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Nyheder2018november22

For ants, unity is strength — and health

When a pathogen enters their colony, ants change their behavior to avoid the outbreak of disease. In this way, they protect the queen, brood and young workers from becoming ill. These results, from a study carried out in collaboration between the groups of Sylvia Cremer at the Institute of Science and Technology Austria (IST Austria) and of Laurent Keller at the University of Lausanne, are publish

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Early human ancestors not to blame for extinctions of giant African mammals

Researchers analyzed a 7-million-year record of extinctions in Africa and compared it to milestones in human evolution previously implicated in these extinctions. Early hominin species played little to no role in driving mammal extinctions in ancient African ecosystems.

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The origins of asymmetry: A protein that makes you do the twist

Asymmetry plays a major role in biology at every scale: think of DNA spirals, the fact that the human heart is positioned on the left, our preference to use our left or right hand. An international team led by a CNRS researcher has shown how a single protein induces a spiral motion in another molecule. Through a domino effect, this causes cells, organs, and indeed the entire body to twist, trigger

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Intensification for redesigned and sustainable agricultural systems

Redesign of agricultural systems is essential to deliver optimum outcomes as ecological and economic conditions change. The combination of agricultural processes in which production is maintained or increased, while environmental outcomes are enhanced, is currently known as sustainable intensification (SI). SI aims to avoid the cultivation of more land, and thus avoid the loss of unfarmed habitat

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Fixing the internet

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News at a glance

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Cracking the Cambrian

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Protecting the colony

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The future of farming

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Rethinking stemness

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Bridging the mass gap

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Gender in the brain

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Somatic mutant clones colonize the human esophagus with age

The extent to which cells in normal tissues accumulate mutations throughout life is poorly understood. Some mutant cells expand into clones that can be detected by genome sequencing. We mapped mutant clones in normal esophageal epithelium from nine donors (age range, 20 to 75 years). Somatic mutations accumulated with age and were caused mainly by intrinsic mutational processes. We found strong p

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Neutral mass spectrometry of virus capsids above 100 megadaltons with nanomechanical resonators

Measurement of the mass of particles in the mega- to gigadalton range is challenging with conventional mass spectrometry. Although this mass range appears optimal for nanomechanical resonators, nanomechanical mass spectrometers often suffer from prohibitive sample loss, extended analysis time, or inadequate resolution. We report on a system architecture combining nebulization of the analytes from

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Gate-induced superconductivity in a monolayer topological insulator

The layered semimetal tungsten ditelluride (WTe 2 ) has recently been found to be a two-dimensional topological insulator (2D TI) when thinned down to a single monolayer, with conducting helical edge channels. We found that intrinsic superconductivity can be induced in this monolayer 2D TI by mild electrostatic doping at temperatures below 1 kelvin. The 2D TI–superconductor transition can be driv

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Electrically tunable low-density superconductivity in a monolayer topological insulator

Turning on superconductivity in a topologically nontrivial insulator may provide a route to search for non-Abelian topological states. However, existing demonstrations of superconductor-insulator switches have involved only topologically trivial systems. Here we report reversible, in situ electrostatic on-off switching of superconductivity in the recently established quantum spin Hall insulator m

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Observation of the topological Anderson insulator in disordered atomic wires

Topology and disorder have a rich combined influence on quantum transport. To probe their interplay, we synthesized one-dimensional chiral symmetric wires with controllable disorder via spectroscopic Hamiltonian engineering, based on the laser-driven coupling of discrete momentum states of ultracold atoms. Measuring the bulk evolution of a topological indicator after a sudden quench, we observed

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Multicomponent intermetallic nanoparticles and superb mechanical behaviors of complex alloys

Alloy design based on single–principal-element systems has approached its limit for performance enhancements. A substantial increase in strength up to gigapascal levels typically causes the premature failure of materials with reduced ductility. Here, we report a strategy to break this trade-off by controllably introducing high-density ductile multicomponent intermetallic nanoparticles (MCINPs) in

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Plio-Pleistocene decline of African megaherbivores: No evidence for ancient hominin impacts

It has long been proposed that pre-modern hominin impacts drove extinctions and shaped the evolutionary history of Africa’s exceptionally diverse large mammal communities, but this hypothesis has yet to be rigorously tested. We analyzed eastern African herbivore communities spanning the past 7 million years—encompassing the entirety of hominin evolutionary history—to test the hypothesis that top-

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Social network plasticity decreases disease transmission in a eusocial insect

Animal social networks are shaped by multiple selection pressures, including the need to ensure efficient communication and functioning while simultaneously limiting disease transmission. Social animals could potentially further reduce epidemic risk by altering their social networks in the presence of pathogens, yet there is currently no evidence for such pathogen-triggered responses. We tested t

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Egocentric coding of external items in the lateral entorhinal cortex

Episodic memory, the conscious recollection of past events, is typically experienced from a first-person (egocentric) perspective. The hippocampus plays an essential role in episodic memory and spatial cognition. Although the allocentric nature of hippocampal spatial coding is well understood, little is known about whether the hippocampus receives egocentric information about external items. We r

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Molecular to organismal chirality is induced by the conserved myosin 1D

The emergence of asymmetry from an initially symmetrical state is a universal transition in nature. Living organisms show asymmetries at the molecular, cellular, tissular, and organismal level. However, whether and how multilevel asymmetries are related remains unclear. In this study, we show that Drosophila myosin 1D (Myo1D) and myosin 1C (Myo1C) are sufficient to generate de novo directional tw

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Structural basis of latent TGF-{beta}1 presentation and activation by GARP on human regulatory T cells

Transforming growth factor–β1 (TGF-β1) is one of very few cytokines produced in a latent form, requiring activation to exert any of its vastly diverse effects on development, immunity, and cancer. Regulatory T cells (T regs ) suppress immune cells within close proximity by activating latent TGF-β1 presented by GARP (glycoprotein A repetitions predominant) to integrin αVβ8 on their surface. We sol

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ESCRT-dependent membrane repair negatively regulates pyroptosis downstream of GSDMD activation

Pyroptosis is a lytic form of cell death that is induced by inflammatory caspases upon activation of the canonical or noncanonical inflammasome pathways. These caspases cleave gasdermin D (GSDMD) to generate an N-terminal GSDMD fragment, which executes pyroptosis by forming membrane pores. We found that calcium influx through GSDMD pores serves as a signal for cells to initiate membrane repair by

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New Products

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Maternal Huluwa dictates the embryonic body axis through {beta}-catenin in vertebrates

The vertebrate body is formed by cell movements and shape change during embryogenesis. It remains undetermined which maternal signals govern the formation of the dorsal organizer and the body axis. We found that maternal depletion of huluwa , a previously unnamed gene, causes loss of the dorsal organizer, the head, and the body axis in zebrafish and Xenopus embryos. Huluwa protein is found on the

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Myofibroblast proliferation and heterogeneity are supported by macrophages during skin repair

During tissue repair, myofibroblasts produce extracellular matrix (ECM) molecules for tissue resilience and strength. Altered ECM deposition can lead to tissue dysfunction and disease. Identification of distinct myofibroblast subsets is necessary to develop treatments for these disorders. We analyzed profibrotic cells during mouse skin wound healing, fibrosis, and aging and identified distinct su

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Discovery of selective chemical probes that inhibit epigenetic factors for acute myeloid leukemia

Some severe forms of leukemia develop because proteins on the epigenetic level lose their regulative function. Now, in a broad international collaboration, UK researchers have identified molecules that can effectively inhibit the dysregulated proteins. In the journal Angewandte Chemie, researchers report the discovery, design, and testing of potential drugs on the cellular level. The findings set

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Artificial intelligence improves highway safety in Las Vegas

Artificial intelligence is helping improve safety along a stretch of Las Vegas' busiest highway.

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Human ancestors not to blame for ancient mammal extinctions in Africa

New research disputes a long-held view that our earliest tool-bearing ancestors contributed to the demise of large mammals in Africa over the last several million years. Instead, the researchers argue that long-term environmental change drove the extinctions, mainly in the form of grassland expansion likely caused by falling atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) levels.

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The origins of asymmetry: A protein that makes you do the twist

Asymmetry plays a major role in biology at every scale: think of DNA spirals, the fact that the human heart is positioned on the left, our preference to use our left or right hand … A team from the Institute of biology Valrose (CNRS/Inserm/Université Côte d'Azur), in collaboration with colleagues from the University of Pennsylvania, has shown how a single protein induces a spiral motion in anoth

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For ants, unity is strength—and health

When a pathogen enters their colony, ants change their behavior to avoid the outbreak of disease. In this way, they protect the queen, brood and young workers from becoming ill. These results, from a study carried out in collaboration between the groups of Sylvia Cremer at the Institute of Science and Technology Austria (IST Austria) and of Laurent Keller at the University of Lausanne, are publish

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Ancient hippo-like reptile was a giant to rival the dinosaurs

We thought only dinosaurs grew into giants during the Triassic, but we've discovered fossils of a mammal-like reptile that was 5 metres long and 3 metres tall

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Humans 'off the hook' for African mammal extinction

New research disputes a theory that early humans helped wipe out many large mammals that once roamed Africa.

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This huge plant eater thrived in the age of dinosaurs — but wasn’t one of them

A newly named plant-eater from the Late Triassic was surprisingly hefty.

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Facebook to pay 100m in Italian fiscal accord

Social media giant Facebook has agreed to pay more than 100 million euros ($114 million) to end a fiscal fraud dispute, Italian tax authorities said Thursday.

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En fødselsdagshilsen til ISS

Den Internationale Rum­­­­sta­tion fylder 20 år og skal lære økonomisk at stå på egne ben. Det kan blive svært.

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The Most Extreme Railway in the World

At 430 miles long, the formidable Mauritania Railway, nicknamed the “backbone of the Sahara,” boasts some of the longest and heaviest trains in the world. Its journey begins in Zouerat, Mauritania, where 22,000 tons of iron ore are mined daily and transported across the searing desert to the port city of Nouadhibou, on Africa’s Atlantic coast. Sometimes the train also carries passengers—merchants

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Best Amazon Cyber Monday Deals (2018): Echo, Kindle, Fire HD

Kindles, Fire Tablets, Fire TVs, and Echo speakers are on sale for Cyber Monday.

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Politics this weekDonald Trump US Democrats

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KAL’s cartoon

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Business this week

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Danmark kan gå forrest med banebrydende screeningmetode af grundvandet

Geus ønsker penge til udvikling af en særlig metode til screening af grundvandet. Men der var ikke penge på finansloven. Det vækker undren i Socialdemokratiet.

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Technology shapes insurance companies' response to wildfires

As wildfires raged this month in California, insurance claims experts at Travelers sat in a command center 3,000 miles (4,828 kilometers) away in Connecticut, monitoring screens showing satellite images, photos from airplane flyovers and social media posts describing what was happening on the ground.

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Rising sea levels threatening historic lighthouses

Rising seas and erosion are threatening lighthouses around the U.S. and the world. Volunteers and cash-strapped governments are doing what they can, but the level of concern, like the water, is rising.

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IDA: Studiemedlemmer fik ja til fredsvalg

IDAs repræsentantskab har sagt god for, at studiemedlemmerne ikke deltager i forårets valg. I stedet udpeger et netværk af studerende studiemedlemmer til de fire faste pladser.

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How to Deconstruct a Football Tackle With Physics

Using video of a football collision, you can figure out the velocity and momentum of the players involved.

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Group Outlines a Path to Reduce Emissions from "Trickier" Sectors

A clean energy think tank has proposed ways to make industry and shipping cleaner with existing technologies — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Ung komet inden for diabetesforskning får hæder

Adam Hulman modtager Danish Diabetes Academy Scientist Award.

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Out of the shadows

Caroline Herschel discovered eight comets – one was named after her – but her work is less known about than her brother William's.

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Diabetescenter sætter fokus på psykologiske elementer i behandlingen

Steno Diabetes Center Odense tilknytter professor i psykologi med speciale i diabetes.

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Regionerne giver syv mio. kr. til uafhængig forskning

Regionernes Medicinpulje har uddelt syv mio. kr. fordelt på seks projekter, der skal undersøge, hvordan medicin kan bruges bedre.

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Mads Skipper får ansvar for videreuddannelse

Mads Skipper bliver ny Sekretariatschef i Videreuddannelsessekretariatet Region Nord og kontorchef i Region Midtjylland.

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Amazon opens US store for Aussie shoppers again: reports

Global online retail giant Amazon will allow users in Australia to shop in its US store again, reports said Thursday, reversing an earlier, unpopular move to block access over local tax laws.

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The Real Reason the Pilgrims Survived

The Pilgrims repeatedly thanked God for their good fortune. But without two earlier developments, the entire undertaking at New Plymouth would have likely failed.

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A holiday miracle? Stores try to cut down on long lines

Retailers will once again offer big deals and early hours to lure shoppers into their stores for the start of the holiday season. But they'll also try to get shoppers out of their stores faster than ever by minimizing the thing they hate most: long lines.

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Spotting nature's own evolution of quantum tricks could transform quantum technology

A new test to spot where the ability to exploit the power of quantum mechanics has evolved in nature has been developed by physicists at the University of Warwick.

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Rapport: Mængden af drivhusgasser i atmosfæren sætter rekord

Niveauet af drivhusgasser i atmosfæren har nu nået en ny rekordhøjde, hedder det i en rapport fra FN.

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Norman Rockwell's 'Four Freedoms' Recast for Modern America

A new photo project by Hank Willis Thomas and Emily Shur updates the iconic paintings so everyone can enjoy them.

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'Game of Thrones,' 'Mad Men,' and Other Pop Culture Meals Worse Than Your Family Thanksgiving

Think your family stuff is unbearable? Compare them to these scenarios.

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Google tightens political ad rules ahead of Europe elections

Google said Thursday it's expanding stricter political advertising requirements to the European Union as part of efforts to curb misinformation and increase transparency ahead of the bloc's elections next year.

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Big test coming up for tiny satellites trailing Mars lander

A pair of tiny experimental satellites trailing NASA's InSight spacecraft all the way to Mars face their biggest test yet.

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Medicinrådet omgør anbefaling af middel mod lungekræft

Kræftmidlet Tecentriq anbefales til færre patienter end først anbefalet. Det står klart, efter Medicinrådet har omgjort sin egen anbefaling.

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Fedme forbundet med forhøjet risiko for type 2-diabetes

Nye studier peger på, at fedme i sig selv er forbundet med øget risiko type 2-diabetes, hjerte-kar-sygdomme og tidlig død.

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Talentfabrikken Nordjylland

»Vi må jo konstatere, at hovedstaden ikke kan klare sig uden nordjyder,« lyder det fra Nordjyllands regionsrådsformand Ulla Astman (S), efter at Svend Særkjær er den tredje regionsdirektør i Region Nordjylland, der rykker til hovedstadsområdet.

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Pembrokeshire treasure hunter unearths Celtic chariot

The ritual burial could be linked to a huge previously undiscovered Iron Age settlement.

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Greenhouse gas levels in atmosphere hit new high: UN

The levels of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere, the main driver of climate change, have hit a new record high, the UN said Thursday, warning that the time to act was running out.

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Raffineret græs kan være landbrugets kvælstof-redning

Ny rapport viser, at det er teknisk muligt at nå kvælstofmålsætning i problemområde ved at omlægge afgrøderne til flerårige græsser.

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Corals and their microbiomes evolved together, new research shows

Corals and the microbes they host evolved together, new research by Oregon State University shows.

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Shallow Mexican seabed traps tsunamis so they strike land repeatedly

A tsunami kept pinging back and forth for three days after being triggered by the 8 September 2017 Mexico earthquake, posing even more risk to human life

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Can Lip Balm Make Your Chapped Lips Worse?

Dry, chapped lips are itchy and painful, but repeatedly applying lip balms and products may not help your case.

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UD invention aims to improve battery performance

Imagine a world where cell phones and laptops can be charged in a matter of minutes instead of hours, rolled up and stored in your pocket, or dropped without sustaining any damage. It is possible, according to University of Delaware Professor Thomas H. Epps, III, but the materials are not there yet.

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The true cost of free shipping

It's easy to see why online shopping is so popular. Just a couple of clicks and that new pair of socks is winging its way to you at breakneck speed. And they can get it to you in two days for free? Click.

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Text visualization: researchers develop system for medical records

Nicole Sultanum says one of the fastest ways to understand information is by sight.

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Watch the first plane with no moving parts take flight – video

The flight represents a breakthrough in 'ionic wind' technology, which uses a powerful electric field to generate charged nitrogen ions, which are then expelled from the back of the aircraft, generating thrust. The plane has a propulsion system that is entirely electrically powered, almost silent, and with a thrust-to-power ratio comparable to that achieved by conventional systems such as jet eng

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Will we ever see a black hole?

In the shadowy regions of black holes two fundamental theories describing our world collide. Can these problems be resolved and do black holes really exist? First, we may have to see one and scientists are trying to do just this.

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Study: Climate change could force outdoor workers to wake up far earlier

A new study published in Earth's Future, a journal of the American Geophysical Union, indicates that if society tries to avoid the economic impacts of climate change on outdoor labor by shifting working hours, outdoor workers in many regions will need to start working well before dawn at the end of this century to avoid the effect of excessive heat stress.

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Here's a tip that could make banks phenomenally successful: radical honesty

Appearing before the banking royal commission, the newly appointed head of the Commonwealth Bank, Matt Comyn, has held out the prospect of ethical leadership making a difference.

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China's legalisation of rhino horn trade: disaster or opportunity?

The Chinese government will be reopening the nation's domestic rhino horn trade, overturning a ban that has stood since 1993. An outcry since the announcement has led to the postponement of the lifting of the ban, which currently remains in place.

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Same, same but different: Tinder profiles around the world

Picture this scenario. You are going backpacking around South America and stop in Brazil. You will be there for only a few days, but you want to meet someone local.

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Eksterne eksperter skal styre Sundhedsplatformen i mål

Region Hovedstaden nedsætter råd af eksterne eksperter, der skal risikovurdere Sundhedsplatformen. Formand har godt kendskab til it-problemer fra sin tid i ATP.

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City water restrictions hurt our most vulnerable – especially women

When we think of the difficulties that women have accessing water, we tend to think of women and girls in developing nations struggling to carry water across large distances. We do not usually think of a woman in metropolitan Melbourne, one of the world's most liveable cities, unable to maintain her own health because of the impact of water restrictions – but we should.

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How we calculated the age of caves in the Cradle of Humankind—and why it matters

As a species, we humans have always been fascinated in where we came from. Initially, it was believed humans couldn't have originated from Africa.

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Black Friday marketing tricks and four ways to stop yourself falling for them

Black Friday is upon us, once again. The annual ritual of deals kick starts the Christmas shopping period. Retailers hope to clear old stock to make way for new lines, especially produced to take advantage of Christmas spending, and counteract the November sales slump. Shoppers hope to snag a bargain.

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Overraskende fund: Dødbringende stjerne gemmer sig i Mælkevejen

Stjernen har potentiale til at eksplodere i et dræbende gammaglimt. Dansk forsker ser dog ingen grund til bekymring.

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Can pay reporting help reduce the gender pay gap?

From the first week of November, women in the United States, Ireland, UK, and around the world are effectively working for free as the gender gap in average pay earnings accounts for remaining two months' salary of the year.

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Revealing the face of an infamous 19th century British assassin from a skull

A brand new portrait of the only person to have successfully assassinated a British Prime Minister, has been revealed by museum technicians at Queen Mary University of London.

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First steps to tackling South Africa's abalone poaching

South Africa faces the possible collapse of several inshore fisheries, particularly certain species of linefish, abalone and West Coast Rock Lobster. If nothing is done, not only will the ecology be poorer and change in many unexpected ways, but sea-derived livelihoods will collapse. The social structures that have maintained communities and relationships with the sea will follow.

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It looks like an anchovy fillet but this ancient creature helps us understand how DNA works

Today a large international consortium of researchers published a complex but important study looking at how DNA works in animals. The research focused on a marine organism, a creature called amphioxus (also known as "the lancelet"), to explore some of the steps that took place as animals evolved from invertebrates (animals without a backbone) to more complex back-boned vertebrates, including us h

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Letters: What’s the Right Time to Eat Thanksgiving Dinner?

“In the spirit of a holiday when people, in claustrophobic proximity to their loved ones, feel compelled to take stronger-than-usual positions on issues of even minuscule import,” Joe Pinsker wrote this week , “I have a conclusion to share: The correct time to eat Thanksgiving dinner is 4 p.m.” Pinsker is right—although not necessarily about dinnertime. Many do take stronger-than-usual positions

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Why Most of America Is Terrible at Making Biscuits

For 25 years in Georgia, I watched my mom make the same batch of six light, fluffy biscuits for breakfast almost every Sunday. Then I moved to New York, never to see a light, fluffy biscuit again. I arrived in the city in 2011, just in time for southern food to get trendy outside its region, and for three years, I bit into a series of artisanal hockey pucks, all advertised on menus as authentic s

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The End of The Clinton Affair

In the new documentary series The Clinton Affair , during a section devoted to the story of Paula Jones, there’s footage from an episode of The Tonight Show that aired in 1997, when Jones’s allegations of sexual harassment against Bill Clinton were an ongoing source of fascination for Americans. The sketch , prerecorded and presumably set in Little Rock, Arkansas, featured the fictionalized “Jone

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Thomas Nast's Thanksgiving Vision of American Identity

Nativism has a long history in the United States and it remains with us still. The 19th-century Southern politician John C. Calhoun argued without embarrassment that “all men are created equal” was not meant literally, and that America was a country of and for white men. Today, fearmongering about immigrants, attacks on the Fourteenth Amendment’s birthright citizenship, and sly verbal nods to whi

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The shifting role of cities in addressing global climate change

In recent years, cities have asserted themselves as relevant actors in efforts to address global climate change. The announcement by the United States of their intent to withdraw from the Paris Agreement has generated more attention than ever for what cities and other subnational authorities can do in this field.

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From gamma rays to X-rays: New method pinpoints previously unnoticed pulsar emission

Based on a new theoretical model, a team of scientists explored the rich data archive of ESA's XMM-Newton and NASA's Chandra space observatories to find pulsating X-ray emission from three sources. The discovery, relying on previous gamma-ray observations of the pulsars, provides a novel tool to investigate the mysterious mechanisms of pulsar emission, which will be important to understand these f

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Ion drive space engine used on aircraft for first time

Imagine an aircraft engine that has no moving parts, produces no harmful exhaust and makes no noise. That's what researchers at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) in the US have created by adapting a technology previously only used in spacecraft so it can power flight over the Earth.

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Climate crisis as greenhouse gas levels reach record highs

A report from the UN's World Meteorological Organisation says that levels of carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases have hit new highs, increasing the risk of catastrophic climate change

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How a ghostly, forgotten particle could be the saviour of physics

It was theorised decades ago but never seen. Now it seems the sterile neutrino could fix flaws in fundamental physics – if only we could find it

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Giant grooves on Mars’ moon Phobos could be caused by rolling boulders

Mars’ largest moon, Phobos, is covered in enormous grooves that stretch over kilometres. They may have been caused by boulders rolling around the surface

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How Much Weed Should Someone Try If It's Their First Time?

Make sure they know the difference between THC and CDB, and remember: Low and slow

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Nailing it: Caltech engineers help show that InSight lander probe can hammer itself into martian soil

On November 26, NASA's InSight lander will complete its six-and-a-half month journey to Mars, touching down at Elysium Planitia, a broad plain near the Martian equator that is home to the second largest volcanic region on the planet.

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How to Vaccinate a Wild Bat

A new technology could make it much easier to fight deadly white-nose syndrome — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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NASA's Lucy in the sky with … asteroids?

A little over 4 billion years ago, the planets in our solar system coexisted with vast numbers of small rocky or icy objects orbiting the Sun. These were the last remnants of the planetesimals – the primitive building blocks that formed the planets. Most of these leftover objects were then lost, as shifts in the orbits of the giant planets scattered them to the distant outer reaches of the solar s

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NASA to launch new refueling mission, helping spacecraft live longer and journey farther

NASA will lay the foundation for spacecraft life extension and long duration space exploration with the upcoming launch of Robotic Refueling Mission 3 (RRM3), a mission that will pioneer techniques for storing and replenishing cryogenic spacecraft fuel.

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Startup PlateJoy sends users personalized meal plans to help them achieve health goals

As a busy undergraduate at MIT, Christina Bognet decided she wanted to start eating a healthier diet. She began checking the nutritional content of her food and considering portion sizes. She created grocery lists to minimize food waste and cost, sifting through hundreds of recipes to find ones that were both healthy and delicious. Then she had to figure out how to make the meals she selected.

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Detecting dengue, Zika, and chikangunya within minutes

An MIT Tata Center funded research team led by MIT Professor Lee Gehrke and collaborator Irene Bosch has developed a paper-based diagnostic test to detect Zika, dengue, chikungunya and other related viruses within minutes. To commercialize the venture, they recently formed life sciences startup, E25Bio, to not only change the way mosquito-borne illnesses are diagnosed, but also enable governments

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Storebæltsbroen har fået udskiftet støddæmpere: Nu er der færre rystelser

Tre års ren Egon Olsen-planlægning skulle der til for at få lirket enorme støddæmpere ud af Storebæltsbroen. Nu er de renoveret … i sidste øjeblik.

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Forskere fremviser de første samtidige 3D-scanninger af hele kroppen

PET/CT-Scanneren Explorer kan som den første i verden producere 3D-billeder af hele kroppen på én gang. Nu vises 3D-billeder produceret af scanneren for første gang til omverdenen.

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Derfor skal du bruge Typescript

Typescript har succes, hvor andre Javascript-overbygninger har fejlet. Det handler om at gå med på det underliggende sprogs præmisser og gøre programmørerne mere produktive, mener amerikansk udvikler.

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Fairness is a universal value. So why all this inequity?

Technology has given humanity the amazing ability to fix almost any problem, conditioning us to search for technological remedies to what might be social problems. Alleviating social inequity is a problem that technology must necessarily attempt to solve, but technology alone cannot shape how humans assemble their societies. Only by emphasizing the primary place of individual identity, human dign

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California Has Become a Crisis for the Republicans

For all the focus since Election Day on the Republican Party’s precipitous decline in California, the true depth of the collapse is still only coming into focus. And so are the implications of that fall for the GOP’s prospects in other western states following the same trajectory of geographic and demographic change that have transformed California’s politics over the past 25 years. When the next

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After the Pittsburgh Shootings, a Thanksgiving Pilgrimage to the Texas Border

B y midday, the desert sun is high and this little protest frankly, feels like a misguided act in powerless futility. About 200 people, Jews and Christians, cluster near an eight-foot stone gate in the West Texas town of Tornillo, singing and praying for hundreds of Central American children held by the federal government. Two cop cars and chain link fences topped with concertina keep them a good

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The Strange Pathos of the Turkey in Madame Bovary

Literary portrayals of Thanksgiving Day—with all its good, bad, and stressful emotional stuffing—have varied over the years. They span from Louisa May Alcott’s sentimental 1882 New England story, “ An Old-Fashioned Thanksgiving ,” all the way to Ta-Nehisi Coates’s aggrieved childhood memories of it as a day of compulsory fasting and reflection in his 2015 memoir, Between the World and Me . Scatte

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JUR-forsker får pris for at styrke dansk erhvervsliv

ErhvervsPostdoc Sebastian Felix Schwemer modtager Tietgenprisen.

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DNA with a twist: Discovery could further antibiotic drug development

Scientists reveal how a 'molecular machine' in bacterial cells prevents fatal DNA twisting, which could be crucial in the development of new antibiotic treatments.

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Universiteter undsiger vidtrækkende plan for fri forskningslitteratur

800 europæiske universiteter tvivler på den europæiske Plan S, som gennem økonomiske sanktioner vil presse forlag og forskere til at gennemføre en Open Access-revolte.

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Broadband researcher believes lack of access offers opportunity

As a yearlong effort to study broadband access in Pennsylvania nears its conclusion, the Penn State faculty member leading the effort sees numerous opportunities. The overwhelming amount of data documenting that relatively few residents of the Commonwealth have access to even the FCC-mandated minimum for measuring internet availability and speed, opens up options for accessing grants to bridge the

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NASA InSight landing on Mars: Milestones

On Nov. 26, NASA's InSight spacecraft will blaze through the Martian atmosphere and attempt to set a lander gently on the surface of the Red Planet in less time than it takes to hard-boil an egg. InSight's entry, descent and landing (EDL) team, based at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California, along with another part of the team at Lockheed Martin Space in Denver, have pre-program

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NASA InSight team on course for Mars touchdown

NASA's Mars Interior Exploration using Seismic Investigations, Geodesy and Heat Transport (InSight) spacecraft is on track for a soft touchdown on the surface of the Red Planet on Nov. 26, the Monday after Thanksgiving. But it's not going to be a relaxing weekend of turkey leftovers, football and shopping for the InSight mission team. Engineers will be keeping a close eye on the stream of data ind

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Benjamin Netanyahu’s Me-or-the-Abyss Allure

Once again, Benjamin Netanyahu seems to have outsmarted his rivals. Last week, Israel and Gaza came to the brink of war after a botched operation by Israeli commandos that killed seven Palestinian militants. The militants subsequently fired more than 400 rockets and mortars in a 24-hour period; Israeli jets responded with scores of air strikes. But the Israeli prime minister defied public pressur

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The surprising power of small data—more information isn't necessarily better in health care or business

Chronic conditions like heart disease and diabetes have been on the rise for decades. They're the number one cause of death and disability in the U.S. today and one reason why health care costs are out of control.

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Fish genes hold key to repairing damaged hearts

The Mexican tetra fish can repair its heart after damage — something researchers have been striving to achieve in humans for years.

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Literature quality linked to foreign language ability in young people

Reading complex and engaging texts is key to inspiring young learners' interest in Modern Foreign Languages (MFL) and potentially improving how the subject is taught in UK secondary schools, according to new Oxford University research.

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Corals and their microbiomes evolved together, new research shows

Corals and the microbes they host evolved together, new research shows, adding fresh insight to the fight to save the Earth's embattled coral reefs.

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Revealed: 35 kidney genes linked to chronic kidney disease risk

An international study lead by University of Manchester scientists has discovered the identity of genes that predispose people to chronic kidney disease.The discovery is a major advance in understanding of the significantly under-diagnosed disorder which, if left undetected, can lead to failing kidneys that need dialysis or kidney transplantation.

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Building the ultimate record of the ocean

Before the advent of modern observational and modeling techniques, understanding how the ocean behaved required piecing together disparate data—often separated by decades in time—from a handful of sources around the world. In the 1980s, that started to change when technological advancements, such as satellites, floats, drifters, and chemical tracers, made continuous, mass measurements possible.

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Image: Paradise lost

Camp Fire in northern California, US, has, without doubt, been one of the state's most destructive. This animation uses data from different Copernicus Sentinels to show the spread of aerosols and smoke.

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How beer-related tweeting climaxed during the World Cup

Data mining reveals a strong but not altogether unexpected link between soccer and beer, with implications for public health.

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Moneyball for Turkeys

The future of American turkey breeding arrived in August and November of this year, when huge new hatcheries opened in Terre Haute, Indiana and Beresford, South Dakota. The facilities represent the state of the art for, respectively, Aviagen and its subsidiary Select Genetics, and Hendrix Genetics and its subsidiary Hybrid Turkeys. These two big companies now rule the turkeyscape. Aviagen’s India

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Dansk privatlivsfokuseret Google-alternativ lukker ned

Dansk virksomhed forsøgte i tre år at skabe et privat alternativ til Googles søgemaskine med Findx. Nu har de drejet nøglen om.

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Climate change: Warming gas concentrations at new record high

The gases that are driving up temperatures reached a new high in 2017 with no sign of a reversal in the trend.

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Crowdsourced field data shows importance of smallholder farms to global food production

A new global field size data set collected as part of a crowdsourcing citizen science project by IIASA researchers has shown that the proportion of smallholder farms may be much larger than previously thought, contributing much more to global food production.

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Cut off from the world, an Indian island remains a mystery

For thousands of years, the people of North Sentinel island have been isolated from the rest of the world.

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Quantum sound waves to open doors for more powerful sensors

For the last decade, scientists have been making giant leaps in their ability to build and control systems based on the bizarre rules of quantum mechanics, which describe the behavior of particles at the subatomic scale.

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Her er det støjfri ion-fly uden bevægelige dele

Efter flere års forskning har Massachusetts Institute of Technology fløjet det første lille eldrevne fly uden propeller eller turbiner.

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The future with lower carbon concrete

Reducing the planet’s greenhouse emissions requires innovative advances, such as concrete that absorbs carbon dioxide as it hardens

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Outgoing Facebook exec takes fall for hiring opposition firm

Facebook's outgoing head of communications is taking the blame for hiring Definers, the public relations firm doing opposition research on the company's critics, including billionaire philanthropist George Soros.

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We have a problem: can a city spaceport keep Houston in the space race?

Famously the home of Nasa’s Mission Control, Houston is struggling how to stay relevant to modern spaceflight. Is a new spaceport the answer? Houston has a long and proud connection with space exploration. It is home to the Johnson Space Center, the Nasa hub best known for hosting Mission Control. But as the US government squeezes Nasa’s budget and cedes much of its work to private industry, high

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Researchers measure carbon footprint of Canada hydroelectric dams

Squatting on spongy soil, a climate scientist lays a small cone-shaped device to "measure the breathing" of a peat bog in the northern part of Canada's Quebec province.

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No room for climate delay, UN chief tells online summit

The world is not moving fast enough to curb global warming and needs immediate action to address the issue, UN Secretary-General Antonio Guterres told an online climate change conference Thursday.

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Scientists wind up deep-water probes in Caribbean waters

A rarely seen shark embryo. Corals up to 7 feet (2 meters) high. Sponges with sharp edges.

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Ash from Alaska volcano prompts aviation warning

An active Alaska volcano is ramping up, spewing ash emissions nearly 3 miles (5 kilometers) into the air.

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Meet Michael, the supercomputer designed to accelerate UK research for EV batteries

A new supercomputer designed to speed up research on two of the UK's most important battery research projects has been installed at University College London (UCL). Named Michael, after the UK's most famous battery scientist, Michael Faraday, the supercomputer will reach 265 teraflops at peak performance.

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Data as Labour

submitted by /u/FearlessSwan [link] [comments]

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Type 2 diabetes now affects nearly 7,000 young Britons

New figures reveal huge rise in children and young people with diabetes linked to obesity Nearly 7,000 children and young Britons under 25 have been diagnosed with type 2 diabetes, the chronic condition linked to obesity that can lead to amputations and blindness. Type 2 diabetes used to be virtually unknown in young people. It usually develops over the age of 40 in white Europeans, or after the

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Amazon gemmer alle dine samtaler med Alexa – for evigt

Alexa lytter kun med den, når vi beder den om det. Men det er alligevel ikke så lidt, at Amazon med tiden kan lære om os ved i årevis at gemme på vores kommunikation med enheden.

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Happy Thanksgiving from SBM!

Today is Thanksgiving in the U.S. and SBM is taking the day off. Have a wonderful holiday!

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Op på løbebåndet og gnav i en broccoli: Gode gener afgør ikke din alder

Dine gamle bedsteforældre er ikke en garanti for et langt liv. I hvert fald viser ny forskning, at kun ti procent af din livslængde bliver afgjort af dine gener.

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Manifestations of Fear in Cross-Cultural Interpretations of Sleep Paralysis

Frontispiece from: Blicke in die Traum- und Geisterwelt (A look into the dream and spirit world), by Friedrich Voigt (1854). What are you most afraid of? Not finding a permanent job? Getting a divorce and losing your family? Losing your funding? Not making this month's rent? Not having a roof over your head? Natural disasters? Nuclear war? Cancer? Having a loved one die of cancer? FAILURE? There

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The Crusade Against Dangerous Food Part 2

Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Deborah Blum talks about her book The Poison Squad: One Chemist’s Single-Minded Crusade for Food Safety at the Turn of the Twentieth Century. Part 2. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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'Plan S’ skal udsulte dyre forsknings-tidsskrifter

Kan du få lov at læse de forskningsresultater, som dine danske skattekroner har betalt for? Ikke nødvendigvis. Det forsøger et hold af forsknings-bureaukrater i EU at ændre med en radikal plan.

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Source of 2015 Southeast Asia smoke cloud found

Researchers show the results of dating of isotopes of carbon carried aloft in smoke from burning peatlands in Indonesia in 2015. Some of the particles are from plants that were alive in the 14th century.

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Keep slapping on that sunscreen

It's safe to slap on the sunscreen this summer — in repeated doses — despite what you may have read about the potential toxicity of sunscreens, researchers say.

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New 'smart' material with potential biomedical, environmental uses

By combining seaweed-derived alginate with the nanomaterial graphene oxide, researchers have developed a new material that's durable and can respond dynamically to its environment.

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Snails become risk-takers when hungry

Research demonstrates that snails take more risks when hungry, risking potentially harmful substances in order to survive.

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Advancement in drug therapies may provide new treatment for Cutaneous leishmaniasis

Cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL) is a parasitic infection caused by Leishmania parasite. CL cases have increased dramatically in Syria and neighboring countries due to conflict-related displacement of Syrians.

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Anabolic steroids linked to higher rates of premature death in men

Men who use androgenic anabolic steroids — such as testosterone — may face a higher risk of early death and of experiencing more hospital admissions, according to a new study.

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How Chile accomplished its renewable energy boom

Chile is currently undergoing a renewable energy boom. Today, it's the second largest market for renewable energies in Latin America, and in 2016 Chile was the top-scoring renewable energy producer in the Americas and second in the world, beaten only by China. Two decades ago, when this process started, this transformation was unthinkable.

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Slowed brainwaves linked to early signs of brain cells going haywire due to dementia

To turn back the clock on Alzheimer's disease, many researchers are seeking ways to effectively diagnose the neurodegenerative disorder earlier. One potential way to do this is by tracking a person's brainwave activity, which slows down in certain brain regions that are likely to be affected by the disease next, according to recent findings.

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Routine vitamin B12 screening may prevent irreversible nerve damage in type-2 diabetes

Patients with type-2 diabetes, taking metformin, should have their vitamin B12 levels assessed more regularly to avoid irreversible nerve damage, according to a new study. The study findings suggest that earlier detection of vitamin B12 deficiency through routine screening of all metformin-treated, type-2 diabetes patients could reduce their risk of developing irreversible, painful and potentially

6d

Cutting the legs off cancer

Melanoma skin cancer tumors grow larger and are more likely to metastasize due to interactions between a pair of molecules, according to experiments in mice and human cells. The results may restore the potential for a type of cancer therapy previously abandoned in clinical trials. The results also implicate one molecule already connected to obesity and dementia as a potential cause of metastasis,

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Lake Erie algal blooms 'seeded' internally by overwintering cells in lake-bottom sediments

Western Lake Erie's annual summer algal blooms are triggered, at least in part, by cyanobacteria cells that survive the winter in lake-bottom sediments, then emerge in the spring to 'seed' the next year's bloom, according to a new research.

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Do Wine Over Those Brussels Sprouts

Taking a swig of red wine before eating Brussels sprouts appears to moderate Brussels sprouts' polarizing flavor. Christopher Intagliata reports. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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The Crusade Against Dangerous Food Part 1

Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Deborah Blum talks about her book The Poison Squad: One Chemist’s Single-Minded Crusade for Food Safety at the Turn of the Twentieth Century. Part 1. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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How Christians co-opted the winter solstice

Christmas was heavily influenced by the Roman festival of Saturnalia. The historical Jesus was not born on December 25th as many contemporary Christians believe. Many staple Christmas traditions predated the festival and were tied into ancient pagan worship of the sun and related directly to the winter solstice. In the depths of darkness covering the entire Northern Hemisphere, the winter solstic

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Improved Accuracy in Multiplex Assays

Interference by endogenous antibodies in immunoassays is a well-documented phenomenon. Download this poster to learn about the profound effects that this can have on the data and how development expertise and assay design can eliminate or reduce the effects of endogenous antibodies.

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Whale earwax reveals 146 years of humanity’s impact

It's just been discovered that whale earwax contains a record of a whale's sub-lethal stressors. It's generally agreed that cortisol is a reliable indicator of a mammal's response to stress. We now have a detailed 146-year impact study of human activity on whales. Baleen whales ( Mysticeti ) have been subjected to human interference for a long time. The 14-member set , which includes humpbacks, m

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High risk

Our reliance on technology means a violent storm on the Sun could have serious effects.

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Hepatitis strain carried by rats makes leap to humans in Hong Kong

Two cases, which emerged close to each other, are thought to be first such cases in the world Researchers say they have found two patients in Hong Kong who contracted a strain of hepatitis carried by rats, in what appears to be the first known human cases in the world. The finding surprised the researchers, though it wasn’t immediately clear whether there were significant implications for human h

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Climate change: How your duvet can help the environment

A summit in London will aim to look at neglected forms of waste – including duvets.

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Smoking during pregnancy increases the likelihood of your baby becoming obese

Smoking during pregnancy increases the chance that your baby will become obese. New research published in Experimental Physiology examined potential reasons for this phenomenon, using tissue which is normally discarded following birth.

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An amusing video about how info-besity can make you stupid.

submitted by /u/ChierHu [link] [comments]

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We urgently need to switch to hybrid heating for homes, says UK report

Millions of householders will need to install hybrid gas-heat pump systems in the next decade if the UK is to meet its emissions targets, says an official advisor

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Hydrogen will never be a full solution to our green energy problems

Hydrogen could help us green some tricky parts of the energy system but it can only have a secondary role compared with electricity from renewables

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Diabetes can be diagnosed by simply shining a light on your skin

Researchers have developed a tool that diagnoses high blood sugar levels simply by analysing the pattern of fluorescent light reflected off the skin

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Federal Ban on Female Genital Mutilation Ruled Unconstitutional by Judge

In a Michigan case involving members of a small Muslim sect, the court found that only states, not federal prosecutors, could bring charges.

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The Atlantic Daily: Sorry for the Delay

What We’re Following Her Emails: Earlier this year, President Donald Trump reportedly sought to prosecute Hillary Clinton and former FBI Director James Comey, neither of whom he’s spared with his public barbs (for Clinton, “Lock her up,” “Crooked Hillary”; for Comey, “untruthful slime ball”). Natasha Bertrand puts these reports in context. Meanwhile, the White House is defending the senior advise

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Night shifts and unhealthy lifestyle linked to particularly high risk of type 2 diabetes

Women who work intermittent night shifts and do not follow a healthy lifestyle face an especially high risk of type 2 diabetes, suggests a study published by The BMJ today.

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Sweetened drinks pose greater diabetes risk than other sugary foods

Sweetened drinks pose a greater risk of type 2 diabetes than most other foods containing fructose, a naturally occurring sugar, finds an evidence review published by The BMJ today.

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Letters: ‘I Want to Grow Up to Be Someone That Fights for Families Like Yours’

‘The Separation Was So Long. My Son Has Changed So Much.’ In September, Jeremy Raff reported on the story of Anita and Jenri , a mother and her six-year-old son. Anita and Jenri fled Honduras and crossed the Rio Grande on a raft near McAllen, Texas, in mid-June; they immediately turned themselves over to Border Patrol and asked for asylum. In accordance with Trump administration policy, agents se

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Study shows skin autofluorescence can predict type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease and death

New research published in Diabetologia (the journal of the European Association for the Study of Diabetes [EASD]) shows that non-invasive measurement of skin autofluorescence (SAF) can predict future risk of type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease (CVD) and mortality, independent of other measures such as measuring blood glucose levels.

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Termites built themselves a landfill the size of Great Britain

Science The insect architects have been building these trash heaps for 4,000 years. Termite mounds cover a huge area in northeastern Brazil, but no one lives inside. Now researchers think they know why.

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Wild coffee plants, Christmas trees and chocolate's tree are surprisingly poorly protected

An indicator to measure plant conservation shows a wide range of wild plants used for food, medicine, shelter, fuel, livestock forage and other valuable purposes are at risk. These include wild populations of firs used for Christmas trees, the original types of kitchen-cupboard staples like vanilla, chamomile, cacao and cinnamon, wild relatives of crops like coffee, and non-cultivated plants used

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Environmental exposures early in life modify immune responses

The prevalence of allergic diseases has increased significantly over the last decades, creating substantial financial and societal burdens. Due to this, researchers are trying to discover new approaches to the prevention and treatment of these diseases.

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More than H2O: Technology simultaneously measures 71 elements in water, other liquids

A new method for simultaneous measurement of 71 inorganic elements in liquids — including water, beverages, and biological fluids — makes element testing much faster, more efficient, and more comprehensive than was possible in the past.

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Orange juice, leafy greens and berries may be tied to decreased memory loss in men

Eating leafy greens, dark orange and red vegetables and berry fruits, and drinking orange juice may be associated with a lower risk of memory loss over time in men.

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Underlying mechanisms of 3d tissue formation

Scientists utilize simulations and laboratory experiments to find that cells sense the mechanical forces to form the primordial eye, the optic cup.

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Putting a face on a cell surface

With the help of machine learning, researchers have been able to thoroughly describe the repertoire proteins on the cell surface for the first time. The latest findings are opening up new approaches in pharmaceutical research.

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Typically human: Babies recognize nested structures similar to our grammar

At a mere five months of age, babies seemingly have the ability to recognize very complex grammatical structures. That is what a research team has now shown.

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Brain-computer interface enables people with paralysis to control tablet devices

Three clinical trial participants with paralysis chatted with family and friends, shopped online and used other tablet computer applications, all by just thinking about pointing and clicking a mouse.

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Study uncovers link between air pollution and intellectual disabilities in children

British children with intellectual disabilities are more likely than their peers to live in areas with high outdoor air pollution, according to a new study.

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Scientists study puncture performance of cactus spines

The same traits that allow barbed cactus spines to readily penetrate animal flesh also make the spines more difficult to dislodge, a new study finds. The microscopic barbs on the spines are layered like shingles and sized perfectly to snag muscle and collagen fibers. When testing the anchoring power of various spines, the researchers discovered that a single cholla spine could hoist a half-pound h

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When AI and optoelectronics meet: Researchers take control of light properties

Researchers customize the properties of broadband light sources using an AI algorithm and a photonic chip.

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Probiotics no help to young kids with stomach virus

A major US study has found that a commonly used probiotic is not effective in improving symptoms of diarrhea and vomiting in young children with gastroenteritis.

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How do flying bees make perfect turns?

Bees adjust their speed to keep turning forces constant, new research shows. The findings can be applied to robots and autonomous vehicles.

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Evolution: South Africa's hominin record is a fair-weather friend

The fossil record of early hominins in South Africa is biased towards periods of drier climate, suggests a study of cave deposits. This finding suggests there are gaps in the fossil record, potentially obscuring evolutionary patterns and affecting our understanding of both the habitats and dietary behaviors of early hominins in this region. South Africa's highest concentration of early hominin fos

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Climate of small star TRAPPIST 1's seven intriguing worlds

New research from astronomers gives updated climate models for the seven planets around the star TRAPPIST-1. The work also could help astronomers more effectively study planets around stars unlike our sun, and better use the resources of the James Webb Space Telescope.

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InSight: Nasa's Mars mission on target for landing

The American space agency says its InSight Mars lander is on a near-perfect Thanksgiving trajectory.

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Probiotic no better than placebo for acute gastroenteritis in children

While probiotics are often used to treat acute gastroenteritis (also known as infectious diarrhea) in children, the latest evidence shows no significant differences in outcomes, compared to a placebo.

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Two physicians condemn use of disease and famine as weapons of war in Yemen

Two Massachusetts General Hospital physicians call on medical and public health communities around the world to condemn the attacks on health care facilities and services in Yemen conducted by the Saudi-led coalition in the three-year-old war.

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New study reveals probiotics do not help children with intestinal infections

Probiotics are a multibillion-dollar industry with marketing claims of being an effective treatment for a multitude of ailments, including diarrhea. However, findings from a new study from the University of Calgary show the popular product has no effect on gastroenteritis, commonly yet erroneously called the stomach flu, in children.

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Probiotics no help to young kids with stomach virus

A major US study led by Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis found that a commonly used probiotic is not effective in improving symptoms of diarrhea and vomiting in young children with gastroenteritis.

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The Clown Is No Fool

“When I was a child, I was fascinated by the spontaneity and the freedom of the clown,” says Reinhard Horstkotte, a performer who is profiled in Emmanuel Vaughn-Lee’s short documentary, Laugh Clown Laugh . Horstkotte embraces these virtues in his work as a clown. Over the course of his life, he has cultivated a rich philosophy of clowning—one that transcends sheer entertainment value. Like many p

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4,000-year-old termite mounds are so vast they're visible from space

This 4,000-year-old structure can be seen from space and wasn't built by humans. The mounds are made up of 200 million mounds of earth. They're still under construction today. They're nearly as old as the pyramids of Giza, and far larger, the equivalent in volume of some 4,000 Great Pyramids. They weren't built by people, though. Two hundred million mounds of dirt — more than 10 cubic kilometers,

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The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: Beef Justice

Programming note : We won’t be publishing a newsletter on Thursday or Friday. We’re leaving you with some stories here to read and discuss for the rest of this week, and will be back in your inboxes on Monday, November 26. Happy Thanksgiving! — Elaine Godfrey Today in 5 Lines Supreme Court Chief Justice John Roberts rejected President Donald Trump’s criticism of the federal judge who ruled agains

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Orange juice, leafy greens and berries may be tied to decreased memory loss in men

Eating leafy greens, dark orange and red vegetables and berry fruits, and drinking orange juice may be associated with a lower risk of memory loss over time in men, according to a study published in the Nov. 21, 2018, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

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Gun Shops Work With Doctors To Prevent Suicide By Firearm

Of all the deaths by gunfire in Colorado, suicides account for about 80 percent. A coalition of doctors, public health researchers and gun shop owners are working together to prevent that self-harm. (Image credit: Theo Stroomer for NPR)

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Visitors From the Ocean’s Twilight Zone

Researchers recently hauled up specimens from a layer of the world’s seas that contains an abundance of aquatic life.

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What magnetic fields can tell us about life on other planets

Every school kid knows that Earth has a magnetic field – it's what makes compasses align north-south and lets us navigate the oceans. It also protects the atmosphere, and thus life, from the sun's powerful wind.

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Nissan board to vote on Ghosn's dismissal

The fate of Nissan's disgraced Carlos Ghosn as chairman of the Japanese car giant is set to be decided Thursday when board members meet to vote on his dismissal, days after the tycoon's arrest for financial misconduct.

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Scientists find possible new species in Caribbean waters

U.S. scientists have wrapped up a 22-day mission exploring waters around Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands with the deepest dives ever recorded in the region.

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Rowhammer Data Hacks Are More Dangerous Than Anyone Feared

Researchers have discovered that the so-called Rowhammer technique works on "error-correcting code" memory, in what amounts to a serious escalation.

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Creepy 'Smiling' Worm Pulled from Bottom of the Sea

Russian fisherman Roman Fedortsov has a habit of pulling ghoulish and bizarre creatures from the deep sea.

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That Escalated Quickly: Putting the Fun in Funiculars

Moving people and freight up and down steep terrain has always been a difficult problem, and beginning in the 1860s, the funicular railway became a solution that has been tried in hundreds of locations around the world. One part elevator, one part streetcar, these counterbalanced cable railways have been built on mountaintops for tourists, on hillsides for mines, along rivers to reach ports, and

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The hunt for missing, dead in California fire

Given the size and scope of the devastation after a deadly wildfire swept Northern California, experts say the search to find the missing and identify victims could take months.

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Amazon says some customer email addresses exposed

Amazon on Wednesday said that a website glitch accidentally exposed names and email addresses of some of the e-commerce giant's customers.

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Spain approves contested data protection law

The Spanish senate approved Wednesday a controversial online data protection law which critics say will allow political parties to target voters with ads based on their internet browsing history.

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Mars landing comes down to final 6 minutes of 6-month trip

It all comes down to the final six minutes of a six-month journey to Mars.

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You Won't Win the Thanksgiving Fight. But You Can Survive

The deep conflicts dividing America will never be solved over a turkey leg. But there are science-backed ways to survive family arguments.

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Did the CDC Really Just Ban … Romaine Lettuce?

Not exactly, but you should definitely throw yours away. Plus: A brief history of *E. coli* outbreaks

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The Books Briefing: Every Literary Family Is Fascinating in Its Own Way

Families! To roughly restate the famous first line of Anna Karenina , each one has its unique troubles—and those troubles are fodder for books. The domestic dramas of these stories range from satirical to heartwarming, and they add insight into social issues stretching far beyond the walls of a single home. Novels by Cynthia D’Aprix Sweeney, Imbolo Mbue, and Jade Chang find families from differen

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An orbiter glitch may mean some signs of liquid water on Mars aren’t real

The way that scientists process data from a Mars orbiter creates what look like signs of saltwater, but may actually be nothing, a study finds.

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Consistency in core language skill stable in typically and atypically developing children

In a 15-year study of thousands of children, including those with dyslexia and autism spectrum disorders, researchers discovered that a so-called core language skill, as identified here, was stable from infancy to adolescence. These findings affirm that when a child's language skills are lagging, early intervention is best. As an infant, grasping a language is one

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UChicago researchers find simple way to massively improve crop loss simulations

In a new study, researchers with NASA, the University of Chicago and the Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research found that including data on when each specific region plants and harvests its crops doubled the accuracy of simulations of crop yields. The adaptation could help policymakers and markets brace for the impacts of crop loss.

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Treating spinal pain with replacement discs made of 'engineered living tissue' moves closer to reality

For the first time, bioengineered spinal discs were successfully implanted and provided long-term function in the largest animal model ever evaluated for tissue-engineered disc replacement. A new Penn Medicine study published in Science Translational Medicine provides compelling translational evidence that the cells of patients suffering from neck and back pain could be used to build a new spinal

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Typically human: Babies recognize nested structures similar to our grammar

At a mere five months of age, babies seemingly have the ability to recognize very complex grammatical structures. That is what a research team headed by Professor Angela Friederici from the Max Planck Institute for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences (MPI CBS) and Professor Jutta Mueller from the University of Osnabrück have now shown in a new study published in Science Advances.

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Electronic glove gives robots a sense of touch

Stanford researchers have developed an electronic glove that bestows robotic hands with some of the manual dexterity humans enjoy.

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Antibodies from human survivors of Andes hantavirus protect rodents against infection

Jose Garrido and colleagues have isolated antibodies from human survivors of Andes hantavirus (ANDV) infection that protected hamsters against the deadly disease.

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Lake Erie algal blooms 'seeded' internally by overwintering cells in lake-bottom sediments

Western Lake Erie's annual summer algal blooms are triggered, at least in part, by cyanobacteria cells that survive the winter in lake-bottom sediments, then emerge in the spring to 'seed' the next year's bloom, according to a research team led by University of Michigan scientists.

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Making an eye for you

Kyoto University scientists utilize simulations and laboratory experiments to find that cells sense the mechanical forces to form the primordial eye, the optic cup.

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Snails become risk-takers when hungry

Research from the University of Sussex proves that snails take more risks when hungry, risking potentially harmful substances in order to survive.

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Canadians' and Americans' Twitter language mirrors national stereotypes, researchers find

A new study examining differences in the language used in nearly 40-million tweets suggests national stereotypes — Canadians tend to be polite and nice while Americans are negative and assertive — are reflected on Twitter, even if those stereotypes aren't necessarily accurate.

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Brain-computer interface enables people with paralysis to control tablet devices

Three clinical trial participants with paralysis chatted with family and friends, shopped online and used other tablet computer applications, all by just thinking about pointing and clicking a mouse.

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Advancement in drug therapies may provide new treatment for Cutaneous leishmaniasis

Cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL) is a parasitic infection caused by Leishmania parasite. CL cases have increased dramatically in Syria and neighboring countries due to conflict-related displacement of Syrians. A study published in PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases by Rana El Hajj at the American University of Beirut, Lebanon describes the development of a novel immunomodulatory analog that may be an ef

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Brain-computer interface enables people with paralysis to control tablet devices

An investigational brain-computer interface (BCI) can enable people with paralysis to directly operate an off-the-shelf tablet device by thinking about making cursor movements and clicks, according to a study published Nov. 21, 2018 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Paul Nuyujukian, Jose Albites-Sanabria, and Jad Saab from the BrainGate consortium, USA, and colleagues.

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Brain implants let paralyzed people use tablets to send texts and stream music

People with paralysis could control commercially available tablets with their brain activity, researchers show.

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Lake Erie algal blooms 'seeded' internally by overwintering cells in lake-bottom sediments

Western Lake Erie's annual summer algal blooms are triggered, at least in part, by cyanobacteria cells that survive the winter in lake-bottom sediments, then emerge in the spring to "seed" the next year's bloom, according to a research team led by University of Michigan scientists.

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Snails become risk-takers when hungry

Hunger increases risk-taking behaviour in snails, according to research from neuroscientists at the University of Sussex.

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Canadians' and Americans' Twitter language mirrors national stereotypes, researchers find

A new study examining differences in the language used in nearly 40-million tweets suggests national stereotypes—Canadians tend to be polite and nice while Americans are negative and assertive—are reflected on Twitter, even if those stereotypes aren't necessarily accurate.

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Team uncovers the underlying mechanisms of 3-D tissue formation

If you want to build an organ for transplant, you need to think in 3-D. Using stem cells, scientists are now able to grow parts of organs in the lab, but that is a far cry from constructing a fully-formed, functioning, three-dimensional organ.

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Researchers find simple way to massively improve crop loss simulations

Droughts or heat waves have consequences that spread beyond farmers anxiously watching their fields; these fluctuations in crop yields can send shockwaves through local and global food supplies and prices.

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This new 'ion drive' airplane flew straight out of science fiction

Technology The quiet propulsion system has no moving parts. The plane's "engine" has no moving parts.

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No Propellers, No Problem: A New Kind of Aircraft Takes Flight

No Propellers, No Problem: A New Kind of Aircraft Takes Flight A new plane about the length and width of a car propels itself by electrifying air molecules to create an ionic wind. SolidStateAirplane.jpg Artist's rendering of the solid state airplane. Image credits: Steven Barrett (MIT) Technology Wednesday, November 21, 2018 – 13:00 Charles Q. Choi, Contributor (Inside Science) — Scientists hav

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Have Astronomers Found Another "Alien Megastructure" Star?

Scientists now have a second example of a strange stellar phenomenon speculatively linked to extraterrestrial intelligence in 2015 — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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USAMRIID scientists help identify key hantavirus receptor

A global team of investigators has identified a key protein involved in Hantavirus Pulmonary Syndrome (HPS), a serious and sometimes fatal respiratory disease, according to research published today in Nature. The cell-surface receptor protein protocadherin-1 (PCDH1), commonly associated with human asthma, is responsible for facilitating lung cell infection and triggering HPS. Discovery of the cell

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The genomic keys to the origin of the vertebrates

An international team of scientists led by Spanish researchers reports how more complex and specialized gene regulation proved to be pivotal in the origin of the vertebrates. The work, published recently by the Nature journal, compiles genomic, epigenomic and gene expression data from several organisms and provides unique information about the functional changes that gave rise to greater complexit

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Radical approach for brighter LEDs

Scientists have discovered that semiconducting molecules with unpaired electrons, termed 'radicals' can be used to fabricate very efficient organic-light-emitting diodes (OLEDs), exploiting their quantum mechanical 'spin' property to overcome efficiency limitations for traditional, non-radical materials.

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Sugar supplement slows tumor growth and can improve cancer treatment

Mannose sugar, a nutritional supplement, can both slow tumor growth and enhance the effects of chemotherapy in mice with multiple types of cancer.

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Evolution: South Africa's hominin record is a fair-weather friend

The fossil record of early hominins in South Africa is biased towards periods of drier climate, suggests a study of cave deposits published online today in Nature. This finding suggests there are gaps in the fossil record, potentially obscuring evolutionary patterns and affecting our understanding of both the habitats and dietary behaviours of early hominins in this region. South Africa's highest

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What makes vertebrates special? We can learn from lancelets

OIST researcher helps unravel the origins of vertebrate gene regulation in a large collaborative study.

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Study identifies how hantaviruses infect lung cells

Hantaviruses cause severe and sometimes fatal respiratory infections, but how they infect lung cells has been a mystery. In today's issue of Nature, an international team including researchers at Albert Einstein College of Medicine reports that hantaviruses gain entry to lung cells by 'unlocking' a cell-surface receptor called protocadherin-1 (PCDH1). Deleting this receptor made lab animals highly

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Researchers discover key gene in cells associated with age-related hearing loss

An international group of researchers, led by Ronna Hertzano, M.D., Ph.D., Associate Professor, Department of Otorhinolaryngology-Head & Neck Surgery, Anatomy and Neurobiology, at the University of Maryland School of Medicine (UMSOM), and Michael Bowl, Ph.D., Programme Leader Track Scientist, Mammalian Genetics Unit, MRC Harwell Institute, UK, have identified the gene that acts as a key regulator

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Never-before-seen DNA recombination in the brain linked to Alzheimer's disease

SBP scientists have identified gene recombination in neurons that produces thousands of new gene variants within Alzheimer's disease brains. The study, published today in Nature, reveals for the first time how the Alzheimer's-linked gene, APP, is recombined by using the same type of enzyme found in HIV. The findings provide rationale for evaluating HIV antiretroviral therapies in people with Alzhe

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MIT engineers fly first-ever plane with no moving parts

MIT engineers have built and flown the first-ever plane with no moving parts. Instead of propellers or turbines, the light aircraft is powered by an 'ionic wind' — a silent but mighty flow of ions that is produced aboard the plane, and that generates enough thrust to propel the plane over a sustained, steady flight.

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Musical training improves visual timing

Drummers and brass players are better able to judge the timing of visual stimuli than members of the color guard, according to a naturalistic study of the world-class drum corps Bluecoats published in eNeuro. This counterintuitive finding extends previous research demonstrating superior sensory learning and memory from cross-training the brain's audio and visual systems.

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Electric zero-emissions plane raises hopes for eco-friendly air travel

There's a new type of electric plane that produces no emissions, the only problem is it is very small and can only fly 55 metres

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Are disposable nappies really so terrible for the environment?

Disposable nappies have been named as the latest plastic good we should ban, but there are problems with compostable and reusable alternatives too

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Simulator helps experts understand how whales get entangled

A new simulator is letting scientists use a joystick to swim a virtual whale across a video screen. But this is no game—it's a serious attempt to better understand how the giant mammals become entangled in fishing lines.

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Facebook appeals its UK fine in Cambridge Analytica scandal

Facebook has appealed its 500,000-pound ($644,000) fine for failing to protect the privacy of its users in the Cambridge Analytica scandal, arguing that U.K regulators failed to prove that British users were directly affected.

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Niger to move protected giraffes as habitat shrinks

Part of a group of a rare giraffes that has become a Niger tourist attraction is to be moved to a reserve 600 kilometres (400 miles) away owing to encroaching desert, farmland and increasing instances of them being struck by vehicles, officials said Wednesday.

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First ever plane with no moving parts takes flight

Flight represents breakthrough that could lead eventually to carbon-neutral air travel The first ever “solid state” plane, with no moving parts in its propulsion system, has successfully flown for a distance of 60 metres, proving that heavier-than-air flight is possible without jets or propellers. The flight represents a breakthrough in “ionic wind” technology, which uses a powerful electric fiel

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Reefer Madness at NASA

The story of NASA ’s efforts to restore the country’s ability to launch American astronauts into space from U.S. soil has just gained a rather interesting new chapter. NASA has decided to conduct reviews of SpaceX and Boeing, the two companies the agency hired to develop astronaut-transportation systems that would allow the United States to fly crewed missions from its own launchpads for the firs

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Scott Pruitt’s Environmental Rollbacks Stumbled in Court. His Successor Is More Thorough.

President Trump’s current choice to run the E.P.A., Andrew Wheeler, could emerge as an effective and efficient driver of the administration’s environmental and climate deregulation agenda.

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Radical approach for brighter LEDs

Scientists have discovered that semiconducting molecules with unpaired electrons, termed 'radicals' can be used to fabricate very efficient organic-light-emitting diodes (OLEDs), exploiting their quantum mechanical 'spin' property to overcome efficiency limitations for traditional, non-radical materials.

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Scientists help identify key hantavirus receptor

A global team of investigators has identified a key protein involved in Hantavirus Pulmonary Syndrome (HPS), a serious and sometimes fatal respiratory disease, according to research published today in the journal Nature.

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Evolution: South Africa's hominin record is a fair-weather friend

New research from an international team of scientists led by University of Cape Town isotope geochemist Dr. Robyn Pickering is the first to provide a timeline for fossils from the caves within the Cradle of Humankind. It also sheds light on the climate conditions of our earliest ancestors in the area.

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What makes vertebrates special? We can learn from lancelets

Scientists once thought that humans must have 2 million genes to account for all our complexity. But since sequencing the human genome, researchers have learned that humans only have about 19,000 to 25,000 genes—not many more than a common roundworm. Now, evidence suggests humans and other vertebrates gained their unique attributes not from sheer number of genes, but from how they regulate the gen

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Modeling the most common form of vision loss in older adults

Age-related macular degeneration is the leading cause of vision loss in people older than 50. University of Pennsylvania biochemist Kathleen Boesze-Battaglia and colleagues have developed a model system that mimics many features of the human condition, giving scientists a platform to gain a deeper understanding of risk factors and possible treatments.

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A new airplane uses charged molecules, not propellers or turbines, to fly

A small aircraft prototype is powered by ionic wind flowing in one direction and pushing the plane in the other.

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An electric plane with no moving parts has made its first flight

The turbineless design uses electroaerodynamic propulsion to fly and could herald the arrival of quieter, lower-emission aircraft.

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Border wall came at high cost, low benefit for U.S. workers

The Secure Fence Act of 2006, which built a partial wall across the US-Mexico border, had a negative economic impact on US citizens—and only minimally reduced unauthorized Mexican migration, researchers report. A new working paper examines the effects of the act, which added 548 miles of border fence between the two countries from 2007 to 2010. At a cost of $2.3 billion, the expansion raised tota

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A Thanksgiving Meditation in the Face of a Changing Climate

I feel grief, guilt, anger, determination, hope, and sadness all at the same time. But what I feel more than anything is gratitude for what we have. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Quanta Writers and Editors Discuss Trends in Science and Math

Why doesn’t our universe make sense? What is time? What is life? On Friday, more than 200 readers joined writers and editors from Quanta Magazine at the Simons Foundation for a wide-ranging panel discussion that examined the newest ideas in fundamental physics, biology and mathematics research, including the questions of whether our universe is “natural,” the nature of time, the origin and evolut

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Helping to transport proteins inside the cell

Researchers from the University of Freiburg have discovered how proteins are transported to the cell's power stations.

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Your 'Fat-Toothed' Relative May Not Make It for Thanksgiving. He Vanished from Earth 300 Million Years Ago.

Although it may look like a dinosaur, a newly identified sail-backed reptile that lived 300 million years ago is actually more closely related to humans, a new study finds.

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The CDC says everyone needs to toss their romaine

Health And don't buy more. We don't lightly advocate for food waste, but with the holidays approaching, an E. coli outbreak of unknown origin is nothing to play around with.

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Brazil's greenhouse gas emissions fall 2.3 percent in 2017

A civil society organization says greenhouse gas emissions in Brazil dropped last year mainly because of lower deforestation rates.

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David Attenborough: Climate 'biggest threat in thousands of years'

The television presenter is to urge greater action in a major speech at UN climate talks next month.

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'Creed II' Review: It's No 'Creed,' But It's a Fair Fight

The sequel is a safe bet—not because it lacks heart, but because it does exactly what you expect it to.

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Puerto Rico Pledges to Go All-Renewable by 2050

A new climate plan also includes measures to make the hurricane-battered island more climate resilient — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Checklist can tell if employee training really works

A new checklist could help develop, implement, and evaluate employee training programs. Businesses, nonprofits, and other organizations spend big money on employee training each year, but how can they tell the preparation is actually working? The checklist, which researchers describe in a paper in the International Journal of Training and Development , provides practical guidance for all stages o

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Paradise regained? Experts call for European approach to US housing

With the embers still raining from blackened skies choked by California's massive wildfires, the effort turns to rebuilding Paradise—a town of almost 30,000 that was wiped off the map.

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Study brings new climate models of small star TRAPPIST 1's seven intriguing worlds

New research from a University of Washington-led team of astronomers gives updated climate models for the seven planets around the star TRAPPIST-1. The work also could help astronomers more effectively study planets around stars unlike our sun, and better use the resources of the James Webb Space Telescope.

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Study calls for shake-up in mental health provision to improve patient outcomes

New research suggests that practitioners should rethink how psychiatry is presented to patients in order to improve mental health outcomes.

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Classroom friendships may offset effects of punitive parents

A study by researchers at UC San Francisco has confirmed the link between Harsh Parenting to Defiance andNoncompliance in Kids and found that kindergarten may provide a unique opportunity for these harshly parented children to retool negative behavior. The study is published in the journal Development and Psychopathology on Nov. 21, 2018.

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Blocks found in Egypt bear name of famed pharaoh's builder

Egypt says archaeologists digging in Cairo have found two blocks of limestone with inscriptions belonging to an engineer who worked for Ramses II, one of the longest ruling pharaohs in antiquity.

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NASA sees Tropical Storm Man-yi approaching typhoon strength Tropical Storm Man-Yi con

Tropical Storm Man-Yi continued to strengthen in the Northwestern Pacific Ocean as NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite provided a visible image of the storm. Warnings are in effect through the Federated States of Micronesia at the storm continues to affect the region.

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NASA sees tropical depression 33W enter the Sulu Sea

Tropical Depression 33W moved through the central Philippines and entered the Sulu Sea when NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite provided a visible image of the storm.

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Capturing the frugal beauty of complex natural tessellations

Surface tessellations are an arrangement of shapes which are tightly fitted, and form repeat patterns on a surface without overlapping. Imagine the pattern of a giraffe's fur, the shell of a tortoise and the honeycomb of bees—all form natural tessellations. Mimicking these natural designs computationally is a complex, multi-disciplinary problem. A global team of computer scientists has developed a

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Designing a safer building block for drug discovery by harnessing visible light

When you reach for a bottle of acetaminophen, you may be looking for relief from a headache. But if you take more than what is recommended, the drug can damage your liver.

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Resolving conflict in the medial frontal cortex

Image courtesy Wikimedia Commons. What does any part of the brain do? This simple question remains largely unanswered in cognitive neuroscience, where researchers are charting out the functional territories of the human brain. As reports of activation have accumulated for the medial frontal cortex (MFC), a swath of gray matter buried in the frontal lobe, a key challenge to the mapping efforts has

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Tales From The Bering Sea: Never Yell At The Deck Boss | Deadliest Catch

Captain Wild Bill learned the golden rule his first year on the sea. Stream Full Episodes of Deadliest Catch: https://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/deadliest-catch/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/DeadliestCatch https://www.facebook.com/Discovery Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/DeadliestCatch https://twitter.com/Discove

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'Longevity protein' rejuvenates muscle healing in old mice

A protein found in healing muscles of younger mice helps older animals bounce back from injury.

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Scientists developed enzymes with remote control

Scientists developed a method to enhance the activity of enzymes by using radio frequency radiation. The method requires making a special complex consisting of enzymes and magnetic nanoparticles. The particles can adsorb radio emission and convert it to heat, resulting in enzymatic processes acceleration by more than four times. Such method can be used to create radio-controlled biochemical system

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UMN researchers work to improve dermatologic care for sexual and gender minority patients

University of Minnesota researchers recently published an opinion piece in JAMA Dermatology focused on standardizing collection of sexual orientation and gender identity in dermatology clinical settings.

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Photons, Quasars and the Possibility of Free Will

Flickers of light from the edge of the cosmos help physicists advance the idea that the future is not predetermined — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Drastic cuts in city air pollution could extend lifespan

The average lifespan of residents of Copenhagen could increase by an entire year in 2040 if there were cuts in pollution to the level found in the countryside. “Of course this reveals to the decision-makers the potential if they were to really do something about the air pollution. Copenhageners can live longer lives, because fewer would get sick and die from diseases which we know are caused by a

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David Attenborough takes 'people's seat' at climate change talks

Sir David Attenborough will join the UN in taking a message from people around the world to the December climate change talks in Poland.

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