Search Posts

Nyheder2018november18

 

Researchers discover a new gear in life's clock: Vitamin D

Researchers at Portland State University discover that vitamin D plays a key role in embryonic development in vertebrates and by blocking vitamin D in embryos of zebrafish, researchers were able to induce dormancy in a species that doesn't enter dormancy. The discovery could have major implications in human health research.

9d

Study finds 45 minutes of patient education improves chronic disease management

The Other 45 directed its efforts to an underserved community, noting the population's higher rates of chronic disease coupled with less exposure and access to accurate health information. By the end of the third visit, patients reported increased confidence in navigating the healthcare system, self-monitoring and insight, and skill and technique acquisition. They also reported decreased emotional

9d

Letters: ‘The Future of American Prosperity in the Next Century Is at Stake’

Amazon Decides on HQ2 Last week, Amazon announced that its second headquarters would be split between Northern Virginia and New York City. In articles for TheAtlantic.com, Alana Semuels and Derek Thompson unpacked what the decision—and the corporate-giveaway culture that enabled it—tells us about American cities and their future. Amazon’s choice to build in two large metropolitan areas, Semuels a

9d

The Tragedy of the Commons, Revisited

A classic study of the perils of resource sharing, with implications for how we deal with climate, has been updated — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

9d

Learning about Science Is a Human Right

A concerted effort by museums and other institutions is helping bring science to the public — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

9d

Termites in Brazil have covered an area the size of Britain in mounds

A vast network of termite tunnels and 2.5-metre-tall mounds that covers 230,000 square kilometres may be the biggest engineered structure built by an insect

9d

Silencing a gene may prevent deadly high bloody pressure in pregnancy

Pre-eclampsia affects up to 10 per cent of pregnancies and can have serious complications. A single injection may one day be enough to treat the condition

9d

Complex stone tools in China may re-write our species’ ancient history

A cache of sophisticated stone tools from a cave in China date back 170,000 years – perhaps a sign that our species arrived in East Asia earlier than we thought

9d

Insole is step forward in healing diabetic foot ulcers

Researchers have developed a shoe insole that could help make the healing process more portable for the 15 percent of Americans who develop ulcers as a result of diabetes. Diabetes can lead to foot ulcers that patients don’t feel or notice until it’s too late. Because they can’t heal on their own, 14 to 24 percent of diabetics in the US who get ulcers end up losing toes, a foot, or a leg. “One of

9d

Teens increasingly choose pot over alcohol, cigarettes

The 'gateway pattern' of adolescent substance use is changing, and marijuana is increasingly the first substance in the sequence of adolescent drug use. Traditionally, students experiment with cigarettes and alcohol before cannabis, but since 2006, less than 50 percent of adolescents try cigarettes and alcohol before they try cannabis for the first time.

9d

‘Like a Terror Movie’: How Climate Change Will Cause More Simultaneous Disasters

By the end of this century, some parts of the world could face as many as six climate-related crises at the same time, researchers have concluded.

9d

What Is Virotherapy?

Viruses are now being developed to attack cancer cells. Here's how they work.

9d

NASA's InSight Mars Lander Touches Down Next Week

The $850 million mission will be the first to land on the Red Planet in more than 6 years — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

9d

NRL demonstrates new non-mechanical laser steering technology

Steerable electro-evanescent optical refractor (SEEOR) chips take laser light in the mid-wavelength infrared (MWIR) as an input and steers the beam at the output in two dimensions without the need for mechanical devices.

9d

High risk of death in the year after ICU discharge; more hospital days linked to higher mortality

Nearly one in five intensive care unit (ICU) survivors die within one year, and increased hospital use is among the factors associated with a higher risk of death, reports a UK population-based study in the January 2019 issue of Critical Care Medicine, the official journal of the Society of Critical Care Medicine (SCCM). Critical Care Medicine is published in the Lippincott portfolio by Wolters Kl

9d

Astronomers discover giant relic of disrupted 'tadpole' galaxy

A team of astronomers led by TAU's Dr. Noah Brosch has identified a disrupted galaxy resembling a giant tadpole, complete with an elliptical head and a long, straight tail, about 300 million light years away from Earth. The discovery illuminates how and why galaxies disappear.

9d

Bio jet fuels good for the climate, but technologies need tweaking

As much as 20 per cent of jet fuel burned in Norway in 2030 could be biofuel made from the country's forest residues. This alone could cut greenhouse gas emissions from Norway's aviation sector by 17 per cent.

9d

From receptor structure to new osteoporosis drugs

Researchers at the University of Zurich have determined the three-dimensional structure of a receptor that controls the release of calcium from bones. The receptor is now one of the main candidates for developing new drugs to treat osteoporosis. Knowing the receptor's blueprint will be instrumental for designing drugs that could even help to rebuild bones.

9d

Healthcare providers — not hackers — leak more of your data

New research from Michigan State University and Johns Hopkins University found that more than half of the recent personal health information, or PHI, data breaches were because of internal issues with medical providers — not because of hackers or external parties.

9d

Study reveals importance of 'cryptic connections' in disease transmission

A new study of disease transmission in bats has broad implications for understanding the hidden connections that can spread diseases between species and lead to large-scale outbreaks.

9d

RNAi therapy mitigates preeclampsia symptoms in UMass Medical School study

A collaboration of scientists including Anastasia Khvorova, Ph.D., from the University of Massachusetts Medical School, have shown that an innovative new type of therapy using small interfering RNAs (siRNA) can temper the symptoms of preeclampsia in an animal model. The research suggests that RNA interference therapy could be a potential strategy for the treatment of preeclampsia in humans.

9d

Seeing is believing: Monitoring real time changes during cell division

Scientist have cast new light on the behaviour of tiny hair-like structures called cilia found on almost every cell in the body. Cilia play important roles in human development and disease. Akin to tiny antennae, they act as cell timers keeping the brakes on cell division until the right growth cues are received. Malfunction of cilia leads to many human diseases such as polycystic kidney disease a

9d

Cosmic serpent

The VISIR instrument on ESO's Very Large Telescope has captured this stunning image of a newly discovered massive triple star system. Nicknamed Apep after an ancient Egyptian deity, this may be the first ever gamma-ray burst progenitor found.

9d

How the brain switches between different sets of rules

An MIT study has found that a region of the thalamus is key to the process of switching between the rules required for different contexts, an ability known as cognitive flexibility.

9d

Researchers discover how 'cryptic' connections in disease transmission influence epidemics

A new study by researchers of disease transmission in bats has broad implications for understanding hidden connections that can spread diseases between species and lead to large-scale outbreaks.

9d

Spectacular star system discovered which could explode in powerful cosmic firework display

A spectacular star system wrapped in an elegant spiral dust cloud has been discovered by astronomers. The system is believed to contain a star that is spinning extremely fast, which could produce one of the most powerful explosions in the universe.

9d

Greenhouse gasses triggering more changes than we can handle

A new study published in Nature Climate Change provides one of the most comprehensive assessments yet of how humanity is being impacted by the simultaneous occurrence of multiple climate hazards strengthened by increasing greenhouse gas emissions. This research reveals that society faces a much larger threat from climate change than previous studies have suggested.

9d

Local drivers of amplified Arctic warming

IBS scientists show that in terms of the cause of the Arctic amplification, local greenhouse gas concentrations, and Arctic climate feedbacks outweigh other processes. This study disproves the previously suggested hypotheses, that emphasized the role of transport of heat from the tropics to the poles as one of the key contributors to the amplified warming in the Arctic.

9d

Antarctic melting slows atmospheric warming and speeds sea level rise

Current climate models do not include the effects on the global climate of melting ice from Antarctica. The new research is the first to project how the melting of the Antarctic ice sheet will affect future climate. The researchers found that the entire Earth will continue warming, but the atmosphere will warm more slowly because more of the heat will be trapped in the ocean.

9d

The 'Swiss Army knife of prehistoric tools' found in Asia, suggests homegrown technology

A study by an international team of researchers, including from the University of Washington, determines that carved stone tools, also known as Levallois cores, were used in Asia 80,000 to 170,000 years ago. With the find — and absent human fossils linking the tools to migrating populations — researchers believe people in Asia developed the technology independently, evidence of similar sets of s

9d

Firearms more likely to be stored unsafely in households if adults misuse alcohol

Firearm injuries and deaths among children are a public health issue. This study used telephone survey data from 5,200 people in Washington to describe how common firearms were in households with children in the state and to assess the association between children living in a home with a firearm stored unsafely and an adult who reported misusing alcohol.

9d

Association of air pollutant at mothers' homes during pregnancy, risk of autism spectrum disorder in kids

In a study of estimated exposure to air pollution at mothers' homes during pregnancy, 1 of 3 airborne pollutants was associated with increased risk of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) in children in a Canadian metropolitan area with relatively low ambient air pollution levels. What causes ASD isn't known but some previous research has suggested environmental contaminants and air pollution may be pot

9d

Dementia associated with most deaths of older adults with down syndrome

Older adults with Down syndrome are at increased risk for developing dementia. This study examined the effect of dementia on death rates in adults with Down syndrome in the United Kingdom. The study included 211 adults, of whom 66 had dementia with an average age at diagnosis of 52. Over the 5 ½-year study period, 27 adults died, 70 percent of whom had dementia, and their average age at death was

9d

Intimate partner violence, sexual assault, PTSD associated with women's experience of menopause

A history of intimate partner violence or sexual assault and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms are common among midlife and older women and are associated with women's experience of menopause.

9d

Two thirds of required pediatric post-marketing drug studies are missing

The FDA requires clinical studies of new drugs in pediatric populations, since many drugs developed for use in adults are also used in children. These studies are often requested after the drug is approved in adults, as 'post-marketing' trials. However, a study from Boston Children's Hospital finds that only about a third of these mandatory trials were completed within an average of seven years.

9d

Emotional abuse may be linked with menopause misery

Smoking, obesity and a sedentary lifestyle have long been linked to heightened symptoms of menopause. Now, a study headed by UC San Francisco has identified another factor that may add to menopause torment: an emotionally abusive partner or spouse.

9d

Mutation that causes autism and intellectual disability makes brain less flexible

About 1 percent of patients diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder and intellectual disability have a mutation in a gene called SETD5. Scientists have now discovered what happens on a molecular level when the gene is mutated in mice, and how this changes the mice's behavior. The results suggest that the brains of mice with a SETD5 mutation may be less flexible

9d

From the Arctic to the tropics: Researchers present unique database on Earth's vegetation

Which plant species grow where — and why? In a new study in Nature Ecology & Evolution, an international research team presents the world's first global vegetation database which contains over 1.1 million complete lists of plant species for all terrestrial ecosystems.

9d

Doomed star in Milky Way threatens rare gamma-ray burst

Researchers say a Wolf-Rayet star system — nicknamed Apep after the Egyptian god of chaos — has all the ingredients for a perfect stellar storm to produce a gamma-ray burst when it goes supernova. Gamma-ray bursts have never been detected in our galaxy before.

9d

The power of social support

In most animal societies, members of one sex dominate those of the other. Is this, as widely believed, an inevitable consequence of a disparity in strength and ferocity between males and females? Not necessarily. A new study on wild spotted hyaenas shows that in this social carnivore, females dominate males because they can rely on greater social support than males, not because they are stronger o

9d

Scientists discover new 'pinwheel' star system

An international team of scientists has discovered a new, massive star system — one that also challenges existing theories of how large stars eventually die.

9d

4,000-year-old termite mounds found in Brazil are visible from space

Researchers reporting in Current Biology on Nov. 19 have found that a vast array of regularly spaced, still-inhabited termite mounds in northeastern Brazil–covering an area the size of Great Britain — are up to about 4,000 years old.

9d

More than just working in your pyjamas, telecommuting saves time and money

For some, it's a familiar question on a grey, winter morning: Should I drive in for those meetings, or join online?

9d

Gut bacteria may guard against diabetes that comes with aging

A friendly microbe in the gut may be the key to staving off insulin resistance, a study in mice finds.

9d

Special journal issue highlights research uses for biological collections and the importance of their preservation

More than a century ago, when botanists and naturalists were in the field collecting plant and animal specimens, they couldn't have imagined that scientists would one day be able to extract DNA from samples to understand how plants and animals are related to one another.

9d

Google data shows public interest in conservation is rising

The public's interest in conservation is rising, according to a new analysis led by Princeton University.

9d

From the Arctic to the tropics: Researchers present unique database on Earth's vegetation

Which plant species grow where, alongside which others—and why? The diversity of global vegetation can be described based on only a few traits from each species. This has been revealed by a research team led by Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg (MLU) and the German Centre for Integrative Biodiversity Research (iDiv) Halle-Jena-Leipzig. In a new study published in the scientific journal Nat

9d

Monitoring real time changes during cell division

Scientist have cast new light on the behaviour of tiny hair-like structures called cilia found on almost every cell in the body.

9d

4,000-year-old termite mounds found in Brazil are visible from space

Researchers reporting in Current Biology on November 19 have found that a vast array of regularly spaced, still-inhabited termite mounds in northeastern Brazil—covering an area the size of Great Britain—are up to about 4,000 years old.

9d

New stone tools analysis challenges theories of human evolution in East Asia

A new study of stone tools from a cave site in China shows that sophisticated "Levallois" tool-making techniques were present in East Asia at a much earlier date than previously thought.

9d

Researchers discover how 'cryptic' connections in disease transmission influence epidemics

Diseases have repeatedly spilled over from wildlife to humans, causing local to global epidemics, such as HIV/AIDS, Ebola, SARS, and Nipah.

9d

Greenhouse gasses triggering more changes than we can handle

A new study published in Nature Climate Change provides one of the most comprehensive assessments yet of how humanity is being impacted by the simultaneous occurrence of multiple climate hazards strengthened by increasing greenhouse gas emissions. This research reveals that society faces a much larger threat from climate change than previous studies have suggested.

9d

Antarctic melting slows atmospheric warming and speeds sea level rise

As the Antarctic ice sheet melts, warming of the atmosphere will be delayed by about a decade but sea level rise will accelerate, according to new research scheduled for advance online publication in the journal Nature.

9d

Doomed star in Milky Way threatens rare gamma-ray burst

University of Sydney astronomers, working with international colleagues, have found a star system like none seen before in our galaxy.

9d

Local drivers of amplified Arctic warming

Long-term observations of surface temperatures show an intensified surface warming in Canada, Siberia, Alaska and in the Arctic Ocean relative to global mean temperature rise. This warming pattern, commonly referred to as Arctic amplification, is consistent with computer models, simulating the response to increasing greenhouse gas concentrations. However, the underlying physical processes for the

9d

How female hyaenas came to dominate males

In most animal societies, members of one sex dominate those of the other. Is this, as widely believed, an inevitable consequence of a disparity in strength and ferocity between males and females? Not necessarily. A new study on wild spotted hyaenas shows that in this social carnivore, females dominate males because they can rely on greater social support than males, not because they are stronger o

9d

This Spinning, Snakelike Star System Might Blast Gamma Rays into the Milky Way When It Dies

Astronomers found a star system in our galaxy that could produce a gamma-ray burst — one of the brightest and most energetic events in the universe.

9d

Elon Musk et skridt nærmere gigabit-internet fra verdensrummet

De amerikanske myndigheder har givet grønt lys til opsendelse af 7.518 kommunikationssatellitter, der skal muliggøre en båndbredde på én gigabit per sekund per slutbruger, når systemet er helt på plads.

9d

For 4,000 Years, Termites Have Been Building Something Incredible in Brazil

In the east of Brazil, mysterious cones of earth rise from the dry, hard-baked soil. Each of these mounds is about 30 feet wide at its base, and stands six to 13 feet tall. From the ground, with about 60 feet of overgrown land separating each mound from its neighbors, it’s hard to tell how many there are. But their true extent becomes dramatically clear from space. Using satellite images , Roy Fu

9d

Universal Quantum Phenomenon Found in Strange Metals

A ubiquitous quantum phenomenon has been detected in a large class of superconducting materials, fueling a growing belief among physicists that an unknown organizing principle governs the collective behavior of particles and determines how they spread energy and information. Understanding this organizing principle could be a key into “quantum strangeness at its deepest level,” said Subir Sachdev

9d

Where you go tells who you are — and vice versa

Mining data to analyze tracking patterns, Civil Engineering Prof Sharon Di can infer the population travel demand level in a region from the trajectories of just a portion of travelers. She found three distinct groups whose demographics she could infer based on their travel patterns: seniors, who travel to a wider variety of places in a day; workers, who stay mostly at work or at home; parents, wh

9d

Google data shows public interest in conservation is rising

The public's interest in conservation is rising. Based on an adapted version of Google Trends — which tracks user searches on Google — the results show that people search for conservation just as often as they do for climate change.

9d

Critical collections

Harvard researchers are among the co-editors of a special issue of Philosophical Transactions B dedicated to exploring the creative ways in which researchers have made use of biological collections around the world and to advocating for their continued preservation.

9d

Having poor vision can raise risk for falls among older adults

A research team, examining information from the National Health and Aging Trends Study (NHATS) and publishing their study in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society, provided up-to-date information on the frequency of falls and learned more about the fear of falling and how it might limit activity among older adults who have vision impairments.

9d

9d

Scientists Finally Know How Wombat Butts Make Cube-Shaped Poops

These marsupials have especially talented poop-cubing butts. And a team of physicists figured out how they work.

9d

Waste CO2 to be turned into ingredients for fuel, plastics and even food

Scientists are ramping up efforts to turn waste CO2 from industry into chemicals such as methanol in a bid to reduce emissions and provide a new source of raw materials for use in fuel, cement and food production.

9d

A job and a half for first Eurostar Neo mission

ESA's Neosat platform developed with Airbus – Eurostar Neo – has found its first mission; supplying two satellites for a role currently being performed by three.

9d

What happens to the brain in zero gravity?

NASA has made a commitment to send humans to Mars by the 2030s. This is an ambitious goal when you think that a typical round trip will anywhere between three and six months and crews will be expected to stay on the red planet for up to two years before planetary alignment allows for the return journey home. It means that the astronauts have to live in reduced (micro) gravity for about three years

9d

Russian tech giant dashes hopes for smartphone

Russian internet giant Yandex disappointed tech enthusiasts on Monday by failing to unveil what many hoped would be a highly anticipated Russian-made smartphone.

9d

How to disagree productively and find common ground | Julia Dhar

Some days, it feels like the only thing we can agree on is that we can't agree — on anything. Drawing on her background as a world debate champion, Julia Dhar offers three techniques to reshape the way we talk to each other so we can start disagreeing productively and finding common ground — over family dinners, during work meetings and in our national conversations.

9d

Post-Soviet Union happiness lag between east and west Europe explained

Research finds that mass unemployment after the fall of the Soviet Union may have had a far longer-term impact on the health and happiness of those living in Eastern Europe than was previously thought.

9d

J. K. Rowling and the Curse of the Prequel Series

This article contains major spoilers for Fantastic Beasts: The Crimes of Grindelwald. When J. K. Rowling first announced in 2013 that she was working on a film adaptation of Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them , she called it an “original story.” That is, it would be “neither a prequel nor a sequel to the Harry Potter series,” taking place 70 years before her original books. Five years later,

9d

Cannabis youth prevention strategy should target mental wellbeing

High school students with positive mental health are less likely to consume cannabis, a recent University of Waterloo study has found.

9d

Chemistry freed from space and time

Shopping on the internet, storing photos in the cloud, turning up a thermostat with an app–all are commonplace. Now, the internet of things and the cloud are entering the world of chemical research and production, as reported in the journal Angewandte Chemie. Researchers have used remote servers in Japan to autonomously optimize conditions to synthesize drugs in a British laboratory. The process

9d

A study analyzes the impact of targeted Facebook advertising on the elections

Research from the Universidad Carlos III de Madrid (UC3M), the University of Warwick and ETH Zurich has studied the effectiveness of micro-targeted political advertising on social media such as Facebook in the United States. The research concludes that it may have increased the number of Donald Trump voters by ten per cent in the 2016 presidential elections.

9d

Move over Rover: There's a new sniffing powerhouse in the neighborhood

Scientists at Georgia Tech are now homing in on the secrets behind animals' super sniffers to develop an artificial chemical sensor that could be used for a variety of tasks, from food safety to national security. Thomas Spencer will present the group's latest design for an electronic nose that concentrates odors for improved chemical sensing at the APS Division of Fluid Dynamics 71st Annual Meeti

9d

Glucose binding molecule could transform the treatment of diabetes

Scientists from the University of Bristol have designed a new synthetic glucose binding molecule platform that brings us one step closer to the development of the world's first glucose-responsive insulin which, say researchers, will transform the treatment of diabetes.

9d

Treating Cervical Cancer In Poor Countries

Treating Cervical Cancer In Poor Countries Results of an International Atomic Energy Agency study on effective brachytherapy in resource-poor settings. Treating Cervical Cancer In Poor Countries Video of Treating Cervical Cancer In Poor Countries Human Monday, November 19, 2018 – 10:00 Jason Socrates Bardi, Editor (Inside Science) — According to Sushil Beriwal at UPMC Hillman Cancer Center, “Cer

9d

Move over Rover: There's a new sniffing powerhouse in the neighborhood

Some animals have a superpower in their sense of smell. They explore, interpret and understand their world with such sensitivity that people have enlisted canines to help solve crime and detect cancer on the breath. Scientists at the Georgia Institute of Technology are now homing in on the secrets behind animals' super sniffers to develop an artificial chemical sensor that could be used for a vari

9d

Euclid progresses with primary mirror delivery

In order to observe billions of faint galaxies and investigate the nature of the dark Universe, ESA's pioneering Euclid mission will require state-of-the-art optics. The first optical element to be delivered, the telescope's primary mirror (M1), has arrived at the premises of Airbus Defence & Space in Toulouse.

9d

Same genes link risk of heart disease and Alzheimer’s

By studying DNA from more than 1.5 million people, researchers have identified points of DNA that increase the risk of cardiovascular disease and also heighten the risk for Alzheimer’s disease. Scientists have long been aware of connections between variations of the APOE gene, which is involved in cholesterol and lipid metabolism, and Alzheimer’s disease. That gene is known to double the risk for

9d

‘New narratives’ can help solve personal problems

Every day, people try to make sense of challenges in their lives, but sometimes their explanations get in the way of solving them, psychologist Gregory Walton says in a new paper. Whether it is a college student feeling like he doesn’t belong at school, a partner concerned about a spat with a loved one, or a parent worried about a crying baby—people often draw negative conclusions about situation

9d

Post-Soviet Union happiness lag between east and west Europe explained

The upheaval caused by the collapse of the Soviet Union that left millions of workers unemployed for long periods of time could be the reason for the sizeable 'transition happiness gap' that existed for many years between east and western nations in Europe, according to new research.

9d

Dogs know when they don't know

In a new study, researchers have shown that dogs possess some 'metacognitive' abilities — specifically, they are aware of when they do not have enough information to solve a problem and will actively seek more information. The researchers created a test in which dogs had to find a reward behind one of two fences. They found that the dogs looked for additional information significantly more often

9d

Targeted Hepatitis C testing misses substantial number of cases in correctional setting

Results from a new study led by Boston Medical Center (BMC) found routine Hepatitis C testing identified a significant number of cases that would have been missed by targeted testing among a population of individuals in Washington State prisons

9d

Mite genomes reveal 'mighty surprising' fragrant and colorful secrets

Scientists at the University of Liverpool have uncovered some unexpected 'foreign' genes in the tiny itch-inducing chigger mite and its more benign but enormous cousin, the giant velvet mite.Genome sequencing of these mites, both members of the trombidid mite family, reveals them to have functional genes for producing terpenes — naturally occurring and often fragrant compounds that are commonly f

9d

Glucose binding molecule could transform the treatment of diabetes

Scientists from the University of Bristol have designed a new synthetic glucose binding molecule platform that brings us one step closer to the development of the world's first glucose-responsive insulin which, say researchers, will transform the treatment of diabetes.

9d

RUDN chemists made an electrode for hydrogen fuel production out of Chinese flour

A RUDN chemist developed a new method of obtaining a porous carbon material on the basis of Chinese flour and water. The samples of the material exhibited high electrocatalytic activity in the course of production of hydrogen — an eco-friendly energy source. The results of the work were published in Electrochimica Acta.

9d

Concomitant use of sleeping pills and strong painkillers is common among people with AD

One in five people with Alzheimer's disease (AD) who use a benzodiazepine are also concomitant users of an opioid, according to a new study from the University of Eastern Finland. Concomitant use was more common in comparison persons, but those with AD used strong opioids more frequently. About half of all concomitant users were prolonged users whose use of these drugs had continued for more than

9d

Computational chemistry supports research on new semiconductor technologies

Researchers at the University of Marburg highlight the ability of computational chemistry approaches using high-performance computing to reveal interesting phenomena that occur between organic molecules and surfaces. They also demonstrate more generally how these interactions can be understood with respect to the molecular and solid state world. Understanding surface chemistry in this way could be

9d

A program of personalized physical exercise reverses functional decline in the over-75s

A program of personalized physical exercise implemented over a three-year period and involving 370 people over the age of 75 admitted to the Geriatric Service of the Hospital Complex of Navarre (CHN) has turned out to be 'safe and effective' in reversing the functional deterioration associated with hospitalization to which patients in this age group are subjected. Other aspects such as cognitive s

9d

RUDN scientist: Tibetan soil enrichment with nitrogen and phosphorus leads to carbon loss

A RUDN soil scientist studied the soils of the Qinghai-Tibet Plateau and found out that simultaneous increase of nitrogen and phosphorus levels reduces the volume of organic carbon in the soil. The work will help reconsider the use of fertilizers in agriculture. The article was published in the Science of the Total Environment journal.

9d

New report outlines cancer screening's future potential

New report summarizes the status of cancer screening and proposes key areas where attention is needed to further advance screening's contribution to cancer control.

9d

Public perspectives on food risks

Roughly half of Americans say the average person faces a serious health risk from food additives over their lifetime, while the other half believes the average person is exposed to potentially threatening additives in such small amounts that there is no serious risk.

9d

More than H2O: Technology simultaneously measures 71 elements in water, other liquids

A new method for simultaneous measurement of 71 inorganic elements in liquids — including water, beverages, and biological fluids — makes element testing much faster, more efficient, and more comprehensive than was possible in the past.

9d

The Question at the Center of the New Gary Hart Movie

It was the era of boxy cellphones, balky mobile-satellite trucks, and the rise of 24/7 cable television news. Photography required developing wet film, and smoking was still ubiquitous in journalism and politics. And on Wednesday afternoon, May 6, 1987, a Washington Post reporter asked the leading candidate for president of the United States if he had ever committed adultery, and nothing has ever

9d

World Toilet Day highlights global sanitation crisis

Poor countries around the world are facing a dangerous shortage of toilets that puts millions of live at risk, according to campaigners marking World Toilet Day by urging governments and businesses to invest more in sanitation.

9d

Carlos Ghosn, the auto world's 'cost killer'

Brazilian-born Carlos Ghosn has long stood out among the world's auto executives as a hard-nosed workaholic able to get a troubled company back on its feet quickly.

9d

A sharing economy for plants: Seed libraries are sprouting up

Thanksgiving may be uniquely American, but its core spirit was exported from harvest festivals stretching back for millennia. Its essence is being grateful for what one has, while noting a duty to share one's good fortune.

9d

The equivalence test: A new way for scientists to tackle so-called negative results

A paleontologist returns to her lab from a summer dig and sets up a study comparing tooth length in two dinosaur species. She and her team work meticulously to avoid biasing their results. They remain blind to the species while measuring, the sample sizes are large, and the data collection and the analysis are rigorous.

9d

With each rocket launch, 'I have three heart attacks'

Kurt Eberly has hardly any hair and keeps losing more. His job is to launch, two times per year, a metallic cylinder packed with several tons of supplies, at high speeds toward the International Space Station, 250 miles (400 kilometers) above the Earth.

9d

More than H2O: Technology simultaneously measures 71 elements in water, other liquids

A new method for simultaneous measurement of 71 inorganic elements in liquids—including water, beverages, and biological fluids—makes element testing much faster, more efficient, and more comprehensive than was possible in the past.

9d

Antarctica's hidden landscape shaped by rivers in warmer era

Antarctica's mountainous landscape was shaped by rivers rather than carved by glaciers as previously thought, a study has revealed.

9d

Sensual goddess fresco discovered in ancient Pompeii bedroom

Archaeologists have found in an ancient Pompeii bedroom a fresco depicting a sensual scene of a goddess and swan.

9d

Communities flee eruption at Guatemala's Volcano of Fire

About 4,000 residents fled Guatemala's Volcano of Fire Monday as red-hot rock and ash spewed into the sky and cascaded down the slopes toward an area devastated by a deadly eruption earlier this year.

9d

Solution for next generation nanochips comes out of thin air

Researchers at RMIT University have engineered a new type of transistor, the building block for all electronics. Instead of sending electrical currents through silicon, these transistors send electrons through narrow air gaps, where they can travel unimpeded as if in space.

9d

Regionsdirektør: Villadsen fratræder med det samme, men under rolige omstændigheder

Henrik Villadsen forlader posten som sygehusdirektør for Sjællands Universitetshospital med øjeblikkelig virkning. Beslutningen er taget af ledelsen i Region Sjælland, som mener, at der er brug for nye kræfter.

9d

Why predicting the weather and climate is even harder for Australia's rainy northern neighbours

Australians love to complain about weather forecasts, but compared with some other parts of the world ours are impressively accurate. Our large, mostly flat continent surrounded by oceans makes modelling Australia's weather and climate relatively straightforward.

9d

New research suggests language influences how consumers trust a brand

Consumers make assumptions based on the language used by a brand or advertiser, and politeness does matter, say researchers at the University of Oregon and University of Washington.

9d

Violence toward women in the video game Red Dead Redemption 2 evokes toxic masculinity

It's common practice in the world of gaming for serious video game players to upload videos of their gaming experiences to YouTube, usually for purposes of providing tips to other gamers, walkthroughs and highlights.

9d

Making X-ray microscopy 10 times faster

Microscopes make the invisible visible. And compared to conventional light microscopes, transmission x-ray microscopes (TXM) can see into samples with much higher resolution, revealing extraordinary details. Researchers across a wide range of scientific fields use TXM to see the structural and chemical makeup of their samples—everything from biological cells to energy storage materials.

9d

The ACLU Declines to Defend Civil Rights

Last week, the NRA kept defending gun rights, the AARP kept advocating for older Americans, and the California Avocado Commission was as steadfast as ever in touting “nature’s highest achievement.” By contrast, the ACLU issued a public statement that constituted a stark, shortsighted betrayal of the organization’s historic mission: It vehemently opposed stronger due-process rights for the accused

9d

På jagt efter MRSA-smitte: DTU støvsuger luften nær svinefarm

Udenlandsk forskning har tidligere vist, at den antibiotikaresistente stafylokokbakterie husdyr-MRSA kan spores luften i nærmiljøet. Nu undersøger Danmark muligheden.

9d

Antarctica's hidden landscape shaped by rivers in warmer era

Antarctica's hidden landscape of mountains and valleys was formed by rivers — rather than glaciers as was previously thought — before the continent became covered in a thick ice sheet, research shows.

9d

Gene vital for post-stroke recovery identified for the first time

Having certain specific variants of the PATJ gene predisposes to worse recovery from ischemic stroke. 7 out of 10 patients with these variants suffer severe sequelae three months after having a stroke, in other words, they are in a situation of dependence, compared to less than half of patients who do not present these variants.These variants could indicate targets for future treatments that impro

9d

Astronomers discover giant relic of disrupted 'tadpole' galaxy

A team of astronomers from Israel, the US and Russia have identified a disrupted galaxy resembling a giant tadpole, complete with an elliptical head and a long, straight tail, about 300 million light years away from Earth. The galaxy is one million light-years long from end to end, ten times larger than the Milky Way. The research is published today in the journal Monthly Notices of the Royal Astr

9d

Mom's teeth tell her history of giving birth and raising babies in Asian black bears

Scientists from Japanese institutions among Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology (TUAT), Picchio Wildlife Research Center, National Agriculture and Food Research Organization, and Tokyo University of Agriculture have discovered that width of surface layers coating tooth's roots correlates with reproductive histories of female Asian black bears. When a female bear raised cubs, the layers

9d

Wombat poop: Scientists reveal mystery behind cube-shaped droppings

Scientists discover how the marsupials are the only known species producing cube-shaped faeces.

9d

New Arecibo Observatory message challenge announced

In 1974, the Arecibo Observatory made history by beaming the most powerful radio message into deep space ever made. The famous Arecibo Message was designed by the AO 74's staff, led by Frank Drake, and with the help of the astronomer and famed science communicator Carl Sagan. It contained information about the human race and was intended to be our intergalactic calling card.

9d

Understanding how to best repower wind farms in the drive for cheaper green energy

With lowest cost green energy considered the future, understanding how to 'repower' existing onshore wind farms supports the Scottish government and industry desire to generate affordable wind power in the future.

9d

How to stay healthy on your next germ-filled flight

DIY Don't get sick on the plane. Packing a bunch of people into a confined airplane cabin during cold and flu season is a recipe for the sniffles. Here's how to stay healthy when you fly.

9d

Climate change: Report raises new optimism over industry

Cutting emissions from heavy industry would generate savings and boost economic growth, commission argues.

9d

Julian Assange Isn’t Worth It

Last week, the U.S. government slipped up and exposed in an unrelated legal filing that there is apparently a sealed criminal complaint against the controversial WikiLeaks editor in chief, Julian Assange. The nature of the charges, as well as when they were actually filed, remains unclear, leaving pundits to speculate on possible legal avenues the government may have pursued and the potential imp

9d

Afdelingslæge skal lede nyt Nationalt Videnscenter for Hovedpine

Jakob Møller Hansen skal stå i spidsen for Nationalt Videnscenter for Hovedpine, der skal udbrede viden om hovedpine til både befolkning og behandlere.

9d

Less pollution can add a year to the lives of Copenhageners in 2040

If air pollution in the city by 2040 is reduced to the level found in the countryside, approximately one year will be added to the lives of Copenhageners, new research from the University of Copenhagen reveals. Pollution from traffic, among other things, is the reason why Copenhageners have reduced life expectancy.

9d

'Boomeranging' back to a parents' home negatively affects young adults' mental health

The number of young adults living in their own household has dropped dramatically in the last decades in the United States, and a growing proportion of young people will move back in with their parents at some point in time. These 'boomerang' moves are associated with an increase in depressive symptoms, a recent MPIDR study suggests.

9d

White matter pathway and individual variability in human stereoacuity

Researchers in the National Institute of Information and Communications Technology (NICT), and Osaka University have identified a human white matter pathway associated with individual variability in human stereoacuity. By combining neuroimaging and psychophysical measurements, we found that the neural tissue density of the white matter pathway, the vertical occipital fasciculus (VOF), correlated w

9d

Benefit of LDR brachytherapy in patients with early-stage prostate cancer is still unclear

Even eleven years after the first benefit assessment, the evidence base remains inadequate. The hopes to be able to close gaps in knowledge were disappointed when PREFERE failed in 2016 due to a lack of interest.

9d

New blood test detects early stage ovarian cancer

Research on a bacterial toxin first discovered in Adelaide has led to the development a new blood test for the early diagnosis of ovarian cancer — a disease which kills over 1000 Australian women and 150,000 globally each year.

9d

Solution for next generation nanochips comes out of thin air

The secret ingredient for the next generation of more powerful electronics could be air, rather than silicon, according to new research. Researchers at RMIT University have engineered a new type of transistor, the building block for all electronics. Instead of sending electrical currents through silicon, these transistors send electrons through narrow air gaps, where they can travel unimpeded as i

9d

Getting things under control: New mouse model aids study of immunomodulation

Mice are resistant to immunomodulatory drugs (IMiDs). As a result, studying the effects of IMiDs was not possible in existing types of mice. Here, an Osaka University-led research team, generated a new type of mouse that responds to IMiD treatment. This new mouse model allows assessment of the therapeutic effects of drugs that may be toxic to humans. If effective, such drugs could potentially prov

9d

What smart hazmat suits and Sonora cactus skins have in common

Motivated by observations of desert flora and fauna, researchers in Arizona began experimenting in the laboratory to characterize cactuses' microscopic 3D epidermal structure at dry and wet times of the year. They apply the lessons in wettability — the study of how droplets interact with solids — to engineering surfaces for industrial applications, and will present the discoveries from this Sono

9d

Researchers a step closer to understanding how deadly bird flu virus takes hold in humans

New research has taken a step towards understanding how highly pathogenic influenza viruses such as deadly bird flu infect humans. Researchers at Griffith's Institute for Glycomics and the University of Hong Kong have revealed specific sugar molecules — Sialylated O-glycans — that are present in the respiratory tract are key receptors for influenza viruses, particularly the highly pathogenic inf

9d

Efficient and stable emission of warm white light from lead-free halide double perovskites

One-fifth of global electricity consumption is based on lighting; efficient and stable white-light emission with single materials is ideal for applications. Photon emission that covers the entire visible spectrum is, however, difficult to attain with a single material. Metal halide perovskites, for instance, have outstanding emission properties but contain lead, and therefore yield unsatisfactory

9d

Why is this line so long?

Warning: After reading this article, you will never again stand in a line without thinking about how to make your wait time shorter. And as an expert in operations management, I'm here to spread the word that sometimes a longer line may actually be a good thing.

9d

Big tech firms pledge training for workers in Southeast Asia

Microsoft, Google and other major technology companies have promised to help provide training in digital skills for around 20 million people in Southeast Asia by 2020 to make sure the region's burgeoning working-age population is a fit for the future job market. Up to 28 million full-time jobs are subject to being displaced, according to a new estimate.

9d

Repowering the UK's oldest wind farms could boost energy generation by 171%

Wind energy has been identified as having an important role to play in the world's move towards a low-carbon future. But, due to short-term planning rules, it may not have as big a part as it could in the UK's own sustainable energy generation.

9d

Enabling fabrication beyond 7nm

How did we get from the Palm Pilots of the 90s to the ultra-powerful smart phones of today? In large part, because of scaling, where integrated circuits are made with smaller feature sizes fitting more and more circuit elements in the same area of silicon at each technology generation. This sets our expectations that in 20 more years, our mobile devices of today will look like the Palm Pilot of ye

9d

How temp workers became the norm in America

Bought a vehicle lately? Ever wonder who assembled it? It turns out that on factory lines across the country, temporary workers are welding, testing and operating machines alongside permanent auto workers—and in many cases making half the money. For them, "temp" does not necessarily stand for temporary; in this context it can mean perma-temp status.

9d

What smart hazmat suits and Sonora cactus skins have in common

When Konrad Rykaczewski moved to Arizona's Sonora Desert region six years ago he took a water bottle and sprayed the plants in his front yard, not to water them, but to see how they interacted with water droplets.

9d

How schools can foster civic discussion in an age of incivility

What is the role of classrooms in an era of political polarization and rising extremist ideologies, hate crimes and violence?

9d

Lunar Outpost shows off new moon rover

Space technology company Lunar Outpost has unveiled their new Lunar Prospector rover that will explore the surface of the moon to search for and map resources. The Lunar Prospector is designed to drill for and analyze sub-surface samples. The first of the smallish robots was recently demonstrated on simulated Lunar regolith at the Colorado School of Mines.

9d

Getting rid of sweat at the push of a button

The Swiss sportswear manufacturer KJUS presented the world's first ski jacket with an integrated electronic user-controlled membrane on November 15. Thanks to the HYDRO_BOT technology developed together with Empa, the ski jacket actively pumps out sweat from inside the jacket to keep skiers dry and warm.

9d

Researchers develop mathematical model that questions long-held assumptions about gene expression

Researchers at the Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS) have developed a mathematical model that sheds new light on the fundamental processes of gene expression in cells.

9d

New survey highlights digital health challenges

New survey: Health system leaders plan to increase spending to defend against cyberattacks, express optimism about reimbursement for telehealth services, and feel anxiety about Apple, Amazon and Google entering the health care space.

9d

Skeletal imitation reveals how bones grow atom-by-atom

Researchers from Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden, have discovered how our bones grow at an atomic level, showing how an unstructured mass orders itself into a perfectly arranged bone structure. The discovery offers new insights, which could yield improved new implants, as well as increasing our knowledge of bone diseases such as osteoporosis.

9d

Ocean warming

New research has uncovered a previously unaccounted for pathway transporting heat from the Pacific Ocean to the Indian Ocean, and even further to the Southern Ocean, which surrounds Antarctica. It has implications for climate change and what we know about global warming.

9d

Mom's teeth tell her history of giving birth and raising babies in Asian black bears

Scientists from four Japanese institutions including Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology (TUAT) have discovered that width of surface layers coating tooth's roots correlates with reproductive histories of female Asian black bears. When a female bear raised cubs, the layers of her teeth were much narrower compared to those when she was not. Thus, measuring layer width of female bears' te

9d

Exploring the genetic contribution to suicide risk

Suicide is the 10th leading cause of death in the United States, claiming more than 44,000 people in the country every year, similar to the number of deaths caused by the opioid epidemic. Previous studies show that suicide tracks in families independent of the effects from a shared environment. Researchers at the University of Utah Health are using resources unique to the state to identify underly

9d

Alcohol-impaired driving and drinking at private residences

Although drunk driving prevention and enforcement programs often focus on people who drink at bars and restaurants, drinking at home is strongly associated with driving after drinking and impaired driving, and may account for about a third of all drink driving events, according to a new study from the Prevention Research Center at the Pacific Institute for Research and Evaluation.

9d

Chemists develop a new method for the synthesis of polymer nanoparticles of a given size

A chemist from RUDN created the technology for the synthesis of polymer nanospheres for use in the production of electrochemical devices. The method does not require any surfactants and produces nanoparticles of a predetermined size. The results of the study were published in Polymer Chemistry.

9d

Computer scientists use artificial intelligence to boost an earthquake physics simulator

A team of researchers from the Earthquake Research Institute, Department of Civil Engineering and Information Technology Center at the University of Tokyo, and the RIKEN Center for Computational Science and RIKEN Center for Advanced Intelligence Project in Japan were finalists for the coveted Gordon Bell Prize for outstanding achievements in high-performance computing. Tsuyoshi Ichimura together w

9d

The engineering work of ants can influence paleoclimatic studies

Ants of the species Messor barbarus modify the grain size and mineralogical composition of the soils they inhabit, influencing the results obtained in palaeoclimatic and palaeoenvironmental studies, according to research conducted by the Complutense University of Madrid (UCM), the National Museum of Natural Sciences (MNCN), the Institute of Geosciences (CSIC, UCM) and the Doñana Biological Station

9d

Scientists describe the course of reactions in two-layer thin metal films

A team of researchers from Siberian Federal University (SFU) obtained thin copper/gold and iron/palladium films and studied the reactions that take place upon heating them. Knowing these processes, scientists will be able to improve the properties of materials currently used in microelectronics. The study was published in the Journal of Solid State Chemistry.

9d

Online platform assures cyber-physical systems research is legit, results don't disappear

Computer scientists from around the globe are using a one-stop shop to find research results that could help them move the field of cyber-physical systems forward, improving the relationships between humans, computers and the physical world that can make life safer, energy-efficient and more convenient.

9d

Using your phone on a plane is safe – but for now you still can't make calls

Over the Thanksgiving travel period an estimated 30 million Americans plan to fly to enjoy turkey and all the trimmings with far-flung family and friends. The huge increase in air travelers and ever more full – and oversold – flights have made air travel more trying. But it has gotten better in one aspect that most of us in the smartphone-addicted public appreciate: Cellphone use is no longer comp

9d

Astronomers discover giant relic of disrupted Tadpole galaxy

A team of astronomers from Israel, the U.S. and Russia have identified a disrupted galaxy resembling a giant tadpole, complete with an elliptical head and a long, straight tail, about 300 million light years away from Earth. The galaxy is one million light-years long from end to end, ten times larger than the Milky Way. The research is published today in the journal Monthly Notices of the Royal As

9d

'Ravenous, Hairy Ogre' Microbe May Represent Entirely New Branch on the Tree of Life

Who needs aliens, when there are plenty of bizarre life forms still to be discovered in Canada?

9d

Universal laws in impact dynamics of dust agglomerates under microgravity conditions

A collaboration between Nagoya University and TU Braunschweig finds evidence that when projectiles hit soft clumps of dust or hard clumps of loose glass beads, the scaling laws for energy dissipation and energy transfer are the same in each case. This helps to understand how granular clumps stick together, and how planets are formed.

9d

Landets første diabetes-hotline åbner i Nordjylland

Steno Diabetes Center i Nordjylland åbner diabetes-hotline til patienter og sundhedspersonale, der har brug for rådgivning.

9d

Dårlig økonomi på universitetshospital skyld i stor fyringsrunde

Et samlet underskud på 180 mio. kr. i Region Sjællands budget er årsagen til, at regionen er midt i en fyringsrunde. 144 mio. kr. stammer fra Sjællands Universitetshospital, hvor direktør Henrik Villadsen netop har forladt direktørstolen.

9d

New sea-level rise and flood alert network developed by Scripps Oceanography launches

In December 2015, a large swell enhanced by El Niño conditions resulted in major flooding in the City of Imperial Beach, a low-lying coastal community south of San Diego along the U.S.-Mexico border. Barricades and barriers installed on the beach were not enough to contain the water along Seacoast Drive.

9d

Fewer Americans are volunteering and giving than any time in the last two decades

While nonprofits have benefitted from record highs in volunteer hours and charitable fundraising totals, it's a case of fewer people doing more, as the percentage of Americans who contribute time and money has fallen to its lowest point in two decades, according to a report released this week by the University of Maryland's Do Good Institute.

9d

'Rogue One' Gets a TV Show, Leia's Daughter Loves 'Episode IX,' and More Star Wars News

Don't worry, there are still plenty of 'Mandalorian' developments still afoot.

9d

Sound and light could detect ovarian cancer earlier

Researchers have found an innovative way to use sound and light, or photoacoustic, imaging to diagnose ovarian tumors. The method may lead to a promising new diagnostic imaging technique to improve current standard of care for patients with ovarian cancer. Ovarian cancer claims the lives of more than 14,000 women in the US each year, ranking fifth among cancer deaths in women. Researchers recentl

9d

Color vision variation in guppies influences female mate preference

A variety of animals have male-specific ornament traits and these ornaments are favored by female choice. Which male traits are preferred by females often varies among females. Genetic mechanisms that create and maintain variations in female preference has been one of the central questions in evolutionary ecology.

9d

New research suggests language influences how consumers trust a brand

Consumers make assumptions based on the language used by a brand or advertiser, and politeness does matter, say researchers at the University of Oregon and University of Washington.

9d

There's Something Hot Hidden Under East Antarctica

Scientists aren't sure precisely what it is.

9d

Error correction in the quantum world

Sebastian Krinner is the first winner of the Lopez-Loreta Prize at ETH Zurich. The physicist has a clear goal: he wants to build a quantum computer that is not only powerful, but also works without errors.

9d

Species and environment affect which frogs are infected by parasitic fungus

An aquatic parasitic fungus causes lethal infections in amphibians and is thought to be one of the reasons for a global decline in toad and frog populations. A new study by researchers from Uppsala University shows a wide variation among different species in the number of infections and that the surrounding environment has an impact.

9d

California fires smoke spews aerosols into an already saturated sky

Fire is devastating. It consumes. It destroys and leaves behind a pernicious force in the form of smoke. Although most people might think that smoke rises and then clears after a fire has been extinguished the opposite is actually true. New research using data collected during NASA airborne science campaigns shows how smoke from wildfires worldwide could impact the atmosphere and climate much more

9d

Exploding stars make key ingredient in sand, glass

We are all, quite literally, made of star dust. Many of the chemicals that compose our planet and our bodies were formed directly by stars. Now, a new study using observations by NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope reports for the first time that silica—one of the most common minerals found on Earth—is formed when massive stars explode.

9d

9d

Første billeder af imploderet argentinsk ubåd

Tidligt lørdag morgen blev vraget af en forsvundet ubåd fundet på cirka 900 meters dybde. Billederne viser ifølge Argentinas Navy årsagen til ulykken.

9d

Rapid 'turn-on' of a nuclear transient observed by astronomers

An international team of astronomers has observed the peculiar activity of a nuclear transient event known as PS1-13cbe. The transient, which occurred in the nucleus of the galaxy SDSS J222153.87+003054.2, experienced a rapid flare-up lasting about 70 days. The finding is reported in a paper published November 8 on arXiv.org.

9d

Kepler telescope bids 'goodnight' with final commands

On the evening of Thursday, Nov. 15, NASA's Kepler space telescope received its final set of commands to disconnect communications with Earth. The "goodnight" commands finalize the spacecraft's transition into retirement, which began on Oct. 30 with NASA's announcement that Kepler had run out of fuel and could no longer conduct science.

9d

A solar sibling identical to the sun

An international team led by Instituto de Astrofísica e Ciências do Espaço (IA) researcher Vardan Adibekyan used a novel method to detect solar siblings. The article was published in the journal Astronomy & Astrophysics.

9d

Automated optimization and synthesis of pharmaceuticals in the cloud

Shopping on the internet, storing photos in the cloud, turning up a thermostat with an app—all are commonplace. Now, the internet of things and the cloud are entering the world of chemical research and production, as reported in the journal Angewandte Chemie. Researchers have used remote servers in Japan to autonomously optimize conditions to synthesize drugs in a British laboratory. The process w

9d

New film celebrates Hubble Space Telescope

On Friday, November 16, a unique film and musical experience, inspired by the Hubble Space Telescope's iconic Deep Field image, premieres at the Kennedy Space Center. The film, titled Deep Field: The Impossible Magnitude of our Universe, features a variety of Hubble's stunning imagery and includes 11 computer-generated visualizations of far-flung galaxies, nebulas, and star clusters developed by t

9d

The psychological differences between those who love and those who loathe Black Friday shopping

If the thought of taking part in the annual ritual of Black Friday gives you cold chills rather than a rush of excitement, you're not alone. For every avid bargain hunter who plans for the day as if training for a marathon, there's someone else who stays home, secure in the knowledge that no one will trample them, shove them or invade their personal space just to get this season's hottest deals.

9d

Image: Hubble hooks a cosmic jellyfish

At first glance, a bright blue crescent immediately jumps out of this NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope image. Is it a bird? A plane? Evidence of extraterrestrial life? No—it's a galaxy.

9d

Mite genomes reveal 'mighty surprising' fragrant and colourful secrets

Scientists at the University of Liverpool have uncovered some unexpected 'foreign' genes in the tiny itch-inducing chigger mite and its more benign but enormous cousin, the giant velvet mite.

9d

Toxic mercury poisoning the Amazon

Alongside the all-too-visible deforestation, the Amazon is facing an invisible but increasing threat from mercury pollution according to a new WWF report released today at the Second Conference of the Parties to the Minamata Convention on Mercury in Geneva, Switzerland.

9d

How digital media blur the border between Australia and China

In September, the ABC website was blocked from being accessed inside China. The reason given was the ABC's "aggressive" reporting on China. Prime Minister Scott Morrison responded by saying that: "China's a sovereign country. They make decisions about what happens there, we make decisions about what happens here."

9d

What does a persistent bloom of algae indicate about the health of the planet?

While the harmful algae known as red tide have historically been common in warm waters like those of the Gulf of Mexico, the troublesome blooms are no longer seasonal. The algae kill marine animals and make life miserable for beachgoers.

9d

DIY crop speed breeding system to boost drought research

Plant speed breeding could be part of the solution to minimise the devastating effects of drought and climate change on crops in the future, according to a University of Queensland researcher.

9d

New way to split tough carbon bonds could open doors for greener chemicals

A breakthrough by chemists at the University of Chicago may one day open possibilities for making chemicals from plants rather than oil, by creating a new method to crack certain tough carbon-to-carbon bonds.

9d

Stronger buildings could delay wildfire destruction, but not stop it, professor says

Low humidity and strong winds in California mean that this month's wildfires could strike again. Unfortunately, better building materials and planning can only offer so much protection, says a Purdue University natural hazards engineering expert.

9d

How NASA will know when InSight touches downNASA Mars Jezero Crater

What's the sound of a touchdown on Mars?

9d

Freeze-frame microscopy captures molecule's 'lock-and-load' on DNA

Pushing the limits of cryo-electron microscopy, University of California, Berkeley, scientists have captured freeze-frames of the changing shape of a huge molecule, one of the body's key molecular machines, as it locks onto DNA and loads the machinery for reading the genetic code.

9d

Tiny teeth tell the story of two fish species' rapid evolution

Elizabeth Sibert is rewriting the story of how the asteroid impact that killed off the dinosaurs affected fish, and she's doing it one tooth at a time.

9d

Attenborough agreed with decision to save penguins' lives

The Dynasties crew took a rare decision to intervene when a group of stranded emperor penguins faced death.

9d

Global Health: The Fight Against Malaria Has Reached a Standstill

Deaths from the disease plummeted from 2000 to 2013, but are now stuck at over 400,000 a year. Donor giving is flat, and some countries are not doing enough to protect their citizens.

9d

Activating a new understanding of gene regulation

Regulation of gene expression—turning genes on or off, increasing or decreasing their expression—is critical for defining cell identity during development and coordinating cellular activity throughout the cell's lifetime. The common model of gene regulation imagines the nucleus of the cell as a large space in which molecules involved in DNA transcription float around seemingly at random until they

9d

Gravitationally lensed quasars

The path of light is bent by mass, an effect predicted by Einstein's theory of gravity, and when a massive galaxy or cluster lies along our line-of-sight to a more distant galaxy its matter will act as a lens to image the light from that object. So-called strong gravitational lensing creates highly distorted, magnified and often multiple images of a single source. (Strong lensing is distinct from

9d

Edible insects

Sainsbury's is the first UK supermarket to stock edible insects – but just how tasty are they?

9d

Drug used for PTSD may worsen nightmares, not reduce suicidal thoughts

Nightmares and insomnia often accompany posttraumatic stress disorder and increase suicide risk.

9d

IUCN Red List Update Signals Hope for Gorillas

The status of the mountain gorilla is now endangered, an upgrade from critically endangered. Other species are becoming more threatened.

9d

Human pharmaceuticals change cricket personality

Crickets that are exposed to human drugs that alter serotonin levels in the brain are less active and less aggressive than crickets that have had no drug exposure, according to a new study led by researchers from Linköping University. The findings have been published in Scientific Reports.

9d

Novel strategy to transform a commercially available iboga alkaloid to post-iboga alkaloids

KAIST chemists have synthesized seven different iboga and post-iboga natural products from commercially available catharanthine by mirroring nature's biosynthetic post-modification of the iboga skeleton.

9d

UK industry to make new 'Hotbirds'

British industry will build new spacecraft for telecoms operator Eutelsat's flagship TV distribution network.

9d

Affordable catalyst for carbon dioxide recycling

A catalyst for carbon dioxide recycling, mineral pentlandite may also be a conceivable alternative to expensive precious metal catalysts. This is the result of a study conducted by researchers from Ruhr-Universität Bochum (RUB), Fritz-Haber Institute Berlin and Fraunhofer Umsicht in Oberhausen. Pentlandite had previously been known as a catalyst for hydrogen production. By adding a suitable solven

9d

Channels for the supply of energy

Working in cooperation with international colleagues, researchers from the University of Freiburg have described how water-insoluble membrane proteins are transported through the aqueous space between the mitochondrial membranes with the aid of chaperone proteins. The membrane proteins enable the cellular powerhouses to import and export small biomolecules. Thus the team led by Prof. Dr. Nils Wied

9d

Now You Can Sequence Your Whole Genome for Just $200

Veritas is offering DNA reading, cheap, for two days. But most consumers don’t understand the difference between that and a 23andMe test.

9d

DJI Mavic 2 Pro Review: Movie Magic

This is the first consumer-oriented drone that actually earns the Pro name.

9d

Image of the Day: Pipelines

Collagen tunnels through mouse lymph nodes ferry antibodies into the bloodstream.

9d

When a Vasectomy Becomes a Guys’ Weekend

While a vasectomy is a quick and highly effective birth-control procedure for men, the idea of surgery on one’s testicles, however brief, can be a bit of a mental hurdle for some guys. But what if there’s a way to get this surgery with built-in moral support? To ease the anxiety, men are starting to turn vasectomies into social activities with friends, getting the procedure done one after another

9d

The Democrats’ White-People Problem

“I want them to talk about racism every day,” Steve Bannon, President Donald Trump’s former strategist, told The American Prospect last year. “If the left is focused on race and identity, and we go with economic nationalism, we can crush the Democrats.” Bannon was tapping into an old American tradition. As early as the 1680s, powerful white people were serving up racism to assuage the injuries of

9d

First-Ever All-Female Antarctic Expedition Busts Women's Endurance Myth

Women who trekked across Antarctica in the first-ever all-female expedition broke more than gender norms — they also busted this gender myth.

9d

Derfor bruger vi kilo, meter og liter – og ikke pund, unse eller bimpel

I sidste uge fandt internationale eksperter – efter 129 år – en ny måde at måle et kilo på. Her er historien om, hvordan vi har brugt århundreder på at finde frem til måleenheden kilogram.

9d

Making X-ray microscopy 10 times faster

NSLS-II's Full Field X-ray Imaging beamline can image samples in 3D faster than ever before.

9d

Are These Earth's Oldest Fossils of Life? Dispute Has E.T. Implications

Rocks found at Isua in Greenland may contain the oldest fossils of life on Earth, but not everyone agrees.

9d

How to 3D-print a living, beating heart

Think 3D printing is all about obscure plastic widgets? Think again – bioprinting pioneer Jennifer Lewis has a plan to make living, breathing human organs

9d

Nonfacial Portrait review: art fights to save faces and paint over AI

Artists play cat and mouse with face-recognition software at a South Korean exhibition in the battle to retain a division between humanity and machines

9d

Timefulness review – our impulsive and pugnacious age needs geology

If you want to save Earth, argues a new book, quit sitting around in the present hoping for the best and learn to think really long term, like a geologist

9d

A molecule for fighting muscular paralysis

Myotubular myopathy is a severe genetic disease that leads to muscle paralysis. Although no treatment currently exists, researchers have identified a molecule that not only greatly reduces the progression of the disease but also boosts life expectancy in animal models by a factor of seven. Since the molecule — known as tamoxifen — is already used for breast cancer, the researchers hope to soon s

9d

Spanking in developing countries does more harm than good, study suggests

Spanking may be increasingly harmful for children on a more global scale than previously known, a new study indicates.

9d

Geneticist solves long-standing finch beak mystery

Biologist have compared the genes of large-beaked Cameroonian finches to those of their smaller-beaked counterparts, found the answer to a 20-year old mystery: 300,000 base pairs, apparently inherited as a unit, always varied between them, and right in the middle of that genetic sequence was the well-known growth factor, IGF-1.

9d

Human activity may influence the distribution and transmission of Bartonella bacteria

A new study suggests that humans play an important role in disease risk, infection patterns, and distribution of Bartonella, advancing current understanding of Bartonella's evolutionary history and how the bacteria may be transmitted between humans and other animal species.

9d

Why Don't Animals Turn into Zombies in 'The Walking Dead'?

Animals do not turn into zombies — only humans do. At least, that seems to be the rule in AMC's sci-fi zombie thriller, "The Walking Dead."

9d

Why American history lives between the cracks

History is written by lions. But it's also recorded by lambs. In order to understand American history, we need to look at the events of the past as more prismatic than the narrative given to us in high school textbooks. Including different voices can paint a more full and vibrant portrait of America. Which is why more walks of American life can and should be storytellers. The Light of the World:

9d

Thin, Flexible New Solar Cells Could Soon Line Your Shirt

A new kind of solar cell called a perovskite is improving rapidly, bringing the prospect of solar-powered vehicles, clothing, and windows closer to reality.

9d

Trump’s Lies Are a Virus, and News Organizations Are the Host

The news media today face an epistemic crisis: how to publish the president’s commentary without amplifying his fabrications and conspiracy theories. One flashpoint came several weeks ago, when President Donald Trump told Axios reporters that he planned to use an executive order to end birthright citizenship because, as he put it, “we’re the only country in the world where a person comes in and h

9d

Dear Therapist: My Boyfriend Loves Me, but He’s Not Affectionate Enough

Editor’s Note: Every Monday, Lori Gottlieb answers questions from readers about their problems, big and small. Have a question? Email her at . Dear Therapist, I'm in a loving, long-distance relationship with my boyfriend. We’ve been together for three years, and long-distance for one. We’re both graduate students, and, for the most part, I think we have a healthy, caring, and respectful relations

9d

Scientists explain how wombats drop cubed feces

How do wombats produce cube-shaped feces? Scientists have investigated the hydrodynamics of fluids, including blood, processed food and urine, in the bodies of animals. She was curious how the differences in wombats' digestive processes and soft tissue structures might explain their oddly shaped scat.

9d

New treatment to protect people with peanut allergies ready for FDA review

Medical researchers have developed a new treatment for protection against accidental exposure to peanut.

9d

Virtual reality simulation of a supermassive black hole

The black hole at the center of our galaxy, Sagittarius A*, has been visualized in virtual reality for the first time.

9d

An Uncanny Display: Algorithmic Art at the Whitney Museum

A new show looks back over a half century of this surprisingly robust genre — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

9d

Geneticists solve long-standing finch beak mystery

Bridgett vonHoldt is best known for her work with dogs and wolves, so she was surprised when a bird biologist pulled her aside and said, "I really think you can help me solve this problem." So she turned to a mystery he'd been wrestling with for more than 20 years.

9d

Rare and diverse giant viruses unexpectedly found in a forest soil ecosystem

Until recently, scientists thought of viruses as mostly small infectious agents, tiny compared to typical bacteria and human cells. So imagine the surprise when biologist Jeff Blanchard and Ph.D. student Lauren Alteio at the University of Massachusetts Amherst, with others at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Joint Genome Institute (JGI), discovered giant viruses—relatively speaking the size o

9d

New machine aims to end India's sewer death shame

Hundreds of "manual scavengers" die each year cleaning out sewers in cities across India but a machine unveiled for Monday's World Toilet Day could help to end that tragic record.

9d

Nissan chief Ghosn arrested over financial misconduct: reports

Nissan chairman Carlos Ghosn was reportedly under arrest in Tokyo on Monday, as his firm accused him of "significant acts of misconduct" and said it would seek to oust him.

9d

Small Farmers in Mexico Keep Corn's Genetic Diversity Alive

“Campesinos” are driving the evolution of maize in North America — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

9d

Super-smart designer babies could be on offer soon. But is that ethical? | Philip Ball

Genetic selection for intelligence has hit the market – and proper regulation has become more critical than ever In his new book Blueprint , the psychologist Robert Plomin explains that it is now possible from our individual genome data to make a meaningful prediction about our IQ. When I discussed the topic with Plomin last month, we agreed on the need for urgent discussion of the implications, b

9d

9d

Ny direktør for Rejseplanen og Rejsekort: Dette er vores drømmescenarie

Hvad kan der ske med Rejseplanen og Rejsekort i fremtiden, når de to tjenester bliver integreret? Det løftede den nye direktør, Claus Rehfeld Moshøj, lidt af sløret for i sidste uge.

9d

The Dueling Deities of Harvard

Updated at 2:35 p.m. ET on November 19, 2018 The Harvard College admissions office: more sinned against than sinning, and currently serving two masters. One is the god of rich things, who demands a reactionary embrace of wealth and privilege, including the czarist notion that you can inherit Harvard the way you can inherit hemophilia or a winter palace. This is the logic of “legacy admissions”—a

9d

The End of the American Order

The Halifax Security Forum is designed to be a gathering of the world’s democratic countries, which are allied to protect each other. Hosted by the Canadian defense minister, the Forum’s signature is the brief videos that introduce the annual gathering. This year’s intro showed relay runners, mostly American, at the Olympics from Berlin in 1932 forward, ending in an uncertain baton handoff—a powe

9d

Obscure Concealed-Carry Group Spent Millions on Facebook Political Ads

One firm spent more than $2 million to advertise on the social network in the no-man's land of digital political ads.

9d

What Infowars' Alex Jones and Voldemort Have in Common

We all suffer when platforms, their users, and governments fall for the tactics of attention-gamers.

9d

Hemp fields offer a late-season pollen source for stressed bees

Colorado’s legal fields of low-THC cannabis can attract a lot of bees.

9d

Trump Attacks the Retired Admiral Who Took Down Osama bin Laden

President Donald Trump fends off criticism with a simple tactic: He dismisses anyone who disagrees with him, often linking the person to prominent Democrats. During an interview on Fox News Sunday , Chris Wallace asked the president about his portrayal of “the fake-news media” as “the enemy of the American people.” Wallace tried to bring up a quote on that subject from retired Admiral William McR

9d

Trump’s Voter-Fraud Lies Are a Betrayal of His Oath

Donald Trump lies regularly and on a wide range of subjects—but not all his lies are the same. Politicians are given ample room for puffery when inflating their accomplishments, and even lies motivated by vanity, like Trump’s boasts about his Inaugural Day crowds, are relatively harmless in the broader scheme of things. But then there are lies that are profoundly consequential, that raise questio

9d

‘If We Pass Medicare for All, I’m Going to Be Silent as a Lamb’

Q UEENS, N.Y.— “Choosing not to speak,” Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez was telling me one day last month, “is taken and read just as deliberately as choosing to speak.” Fresh off her upset primary victory over Representative Joe Crowley here, the nation’s most famous congressional candidate was speaking pretty much everywhere this summer—stumping for fellow progressives all over the country, hitting th

9d

Techtopia #79: Nordiske ingeniører vil diskutere AI

Nordiske ingeniører vil ikke overlade diskussionen om kunstig intelligens og etik til politikere, medier og filosoffer. De har fingrene i algoritmerne og har dermed et ansvar, som de ønsker at forvalte.

9d

Efter kaotisk forløb: Danske kommuner i kø for at etablere gratis wifi i byerne

Aflyst ansøgningsrunde, datalæk og it-nedbrud ramte 36 kommuner, der søgte om EU-tilskud til gratis wifi-hotspots.

9d

Etisk hacker finder data om børn frit fremme på nettet: Det flyder med eksempler

Nettet flyder med følsomme persondata, der ligger ubeskyttet hen – og som er meget nemme at grave frem, lyder det fra etisk hacker.

9d

Henrik Villadsen stopper på Sjællands Universitetshospital

Sygehusdirektør Henrik Villadsen er fritstillet efter uenighed om strategi og drift.

9d

The New Health Care: Are You Sitting Down? Standing Desks Are Overrated

They’re not cures for anything, and standing is not exercise.

9d

Sigrid Johnson Was Black. A DNA Test Said She Wasn’t.

The surge in popularity of services like 23andMe and Ancestry means that more and more people are unearthing long-buried connections and surprises in their ancestry.

9d

Forskere brugte AI til at lave 'master'-fingeraftryk, som kan låse smartphones op

Forskerne udnyttede en svaghed i fingeraftrykslæsere.

9d

Forsker bortvist, da han afslørede kollegers brug af fuptidsskrifter

Canadisk universitet lukkede for lønposen, da en af dets egne forskere offentliggjorde studie om kollegers indkomster fra såkaldte predatory journals.

9d

Princeton geneticist solves long-standing finch beak mystery

Princeton biologist Bridgett vonHoldt is best known for her work with canines, but when she compared the genes of large-beaked Cameroonian finches to those of their smaller-beaked counterparts, she found the answer to a 20-year old mystery: 300,000 base pairs, apparently inherited as a unit, always varied between them, and right in the middle of that genetic sequence was the well-known growth fact

9d

New drug discovery could halt spread of brain cancer

A team of researchers at Virginia Tech may have found a solution to stopping the spread of glioblastoma with a new drug and cancer treatment method. This work is part of a five-year research grant project across multiple universities, examining the role of interstitial fluid flow in spreading glioma cells through the brain.

9d

New blood pressure guideline could prevent 3 million cardiovascular events over 10 years

In 2017, the American College of Cardiology and the American Heart Association released new blood pressure guidelines, lowering hypertension threshold to 130/80 mm Hg from the previous 140/90 mm Hg. A new study predicts that achieving and maintaining the 2017 guideline blood pressure goals could prevent more than 3 million cardiovascular disease events over 10 years.

9d

Vil du være med til at finde de mest interessante nyheder? Send email herom til BioNyt

Se nyheder fra en tidligere dato

Tegn abonnement på

BioNyt Videnskabens Verden (www.bionyt.dk) er Danmarks ældste populærvidenskabelige tidsskrift for naturvidenskab. Det er det eneste blad af sin art i Danmark, som er helliget international forskning inden for livsvidenskaberne.

Bladet bringer aktuelle, spændende forskningsnyheder inden for biologi, medicin og andre naturvidenskabelige områder som f.eks. klimaændringer, nanoteknologi, partikelfysik, astronomi, seksualitet, biologiske våben, ecstasy, evolutionsbiologi, kloning, fedme, søvnforskning, muligheden for liv på mars, influenzaepidemier, livets opståen osv.

Artiklerne roses for at gøre vanskeligt stof forståeligt, uden at den videnskabelige holdbarhed tabes.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *


CAPTCHA Image
Reload Image