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Nyheder2018november19

Detoxify? Drink ginger? What to do after 10 days of bad air

As firefighters begin to gain control of the Camp Fire in Butte County and rain promises to wash away much of the unhealthy air in the Bay Area, a question remains:

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Canopy cameras shed new light on monkey business in Brazil

A team of Brazilian biologists supported by the Conservation Leadership Programme (CLP) is unlocking the secrets of one of the world's most fragile and threatened biodiversity hotspots thanks to the success of a pioneering camera trap project.

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How to convert climate-changing carbon dioxide into plastics and other products

Rutgers scientists have developed catalysts that can convert carbon dioxide—the main cause of global warming—into plastics, fabrics, resins and other products.

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Reducing the impact forces of water entry

When professional divers jump from a springboard, their hands are perpendicular to the water, with wrists pointed upward, as they continue toward their plunge at 30 mph.

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Better forest management won't end wildfires, but it can reduce the risks – here's how

President Donald Trump's recent comments blaming forest managers for catastrophic California wildfires have been met with outrage and ridicule from the wildland fire and forestry community. Not only were these remarks insensitive to the humanitarian crisis unfolding in California – they also reflected a muddled understanding of the interactions between wildfire and forest management.

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Combining pneumatics with a hydrogel to create a baromorph—for soft robotics

A small team of researchers at Université Paris Diderot has come up with a way to combine pneumatics with a hydrogel to create a baromorph for soft robotics applications—a baromorph is a soft material that self-configures when inflated. In their paper published in the journal Nature Materials, the group describes their research and their geometric creations. Efi Efrati with the Weizmann Institute

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Researchers report a temperature-responsive gel that absorbs and releases moisture

Takashi Miyata at Kansai University and colleagues report in Nature Communications a temperature-responsive gel that absorbs moisture and, when heated, releases it in the form of water. Applications include energy-efficient materials for condensing moisture into water.

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Dogs know when they don't know

Researchers at the DogStudies lab at the Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History have shown that dogs possess some "metacognitive" abilities—specifically, they are aware of when they do not have enough information to solve a problem and will actively seek more information, similarly to primates. To investigate this, the researchers created a test in which dogs had to find a reward—a

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‘Scores’ of parasite genomes may lead to new treatments

Scientists have sequenced the genomes of scores of parasitic worms—a move that could lead to new and more efficient ways to treat the illnesses they cause. Researchers conducted genomic studies of 81 worm species, including 45 that had never been sequenced before, and documented nearly a million new genes. With further study, some of those genes might present promising targets for new medical tre

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Dead sperm whale found in Indonesia had ingested '6kg of plastic'

The dead sperm whale, which washed ashore in Indonesia, had ingested nearly 6kg of plastic waste.

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Tactile Excel sheets and graphics to boost job prospects for blind people

Touchscreens and digital graphics are everywhere, but for people who are visually impaired, they can be a major hurdle to using modern technology. But this is set to change, thanks to tactile technology that automatically converts complex digital graphics into braille and stick-on smartphone buttons that make apps navigable by touch.

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Fear, more than hate, feeds online bigotry and real-world violence

When a U.S. senator asked Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg, "Can you define hate speech?" it was arguably the most important question that social networks face: how to identify extremism inside their communities.

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Parks help cities – but only if people use them

In cities, access to parks is strongly linked with better health for both people and neighborhoods.

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Deep sea mining zone hosts carbon dioxide-consuming bacteria, scientists discover

Scientists have discovered that bacteria in the deepest parts of the seafloor are absorbing carbon dioxide and could be turning themselves into an additional food source for other deep-sea life.

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How could multilingualism benefit India's poorest schoolchildren?

Multilingualism is the norm in India. But rather than enjoying the cognitive and learning advantages seen in multilingual children in the Global North, Indian children show low levels of learning basic school skills. Professor Ianthi Tsimpli is trying to disentangle the causes of this paradox.

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From receptor structure to new osteoporosis drugs

Researchers at the University of Zurich have determined the three-dimensional structure of a receptor that controls the release of calcium from bones. The receptor is now one of the main candidates for developing new drugs to treat osteoporosis. Knowing the receptor's blueprint will be instrumental for designing drugs that could even help to rebuild bones.

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Scientists identify new genetic causes linked to abnormal pregnancies and miscarriages

A team of scientists at the Research Institute of the McGill University Health Centre (RI-MUHC) and McGill University have identified three genes responsible for recurrent molar pregnancies, a rare complication that occurs when a non-viable pregnancy with no embryo implants in the uterus. The results of this study, published in The American Journal of Human Genetics, could have important implicati

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Ground and stream water clues reveal shale drilling impacts

Chemical clues in waters near Marcellus Shale gas wells in rural Pennsylvania can identify new drilling-related sources of methane contamination, according to scientists.

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Russia's Fancy Bear and Cozy Bear Hackers May Have New Phishing Tricks

Two new reports show an uptick in sophisticated phishing attacks originating from—where else—Russia.

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Regioner skal etablere centre til patienter med funktionelle lidelser

Regionerne skal hver have et center, der skal hjælpe patienter med funktionelle lidelser. Målet er at opbygge stærke faglige miljøer, siger formand for regionernes sundhedsudvalget.

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Tibetan soil enrichment with nitrogen and phosphorus leads to carbon loss

A RUDN soil scientist studied the soils of the Qinghai-Tibet Plateau and found that a simultaneous increase of nitrogen and phosphorus levels reduces the volume of organic carbon in the soil. The work will help reconsider the use of fertilizers in agriculture. The article was published in Science of the Total Environment.

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Who lives with you? Facebook seeks to patent software to figure out profiles of households

Facebook Inc. is applying to patent software that it could use to create profiles of users' households by making educated guesses about how many people live in the household, what their relationships to each other are, what interests they share and what electronic devices they use.

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Air pollution reduces global life expectancy by nearly two years

Fossil fuel-driven particulate air pollution cuts global average life expectancy by 1.8 years per person, according to a new pollution index and accompanying report produced by the Energy Policy Institute at the University of Chicago. The Air Quality Life Index establishes particulate pollution as the single greatest threat to human health globally, with its effect on life expectancy exceeding tha

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Electrons inside of some ceramic crystals appear to dissipate in a familiar way

A team of researchers from Canada, France and Poland has found that electrons inside of some ceramic crystals appear to dissipate in a surprising, yet familiar way—possibly a clue to the reason for the odd behavior of "strange metals." In their paper published in the journal Nature Physics, the researchers describe their experiments to better understand why strange metals behave the way they do.

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Will algorithms predict your future?

A report from Cardiff University reveals the extent to which public service provision is now being influenced by data analytics.

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New fingertip sensors to help veterans feel through their prosthetics

Today's prosthetic limbs are tools – literal attachments to the body.

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America’s Health-Care System Is Making the Opioid Crisis Worse

Outside a liquor store in a rough part of Trenton, New Jersey, a one-eyed woman with sores on her face walked by, seemingly in a hurry. I asked if she used heroin, and when she said she did, I asked her whether she had ever considered treatment. She said doctors have dismissed her. They tell her she’s choosing her “lifestyle.” The woman—who, like others, wouldn’t give me her name because of the s

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'Battlefield V' Review: Finding Grandeur in History's Bloodiest War, 64 Players at a Time

As yourself, a squad member, and part of a larger multinational force, you're implicated as a piece of the ever-charging global machine that fought World War Two.

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The Doctor Prescribes Video Games and Virtual Reality Rehab

Opinion: Scientifically-backed software is shifting patient care from the hospital to the home.

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NTU Singapore scientists develop 'contact lens' patch to treat eye diseases

NTU Singapore scientists have developed a 'contact lens' patch with microneedles that could be a painless and efficient alternative to current methods of treating eye diseases such as glaucoma. Patients are unable to keep up with the prescribed regime of current localised treatment methods like eye drops, which are hindered by the eye's natural defences, blinking and tears. Eye injections can be p

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Do interactions in molecular and cellular networks follow the same principles as human social interplay?

To decode the underlying laws that govern the organization of life into molecules, cells and tissues are the great scientific challenges of our time. Dr. Carlo Vittorio Cannistraci from the Biotechnology Center (BIOTEC) at the Technical University Dresden, Germany, explored the question whether brain cells interact in the same manner as molecules within a cell and published his findings in the sci

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Reduction in wood burning by rural people in China results in less fine particulate matter pollution

A team of researchers from China, the U.S. and Norway has found that urging rural residents to switch from burning wood and grasses to cleaner fuels for cooking has resulted in less fine particulate matter being spewed into the air. In their paper published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the group describes their study of air quality for the period from 2005 to 2015 in China a

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Embryological study of the skull reveals dinosaur-bird connection

Birds are the surviving descendants of predatory dinosaurs. However, since the likes of Tyrannosaurus and Velociraptor, some parts of their anatomy have become radically transformed. The skull, for instance, is now toothless, and accommodates much larger eyes and brain. Skulls are like 3-D puzzles made of smaller bones: As the eye socket and brain case expanded along evolution, birds lost two bone

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Air pollution is shaving years from people's lives, study finds

WASHINGTON—People could add years to their lives in smog-plagued parts of the world if authorities could reduce particulate pollution—soot from cars and industry—to levels recommended by the World Health Organization, a new study reported Monday.

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Fungal spores are a primary source of sodium salt particles in Amazon air

Tiny particles of sodium salt float in the air over the pristine Amazon basin. Why? The only explanation before now has been that winds blow marine particles hundreds of miles inland from the Atlantic Ocean. An international team of scientists used chemical imaging and atmospheric models to prove otherwise. They discovered that, during the wet season, fungal spores make up as much as 69 percent of

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Responses of waterbirds to climate change is linked to their preferred wintering habitats

A new scientific article shows that 25 European waterbird species can change their wintering areas depending on winter weather. Warm winters allow them to shift their wintering areas northeastwards, whereas cold spells push birds southwestwards. Species wintering in deep waters show the fastest long-term change: their abundances have shifted annually about 5 km northeastwards in the past 24 years.

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Tracking an epidemic requires computer models—but what if those models are wrong?

Whether they're tracking the future spread of an epidemic, or determining where best to distribute a vaccine during an outbreak, today's disease researchers depend on reliable computer models.

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Fregatten sank med en række af verdens mest avancerede maritime våben om bord

De norske fregatter var tidligt ude med flere nye våbensystemer – men helikopterne mangler stadig.

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Reducing water scarcity by restoring contaminated groundwater aquifers

The fight against water scarcity is becoming one of the main 21st century challenges, with securing a clean supply key to efforts. The REGROUND project has developed a novel, green ground water-innovation and is ready to introduce it to European markets.

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Sunset Crater, San Francisco Volcanic Field

The San Francisco Volcanic Field is a 4,700 square kilometers (1,800 square miles) area in the southern boundary of the Colorado Plateau. The field contains more than 600 scoria cones active in the past six million years. The Sunset Crater is the youngest of these scoria cones, and was active about 1000 years ago.

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Your riding position can give you an advantage in a road cycling sprint, research shows

Many professional road cycling events are hundreds of kilometres long, but the final placings are often decided by what happens in the last few seconds of any race stage.

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Combining real, virtual worlds improves driverless vehicle testing

Augmented reality technology can accelerate testing of connected and automated vehicles by 1,000 to 100,000 times, and reduce additional testing costs—beyond the price of physical vehicles—to almost zero, according to a new white paper published by Mcity.

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How Political Opinions Change

A clever experiment shows it's surprisingly easy to change someone’s political views, revealing how flexible we are — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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NASA has chosen the landing site for its life-hunting 2020 Mars rover

Jezero crater on Mars is thought to have once had a river flowing along its rim and could hold signs of ancient life

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Oil extraction likely triggered mid-century earthquakes in L.A.

World War II-era oil pumping under Los Angeles likely triggered a rash of mid-sized earthquakes in the 1930s and 1940s, potentially leading seismologists to overestimate the earthquake potential in the region, according to new research published in AGU's Journal of Geophysical Research: Solid Earth.

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Chemists determine how to avoid byproducts in the synthesis of perovskites

A RUDN professor, together with his colleagues from other Moscow universities, has described the mechanism of byproducts produced in the course of the synthesis of perovskites—minerals that have numerous prospective applications, e.g. as superconductors. The discovery could make their production faster and more efficient. The article was published in Chemistry of Materials.

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Just Because an Election Is Legal Doesn’t Mean It’s Legitimate

Updated at 2:38 p.m. ET on November 20, 2018 The Georgia Democrat Stacey Abrams won’t call her opponent, the Republican Brian Kemp, the legitimate winner of the 2018 gubernatorial election, although she concedes that he is the legal winner. “We know sometimes the law does not do what it should and something being legal does not make it right,” Abrams told CNN’s Jake Tapper on Sunday . Her reasoni

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Does Netflix's '13 Reasons Why' influence teen suicide? Survey asks at-risk youths

A significant proportion of suicidal teens treated in one psychiatric emergency department said that watching the Netflix series '13 Reasons Why' had increased their suicide risk, a University of Michigan study finds.

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Reducing the impact forces of water entry

As professional divers complete what's known as a rip dive, their hands remove water in front of the body, creating a cavity that reduces the initial impact force. The rest of the body is aligned to shoot through the same cavity created by the hands. Using the hands to create cavities in the water's surface is similar to the concept behind the fluid-structure studies that researchers at Utah State

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Aquatic animals that jump out of water inspire leaping robots

Ever watch aquatic animals jump out of the water and wonder how they manage to do it in such a streamlined and graceful way? Researchers who specialize in water entry and exit in nature had the same question. During the APS DFD 71st Annual Meeting, Nov. 18-20, they will present their work designing a robotic system inspired by jumping copepods and frogs to illuminate some of the fluid dynamics at

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Tiny lasers light up immune cells

A team of researchers from the School of Physics at the University of St Andrews have developed tiny lasers that could revolutionise our understanding and treatment of many diseases, including cancer.

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Siemens to build new London Underground trains

German manufacturing conglomerate Siemens will build almost 100 new trains to replace the decades-old rolling stock on London Underground's Piccadilly Line, the group said in a statement Tuesday.

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Wild With: Wolves (360 Video)

Immerse yourself into the thick North American woods to watch how wolves investigate and hunt in a pack. These cute and cuddly looking animals can be some of the craftiest and fiercest hunters amongst the animal kingdom. VR360 is best viewed in a headset. On your phone: (1) tap the cardboard icon on the bottom right (2) place your phone into any VR viewer (3) Enjoy! For a more immersive experienc

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En hjælpende hånd til patienter og praktiserende læger

Vores forslag om at lade nyuddannede læger gøre tjeneste i seks måneder i almen praksis er ikke ment som en fornærmelse. Tværtimod. Det er en anerkendelse af de praktiserende lægers vigtige betydning i sundhedsvæsenet.

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Thanksgiving Movies Leave a Lot to Be Desired. America Needs a New One—Let's Make It 'Coco'

It's the best all-ages movie in years—and it's ready to stream. Watch it this week with your own cartoonish family.

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Brilliant Two Switch Panel: Rule Your Smart Home Devices

This ingenious smart home hub and light switch integrates with Alexa, Nest, Ecobee, Ring, Hue, Sonos, and more, but it still has a little way to go.

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Stop Worrying About Buying Carbon Offsets for Your Flights

Many airlines must offset their emissions to meet a UN agreement, so they're done relying on individuals, which is likely more effective anyway.

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Lucid Dreaming: This Retreat Can Train Your Nighttime Visions

Stephen LaBerge is the Thomas Edison of lucid dreaming and the best way to meet him is at private conferences. I hopped a plane, to find out what I could learn.

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Climate change will likely cause darker tropical forests, researchers say

Observable effects of climate change that scientists had predicted in the past are now a reality: Glaciers are shrinking, plant and animal ranges have shifted and trees are flowering sooner.

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Bio jet fuels good for the climate, but technologies need tweaking

Norwegian aviation executives like to joke among themselves that when God created aviation, he was thinking of Norway.

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Image of the Day: Hair Brush

Cats' tongues are covered in tiny spines called papillae, which help wick moisture from the mouth and onto the fur.

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With Brain Implants, Scientists Aim to Translate Thoughts into Speech

Experts increasingly think a system that could help paralyzed patients is within reach — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Volcanoes and glaciers combine as powerful methane producers

Large amounts of the potent greenhouse gas methane are being released from an Icelandic glacier, scientists have discovered. A study of Sólheimajökull glacier, which flows from the active, ice-covered volcano Katla, shows that up to 41 tons of methane is being released through meltwaters every day during the summer months.

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Forskere: Der bliver drukket mere alkohol i lande med koldt og mørkt klima

Folk, der lever i lande med koldt og mørkt klima, drikker ofte mere alkohol. Og flere af dem får leversygdomme, viser undersøgelse.

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Encouraging prospects for moon hunters

Astrophysicists of the University of Zürich, ETH Zürich and the NCCR PlanetS show how the icy moons of Uranus were born. Their result suggests that such potentially habitable worlds are much more abundant in the Universe than previously thought. The unprecedentedly complex computer simulations were performed at the Swiss National Supercomputing Centre (CSCS) in Lugano.

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Ground and stream water clues reveal shale drilling impacts

Chemical clues in waters near Marcellus Shale gas wells in rural Pennsylvania can identify new drilling-related sources of methane contamination, according to scientists.

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A toxic bullet involved in bacterial competition found by researchers

A bacterial toxin that allows an infectious strain of bacteria to defeat its competitors has been discovered by Imperial College London scientists.

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Plant characteristics shaped by parental conflict

Different subpopulations of a plant species can have distinct traits, varying in size, seed count, coloration, and so on. The primary source of this variation is genes: different versions of a gene can lead to different traits. However, genes are not the only determinant of such traits, and researchers are learning more about another contributor: epigenetics. Epigenetic factors are things that reg

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New study highlights complexity of warming and melting in Antarctica

In a study released on Nature Climate Change's website today, scientists draw from recent findings to underscore the multifaceted dynamics of surface melting in Antarctica. The study authors come from Columbia University's Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory, the Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences at the University of Colorado Boulder, and Rowan University.

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Reduced pollution can add a year to the lives of Copenhageners in 2040

Copenhagen has been struggling with air pollution for many years now. Pollution from lorries, vans, buses and cars each year costs lives. Now, research conducted by the University of Copenhagen and a series of collaborators shows that the average lifespan of Copenhageners could increase by an entire year in 2040 if the level of pollution was reduced to the level found in the countryside.

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MDMA Makes People More Cooperative… But That Doesn't Mean More Trusting

A new study from England suggests that the drug makes people more cooperative, but only with those who are deemed trustworthy.

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These Ancient Termite Mounds Are As Old As the Egyptian Pyramids. And They're Visible from Space.

Around the same time the ancient Egyptians were building their mighty pyramids, tiny termites were digging through the earth, creating giant mounds in Brazil that still exist today and are so massive, they're visible from space, according to a new study.

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Half of the Year's Rain Falls on Earth in Just 12 Days

Extreme precipitation will be more likely in a warming world.

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Middle East Looters Turn to Spirit Possession to Find Gold Treasure

Some looters are turning to spirits called "jinn" in their hunt for gold treasure.

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James Patterson on writing: Plotting, research, and first drafts

James Patterson has sold 300 million copies of his 130 books, making him one of the most successful authors alive today. He talks about how some writers can overdo it by adding too much research, or worse, straying from their outline for too long. James' latest book, The President is Missing , co-written with former President Bill Clinton, is out now. The President Is Missing: A Novel List Price:

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How to Share and Store Pictures with Google Photos, Dropbox, AirDrop, and More

Leave no album un-shared with these easy-to-use apps.

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How a Bunch of Dreamers Turned Texas a Shade of Pink

The US Senate contest between Ted Cruz and Beto O’Rourke drew most of the headlines, but the real story was how voters hit the gerrymandering wall.

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Airports Cracked Uber and Lyft—Time for Cities to Take Note

Airports serve as handy case studies for what happens when the cars show up, and how to beat them back again.

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På jagt efter enzymer: »Jeg kigger ind i planternes maskinrum«

Tomas Laursen vil gerne afkode den præcise arbejdsgang, planter bruger, når de strikker deres særlige stoffer som vanilje eller morfin sammen. Målet er storskalaproduktion af medicinske stoffer.

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The Correct Time to Eat Thanksgiving Dinner

In the spirit of a holiday when people, in claustrophobic proximity to their loved ones, feel compelled to take stronger-than-usual positions on issues of even minuscule import, I have a conclusion to share: The correct time to eat Thanksgiving dinner is 4 p.m. There are many obvious reasons why this is the case. Start with the turkey. It needs about four hours in the oven (give or take, dependin

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Tossing a Bird That Does Not Fly Out of a Plane

YELLVILLE, Arkansas — It is October in the Ozarks. The grass has dried out and the trees have bronzed and browned. Deer lie glaze-eyed in the back of camouflaged pickup trucks. High-school football helmets crack every Friday night. And seven days a week, workers in processing plants are helping to kill, gut, pluck, and truss turkeys for Thanksgiving tables around the country. Here in Yellville, t

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Why Do MDs Get More Research Dollars Than Doctors of Osteopathy?

And what exactly is osteopathy, anyway? — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Colorful Asteroids Near Neptune Reveal a Solar System Conundrum

Unexplained patterns in the colors of certain space rocks suggest scientists still have much to learn about the solar system’s origins and early evolution — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Nyslået datalogiprofessor ser kritisk på Google: Tilfældige firmaer skal ikke have monopol på sandheden

Nyudnævnt professor i datalogi på Aalborg Universitet vil sikre borgernes adgang til informationer via det intelligente web, også kaldet det semantiske web.

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El Niño på trapperne: Kan have stået bag global hungersnød for over 100 år siden

El Niño er på vej, viser de nyeste målinger. I år bliver den formentlig 'svag,' men fænomenet kan medføre katastrofale konsekvenser.

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Nuclear ‘knots’ could unravel the mysteries of atoms

Skyrmions might help loosen scientific snarls in studies of atomic nuclei.

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The Eerie Parallels Between Trump and the Watergate ‘Road Map’

Nearly 45 years ago, the House Judiciary Committee concluded that President Richard Nixon’s contact with high-level Justice Department officials overseeing the Watergate investigation, detailed in a 62-page “road map” of evidence collected by prosecutors in 1972–73, amounted to an impeachable misuse of executive power. A half century later, the FBI’s former top lawyer, Jim Baker—a close friend an

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Who Owns Oklahoma?

Fifteen years ago, an assistant federal public defender and a defense investigator found a cross commemorating a murder beside a deserted road in eastern Oklahoma. It wasn’t where it was supposed to be. Law-enforcement records said it should have been about a mile and a quarter away. That slight discrepancy has led to a Supreme Court case slated for oral arguments on November 27. Formally at stak

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American Exorcism

Louisa Muskovits appeared to be having a panic attack. It was March of 2016, and Louisa, a 33-year-old with a history of alcohol abuse, was having a regular weekly session with her chemical-dependency counselor in Tacoma, Washington. Louisa had recently separated from her husband, Steven. When the counselor asked about her marriage, she said she wasn’t ready to talk about it. The counselor presse

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DIY Internet Access Gets a Reboot From Grassroots Co-Ops

Efforts to bring broadband connections to small communities signal the potential to reboot the spirit of the web.

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5 New Nonlethal Weapons the Defense Department Is Developing

The US Department of Defense's Joint Non-Lethal Weapons Program is testing a new arsenal powered by lasers, plasma, chemical irritants, and more.

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California Fire Survivors Brace for Debris-Filled Mudslides

The rains are coming to California, and the fires have primed the soil for another disaster that can claim yet more lives.

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Beware Black Friday Scams Lurking Among the Holiday Deals

Cybercriminals are always looking to steal your credit card or even your identity. But it pays to be on extra high alert come Black Friday.

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We Made Our Own Artificial Intelligence Art, and So Can You

WIRED's Tom Simonite, with little programming experience, used open source tools and data to create art with machine learning.

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3 Smart Things About Our Sixth Sense: Interoception

Beyond sight, hearing, smell, taste, and touch, we have an inner sense that allows us to perceive ourselves.

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Tundra-Trailblazing Beavers Shaped How We CoexistCanada Dennis Hume Wrong

The buck-toothed rodents have long taken the lead in forging civilization's path forward.

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How a Teenager's Code Spawned a $432,500 Piece of Art

Robbie Barrat shared code to generate art with AI. To his surprise, a Paris collective used it to create a portrait that sold at Christie's.

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Giant Lasers Bring Distant Twinkling Stars Into Sharp Focus

Earthbound beams of light help a telescope in Chile stabilize flickering from afar.

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3D-Printed Organs From Living Cells Could Help Boost Senses

Michael McAlpine, a mechanical engineer at the University of Minnesota, has spent the past six years making a less synthetic kind of prosthetic.

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Ash dieback: Seed orchards could help species recover sooner

A scientist at the John Innes Centre in Norwich says resistant seeds could help beat the fatal disease.

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How to convert climate-changing carbon dioxide into plastics and other products

Rutgers scientists have developed catalysts that can convert carbon dioxide — the main cause of global warming — into plastics, fabrics, resins and other products.

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MRI scans shows promise in predicting dementia

Doctors may one day be able to gauge a patient's risk of dementia with an MRI scan, according to a new study from Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. Using a new technique for analyzing MRI data, researchers were able to predict who would experience cognitive decline with 89 percent accuracy.

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Volcanoes and glaciers combine as powerful methane producers

Large amounts of the potent greenhouse gas methane are being released from an Icelandic glacier, scientists have discovered.A study of Sólheimajökull glacier, which flows from the active, ice-covered volcano Katla, shows that up to 41 tonnes of methane is being released through meltwaters every day during the summer months.

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Scientists unveil completely human platform for testing age-specific vaccine responses

A team of scientists at Boston Children's Hospital has developed the first modeling system for testing age-specific human immune responses to vaccines — outside the body. The practical, cost-effective new platform, using all human components, is expected to accelerate and de-risk the development, assessment and selection of vaccines.

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When AI and optoelectronics meet: Researchers take control of light properties

Researchers from INRS and the University of Sussex customize the properties of broadband light sources using an AI algorithm and a photonic chip.

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Researchers use MRI to predict Alzheimer's disease

MRI brain scans perform better than common clinical tests at predicting which people will go on to develop Alzheimer's disease, according to a new study.

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Women benefit from mammography screening beyond age 75

Women age 75 years and older should continue to get screening mammograms because of the comparatively high incidence of breast cancer found in this age group, according to a new study.

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Elon Musk renames his BFR spacecraft Starship

The entrepreneur would not reveal why he had renamed the craft, which has still not yet been built.

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Star to fallen idol: The Japanese rise and fall of Carlos Ghosn

Carlos Ghosn's status as an outsider in Japan brought him huge success, as his maverick style blew a gale through a musty corporate world, but his disregard of business norms may ultimately prove his undoing.

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Twitter CEO Dorsey sparks India social media storm

Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey has been accused of inciting hate against India's highest caste after being photographed holding a poster declaring "smash Brahminical patriarchy" during a visit to the country.

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S. Korea's Jeju Air in $4.4 bn 40-plane Boeing order

South Korean budget carrier Jeju Air has ordered 40 airplanes from US manufacturer Boeing for $4.4 billion, the airline said on Tuesday, one of the country's largest-ever aircraft purchases.

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Amazon HQ expansion means tough fight for talent

When tech giants like Amazon expand, other companies don't just worry about losing business. They also fret about hanging on to their employees.

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90 meter lang vinge: Kinesiske Goldwind satser på havvindmøller

Med lancering af hele tre nye offshore-modeller – heraf en 8 MW med rotordiameter på 168 meter – øger verdens tredjestørste vindmølleproducent sin satsning til søs.

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Forsøg dæmper frygten for fed mad: Kroppen tilpasser sig

Det er ikke farligt at spise en kost med meget fedt. Det er det samlede kalorieindtag og den varierede kost, der gør forskellen, viser dansk forsøg.

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The physicist called Einstein – but not the one you think

There is debate around how much Albert Einstein's first wife, Mileva, contributed to his discoveries.

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Stofskiftet tilpasser sig fed mad

Fedt er fedt – En langvarig, høj daglig indtagelse af fedt i maden – mættet…

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EasyJet logs soaring annual profit

EasyJet's annual net profit jumped by almost a fifth on strong sales and record passenger numbers, the British no-frills airline announced on Tuesday.

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Leaky Brain, Leaky Gut: Are They Real?

First there was leaky gut; now there’s leaky brain. These questionable concepts are being promoted by practitioners of so-called “functional medicine.”

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Nissan shares plunge as Ghosn faces ouster after arrest

Nissan and Mitsubishi shares plunged Tuesday, as the automakers prepared to oust chairman Carlos Ghosn a day after he was arrested for alleged financial misconduct.

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Canada rig accident spills 250,000 liters of oil into Atlantic

A surveillance aircraft and six ships were dispatched Monday to assess a spill of 250,000 liters of oil from a drilling platform off Canada's Atlantic coast, officials said.

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California wildfire pollution paralyzes San Francisco region

The sidewalk cafes of this Silicon Valley city, usually packed at lunchtime with workers from Google and other high-tech companies, were mostly abandoned Monday afternoon.

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Instagram ousting fake followers from accounts

Instagram on Monday said it is booting fake followers, likes, and comments generated by applications tailored to make accounts appear more popular than they actually are.

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Student loan debt still crippling burden for millions of Americans

Michael Bloomberg's record $1.8 billion donation for financial aid to Johns Hopkins University highlights the problem of student debt in America, which can still be a burden even years after graduation.

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Scientists work to save wild Puerto Rican parrot after Maria

Biologists are trying to save the last of the endangered Puerto Rican parrots after more than half the population of the bright green birds with turquoise-tipped wings disappeared when Hurricane Maria hit Puerto Rico and destroyed their habitat and food sources.

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Frogs breed young to beat virus

Frogs from groups exposed to a deadly virus are breeding at younger ages, new research suggests.

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Live probiotics can re-balance the gut microbiome and modify immune system response

New research published in the International Journal of Pharmaceutics demonstrates that 'good' bacteria in the live probiotic SymproveTM can successfully reach and colonise the gut, where they go on to change the existing gut flora. They are also capable of modifying immune response.

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Dansk ’verdensklasse’-satsning på kunstig intelligens: Ihh, hvor vi gungrer!

»Ministeren mangler med sin storskrydende udmelding tilsyneladende blik for den buldrende udvikling i kunstig intelligens, som forgår på globalt plan,« lyder det fra Henning Mølsted, redaktør på Version2.

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Depressed people have an increased risk of atrial fibrillation

Depressed people have an increased risk of atrial fibrillation, according to a study published today in the European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, a European Society of Cardiology (ESC) journal.1 Medication was not responsible for the high frequency of atrial fibrillation in depressed people. The findings are reported during Global AF Aware Week.

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Pølle-mysterie er løst: Derfor er vombattens afføring firkantet

Vombatten er det eneste dyr i verden, som laver firkantet lort. De bruger afføringen til at afmærke deres territorium.

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How to melt gold at room temperature

When the tension rises, unexpected things can happen — not least when it comes to gold atoms. Researchers from, among others, Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden, have now managed, for the first time, to make the surface of a gold object melt at room temperature.

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Frogs breed young to beat virus

Frogs from groups exposed to a deadly virus are breeding at younger ages, new research suggests.

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Explaining the plummeting cost of solar power

The dramatic drop in the cost of solar photovoltaic (PV) modules, which has fallen by 99 percent over the last four decades, is often touted as a major success story for renewable energy technology. But one question has never been fully addressed: What exactly accounts for that stunning drop? A new analysis by MIT researchers has pinpointed what caused the savings, including the policies and techn

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Many patients diagnosed with adenomas may not receive colonoscopies in recommended time frame

Patients who are diagnosed with adenomas, a possible precursor of colorectal cancer, often do not receive subsequent colonoscopies within the recommended time frame.

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Improving dementia care and treatment saves thousands of pounds in care homes

Improving staff training in care homes and reducing reliance on harmful medications saves thousands of pounds per year, as well as improving quality of life and reducing agitation in dementia, new research has demonstrated.

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Barack Obama and Donald Trump Can’t Stand Each Other

CHICAGO —The midterms are done, and Barack Obama is trying to get back to his post-presidency. He still thinks the country and the world are broken, but he’s dropping back out of the public debate, urging those who came to his foundation’s second annual summit here on Monday that they need to pick back up the charge for change. “You literally can remake the world right now, because it badly needs

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Trænede stamceller skal kurere Parkinsons

Syv patienter i Japan bliver forsøgt kurereret for Parkinsons sygdom ved hjælp af stamcelleterapi. Danske stamcelleforskere starter forsøg om halvandet år.

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11 Things We’d Really Like to Know: Does the Universe Still Need Einstein?

Physicists are no longer unified in the search for a unified theory.

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Science Times at 40: The Key to Stopping the Illegal Wildlife Trade: China

The country is a critical market for animal contraband. Some scientists fear the official commitment to conservation may be wavering.

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A Conversation With: Steven Pinker Thinks the Future Is Looking Bright

The Harvard psychologist says he is no starry-eyed optimist. It’s just that the data don’t lie.

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Science Times at 40: Survivor

A story of mass extinctions.

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11 THINGS We’d Really like to know: How Can We Unleash the Immune System?

Although immunotherapy can work wonders for cancer, it does not help everyone, side effects can be fierce, and costs are high. But the field is young.

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11 Things We’d Really Like to Know: Where’s Our Warp Drive to the Stars?

Physicists haven’t given up on the dream of zipping around the universe. Now they’ve come up with a far-out idea for making it happen.

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11 Things We’d Really Like to Know: Will We Survive Climate Change?

Possibly. There is ‘no scientific support for inevitable doom,’ one expert notes.

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11 Things We’d Really Like to Know: How Will We Outsmart A.I. Liars?

For better and worse, humans are only improving their ability to deceive themselves with technology.

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11 Things We’d Really Like to Know: Honestly, Some Questions Are Better Left Unanswered

Cat-poop coffee. Time travel. Alien messages. We should leave some mysteries alone.

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11 Things We’d Really Like to Know: How Long Can People Live?

The trick is not to increase life span, scientists say, but to lengthen “health span.”

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11 Things We’d Really Like to Know: Why Are We Still So Fat?

Only bariatric surgery reliably leads to long-term weight loss. Now scientists hope to duplicate the effects with a pill.

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Global Health: Why Don’t We Have Vaccines Against Everything?

Money is just the obvious obstacle. A few diseases, like H.I.V., so far have outwitted both the immune system and scientists.

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11 things we’d really like to know: When Will We Solve Mental Illness?

Biology was supposed to cure what ails psychiatry. Decades later, millions of people with mental disorders are still waiting.

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11 things we’d Really like to know: Will We Ever Cure Alzheimer’s?

Few drugs have been approved for treatment of this dementia, and none works very well. It has become one of the most intractable problems in medicine.

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11 Things We’d Really Like to Know: How Did We Get to Be Human?

Evolution did not draw a straight line from early hominins to modern humans. At one point, we shared the planet with a number of near-relatives.

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Rains Bring a Microbial Massacre to Chilean Desert

Freak heavy rainstorms in 2015 and 2017 wiped out many dry-adapted microbes in the Atacama Desert, useful info in the search for life off Earth. Christopher Intagliata reports. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Science Times at 40: Is There Hope for These Great Apes?

Mountain gorillas are faring better — perhaps because some humans just won’t listen to reason.

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Science Times at 40: Essay: The Experiments Are Fascinating. But Nobody Can Repeat Them.

Science is mired in a “replication” crisis. Fixing it will not be easy.

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Science Times at 40: ‘Enough Is Enough’: Science, Too, Has a Problem With Harassment

Many women in science thought that meritocracy was the antidote to sexism. Now some have decided on a more direct approach.

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Science Times at 40: Some Good News, and a Hard Truth, About Science

Lost in the swirl of alternative truths is the fact that science is a verb, not a noun.

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The Atlantic Daily: Reliably Unrepeatable

What We’re Following Redesigning Immigration: Presidential tweets and threats aside, is there a better way to handle immigration to the U.S., a system with years-long application backlogs and millions of undocumented workers? Krishnadev Calamur looks at these models for redesigning a hypothetical—and more efficient—immigration system for the U.S. Repeating Research: A large team of psychologists

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NASA Mars 2020 Rover Gets a Landing Site: A Crater That Contained a Lake

The rover will search the Jezero Crater and delta for the chemical building blocks of life and other signs of past microbes.

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To predict the future, the brain has two clocks

submitted by /u/ClarendonDrive [link] [comments]

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Aspirin and omega-3 reduce pre-cancerous bowel polyps

Both aspirin and a purified omega-3, called EPA, reduce the number of pre-cancerous polyps in patients found to be at high risk of developing bowel cancer, according to new research.

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We finally know how wombats poop cubes

Animals An engineer got the scoop on square poop. Everyone knows wombat poop is square, but until now, no one knew why.

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Why the White House Correspondents’ Association dinner won’t feature a comedian in 2019

The 2018 WHCA ended in controversy after comedian Michelle Wolf made jokes some considered to be offensive. The WHCA apologized for Wolf's jokes, though some journalists and many comedians backed the comedian and decried arguments in favor of limiting the types of speech permitted at the event. Ron Chernow , who penned a bestselling biography of Alexander Hamilton, will speak at next year's dinne

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Swifts ride air currents to catch a free lunch

Once an adult swift (Apus apus) leaves its breeding colony and takes to the air migrating south, it won't touch down again until returning home to nest 10 months later. "Common swifts are exceptional in their level of adaptation to aerial life," says Emmanuel de Margerie, a biologist from the CNRS (Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique) at the University of Rennes, France, adding, "Foraging

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The subtle science of wok tossing

Wok tossing is essential for making a good fried rice—or so claim a group of researchers presenting new work at the American Physical Society's Division of Fluid Dynamics 71st Annual Meeting, which will take place Nov. 18-20 at the Georgia World Congress Center in Atlanta, Georgia.

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The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: No More Funny Business

Written by Olivia Paschal ( @oliviacpaschal ) and Madeleine Carlisle ( @maddiecarlisle2 ) Today in 5 Lines Sixteen House Democrats signed a letter stating their opposition to Nancy Pelosi as the next speaker of the House. There is currently no declared challenger to Pelosi. CNN said it will drop its lawsuit against the Trump administration after the White House fully restored White House correspo

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Trump Restores Acosta’s Pass but Issues ‘Rules’ for Reporters

Nearly a week after the start of a heated legal battle, the White House decided on Monday that it would fully restore the CNN chief White House correspondent Jim Acosta’s press credentials. In response, CNN announced that its lawsuit is “no longer necessary.” “We look forward to continuing to cover the White House,” the network said in a statement. The decision came in the form of a letter Monday

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Response to daily stressors could affect brain health in older adults

Taking typical daily annoyances such as a long wait at the doctor's office or a traffic jam on the freeway in stride may help preserve brain health in older adults.

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Chemistry freed from space and time

Shopping on the internet, storing photos in the cloud, turning up a thermostat with an app — all are commonplace. Now, the internet of things and the cloud are entering the world of chemical research and production. Researchers have used remote servers in Japan to autonomously optimize conditions to synthesize drugs in a British laboratory. The process was controlled over the internet by research

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Online Shopping: The Complete Wired Guide

Everything you ever wanted to know about Amazon, data privacy, and those weird new register-free retail stores.

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Proposed cancer treatment may boost lung cancer stem cells, study warns

Epigenetic therapies — targeting enzymes that alter what genes are turned on or off in a cell — are of growing interest in the cancer field as a way of making a cancer less aggressive or less malignant. Researchers at Boston Children's Hospital now report that at least one epigenetic therapy that initially looked promising for lung cancer actually has the opposite effect, boosting cancer stem ce

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Researchers offer perspective on legal, ethical implications of lost eggs and embryos

Three medical and legal scholars discussed the implications of one couple's wrongful death suit seeking compensation for the March 2018 loss at a fertility center of more than 4,000 frozen eggs and embryos.

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Astronomers discover giant relic of disrupted 'tadpole' galaxy

Astronomers have identified a disrupted galaxy resembling a giant tadpole, complete with an elliptical head and a long, straight tail, about 300 million light years away from Earth. The discovery illuminates how and why galaxies disappear.

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New non-mechanical laser steering technology

Steerable electro-evanescent optical refractor (SEEOR) chips take laser light in the mid-wavelength infrared (MWIR) as an input and steers the beam at the output in two dimensions without the need for mechanical devices.

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Widely used reference for the human genome is missing 300 million bits of DNA

Experts say additional reference genomes from different populations are needed for research.

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New gear in life's clock: Vitamin D

Researchers discover that vitamin D plays a key role in embryonic development in vertebrates and by blocking vitamin D in embryos of zebrafish, researchers were able to induce dormancy in a species that doesn't enter dormancy. The discovery could have major implications in human health research.

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Odd bodies, rapid spins keep cosmic rings close

Forget those shepherding moons. Gravity and the odd shapes of asteroid Chariklo and dwarf planet Haumea — small objects deep in our solar system — can be credited for forming and maintaining their own rings, according new research.

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Light scalpel: A major step toward non-viral ocular gene therapy using laser and nanotechnology

Gold nanoparticles, which act like 'nanolenses,' concentrate the energy produced by the extremely short pulse of a femtosecond laser to create a nanoscale incision on the surface of the eye's retina cells. This technology, which preserves cell integrity, can be used to effectively inject drugs or genes into specific areas of the eye, offering new hope to people with glaucoma, retinitis or macular

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Prototype of robot dog nose

Every day, thousands of trained K9 dogs sniff out narcotics, explosives and missing people. These dogs are invaluable for security, but they're also expensive. Researchers have made the beginning steps toward an artificial 'robot nose' device that officers could use instead of dogs. The heart of the system would be living odor receptors grown from mouse genes that respond to target odors, includin

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Powerful new map depicts environmental degradation across Earth

Geographers have created a new world map showing dramatic changes in land use over the last quarter century. Researchers turned high-resolution satellite images from the European Space Agency into one of the most detailed looks so far at how people are reshaping the planet.

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Kindergarten difficulties may predict academic achievement across primary grades

Identifying factors that predict academic difficulties during elementary school should help inform efforts to help children who may be at risk. New research suggests that children's executive functions may be a particularly important risk factor for such difficulties.

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As climate and land-use change accelerate, so must efforts to preserve California's plants

A team developed a computer model that identifies the high-priority areas in California for preservation in order to save the state's native plants in the face of rapid climate change and habitat destruction. The model is based on three measures of biodiversity: genetic uniqueness (divergence), historic speciation rate (diversification) and independent evolutionary history (survival), but also inc

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'True polar wander' may have caused ice age

Earth's latest ice age may have been caused by changes deep inside the planet. Based on evidence from the Pacific Ocean, including the position of the Hawaiian Islands.

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Freeze-frame microscopy captures molecule's 'lock-and-load' on DNA

One of the body's largest macromolecules is the machinery that gloms onto DNA and transcribes it into mRNA, the blueprint for proteins. But the molecule, TFIID, is complex with lots of floppy appendages, which makes it hard to obtain a clear picture of its structure. Using state-of-the-art cryo-electron microscopy detectors and computer analysis, scientists have captured unprecedented detail of ho

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Bending light around tight corners without backscattering losses

Researchers demonstrate a new optical waveguide capable of bending photons around tight corners on a smaller scale than previously possible. The technology is made possible by through photonic crystals using the concept of topological insulators.

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Human images from world's first total-body scanner unveiled

EXPLORER, the world's first medical imaging scanner that can capture a 3D picture of the whole human body at once, has produced its first scans.

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Cessation fatigue predicts which smokers making a quit attempt are likely to relapse

Cessation fatigue increased in the first six weeks of a quit attempt and increased the likelihood of relapse, report researchers at the Medical University of South Carolina in the Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology. Higher cessation fatigue also predicted worse performance on several other important cessation milestones. Cessation fatigue offers a new target for treatment interventions,

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'Druggable' cancer target found in pathway regulating organ size

It's known that cancer involves unchecked cell growth and that a biological pathway that regulates organ size, known at the Hippo pathway, is also involved in cancer. It's further known that a major player in this pathway, YAP, drives many types of tumors. Now, researchers at Boston Children's Hospital have solved an ongoing problem: how to turn this knowledge into a practical drug target.

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Ancient Skeletons of Woman and Fetus Hint at Childbirth Death 3,700 Years Ago

Archaeologists in Egypt recently unearthed a grim discovery: skeletons of a pregnant woman and her fetus.

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Building a Trestle Table for Thanksgiving | Alaska: The Last Frontier

Atz Sr.’s floating homestead needs a table for Thanksgiving dinner. Stream Full Episodes of Alaska: The Last Frontier: https://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/alaska-the-last-frontier/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/AlaskaTLF/ https://www.facebook.com/Discovery Follow on Twitter: https://twitter.com/AlaskaTLF https://twitter.com/D

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The Opposition to Nancy Pelosi Stumbles

The effort of some House Democrats to deny Nancy Pelosi the speakership may be trending more whimper than bang. On Monday, 16 members and members-in-waiting signed on to a letter pledging to vote for “new leadership” in the caucus’s internal elections next week and on the House floor in January. “We are thankful to Leader Pelosi for her years of service to our country and to our caucus,” the lett

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Hackers Hit Make-A-Wish Website With Cryptojacking Scheme

Cryptojacking officially knows no bounds.

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NASA picks ancient Martian river delta for 2020 rover touchdown

NASA has picked an ancient river delta as the landing site for its uncrewed Mars 2020 rover, to hunt for evidence of past life on Earth's neighboring planet, officials said Monday.

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Russian, US officials say space cooperation remains strong

Russian and U.S. space officials hailed the joint work of their programs Monday and said cooperation remains strong despite political tensions between their countries.

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Digital offense: Anonymity dulls our moral outrage

A recent study digs deeper into exactly why people react less strongly to insults online, and offers a glimpse at what might help people be more civil to each other.

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Move over Rover: There's a new sniffing powerhouse in the neighborhood

Scientists are now homing in on the secrets behind animals' super sniffers to develop an artificial chemical sensor that could be used for a variety of tasks, from food safety to national security.

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The 'Swiss Army knife of prehistoric tools' found in Asia, suggests homegrown technology

A study by an international team of researchers have determines that carved stone tools, also known as Levallois cores, were used in Asia 80,000 to 170,000 years ago. With the find — and absent human fossils linking the tools to migrating populations — researchers believe people in Asia developed the technology independently, evidence of similar sets of skills evolving throughout different parts

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Using Skype to beat the blues

Researchers compared four different types of online communication technologies — video chat, email, social networks and instant messaging — used by people 60 and older and then gauged their symptoms of depression based on survey responses two years later. The study found that people who used video chat functions such as Skype and FaceTime had almost half the estimated probability of depressive s

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Jumping genes shed light on how advanced life may have emerged

A previously unappreciated interaction in the genome turns out to have possibly been one of the driving forces in the emergence of advanced life. This discovery began with a curiosity for retrotransposons, known as "jumping genes," which are DNA sequences that copy and paste themselves within the genome, multiplying rapidly. Researchers inserted a retrotransposon into bacteria, and the results c

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Climate change will drive U.S. ragweed north

New research looks at how the most common cause of sneezing and sniffling in North America is likely to shift under climate change. A new study finds that common ragweed will expand its range northward as the climate warms, reaching places including New York, Vermont, New Hampshire, and Maine, while retreating from some current hot spots. “It was surprising that nobody had looked at ragweed distr

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Updated 9:32 a.m.—Here are the best Black Friday deals currently on the internet

Gadgets This list will be updated through Cyber Monday. Despite retailers overeager advertising—which now seems to stretch Black Friday all the way to Nov. 1—Thanksgiving week remains one of the best in the year for good…

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Intelligent sprayers poised to transform nursery industry

Producers of landscape trees, shrubs, vines and perennials, all of which are known as nursery crops, are poised to adopt an industry-wide change that will benefit all of society. Researchers with the University of Tennessee Institute of Agriculture are among the agricultural scientists to help test a newly developed technology that will allow producers to use significantly reduced amounts of pesti

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Digital offense: Anonymity dulls our moral outrage

From online forums to community groups, research and experience shows people are more willing to insult and use menacing language online than in person, especially when there's the protection of anonymity behind a computer. New research appearing in Social Psychological and Personality Science indicates that people react less strongly to malicious speech on digital platforms and see the victims as

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NSF Reverses Policy Limiting Grant Proposal Submissions

Scientists will no longer be limited to one proposal as the lead or co-lead investigator per year.

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Digital offense: Anonymity dulls our moral outrage

A recent study from The University of South Florida digs deeper into exactly why people react less strongly to insults online, and offers a glimpse at what might help people be more civil to each other.

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The scoop on how your cat's sandpapery tongue deep cleans

Cat lovers know when kitties groom, their tongues are pretty scratchy. Using high-tech scans and some other tricks, scientists are learning how those sandpapery tongues help cats get clean and stay cool.

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Satellite finds Tropical Cyclone Bouchra reborn in Southern Indian Ocean

Tropical Cyclone 04S, known as Bouchra formed in the Southern Indian Ocean during the week of Nov. 12 and by the end of the week it had become a remnant low pressure area. Over the weekend of Nov. 17 and 18 it regenerated into a tropical cyclone and the NOAA-20 satellite passed overhead and captured a visible image of the storm.

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GPM satellite sees light rain occurring in Tropical Depression 33W's eastern side

The Global Precipitation Measurement mission or GPM core satellite is providing data on rain rates within Tropical Cyclone 33W as it moves over the Philippines on Nov. 19.

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'Magnetic topological insulator' makes its own magnetic field

A team of U.S. and Korean physicists has found the first evidence of a two-dimensional material that can become a magnetic topological insulator even when it is not placed in a magnetic field.

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'True polar wander' may have caused ice age

Earth's latest ice age may have been caused by changes deep inside the planet. Based on evidence from the Pacific Ocean, including the position of the Hawaiian Islands, Rice University geophysicists have determined Earth shifted relative to its spin axis within the past 12 million years, which caused Greenland to move far enough toward the north pole to kick off the ice age that began about 3.2 mi

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‘Pinwheel’ system may upend star death theory

Scientists have discovered a new, massive star system—one that challenges existing theories of how large stars eventually die. “This system is likely the first of its kind ever discovered in our own galaxy,” says Benjamin Pope, a NASA Sagan fellow at the Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics at New York University. Specifically, the scientists detected a gamma-ray burst progenitor system—a ty

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As climate and land-use change accelerate, so must efforts to preserve California's plants

As the IPCC warns that we have only 12 years to reduce greenhouse gas emissions by nearly half or risk significantly greater impacts from climate change, University of California, Berkeley, scientists are charting the best course to save California's native plants from these human threats.

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Powerful new map depicts environmental degradation across Earth

A powerful new map by the University of Cincinnati illustrates one motivating force behind migrant caravans leaving Guatemala and Honduras to reach the United States.

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Let's draw! New deep learning technique for realistic caricature art

Caricature portrait drawing is a distinct art form where artists sketch a person's face in an exaggerated manner, most times to elicit humor. Automating this technique poses challenges due to the amount of intricate details and shapes involved and level of professional skills it takes to transform a person artistically from their real-life selves to a creatively exaggerated one.

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Human images from world's first total-body scanner unveiled

EXPLORER, the world's first medical imaging scanner that can capture a 3D picture of the whole human body at once, has produced its first scans.

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Research offers hope for simpler cancer diagnosis and treatment

Monitoring cancer can often be an intrusive and exhausting process for patients. But with Brigham Young University chemistry professor Ryan Kelly's new research, there is hope for a simpler way: No more biopsies. No more spinal taps. Instead, patients may be able to take a simple blood test to diagnose, monitor and tailor appropriate therapies for various cancers.

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Bending light around tight corners without backscattering losses

Engineers at Duke University have demonstrated a device that can direct photons of light around sharp corners with virtually no losses due to backscattering, a key property that will be needed if electronics are ever to be replaced with light-based devices.

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A Functional Immigration System Would Look Nothing Like America's

President Donald Trump says that the U.S. immigration system is broken, and in recent days he has railed against what he says is an “ invasion ” by Central American migrants making their way to the United States. Along with a regular diet of tweets to that effect, he has accelerated the process begun during the Obama presidency of deporting those in the country illegally; criticized the migration

9d

Psychology’s Replication Crisis Is Running Out of Excuses

Over the past few years, an international team of almost 200 psychologists has been trying to repeat a set of previously published experiments from its field, to see if it can get the same results. Despite its best efforts, the project, called Many Labs 2 , has only succeeded in 14 out of 28 cases. Six years ago, that might have been shocking. Now it comes as expected (if still somewhat disturbin

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Satellite finds Tropical Cyclone Bouchra reborn in Southern Indian Ocean

Tropical Cyclone 04S, known as Bouchra formed in the Southern Indian Ocean during the week of Nov. 12 and by the end of the week it had become a remnant low pressure area. Over the weekend of Nov. 17 and 18 it regenerated into a tropical cyclone and the NOAA-20 satellite passed overhead and captured a visible image of the storm.

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Bending light around tight corners without backscattering losses

Researchers from Duke University demonstrate a new optical waveguide capable of bending photons around tight corners on a smaller scale than previously possible. The technology is made possible by through photonic crystals using the concept of topological insulators.

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NASA’s Mars 2020 rover will look for ancient life in a former river delta

NASA’s Mars 2020 rover is going to Jezero crater, the site of an ancient river delta that may harbor signs of life.

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Cat Tongues Help Wild and Domestic Felines Keep Clean and Cool

Cat Tongues Help Wild and Domestic Felines Keep Clean and Cool A closer look at cat tongues helps explain why the animals' grooming is so effective and may inspire new brushes — for pets and humans. cat-tongue-close-up.jpg Enlarged view of a cat's tongue. Image credits: Alexis Noel Creature Monday, November 19, 2018 – 15:00 Charles Q. Choi, Contributor (Inside Science) — New insights into how c

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The air quality in San Francisco is so bad, being there for a day is like smoking 10 cigarettes

Health Particulates in the air from wildfires make going outside a health risk for many Californians. After tearing through entire towns, burning over 10,000 homes and killing at least 70 people, the Camp Fire in Northern California is now about 65 percent contained. But…

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GPM satellite sees light rain occurring in Tropical Depression 33W's eastern side

The Global Precipitation Measurement mission or GPM core satellite is providing data on rain rates within Tropical Cyclone 33W as it moves over the Philippines on Nov. 19.

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Using Skype to beat the blues

Researchers compared four different types of online communication technologies — video chat, email, social networks and instant messaging — used by people 60 and older and then gauged their symptoms of depression based on survey responses two years later. The study found that people who used video chat functions such as Skype and FaceTime had almost half the estimated probability of depressive s

9d

Jumping genes shed light on how advanced life may have emerged

A previously unappreciated interaction in the genome turns out to have possibly been one of the driving forces in the emergence of advanced life. This discovery began with a curiosity for retrotransposons, known as "jumping genes," which are DNA sequences that copy and paste themselves within the genome, multiplying rapidly. Researchers inserted a retrotransposon into bacteria, and the results cou

9d

A new study says alcohol changes how the brain creates memories

A new study suggests that drinking alcohol can affect how memories are stored away as good or bad. This may have drastic implications for how addiction is caused and how people recall intoxication. The findings may one day lead to a new form of treatment for those suffering from addiction. A new study from Brown University suggests that alcohol changes how the brain processes memories, potentiall

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Heatwaves significantly impact male fertility, says huge study

New research on beetles shows that successive exposure to heatwaves reduces male fertility, sometimes to the point of sterility. The research has implications both for how the insect population will sustain itself as well as how human fertility may work on an increasingly hotter Earth. With this and other evidence, it is becoming clear that more common and more extreme heatwaves may be the most d

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Study: New peanut allergy treatment could save kids' lives

The trial included hundreds of participants with peanut allergies. The oral regimen contained trace amounts of peanut protein, and participants would take increasing amounts of the protein over the course of six months, with the goal being to retrain the immune system. By the end, about two-thirds of participants were able to consume peanut protein without showing any allergic symptoms. A new tre

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Can AI laugh? We investigated.

I tried to make a piece of Artificial Intelligence laugh. The A.I. was powered by a library of transcripts by stand-up comedians. It has been hypothesized that social laughter releases an opioid that helps solidify long-term human relationships. None I recently heard about a project put together by a student at MIT where an A.I. was built on the back of stand-up comedian transcripts in order to s

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10 pieces of wisdom from Alan Watts

Though the British philosopher died in 1973, his work continues to make an impact. A recently published collection, The Collected Letters Alan Watts , is a deep dive into his personal correspondences. Watts was an early proponent for spreading Eastern philosophy to Western culture. None Shortly after Alan Watts's death in 1973, his eldest daughters, Joan and Anne, began collecting boxes of his le

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Report: 80% of Americans are insufficiently active

According to researchers at the US Department of Health and Human Services, 80% of Americans don't exercise enough. Lack of exercise is attributed to $117 billion in annual health care costs. With more duties being automated and outsourced to AI, we're losing our sense of agency. None The annoyance of automated messages when trying to talk to a human at your bank or doctor's office is dwindling a

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Dorothy Cheney, Pioneer in Social Cognition, Dies

Her work changed the discipline by bringing rigorous experimentation to field studies of monkeys and baboons.

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Jumping genes shed light on how advanced life may have emerged

A previously unappreciated interaction in the genome turns out to have possibly been one of the driving forces in the emergence of advanced life, billions of years ago.

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Researchers find source of deadly 2015 Southeast Asia smoke cloud

Smoke from widespread fires in Indonesia in the summer and fall of 2015 hung heavily over major urban centers in Southeast Asia, causing adverse health effects for millions of people. The afflicted could not have known that the polluted air they were breathing contained carbon from plants that were alive during the Middle Ages.

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Major natural carbon sink may soon become carbon source

Until humans can find a way to geoengineer ourselves out of the climate disaster we've created, we must rely on natural carbon sinks, such as oceans and forests, to suck carbon dioxide out of the atmosphere. These ecosystems are deteriorating at the hand of climate change, and once destroyed they may not only stop absorbing carbon from the atmosphere, but start emitting it.

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Russian trolls relied on local news over fake stories in 2016

The Internet Research Agency, a Russia-based group of Internet trolls, relied on local news more than it did fake news to disrupt the 2016 presidential election, according to a new analysis. “Russian trolls shared five times more local news content than they did junk news content, our research shows,” says Joshua Tucker, a professor of politics at New York University and codirector of the univers

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Study links shoulder ultrasound brightness with type 2 diabetes

Henry Ford Hospital researchers may have unknowingly happened on a new predictor of type 2 diabetes as part of a new ultrasound shoulder study. The predictor may be an ultrasound of the deltoid muscle, which researchers found appears much brighter on diabetic patients than on obese nondiabetic patients.

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The New 'Aquaman' Trailer Is Here to Quench Your Thirst

Also: Apparently, General Mills is soliciting ideas for Hollywood productions based on its monster cereals.

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To resolve inflammation, location matters

A single protein can both restrain the initiation of inflammation and help to actively resolve it, according to new research led by George Hajishengallis of the University of Pennsylvania and Triantafyllos Chavakis of Technical University of Dresden. They found that the type of cell that secretes the protein determines which activity the protein promotes.

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'Magnetic topological insulator' makes its own magnetic field

A team of U.S. and Korean physicists has found the first evidence of a two-dimensional material that can become a magnetic topological insulator even when it is not placed in a magnetic field.

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Researchers find multisystem disorder caused by CCDC47 variants

Researchers and clinicians through a multicenter collaboration have identified a novel multisystem disorder caused by bi-allelic variants in the CCDC47 gene. Their findings are reported in the American Journal of Human Genetics. In this study, detailed clinical characterization and functional studies were performed on four unrelated individuals with a complex multisystem disorder characterized by

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Freeze-frame microscopy captures molecule's 'lock-and-load' on DNA

One of the body's largest macromolecules is the machinery that gloms onto DNA and transcribes it into mRNA, the blueprint for proteins. But the molecule, TFIID, is complex with lots of floppy appendages, which makes it hard to obtain a clear picture of its structure. Using state-of-the-art cryo-electron microscopy detectors and computer analysis, UC Berkeley scientists have captured unprecedented

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The Limits of a Billion-Dollar Donation to Johns Hopkins

Michael Bloomberg, the billionaire philanthropist, announced a double-take-causing donation to Johns Hopkins University on Sunday. The former mayor said he would be giving $1.8 billion to his alma mater. It’s the largest single donation to an American university in history—and the continuation of a trend for Bloomberg, who has made a habit of donating to Johns Hopkins. Several reports and observe

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Science stories to save you from awkward Thanksgiving conversations

Science Avoid politics with newts, mice, dogs, and more This Thanksgiving, try these wacky, wonderful, and weird science stories from the past year to steer the dinner conversation from politics and into safe waters.

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The Art of Woke Wellness

I first felt reality shift when, at 7 a.m. on a Saturday, there was a line for a class called Body Blast Bootcamp, and I worried that there wouldn’t be enough room for everyone. The draw to this explicitly not-fun undertaking, others in line told me, was that we would be glad to have done it when it was over. We all made it in, and the workout studio was a carpeted conference room where an Instag

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'True polar wander' may have caused ice age

Earth's latest ice age may have been caused by changes deep inside the planet. Based on evidence from the Pacific Ocean, including the position of the Hawaiian Islands.

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Mount Sinai researchers study second-hand marijuana smoke in children

In a study designed to evaluate second-hand marijuana smoke exposure among children — a topic that scientists have not yet widely addressed — researchers at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai found that nearly half of children whose parents smoked marijuana showed evidence of second-hand marijuana smoke exposure. The study appears in the December issue of Pediatrics.

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As climate and land-use change accelerate, so must efforts to preserve California's plants

A UC Berkeley team developed a computer model that identifies the high-priority areas in California for preservation in order to save the state's native plants in the face of rapid climate change and habitat destruction. The model is based on three measures of biodiversity: genetic uniqueness (divergence), historic speciation rate (diversification) and independent evolutionary history (survival),

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Older, frail heart attack patients at greater risk of bleeding

Many older patients who are considered frail by medical standards receive anticoagulants (blood thinners) and undergo cardiac catheterization during a heart attack. While these treatments can be helpful, they also can cause major bleeding, and frailty is an important bleeding risk factor according to a study published today in in JACC: Cardiovascular Interventions.

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Last week in tech: Underground tunnels, sad Facebook execs, and Black Friday prep

Technology Black Friday is almost here. Read this in your tent while you wait for the doorbusters. Catch up on your tech news while you're waiting for cheap Tupperware.

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Air pollution study helped city ban truck traffic

A collaboration between researchers and residents of a New Jersey city provided evidence that heavy truck traffic affected a neighborhood’s air quality and compromised health. For decades, heavy diesel trucks taking cargo from container ships at the Port Newark-Elizabeth Marine Terminal used a residential street in Elizabeth, New Jersey, to avoid the tolls between Exits 13 and 13A on the New Jers

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The Ethical Quandary of Human Infection Studies

Sometimes infecting volunteers with a disease can lead to new treatments. But how much risk and compensation is acceptable for those in poor nations? — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Kindergarten difficulties may predict academic achievement across primary grades

Identifying factors that predict academic difficulties during elementary school should help inform efforts to help children who may be at risk. New Penn State research suggests that children's executive functions may be a particularly important risk factor for such difficulties.

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Research offers hope for simpler cancer diagnosis and treatment

Imagine: No more biopsies. No more spinal taps. With help from recent research, cancer patients may be instead eventually be able to take a simple blood test to diagnose, monitor and tailor appropriate therapies.

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Powerful new map depicts environmental degradation across Earth

University of Cincinnati geography professor Tomasz Stepinski created a new world map showing dramatic changes in land use over the last quarter century. Stepinski turned high-resolution satellite images from the European Space Agency into one of the most detailed looks so far at how people are reshaping the planet.

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WHO Chief Warns Congo Violence Is Allowing Ebola to Spread

Rebels repeatedly attack the outbreak epicenter—where the response operation is headquartered — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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What Is Chickenpox? Causes, Symptoms & Treatment

Chickenpox is a viral infection that's easily prevented by a highly effective vaccine.

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California’s Apocalyptic Cycle

It was my mother who first alerted me to the Woolsey Fire in northern Los Angeles County. She’d been cutting down a few withered branches of a banana tree outside her home in Pacific Palisades, and one stalk had become lodged against her roof shingles. These tar-coated rectangles are supposed to be flame retardant, but my 88-year-old mother, having lived through the fire bombings of Osaka during

9d

How to make time for exercise — even on your craziest days

There's no shortage of science suggesting that exercise is good for your mental as well as your physical health — and yet for many of us, incorporating exercise into our daily routines remains a struggle. A new study , published in the journal Neuropsychologia, asks why. Shouldn't it be easier to take on a habit that is so good for us? The study's answer points towards what's holding us back: Acc

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Taurine transport gene sheds light on bad sleep

Researchers have discovered a new mechanism that regulates sleep in fruit flies that involves glial cells and their ability to manage a common ingredient in many energy drinks. Sleep is an essential behavioral state in animals ranging from invertebrates to humans. It is critical for immune function, stable metabolism, brain repair, learning, and memory. Over the course of a lifetime, more than 30

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Response to daily stressors could affect brain health in older adults

Taking typical daily annoyances such as a long wait at the doctor's office or a traffic jam on the freeway in stride may help preserve brain health in older adults.

9d

Let's draw!: New deep learning technique for realistic caricature art

Caricature portrait drawing is a distinct art form where artists sketch a person's face in an exaggerated manner, most times to elicit humor. Automating this technique poses challenges due to the amount of intricate details and shapes involved and level of professional skills it takes to transform a person artistically from their real-life selves to a creatively exaggerated one.

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Novel target identified for neuron regeneration, functional recovery in spinal cord injury

Restoring the ability to walk following spinal cord injury (SCI) requires neurons in the brain to reestablish communication pathways with neurons in the spinal cord. Mature neurons, however, are unable to regenerate their axons to facilitate this process. Now, Temple scientists show that this limitation may be overcome by targeting liver kinase B1 (LKB1) protein. In mice with SCI, targeted LKB1 up

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MDMA makes people cooperative, but not gullible

New research from King's College London has found that MDMA, the main ingredient in ecstasy, causes people to cooperate better — but only with trustworthy people. In the first study to look in detail at how MDMA impacts cooperative behavior the researchers also identified changes to activity in brain regions linked to social processing.

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Ecstasy ingredient may promote cooperation

The recreational drug known as ecstasy or molly may help people regain trust in others after being betrayed, suggests results of a controlled laboratory study, published in JNeurosci, of healthy men given a pure form of the substance. The drug is currently being assessed for its potential as a supplemental treatment for post-traumatic stress disorder.

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Where the brain turns quality and quantity into value

Researchers have pinpointed a part of the human brain responsible for 'on-the-fly' decision-making. According to the findings published in JNeurosci, the anterior cingulate cortex integrates disparate information about the desirability and amount of an option to inform choice.

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Gadget Lab Podcast: Can Magic Leap Stand Out from the AR Pack?

We sat down with Magic Leap's Brenda Freeman to discuss the future of immersive media when it means wearing AR goggles on your face.

9d

Nasa 2020 robot rover to target Jezero 'lake' crater

America's next robot rover will be sent to a 50km-wide depression that once had water running through it.

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Researchers hope a 'robo-nose' could give K-9 officers a break

Every day, thousands of trained K9 dogs sniff out narcotics, explosives and missing people across the United States. These dogs are invaluable for security, but they're also very expensive and they can get tired.

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Translocating frogs to lakes where disease wiped out previous populations may be the key to recovery

In a box, within a canister, surrounded by snow, tucked tightly into a backpack strapped to one determined ecologist. Twenty at a time they travel, these unassuming, iconic frogs, departing places where they're thriving for sites from which their species has vanished. Their mission: population recovery.

9d

Bitcoin falls below $5,000 for first time since Oct 2017

The value of bitcoin slipped Monday below $5,000 (4,367 euros) for the first time since October 2017 as volatility returned to the cryptocurrency market.

9d

What Is Chickenpox? Causes, Symptoms & Treatment

Chickenpox is a viral infection that's easily prevented by a highly effective vaccine.

9d

A Bronze Age tomb in Israel reveals the earliest known use of vanilla

Residue of the aromatic substance in 3 jugs dates to around 3,600 years ago.

9d

Klimaprofessorer om regnefejl: Nogle råber højt, men det ændrer ikke på konklusionen

Der er fejl i matematikken bag en højtprofileret undersøgelse, som viser, at havet har absorberet langt mere varme, end videnskaben havde regnet med.

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Location, location, location

In a box, within a canister, surrounded by snow, tucked tightly into a backpack strapped to one determined ecologist. Twenty at a time they travel, these unassuming, iconic frogs, departing places where they're thriving for sites from which their species has vanished. Their mission: population recovery.

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Duke forms prototype of robot dog nose

Every day, thousands of trained K9 dogs sniff out narcotics, explosives and missing people. These dogs are invaluable for security, but they're also expensive. Duke researchers have made the beginning steps toward an artificial 'robot nose' device that officers could use instead of dogs. The heart of the system would be living odor receptors grown from mouse genes that respond to target odors, inc

9d

A major step toward non-viral ocular gene therapy using laser and nanotechnology

In January 2009, the life of engineer Michel Meunier, a professor at Polytechnique Montréal, changed dramatically. Like others, he had observed that the extremely short pulse of a femtosecond laser could make nanometre-sized holes appear in silicon when it was covered by gold nanoparticles. But this researcher, recognized internationally for his skills in laser and nanotechnology, decided to go a

9d

Law of soot light absorption: Current climate models underestimate warming by black carbon aerosol

Soot belches out of diesel engines, rises from wood- and dung-burning cookstoves and shoots out of oil refinery stacks. According to recent research, air pollution, including soot, is linked to heart disease, some cancers and, in the United States, as many as 150,000 cases of diabetes every year.

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Odd bodies, rapid spins keep cosmic rings close

Forget those shepherding moons. Gravity and the odd shapes of asteroid Chariklo and dwarf planet Haumea—small objects deep in our solar system—can be credited for forming and maintaining their own rings, according new research in Nature Astronomy.

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Researchers discover a new gear in life's clock: Vitamin D

New research from Portland State University finds vitamin D, or a lack thereof can trigger or suspend embryonic development in a species of fish. The study also provides evidence suggesting the vitamin is critical to the early development of vertebrates generally.

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Current climate models underestimate warming by black carbon aerosol

Researchers in the School of Engineering & Applied Science have discovered a new, natural law that sheds light on the fundamental relationship between coated black carbon and light absorption.

9d

Scientists trained a computer to classify breast cancer tumors

In a study published in the journal NPJ Breast Cancer, researchers reported they used a form of artificial intelligence called machine learning, or deep learning, to train a computer to identify certain features of breast cancer tumors from images.

9d

Hidden giants in forest soils

Only a fraction of the microbes residing in, on and around soils have been identified through efforts to understand their contributions to global nutrient cycles. Soils are also home to countless viruses that can infect microbes, impacting their ability to regulate these global cycles. In Nature Communications, giant virus genomes have been discovered for the first time in a forest soil ecosystem

9d

Screening tool is effective for identifying child sex trafficking victims in a pediatric ED

An initial screening tool can be used effectively in a busy, inner?city emergency department to identify child sex trafficking victims presenting with high?risk health complaints.

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A major step toward non-viral ocular gene therapy using laser and nanotechnology

Gold nanoparticles, which act like 'nanolenses,' concentrate the energy produced by the extremely short pulse of a femtosecond laser to create a nanoscale incision on the surface of the eye's retina cells. This technology, which preserves cell integrity, can be used to effectively inject drugs or genes into specific areas of the eye, offering new hope to people with glaucoma, retinitis or macular

9d

Widely used reference for the human genome is missing 300 million bits of DNA

Experts say additional reference genomes from different populations are needed for research.

9d

New research questions role of gut parasite in intestinal diseases such as IBS

New University of Kent-led research on the way a common gut parasite behaves could help lead to a better understanding of its role in the development of intestinal diseases such as irritable bowel syndrome.

9d

Blockchain smart contracts are finally good for something in the real world

A startup says it has tackled a long-standing problem that has kept smart contracts from responding to actual events.

9d

NRL demonstrates new non-mechanical laser steering technology

Scientists at the U.S. Naval Research Laboratory have recently demonstrated a new nonmechanical chip-based beam steering technology that offers an alternative to costly, cumbersome and often unreliable and inefficient mechanical gimbal-style laser scanners.

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Minnesota Is on Track to Meet Its Renewable Energy Goals

A new study finds the state could meet these milestones without costing taxpayers extra money — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

9d

Did you solve it? Five shady puzzles

The solutions to today’s puzzles Earlier today I set you five puzzles from More Geometry Snacks . Here are the questions each followed by two methods of solution. Sometimes the simple action of drawing in a few extra lines reveals the solution clearly. 1. A point inside a square is connected to its four vertices. What fraction of the square is shaded? Continue reading…

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Odd bodies, rapid spins keep cosmic rings close

Forget those shepherding moons. Gravity and the odd shapes of asteroid Chariklo and dwarf planet Haumea — small objects deep in our solar system — can be credited for forming and maintaining their own rings, according new research in Nature Astronomy.

9d

Study: In-person, but not online, social contact may protect against psychiatric disorders

In-person social contact seems to offer some protection against depression and PTSD symptoms, but the same is not true of contact on Facebook, suggests a study by Veterans Affairs researchers and colleagues.

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Researchers find promise in new treatment for peanut allergy

Controlled ingestion of peanut protein could help build tolerance in peanut allergy sufferers. Authors of a new study published in the New England Journal of Medicine say an oral immunotherapy drug they tested could be the first FDA-approved medication of its kind for people with peanut allergy. The medication, called AR101, is derived from peanut protein.

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