovering from natural disasters

Communities recovering from natural disasters often see an increase in the number of businesses and non-profits that develop in the wake of the cleanup, but that apparent growth doesn't necessarily counterweigh the accompanying rise in poverty levels in areas transformed by events such as storms, earthquakes and wildfires.

12d

Warmer, Wetter Than Usual Winter Headed for Much of US

Just over half of the United States has no need to fear a frigid, frozen winter in the coming months — instead, they'll likely experience a warmer and wetter winter than usual, according to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA)

12d

Dodging antibiotic resistance by curbing bacterial evolution

With many disease-causing bacteria ratcheting up their shields against current drugs, new tactics are vital to protect people from treatment-resistant infections.

12d

Selling plants on Amazon: A forest of untapped opportunity

A first-of-its-kind study out of Kansas State University examined the the untapped market for selling plants online by horticultural businesses.

12d

Color coded—matching taste with color

Color can impact the taste of food, and our experiences and expectations can affect how we taste food, according to Penn State researchers, who suggest this may have implications for how food and beverage industries should market their products.

12d

Treated superalloys demonstrate unprecedented heat resistance

Researchers at Idaho National Laboratory have discovered how to make "superalloys" even more super, extending useful life by thousands of hours. The discovery could improve materials performance for electrical generators and nuclear reactors. The key is to heat and cool the superalloy in a specific way. That creates a microstructure within the material that can withstand high heat more than six ti

12d

Water may be an inevitable result of the process that forms rocky planets

A lot of Earth's water is asteroidal in origin, but some of it may come from dissolved solar nebula gas. Our planet hides majority of its water inside: two oceans in the mantle and 4–5 in the core. New reason to suspect that water is abundant throughout the universe. Scientists have puzzled for some time over how the Earth first acquired water. Some have theorized it arrived in cometary ice, or p

12d

NASA catches Tropical Cyclone Gaja's landfall

Caught in the act of landfall, Tropical Cyclone Gaja was seen by NASA's Aqua satellite as it passed overhead and collected temperature information.

12d

Trump Says He’ll Nominate Andrew Wheeler to Head the E.P.A.

The president made the announcement while leading a Presidential Medal of Freedom ceremony at the White House.

12d

Dodging antibiotic resistance by curbing bacterial evolution

Lowering mutation rates in harmful bacteria might be an as yet untried way to hinder the emergence of antimicrobial pathogens. One target for drug development might be a protein factor, DNA translocase Mfd, that enables bacteria to evolve rapidly by promoting mutations in many different bacterial species. This action speeds antibiotic resistance, including multi-drug resistance. Working on drugs t

12d

Selling plants on Amazon: A forest of untapped opportunity

The purpose of this study was to determine the extent to which horticultural businesses were directly selling live plant products online, either through Amazon, Ebay, or from their own websites.

12d

Research Building Burns Down in Woolsey Fire

The structure was the cornerstone of a UCLA conservation science center.

12d

Elon Musk's SpaceX approved to launch 7,518 Starlink satellites into orbit

SpaceX plans to launch 1,600 satellites over the next few years, and to complete its full network over the next six. Blanketing the globe with wireless internet-providing satellites could have big implications for financial institutions and people in rural areas. Some are concerned about the proliferation of space debris in Earth's orbit. The Federal Communications Commissions has approved the la

12d

Humpback whales come to the Mediterranean to feed themselves

Although the presence of humpback whales in the Mediterranean has been considered unusual, it is known that their visits have increased in the last 150 years. A recent study indicates that what motivates these cetacean mammals to enter these waters is the search for food.

12d

Treated superalloys demonstrate unprecedented heat resistance

Researchers at Idaho National Laboratory have discovered how to make 'superalloys' even more super, extending useful life by thousands of hours. The discovery could improve materials performance for electrical generators and nuclear reactors.

12d

Making moves and memories, are they connected?

Researchers report the first direct evidence that the cerebellum does more than just control muscle activity. It also plays a role in cognitive functions.

12d

Bursting bubbles launch bacteria from water to air

A new study shows how bubbles contaminated with bacteria can act as tiny microbial grenades, bursting and launching microorganisms, including potential pathogens, out of the water and into the air.

12d

Astronomers detect once-in-a-lifetime gamma rays

It's not every day you get to observe a gamma-ray binary system. In fact, it's a once-in-a-lifetime experience comparable to seeing Halley's Comet or a solar eclipse.

12d

Animal populations are shrinking due to their high-risk food-finding strategies

A study using animal-attached technology to measure food consumption in four very different wild vertebrates has revealed that animals using a high-risk strategy to find rarer food are particularly susceptible to becoming extinct, as they fail to gather food for their young before they starve.

12d

'Smart skin' simplifies spotting strain in structures

A 'smart skin' employs the unique fluorescent characteristics of carbon nanotubes to quickly assess strain in materials. The method is intended for aircraft, spacecraft and critical infrastructures in which mechanical strain needs to be monitored.

12d

A bigger nose, a bigger bang: Size matters for ecoholocating toothed whales

A new study sheds light on how toothed whales adapted their sonar abilities to occupy different environments. The study shows that as animals grew bigger, they were able to put more energy into their echolocation sounds — but surprisingly, the sound energy increased much more than expected.

12d

Wild With: Bears (360 Video)

Ever wonder what it's like to stare down a Kodiak grizzly bear face-to-face in the woods? Put on a headset and feel her roar and see her massive height from a safe distance. VR360 is best viewed in a headset. On your phone: (1) tap the cardboard icon on the bottom right (2) place your phone into any VR viewer (3) Enjoy! For a more immersive experience download and watch on the Discovery VR app –

12d

Overflowing crater lakes carved canyons across Mars

Today, most of the water on Mars is locked away in frozen ice caps. But billions of years ago it flowed freely across the surface, forming rushing rivers that emptied into craters, forming lakes and seas. New research led by The University of Texas at Austin has found evidence that sometimes the lakes would take on so much water that they overflowed and burst from the sides of their basins, creati

12d

Newborn babies' brain responses to being touched on the face measured for the first time

A newborn baby's brain responds to being touched on the face, according to new research co-led by UCL.Babies use this sense of touch — facial somatosensation — to find and latch onto their mother's nipple, and should have this ability from birth.Premature babies often have difficulty feeding, and underdevelopment of their facial sensitivity may be one of the main causes.

12d

Overflowing crater lakes carved canyons across Mars

Today, most of the water on Mars is locked away in frozen ice caps. But billions of years ago it flowed freely across the surface, forming rushing rivers that emptied into craters, forming lakes and seas. New research led by The University of Texas at Austin has found evidence that sometimes the lakes would take on so much water that they overflowed and burst from the sides of their basins, creati

12d

Næsten halvdelen af danskerne sover dårligt: Anita går til søvn-psykolog

I fire år har Anita Knudsen haft søvnproblemer uden at vide hvorfor, men nu hjælper en søvnpsykolog hende tilbage til drømmeland.

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The New York Times is using AI to help digitize millions of archival photographs

Technology A collaborative project to bring the photographs stored in “the morgue” back to life. There are six to eight million photographs stored in the basement of The New York Times, soon they will see the light of day.

12d

Color coded — matching taste with color

Color can impact the taste of food, and our experiences and expectations can affect how we taste food, according to Penn State researchers, who suggest this may have implications for how food and beverage industries should market their products.

12d

Organizations with broad social ties help recovering from natural disasters

In order to encourage a wide economic recovery following a natural disaster, communities should think about activating advocacy organizations such as local environmental groups, political organizations and human-rights groups. New businesses alone, do not offset rise in post-disaster poverty levels.

12d

UCLA cell study reveals how head injuries lead to serious brain diseases

UCLA biologists reveal the hidden molecular basis of brain disorders and provide the first cell atlas of the hippocampus — the part of the brain that helps regulate learning and memory — as it is affected by traumatic brain injury. The researchers propose gene candidates for treating brain diseases associated with traumatic brain injury such as Alzheimer's disease and post-traumatic stress disor

12d

Engineered DNA-encoded PCSK9 inhibitors may provide an effective alternative for treating high cholesterol

Researchers have developed novel synthetic DNA-encoded monoclonal antibodies (DMAbs) directed against PCSK9, a protein key to regulating cholesterol levels in the bloodstream. Results of preclinical studies showed a significant cholesterol decrease, opening the door for further development of this approach as a simple, less frequent and cost-effective therapy.

12d

Drop your weapons!

It takes energy to make weapons, but it may take even more energy to maintain them. Because leaf-footed bugs drop their legs, it is possible to measure how much energy they allocate to maintaining this appendage that males use to fight other males.

12d

NASA catches Tropical Cyclone Gaja's landfall

Caught in the act of landfall, Tropical Cyclone Gaja was seen by NASA's Aqua satellite as it passed overhead and collected temperature information.

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