Search Posts

Nyheder2018november27

 

'Mini-placentas' could provide a model for early pregnancy

Researchers say that new 'mini-placentas' — a cellular model of the early stages of the placenta — could provide a window into early pregnancy and help transform our understanding of reproductive disorders. Details of this new research are published today in the journal Nature.

4h

Marine species quickly revealed by new 'Go Fish' tool, highlights potential of emerging eDNA science

Initiating eDNA as a coordinated US research theme, standardized eDNA sampling and reporting protocols, agreed baseline monitoring sites, and prioritizing ocean habitats for exploration, are among the aims of the First National Conference on Marine Environmental DNA (The Rockefeller University, N.Y., Nov. 29-30).The emerging science of environmental DNA is a far-reaching, potent complement to trad

4h

The Inimitable Creativity of Stephen Hillenburg

Every generation has its universal cult classic—a TV show beloved by millions that somehow feels unique, a widely watched phenomenon that’s so singular and strange that you feel as though only you could’ve discovered and fallen in love with it. For so many children of the 21st century, that show was SpongeBob SquarePants , a Nickelodeon cartoon about an anthropomorphized yellow sponge who lives i

4h

The Infinite Weirdness of Never-Ending Chat Histories

On Monday, a slew of Facebook users logged on to the platform and were bombarded with old chat messages, some from nearly a decade ago, all popping up as new through Facebook Messenger. It was a bug , and it disappeared quickly. “Earlier today, some people may have experienced Facebook resending older messages. The issue, caused by software updates, has been fully resolved. We’re sorry for any in

4h

Resource-based communities: Not just all work and no play

A new study by University of Alberta scientists explores how leisure and recreation access can improve social connections in resource-based communities like Fort McMurray. The findings build on a 2016 study of fly-in, fly-out workers in the city of Fort McMurray that found that the employment model may be having negative effects due to a lack of options to get workers involved in the community.

4h

Dutch Banks post-2008: Substantial increase in the equity capital is key to bank stability

In the aftermath of the global financial crisis of 2007-2008 and the following studies and comments in literature and the financial press, a study from a group of leading Dutch economists, published in June 2018, is commented by Prof.dr. Piet Duffhues, Tilburg University, the Netherlands.

4h

Geographer brings fresh perspective to study of US, world corruption in new books

A few years ago, Barney Warf wondered why no geographer yet had undertaken a major study of corruption. The geography professor at the University of Kansas said his field is uniquely well-suited to the study of fraudulent, dishonest or criminal conduct—like accepting bribes—by people in power, both in the U.S. and globally.

4h

New study explores ecosystem stability

In an era of rapid ecological change, scientists are turning to historical periods of persistence to better understand what drives stability. A team from the California Academy of Sciences and the Field Museum of Natural History has examined the structural complexity of ancient ecosystems by looking at the number of species and how they're organized by function, such as top predators or decomposer

4h

The first successful flight of an ionic-wind aircraft

A team of scientists at MIT have flown the first ionic-wind aircraft It's the first successful test of the emission-free technology Imagine silent aircraft gliding overhead In February 1904, the Wright Brothers first achieved flight at Kitty Hawk, North Carolina. Their time aloft was brief, less than 12 seconds, and the distance their craft traveled just 36.6 meters, but the moment made history a

4h

Lab-grown placentas 'will transform pregnancy research'

Cambridge team develops organoids or mini placentas to advance knowledge of stillbirth and pre-eclampsia Scientists have grown “mini placentas” in a breakthrough that could transform research into the underlying causes of miscarriage, stillbirth and other pregnancy disorders. The tiny organoids mimic the placenta in the early stages of the first trimester and will be used to understand how the ti

4h

Fires fueled spread of grasslands on ancient Earth

Ancient wildfires played a crucial role in the formation and spread of grasslands like those that now cover large parts of the Earth, according to scientists at Penn State and the Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History.

4h

'Stash your trash,' say rat researchers

Rats. Can't live with them, can't live without them—or so it seems in a city like Chicago. Researchers from Lincoln Park Zoo's Urban Wildlife Institute and Davee Center for Epidemiology and Endocrinology set out to understand why. The findings are published Nov. 28 in Frontiers in Ecology and Evolution.

4h

The future of fighting cancer: Zapping tumors in less than a second

New accelerator-based technology being developed by the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory and Stanford University aims to reduce the side effects of cancer radiation therapy by shrinking its duration from minutes to under a second. Built into future compact medical devices, technology developed for high-energy physics could also help make radiation therapy more accessible

4h

Atomic jet—the first lens for extreme-ultraviolet light developed

Scientists from the Max Born Institute (MBI) have developed the first refractive lens that focuses extreme ultraviolet beams. Instead of using a glass lens, which is non-transparent in the extreme-ultraviolet region, the researchers have demonstrated a lens that is formed by a jet of atoms. The results, which provide novel opportunities for the imaging of biological samples on the shortest timesca

5h

Earth's polar regions communicate via oceanic 'postcards,' atmospheric 'text messages'

Scientists have documented a two-part climatic connection between the North Atlantic Ocean and Antarctica, a fast atmospheric channel and a much slower oceanic one, that caused rapid changes in climate during the last ice age—and may again.

5h

NIST atomic clocks now keep time well enough to improve models of Earth

Experimental atomic clocks at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) have achieved three new performance records, now ticking precisely enough to not only improve timekeeping and navigation, but also detect faint signals from gravity, the early universe and perhaps even dark matter.

5h

The secret to better berries? Wild bees

Want bigger, faster-growing blueberries? New research shows wild bees are an essential secret ingredient in larger and better blueberry yields—producing plumper, faster-ripening berries.

5h

Intelligent framework aims to optimize data transfer in 5G networks

A North Carolina State University researcher has developed technology designed to allow cellular communication nodes in 5G systems to partition bandwidth more efficiently in order to improve end-to-end data transmission rates. In simulations, the tech is capable of meeting the international goal of 10 gigabits per second in peak performance areas.

5h

The All-New Gladiator Is Jeep’s Old-School Nod to Pickups

Americans love pickup trucks, and Jeep is happy to cater to their wishes.

5h

A terrible choice: Cancer treatment or hospice care, but not both

Colorado studies explore costs, benefits, and experiences of veterans receiving concurrent cancer treatment and hospice care; their findings may provide the basis for wider adoption of this nonstandard practice.

5h

Growing pile of human and animal waste harbors threats, opportunities

As demand for meat and dairy products increases across the world, much attention has landed on how livestock impact the environment, from land usage to greenhouse gas emissions.

5h

New method automatically computes realistic movement with friction from 3-D design

Simulating any 3-D surface or structure—from tree leaves and garments to pages of a book—is a computationally challenging, time-consuming task. While various geometric tools are available to mimic the shape modeling of these surfaces, a new method is making it possible to also compute and enable the physics—movement and distortion—of the surface and does so intuitively and with realistic results.

5h

Sharing benefits of digitized DNA

Today, scientists can sift through quadrillions of genetic sequences in open-access databases, searching (free-of-charge) for new ways to engineer crops, develop medicines or even create synthetic organisms. But a controversial proposal that aims to share the benefits of digitized DNA could affect scientists' ability to use these data, according to an article in Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN).

5h

Lasers could take 3-D printing to next level

Cars that go more than 1,000 miles on a single fill-up and smartphones that can run for days without recharging are among the possibilities that could come out of a new Clemson University research project that brings together 3-D printing and laser processing.

5h

Flexible electronic skin aids human-machine interactions

Human skin contains sensitive nerve cells that detect pressure, temperature and other sensations that allow tactile interactions with the environment. To help robots and prosthetic devices attain these abilities, scientists are trying to develop electronic skins. Now researchers report a new method in ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces that creates an ultrathin, stretchable electronic skin, which

5h

Authenticating the geographic origin of hazelnuts

Hazelnuts, like olive oil, cheese and other agricultural products, differ in flavor depending on their geographic origin. Because consumers and processors are willing to pay more for better nuts—especially in fine chocolates and other delicacies—testing methods are needed to reliably authenticate the nuts' country of origin. Researchers now report in ACS' Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry

5h

Researchers map light and sound wave interactions in optical fibers

Optical fibers make the internet happen. They are fine threads of glass, as thin as a human hair, produced to transmit light. Optical fibers carry thousands of Giga bits of data per second across the world and back. The same fibers also guide ultrasound waves, somewhat similar to those used in medical imaging.

5h

A big step toward the practical application of 3D holography with high- performance computers

Computer scientists have succeeded in developing a special purpose computer that can project high-quality 3D holography as a video. With the newly developed 'phase type' HORN-8, the calculation method for adjusting the phase of light was implemented, and the researchers were successful at projecting holography information as a 3D video with high-quality images.

5h

Climate change poses significant threat to nutritional benefits of oysters

The nutritional qualities of shellfish could be significantly reduced by future ocean acidification and warming, a new study suggests.

5h

Million-indsamling af sæd og æg skal redde verdens største koralrev

Forskere vil dyrke millionvis af koral-larver, som de kan sætte ud i de ødelagte områder af Great Barrier Reef, inden det er for sent.

5h

Jumpin' droplets! Researchers seek to improve efficiency of condensers

Hold a cold drink on a hot day, and watch as small droplets form on the glass, eventually coalescing into a layer of moisture (and prompting you to reach for a coaster).

5h

The virus detectives—The secret of brown trout dying uncovered

Every summer in Southern Germany, Austria and Switzerland, tons of brown trout perish. An interdisciplinary team from the Technical University of Munich (TUM) has now discovered the culprit of the mysterious dying afflicting brown trout. It is triggered by a previously unknown virus, which is related to a virus that infects salmon in the North Atlantic and the Pacific.

5h

Here’s how much climate change could cost the U.S.

A report by hundreds of scientists from 13 federal agencies starkly outlines the economic impacts of climate change on the United States.

5h

Nations Are Not Reducing Emissions Quickly Enough to Meet 2C Target

The “emissions gap” is widening as the window to take action narrows — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

5h

Maine’s new voting system is mathematically superior—and constitutionally questionable

Science The indicator state is asking: what's the best way to vote? Maine's alternative voting scheme faces a legal test after its first use in a national election.

5h

'In Search Of The Canary Tree' Highlights The Links Between Nature, Climate And Us

Conservation scientist Lauren E. Oakes weaves her musings about humans' place in a warming world together with conservation science in a moving and effective way. (Image credit: PR)

5h

A new way to provide cooling without power

A system developed at MIT can provide passive cooling without the need for power, and could be used to preserve food or vaccines in hot, off-grid locations.

5h

Resource-based communities: Not just all work and no play

A new study by University of Alberta scientists explores how leisure and recreation access can improve social connections in resource-based communities like Fort McMurray. The findings build on a 2016 study of fly-in, fly-out workers in the city of Fort McMurray that found that the employment model may be having negative effects due to a lack of options to get workers involved in the community.

5h

Fires fueled spread of grasslands on ancient Earth

Ancient wildfires played a crucial role in the formation and spread of grasslands like those that now cover large parts of the Earth, according to scientists at Penn State and the Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History.

5h

More Oregonians sharing end-of-life wishes with POLST

More Oregonians are making their end-of-life wishes known through forms known as Physician Order for Life-Sustaining Treatment, or POLST, according to research in the Journal of Palliative Medicine. Researchers also found how people are using the form is changing.

5h

5h

Roadkill deaths halved on Australian road thanks to a fence of sound

A network of alarms activated by approaching car headlights has stopped hundreds of animals from being run over and killed on an Australian highway

5h

Climate report Trump tried to bury: key findings No 2 – some action is far better than none

In part two of our series on the climate report Trump tried to bury over Thanksgiving, we look at its arguments for lowering emissions Part one: how air pollution is killing us The Trump administration published a major report on climate change the day after Thanksgiving. We will explore the key findings each day this week. Donald Trump doesn’t believe his own government’s major report on climate

5h

A Copy Machine Artist Creates Photos of Familiar Landscapes

Dominique Teufen uses food packaging, plastic wrap, and fabric scraps to construct natural-looking scenery on the glass.

5h

Microscope measures muscle weakness

Biotechnologists have developed a system to accurately measure muscle weakness caused by structural changes in muscle tissue. The new method allows muscle function to be assessed using imaging without the need for sophisticated biomechanical recordings, and could in future even make taking tissue samples for diagnosing myopathy superfluous.

5h

'Stash your trash,' say rat researchers

Rat complaints are indicators of rat abundance, finds a new study — as are the availability of uncontained garbage and neighborhoods with a high rate of rental units (vs. owned).

5h

Researchers examine trends in opioid prescriptions in children and adolescents

The researchers observed a downward shift in opioid prescriptions in children and adolescents, which aligns with previously reported trends in adult populations. Their results are published in JAMA Pediatrics.

5h

Trump’s Deal With Mexico Could Make Asylum Next to Impossible

Over the course of Donald Trump’s presidency, the administration has narrowed what the government considers grounds for asylum, and most recently it tried to ban those who cross the border illegally from requesting the protection. Now, it’s considering yet another proposal that could make it even harder for individuals seeking refuge in the U.S. The Trump administration is reportedly brokering a

5h

What's the Fastest 100 Meter Dash a Human Can Run?

History's best time, set by Usain Bolt, is 9.58 seconds. Depending on how you parse the data, he's either rather close—or worlds away—from the theoretical limit.

6h

Racial and Ethnic Disparities in NIH Funding

Research is elucidating a complicated phenomenon — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

6h

Bitcoin and blockchain jobs are booming — and they pay well

A study by Glassdoor found that demand for blockchain work has risen 300% since last year Glassdoor reported the median starting salary for blockchain job openings was over $32,000 higher than the median US salary, an increase of 61.8%. Despite the issues in the current crypto market, blockchain technology appears to have a bright future None For those in the United States, the economy continues

6h

There's Drug-Resistant Bacteria in the Space Toilets, Guys

Always wash your hands after using the space toilet. Always.

6h

The truth about supplements: do they work and should you take them?

Fish oils, multivitamins and other supplements are a huge industry, but the latest research indicates they are often of little use. Here's what you need to know

6h

EU set to resist air industry attempts to limit climate change action

The global air industry wants to stop countries from cutting aviation emissions, but it is likely that the European Union won't agree to such a flawed plan

6h

Transfusions with older blood linked to adverse events, death, new study finds

Major trauma victims who receive transfusions of packed blood 22 days old or older may face increased risk of death within 24 hours, according to a new study in Annals of Emergency Medicine.

6h

The secret to better berries? Wild bees

New research shows wild bees are essential for producing larger and better blueberry yields – with plumper, faster-ripening berries.The study is the first to show that wild bees improve not only blueberry quantities, but also size and other quality factors. It finds they produce greater berry size (12 percent), quantity (12 percent), size consistency (11 percent), and earlier harvests — by two an

6h

American adults have very low rate of metabolic health

A new study found that the prevalence of metabolic health is very low among American adults, even among those who have normal weight.

6h

The virus detectives

Every summer in Southern Germany, Austria and Switzerland, tons of brown trout perish. An interdisciplinary team from the Technical University of Munich (TUM) has now discovered the culprit of the mysterious dying afflicting brown trout. It is triggered by a previously unknown virus, which is related to a virus that infects salmon in the North Atlantic and the Pacific.

6h

New study finds racial disparities in oral anticoagulant use

Black patients with atrial fibrillation are significantly less likely to receive oral anticoagulants — particularly newer, more effective versions — than white and Hispanic patients.

6h

‘Parentese’ coaching for parents boosts babies’ language

When parents talk to their baby with a style of speech known as “parentese”—talking slowly and clearly, and often with exaggerated vowels and intonation—the infant’s language development improves, a new study shows. “We know from over 30 years of research in the lab that infants prefer parentese over standard speech, and that infants who are exposed to more parentese at home have larger vocabular

6h

Nanoscale blood test technique set to springboard cancer discoveries

A technique to get more information from the blood of cancer patients than previously possible has been developed. The discovery could potentially accelerate early diagnosis, speed up drug discovery and lead to advancements in personalized medicines.

6h

North American checklist identifies the fungus among us

Some fungi are smelly and coated in mucus. Others have gills that glow in the dark. Some are delicious; others, poisonous. Some spur euphoria when ingested. Some produce antibiotics. All of these fungi — and hundreds of thousands, if not millions, more — occur in North America. Of those that are known to science, 44,488 appear in a new checklist of North American fungi.

6h

New study supports mammography screening at 30 for some women

A new, large-scale study of more than 5 million mammograms found that annual mammography screening beginning at age 30 may benefit women with at least one of three specific risk factors: dense breasts, a personal history of breast cancer or a family history of breast cancer.

6h

Cryoablation shows promise in treating low-risk breast cancers

Cryoablation — the destruction of cancer cells through freezing — shows early indications of effectiveness in treating women with low-risk breast cancers. Researchers said that over the four years of the study, there has only been one case of cancer recurrence out of 180 patients.

6h

Blue Brain Project releases first-ever digital 3D brain cell atlas

The Blue Brain Cell Atlas is like 'going from hand-drawn maps to Google Earth' — providing previously unavailable information on major cell types, numbers and positions in all 737 brain regions. This comprehensive, interactive and dynamic online resource allows anyone to visualize every region in the mouse brain, cell-by-cell and in 3D, and freely download data for new analyses and modelling. It

6h

New report calls for health monitoring and research program on Gulf War and post-9/11 veterans

To help determine if the descendants of Gulf War and post-9/11 veterans are at risk for health effects resulting from the service members' exposure to toxicants during deployment, a new report from the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine recommends the creation of a health monitoring and research program (HMRP).

6h

Rewriting the brain pathway for consciousness

Overturning decades of neuroanatomy dogma, a new University of Iowa study shows that the thalamus is not a critical part of the brain pathway involved in keeping humans awake and conscious. The findings could lead to new, better targets for treating coma and other disorders of consciousness.

6h

Researchers reveal link between job titles and gender equality

Researchers at the Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics (MPI) have revealed a link between role-nouns (e.g. job titles) in gendered languages and gender equality. The study, which examined whether the masculine form in the plural in German is understood as gender-neutral or as specific to males, confirms earlier findings in behavioural research: people tend to interpret the grammatically mas

6h

RCSI research reveals that 1 in 4 suicide attempts are associated with perceptual difficulties

Researchers at RCSI (Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland) have revealed that one quarter of suicide attempts are associated with dysfunction in how the brain interprets basic perceptual information, such as what we see, hear and think. The research shows that this dysfunction can predict suicidal behavior, and offers new prospects for treatment and suicide prevention. The research has today been

6h

Jumpin' droplets! Researchers seek to improve efficiency of condensers

A team at Colorado State University has figured out how to keep condensed droplets from coalescing into a film, and to make the droplets jump high enough to move away from the condenser surface.

6h

Growing pile of human and animal waste harbors threats, opportunities

Researchers at Georgia Institute of Technology and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention are highlighting another effect from animals raised for food and the humans who eat them: the fecal matter they all leave behind.

6h

Healthy blood stem cells have as many DNA mutations as leukemic cells

Researchers from the Princess Máxima Center for Pediatric Oncology have shown that the number of mutations in healthy and leukemic blood stem cells does not differ. Rather the location of the mutations in the DNA is relevant. Using the mutation patterns in the hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) the team was able to trace the developmental lineage tree of the cells.

6h

New method automatically computes realistic movement with friction from 3D design

Researchers from Inria, the French National Institute for computer science and applied mathematics, have developed a novel algorithm that computes the shape of the surface at rest, that is, without any external force, and when this shape is deformed under gravity, contact and friction, it precisely matches the shape the user has designed.

6h

Antibiotic could protect against neurodegenerative diseases during aging

An antibiotic, minocycline, can increase the lifespan of roundworms by preventing the build-up of proteins during aging, a study in the open-access journal eLife reports.

6h

Sharing benefits of digitized DNA

Today, scientists can sift through quadrillions of genetic sequences in open-access databases, searching (free-of-charge) for new ways to engineer crops, develop medicines or even create synthetic organisms. But a controversial proposal that aims to share the benefits of digitized DNA could affect scientists' ability to use these data, according to an article in Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN),

6h

Reading rats' minds

Place cells in the hippocampus fire when we are in a certain position — this discovery by John O'Keefe, May-Britt Moser and Edvard Moser brought them the Nobel Prize in Medicine in 2014. Based on which place cell fires, scientists can determine were a rat is. Neuroscientists are now able to tell where a rat will go next, just from observing which neuron fires in a task that tests rats' reference

6h

Skin cancer rates far higher than previously thought, according to new national database

Data from a newly established UK skin cancer database, the largest of its kind in the world, has revealed that there are over 45,000 cutaneous squamous cell carcinomas every year in England, 350 percent more than previous estimates suggested.

6h

FIONA measures the mass number of 2 superheavy elements: Moscovium and Nihonium

A Berkeley Lab-led team has directly measured the mass numbers of two superheavy elements: moscovium (element 115), and nihonium (element 113).

6h

Cost and weight-loss potential matter most to bariatric surgery patients

New study at Michigan Medicine reveals the most commonly performed bariatric surgery, sleeve gastrectomy, doesn't fit the top qualities that surveyed patients want out of their weight loss journey.

6h

Do magazine-ranked hospitals for cardiovascular care have better outcomes?

Whether hospital rankings by US News & World Report magazine reflect quality of care has been debated.

6h

Mental health care increasing most among those with less distress

A new study shows that more Americans are getting outpatient mental health care and the rate of serious psychological distress is decreasing. However, a careful analysis of the data shows that the growth in outpatient mental health care is being driven by people with little or no psychological distress, and many with serious distress don't get the care they need.

6h

Researchers discover why some parts of the body have hair and others don't

Why do humans have hair on our arms and legs but not on the palms of our hands and the soles of our feet? It's a fundamental question in human evolution that researchers at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania say they've found clues to in a new study.

6h

How Do Scientists Prove That Twin Babies Had Their Genes Edited?

Questions are swirling after the announcement that the first gene-edited babies were born earlier this month — including what exactly researchers did and whether they even did it.

6h

Moscovium and Nihonium: FIONA measures the mass number of two superheavy elements

A team led by nuclear physicists at the Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) has reported the first direct measurements of the mass numbers for the nuclei of two superheavy elements: moscovium, which is element 115, and nihonium, element 113.

6h

Google Fi for iPhones: Fewer Features, Lower Prices

Google's MVNO is getting the iPhone and top Android devices, finally addressing its biggest blindspot.

6h

Computer hackers could be thwarted by new 'deception consistency' method

Can you deceive a deceiver? That's the question that computer scientists at Binghamton University, State University of New York have recently been exploring.Assistant Professor of Computer Science Guanhua Yan and PhD student Zhan Shu are looking at how to make cyber deception a more effective tool against malicious hackers.

6h

Authenticating the geographic origin of hazelnuts

Hazelnuts, like olive oil, cheese and other agricultural products, differ in flavor depending on their geographic origin. Because consumers and processors are willing to pay more for better nuts — especially in fine chocolates and other delicacies — testing methods are needed to reliably authenticate the nuts' country of origin. Researchers now report in ACS' Journal of Agricultural and Food Che

6h

Flexible electronic skin aids human-machine interactions (video)

Human skin contains sensitive nerve cells that detect pressure, temperature and other sensations that allow tactile interactions with the environment. To help robots and prosthetic devices attain these abilities, scientists are trying to develop electronic skins. Now researchers report a new method in ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces that creates an ultrathin, stretchable electronic skin, which

6h

Intelligent framework aims to optimize data transfer in 5G networks

New technology is designed to allow cellular communication nodes in 5G systems to partition bandwidth more efficiently in order to improve end-to-end data transmission rates. In simulations, the tech is capable of meeting the international goal of 10 gigabits per second in peak performance areas.

6h

Despite common obesity gene variants obese children lose weight after lifestyle changes

Children who are genetically predisposed to overweight, due to common gene variants, can still lose weight by changing their diet and exercise habits. Around 750 children and adolescents with overweight or obesity undergoing lifestyle intervention participated in the study conducted by researchers from the University of Copenhagen and Holbæk Hospital.

6h

How much do you trust Dr. Google?

Women experiencing signs of breast cancer vary in how they value, use, and trust 'Dr. Google' when making sense of their symptoms, a new study in the journal Health, Risk & Society reports.

6h

The protein with the starting gun

Whether dormant bacteria begin to reproduce is no accident. Rather, they are simply waiting for a clear signal from a single protein in the cell interior. ETH researchers have now deciphered the molecular mechanisms behind this.

6h

An Incomplete Reconstruction

JACKSON, Miss.—In a museum that memorializes the black victims of the lynching capital of the world, Mike Espy conceded victory to a candidate who made an infamous joke about lynchings. On the day of the Senate runoff, the Democratic candidate’s supporters gathered at the Mississippi Civil Rights Museum, which features detailed exhibits on the horrors of racial terrorism, and also highlights the

7h

Predators drive Nemo's relationship with an unlikely friend

Predators have been identified as the shaping force behind mutually beneficial relationships between species such as clownfish and anemones.

7h

100 solutions to climate change | Chad Frischmann

What if we took out more greenhouse gases than we put into the atmosphere? This hypothetical scenario, known as "drawdown," is our only hope of averting climate disaster, says strategist Chad Frischmann. In a forward-thinking talk, he shares solutions to climate change that exist today — conventional tactics like the use of renewable energy and better land management as well as some lesser-known

7h

Minister om uddannelseslukninger: Det er ikke os. Det er økonomien

Mandag var uddannelses- og forskningsminister Tommy Ahlers (V) i ilden, da han besøgte Aalborg Universitets københavnske campus til et topmøde om STEM-uddannelserne. For mens STEM-uddannelserne roses, skal syv af universitetets STEM uddannelser nedlægges.

7h

Scientists direct bacteria with expanded genetic code to evolve extreme heat tolerance

Synthetic bacteria with expanded genetic codes can evolve proteins in the laboratory with enhanced properties using mechanisms that might not be possible with nature's 20 amino acid building blocks. Exposing bacteria with an artificially expanded genetic code to temperatures at which they cannot normally grow, researchers found that some of the bacteria evolved new heat-resistant proteins that rem

7h

Self-assessing back pain by app just as effective as traditional methods, study shows

Patients can assess their own back pain using an app on their phone or tablet as effectively as current paper methods, a new study from the University of Warwick has shown.

7h

Extract from soursop leaves can prevent the symptoms of fibromyalgia

The consumption of extract of Annona muricata L. leaves in pharmaceutical form and in the correct dosage can reduce the chronic pain, anxiety and depression that accompany this disease.

7h

Scientists discovered a set of enzymes to create glowing organisms

There are over 100 species of mushrooms that emit light. Now, scientists have for the first time identified the biochemical pathway that allows bioluminescent fungi to light up. But they went even further: by putting the three genes necessary to generate luminescence into a non-glowing yeast, they created an artificially luminescent eukaryote. Fyodor Kondrashov, professor at the Institute of Scien

7h

Vaccination may reduce the severity of the flu in vaccinated but still infected patients

When influenza vaccination is ineffective in preventing the flu, it could have an additional effect reducing the severity of the infection, according to an epidemiological study which has the participation of members of the research group Epidemiology, Prevention and Control of Communicable Diseases led by Professor Angela Domi­nguez, from the Department of Medicine of the UB- and the Epidemiology

7h

Post-urban development

A contemporary city expands; it is stitched together with communications, but lacks integrity. Districts, urban communities and practices are so heterogeneous, that they often don't interact with each other. A united space is split into fragments. Communication is replaced with alienation. Dmitry Zamyatin, geographer and researcher of culture, chief research fellow at the Graduate School of Urbani

7h

Global warming increases the risk of an extinction domino effect

The complex network of interdependencies between plants and animals multiplies the species at risk of extinction due to environmental change.

7h

New Amsterdam Is a Medical Drama That Fails Doctors—And Viewers

In an early episode of NBC’s medical drama New Amsterdam , viewers see a 10-year-old boy named Leo sitting on a hospital floor, listless and unspeaking. “He used to be energetic. Silly,” his mother laments. She explains to a doctor that for several years, Leo has been taking a powerful cocktail of antipsychotic medications following a series of violent outbursts at school. “Who needs breakfast, a

7h

Messy offices may signal these personality traits to others

An extremely messy personal space may lead people to believe the owner of that space is more neurotic and less agreeable, according to a new study. Psychologists explored the degree of messiness in one’s workspace and how it affects perceptions of the owner’s personality. Their findings appear in the journal Personality and Individual Differences . In three experiments, researchers randomly assig

7h

Smartphone ad analyzer creates 'individual footprint' for advertising outreach analysis

A Purdue University doctoral candidate is developing an advertisement and audience analysis system that will enable advertisers to track specific commercials' outreach and audience ratings by analyzing short video clips and demographic surveys sent directly from viewers' smartphones.

7h

Special topic: Superconductivity and magnetism in transition-metal compounds

SCIENCE CHINA Physics Mechanics Astronomy recently publishes a topical issue, in which eight articles are collected to touch some of the frontier studies of this field.

7h

A golden age for particle analysis

Process engineers at Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg (FAU) have developed a method which allows the size and shape of nanoparticles in dispersions to be determined considerably quicker than ever before. Based on gold nanorods, they demonstrated how length and diameter distributions can be measured accurately in just one step instead of the complicated series of electron microscop

7h

Food webs essential for nature conservation efforts in the future

Nature conservation should not focus on individual species but on whole food webs, because the protection of their functioning is important for the predictability of species, especially when global warming is increasing environmental variability.

7h

Researchers have found the first risk genes for ADHD

A major international collaboration headed by researchers from the Danish iPSYCH project, the Broad Institute of Harvard and MIT, Massachusetts General Hospital, SUNY Upstate Medical University, and the Psychiatric Genomics Consortium has for the first time identified genetic variants which increase the risk of ADHD. The new findings provide a completely new insight into the biology behind ADHD.

7h

Defective protein factories in disease

Ever since the 1960s, the medical world has wondered why some patients who suffer from illnesses resulting from inadequate cell division are much more susceptible to cancer which is conversely characterized by excessive cell division. The Laboratory for Disease Mechanisms in Cancer in Leuven, Belgium has now succeeded in unraveling the mechanism of how defective ribosomes can cause both insufficie

7h

New study explores ecosystem stability

A new study explores ecosystem stability. Its findings raise questions about the stability of our modern global system.

7h

The 'Chinese Pyramids' and the pole star

The mausoleums of the Han Emperors are visible still today within the rapidly developing landscape of the northwestern surroundings of Xian along the Wei River. These "Pyramids" are shown to be oriented according to astronomical criteria.

7h

Camphorsulfonic acid-catalyzed Michael reaction of indoles with enones

Michael addition reaction is one of the most important and widely used reactions for making carbon-carbon or carbon-hetero bonds in organic synthesis. The reaction involves a facile attack of nucleophile to enone in a conjugated manner across a carbon-carbon double bond. The researchers herein report an expeditious camphor sulfonic acid-catalyzed Michael reaction for the synthesis of different 3-s

7h

Great apes and ravens plan without thinking

Planning and self control in animals do not require human-like mental capacities, according to a study from Stockholm University. Newly developed learning models, similar to models within artificial intelligence research, show how planning in ravens and great apes can develop through prior experiences without any need of thinking.

7h

Platelets grown from stem cells may be alternative to donated platelets

Researchers have developed a way to grow human platelets in the laboratory from stem cells derived from fat tissue. The achievement, reported today in the journal Blood, suggests manufactured platelets could eventually reduce the reliance on donated platelets to help patients with cancer and other disorders.

7h

Only 12 percent of American adults are metabolically healthy, study finds

The prevalence of metabolic health in American adults is 'alarmingly low,' even among people who are normal weight, according to a new study from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill's Gillings School of Global Public Health. Only one in eight Americans is achieving optimal metabolic health. This carries serious implications for public health since poor metabolic health leaves people mo

7h

Kun to bud på signalsystemets plan B: Derfor steg prisen med 138 pct.

100 millioner kr. forventede Banedanmark, at det ville koste at beskytte de gamle signaler mellem Roskilde og Holbæk mod magnetfelter fra køreledninger. Men foreløbig laveste bud lyder 238 mio. kr.

7h

Global warming increases the risk of an extinction domino effect

The complex network of interdependencies between plants and animals multiplies the species at risk of extinction due to environmental change, according to a JRC study.

7h

Why older women are less healthy than older men

Genes that act late in life could explain why women have poorer health than men in older age, according to new research.

7h

Ny kvinde for bordenden i Yngre Læger: »Der skal godt nok meget til, at jeg bider fra mig«

Helga Schultz er valgt som ny formand for Yngre Læge. Med erfaring som både tillidsrepræsentant på Nordsjællands Hospital og formand for YL Hovedstaden er hun ikke helt grøn i gamet, men hun er en anden type end den afgående formand, mener hun selv

7h

Arctic cold war: climate change has ignited a new polar power struggle

Climate change is redrawing the Arctic geopolitical map. Rising temperatures are causing permafrost and sea ice in the Arctic Circle to melt at an alarming rate. While this should be a worldwide cause for concern as its impact will have catastrophic consequences for the entire planet, the US, Russia, Canada, Denmark, Norway, Sweden, Finland and Iceland instead see it as an opportunity to gain acce

8h

A new drug to prevent life-threatening swelling attacks

Patients with hereditary angioedema experience recurrent and sometimes life-threatening swelling attacks. Researchers from Charité – Universitätsmedizin Berlin have tested an antibody capable of reducing the frequency of these swelling attacks by more than 90 percent. Results from their phase 3 trial were published yesterday in JAMA*, the renowned Journal of the American Medical Association.

8h

Researchers map light and sound wave interactions in optical fibers

Earlier this year researchers developed sensing protocols that allow optical fibers to 'listen' outside an optical fiber where they cannot 'look', based on an interplay between light waves and ultrasound. Now they have constructed a measurement protocol that can map local power levels of multiple optical wave components over many kilometers of fiber. This new insight may be applied to sensor syste

8h

Fitbits go the distance in running study

La Trobe University researchers have put one of the world's most popular activity trackers to the test.

8h

'Dancing' hyperon in pear-shaped hypernuclei

Hypernuclei provide the information to understand fundamental interaction in nature, new state of nuclear matter, and the structure of neutron stars. Researchers develop a new relativistic nuclear model for the low-energy structure of pear-like shaped hypernuclei. They have disclosed interesting behaviors of the hyperon in the pear-shaped hypernucleus ${}_{\Lambda }^{21}$Ne.

8h

8h

The Atlantic Begins “The Speech Wars” Reporting Project

Today The Atlantic begins a year-long reporting project, “ The Speech Wars ,” exploring questions of American free expression and public discourse. The project will unfold across TheAtlantic.com, in video, and through live events, beginning with an event next week in San Francisco looking at the debate about free speech on campuses, on tech platforms, and in politics. “The Speech Wars” is born ou

8h

Scientist in China defends human embryo gene editing

He Jiankui uses Hong Kong summit to reply to critics of his Crispr-Cas9 trials altering baby DNA for HIV resistance The Chinese scientist who claims to have altered the DNA of twin girls before birth – without going through the usual scientific channels – said he was proud of his work, and claimed another woman enrolled in his trial was pregnant with a similarly modified baby. The scientist, He J

8h

Test prep is a rite of passage for many Asian-Americans

When ACT released its latest test scores this past October, the results showed that average scores took a dip for every racial group in the United States except one – Asian-Americans.

8h

Low-income parents want a white picket fence, not just money, before getting married

Marriage rates in the U.S. are declining, especially among the lowest-income Americans.

8h

Future wildfires: Stronger buildings could delay, but not stop, destruction alone

California's deadly Camp Fire is now 100 percent contained, but low humidity and strong winds in the state mean that wildfires could strike again.

8h

Gold nanoparticle microsecond tracking with atomic-level localization precision achieved

Gold nanoparticles have been used as an optical probe of high-localization precision, high-speed single-molecule tracking of protein molecular motors. With newly developed dark-field microscopy, researchers in Institute for Molecular Science, Japan, have achieved gold nanoparticle tracking with atomic-level angstrom localization precision and microsecond time resolution. Detailed motion of kinesin

8h

New HIV diagnoses at high levels in the European Region but progress in EU

With nearly 160,000 new HIV diagnoses, 2017 marked another year of alarming numbers of HIV diagnoses in the WHO European Region. Encouragingly, the overall increasing trend is not as steep as before. The eastern part of the Region recorded over 130,000 new HIV diagnoses, the highest number ever. In contrast, the EU/EEA countries reported a decline in rates, mainly driven by a 20 percent decrease s

8h

New technique for identifying small molecules may speed up drug discovery, manufacturing

A UCLA-led team of scientists has developed a new technique that will enable researchers to easily and quickly determine the structures of organic molecules using very small samples. The approach enables scientists to analyze nanocrystals, which are so small that they can only be seen using special electron microscopes, and identify them within about 30 minutes, instead of the several hours that t

8h

Predators drive Nemo's relationship with an unlikely friend

Predators have been identified as the shaping force behind mutually beneficial relationships between species such as clownfish and anemones.

8h

Study: Public transportation use linked to better public health

Promoting robust public transportation systems may come with a bonus for public health — lower obesity rates. A new study from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign compares data from two years to find that a single percentage-point increase in mass transit ridership is associated with a 0.473 percentage-point lower obesity rate in counties across the United States.

8h

How a bank clerk became a record-breaking polar explorer

Science In between, she almost died in the Arctic. When Ann Daniels signed up for an all-female mission to the North Pole, she had never even skied before. Since then, she has braved freezing temperatures, polar bears,…

8h

The protein with the starting gun

Whether dormant bacteria begin to reproduce is no accidence. Rather, they are simply waiting for a clear signal from a single protein in the cell interior. ETH researchers have now deciphered the molecular mechanisms behind this.

8h

Using solar to light up communities, grow incomes of rural households

Immaculate Tumwebaze, is a resident of Katara village, Kichwamba sub county, Rubirizi district. She is one of the 18 members of Katara Women Poverty Eradication Group (KWPEG) that have benefited from the Scaling-up rural electrification using innovative solar PV distribution models project by World Wide Fund for Nature Uganda Country Office (WWF-UCO) with funding from European Union. This project

8h

A bright side to those dire climate change reports?

A dire new climate report compiled by 13 U.S. federal agencies begins with an unequivocal pronouncement: "Earth's climate is now changing faster than at any point in modern history, primarily as a result of human activities."

8h

Evaluating the use of automated facial recognition technology in major policing operations

Academics at Cardiff University have conducted the first independent academic evaluation of Automated Facial Recognition (AFR) technology across a variety of major policing operations.

8h

'World's worst environmental disaster' set to be repeated with controversial new dam in Africa

Encompassing swathes of Ethiopia, South Sudan and Kenya, the Omo-Turkana Basin is one of the oldest landscapes in the world that is known to have been inhabited by Homo sapiens and is now one of the world's most extraordinary examples of ethnic diversity. In the lower Omo Valley alone, a varied history of cross-cultural encounters has played out to produce eight distinct ethnic groups, speaking ma

8h

Is Silicon Valley ready for fully autonomous Waymo vehicles?

Waymo, the first company to get approval from the Department of Motor Vehicles to test fully self-driving vehicles on California roads, faces questions and concerns galore as it prepares to roll out the cars in Silicon Valley.

8h

Why the U.S. Can’t Solve Big Problems

The federal government released a devastating report last week documenting the immense economic and human cost that the U.S. will incur as a result of climate change. It warns that the damage to roads alone will add up to $21 billion by the end of the century. In certain parts of the Midwest, farms will produce 75 percent less corn than today, while ocean acidification could result in $230 billio

8h

Image: Robotic hopper

This walking and hopping robot is currently being tested in ESA's Mars Yard.

8h

5 ways to help robots work together with people

For most people today, robots and smart systems are servants that work in the background, vacuuming carpets or turning lights on and off. Or they're machines that have taken over repetitive human jobs from assembly-line workers and bank tellers. But the technologies are getting good enough that machines will be able work alongside people as teammates – much as human-dog teams handle tasks like hun

8h

Sydvestjysk Sygehus får ny lægelig direktør

Region Syddanmark har ansat Anna-Marie Bloch Münster som ny lægelig direktør på Sydvestjysk Sygehus.

8h

Frustratrion blandt læger: Sundhedsloven bremser forskningen

En rundspørge blandt medlemmer af Lægevidenskabelige Selskaber, viser at læger oplever, at sundhedsloven ofte giver dem problemer i forskningssituationer. De har f.eks. ofte svært ved at få adgang til journaldata .

8h

Recovery plan for endangered butterfly takes wing in San Diego

They trudged single file up a dirt trail to a hillside shoulder of open land in Rancho San Diego. It was a clear midweek morning, blue skies, with views to San Miguel Mountain and the Sweetwater Reservoir.

8h

'Internet of electricity' and zero-carbon molecules will help decarbonise Europe – report

An 'internet of electricity," zero-carbon cities and turning European soils into carbon sinks are among a slew of ambitious ideas to decarbonise our society and slash greenhouse gas emissions proposed by environmental experts in a reportpublished on 28 November.

8h

Dansk forskning opklarer den klistrede frøtunges hemmeligheder

Forskergruppe har kortlagt, hvordan kemien i frøspyt ændrer sig, når den skal bruges til fluefangst. Målet er udvikling af nye typer lim.

8h

Checkmating tumors

Chess and cancer research have one thing in common: one must act strategically to defeat the opponent. And that's exactly what scientists at the MDC are doing. They are seeking to selectively make only those cancer cells aggressive that would otherwise evade chemotherapy — and then lure them into a trap.

8h

Over one third of Indonesia's coral reefs in bad state, study finds

More than a third of Indonesia's coral reefs are in bad condition, scientists said Tuesday, raising concerns about the future of the archipelago's vast marine ecosystem.

8h

Spotify's 'Wrapped' Ads Highlight the Weird and Wonderful of 2018

Yanny and Laurel and yodeling and more appear in Spotify's annual celebration of quirky playlists and music streaming.

8h

Beavers are engineering a new Alaskan tundra

Climate change has enabled the recent expansion of beavers into northwestern Alaska, a trend that could have major ecological consequences for the region in the coming decades.

8h

'Murder map' reveals medieval London's meanest streets

First digital map of the murders recorded by the city's Coroner in early 1300s shows Cheapside and Cornhill were homicide 'hot spots,' and Sundays held the highest risk of violent death for medieval Londoners.

8h

A big step toward the practical application of 3-D holography with high-performance computers

Japanese computer scientists have developed a special purpose computer that can project high-quality three-dimensional (3-D) holography as video. The research team led by Tomoyoshi Ito, who is a professor at the Institute for Global Prominent Research, Chiba University, has been working to increase the speed of the holographic projections by developing new hardware.

8h

Sundhedsreform: Udskydelse skyldes politiske hensyn

ANALYSE: Regeringen kunne sagtens have haft en sundhedsreform klar nu, men december er en dårlig måned for nye udspil.

9h

The potentially deadly bacterium that's on everyone's skin

Forget MRSA and E. coli. There's another bacterium that is becoming increasingly dangerous due to antibiotic resistance — and it's present on the skin of every person on the planet.

9h

Genetic mutation drives tumor regression in Tasmanian Devils

Scientists have discovered genes and other genetic variations that appear to be involved in cancerous tumors shrinking in Tasmanian devils. Their research could have important implications for treating cancer in humans and other mammals.

9h

Researchers regrow hair on wounded skin

By stirring crosstalk among skin cells that form the roots of hair, researchers report they have regrown hair strands on damaged skin. The findings better explain why hair does not normally grow on wounded skin, and may help in the search for better drugs to restore hair growth, say the study's authors.

9h

Scientists achieve direct electrocatalytic reduction of carbon dioxide, raising hopes for smart carbon capture

Chemists propose an innovative way to achieve carbon capture using a rhenium-based electrocatalytic system that is capable of reducing low-concentration carbon dioxide (even 1 percent) with high selectivity and durability, which is a new potential technology to enable direct utilization of carbon dioxide in exhaust gases from heavy industries.

9h

MRI scans may offer a way to predict dementia risk

MRI brain scans may one day be able to gauge your risk of dementia as early as 2.6 years before memory loss is detectable, according to a small study. In the study, MRI brain scans predicted with 89 percent accuracy who would go on to develop dementia within three years. “Right now it’s hard to say whether an older person with normal cognition or mild cognitive impairment is likely to develop dem

9h

What are tech companies doing about ethical use of data? Not much

Our relationship with tech companies has changed significantly over the past 18 months. Ongoing data breaches, and the revelations surrounding the Cambridge Analytica scandal, have raised concerns about who owns our data, and how it is being used and shared.

9h

Image: ExoMars rover prototype

The sun set on a week of trials for the ExoMars rover prototype named Charlie (in the foreground). The first of two field trials for the mission, known as ExoFiT, took place in the Tabernas desert in Spain between 13-26 October.

9h

EU sets goal to be 'climate neutral' by 2050

The European Union on Wednesday urged government, businesses, citizens and regions to join it in an ambitious plan to cut emissions and make the bloc carbon neutral by 2050.

9h

Artificial joint restores wrist-like movements to forearm amputees

A new artificial joint restores important wrist-like movements to forearm amputees, which could dramatically improve their quality of life. A group of researchers led by Max Ortiz Catalan, Associate Professor at Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden, has published their research in the journal IEEE Transactions on Neural Systems & Rehabilitation Engineering.

9h

Example of microplastic pollutants disrupting predator-prey relationship found

A team of researchers with the French National Centre for Scientific Research has found an example of environmental microplastics disrupting a predator-prey relationship. In their paper published in the journal Biology Letters, the group describes their study of the impact of microplastic consumption on the common periwinkle and what they found.

9h

Thousands evacuated as Australian bushfires rage

Thousands of people were being evacuated from their homes in northeast Australia late Wednesday, as bushfires raged across Queensland state amid a scorching heatwave.

9h

How antibiotics spread resistance

Bacteria can become insensitive to antibiotics by picking up resistance genes from the environment. Unfortunately for patients, the stress response induced by antibiotics activates competence in microorganisms, the ability to take up and integrate foreign DNA. Microbiologists from the University of Groningen (UG) and the University of Lausanne have now described a new mechanism by which Streptococ

9h

The quest for galactic relics from the primordial universe

A new study reports characteristics of massive, ultracompact galaxies. It was published in the journal Astronomy & Astrophysics and was carried out by an international team led by Fernando Buitrago of Instituto de Astrofísica e Ciências do Espaço (IA2) and Faculdade de Ciências da Universidade de Lisboa (FCUL).

9h

Researchers identify key players in mysterious process of protein quality control

Proteins are the workhorses of our cells, carrying out essential tasks to keep our cells – and our bodies – functioning properly. But proteins can only do their jobs if they fold into the right shape.

9h

Predators drive clownfish relationship with an unlikely friend

Predators have been identified as the shaping force behind mutually beneficial relationships between species such as clownfish and anemones.

9h

Researchers discover honeybee gynandromorph with two fathers and no mother

A team of researchers at the University of Sydney has discovered a honeybee gynandromorph with two fathers and no mother—the first ever of its kind observed in nature. In their paper published in the journal Biology Letters, the group describes their study of honeybee gynandromorphs and what they found.

9h

Refugees reclaim human rights with technology

Arabic bounces off the walls of a small room in a nondescript building in Lebanon's notorious Bekaa Valley. About a dozen Syrian refugees carefully take photos of their diplomas and training certificates. One young man steadies a document on the brace around his left leg—a reminder of the civil war that has driven millions from their country, many here to Lebanon.

9h

Lovgivningen om journaladgang er dybt forældet

Journaloplysninger spredes unødvendigt, og der er for megen usikkerhed og lange behandlingstider for forskerne, viser en undersøgelse, som LVS har lavet. Det går ud over patienterne.

9h

Besparelser på Regionshospital Nordjylland rammer lægestillinger

Alle faggrupper er i spil, når ledelsen på Regionshospital Nordjylland skal gennemføre en spareøvelse på 50 mio. kr.

9h

Behind the scenes of recovering NASA's Hubble

In the early morning of October 27, the Hubble Space Telescope targeted a field of galaxies not far from the Great Square in the constellation Pegasus. Contained in the field were star-forming galaxies up to 11 billion light-years away. With the target in its sights, Hubble's Wide Field Camera 3 recorded an image. It was the first picture captured by the telescope since it closed its eyes on the u

9h

Extremely strong and yet incredibly ductile multicomponent alloys developed

A research team led by City University of Hong Kong (CityU) has developed a strategy for creating new high-strength alloys that are extremely strong, ductile and flexible. The strategy overcomes the critical issues of the strength-ductility trade-off dilemma, paving the way for innovative structural materials in future.

9h

Scientists direct bacteria with expanded genetic code to evolve extreme heat tolerance

Scripps Research scientists have shown that synthetic bacteria with expanded genetic codes can evolve proteins in the laboratory with enhanced properties using mechanisms that might not be possible with nature's 20 amino acid building blocks. Exposing bacteria with an artificially expanded genetic code to temperatures at which they cannot normally grow, the researchers found that some of the bacte

9h

Chinese Researcher Reports First Gene-Edited Babies

A Chinese scientist announces first gene-edited babies, setting off a discussion of the science and ethics of using CRISPR on humans.

9h

Smart speakers make passive listeners

People explore less when they get recommendations from voice-based platforms such as Amazon's Alexa or Apple's Siri, making it more likely that they'll hear options chosen by an algorithm than those they might actually prefer.

9h

Toward cost-effective solutions for next-generation consumer electronics, electric vehicles and power grids

The search for a better lithium-ion battery—one that could keep a cell phone working for days, increase the range of electric cars and maximize energy storage on a grid—is an ongoing quest, but a recent study done by Canadian Light Source (CLS) scientists with the National Research Council of Canada (NRC) showed that the answer can be found in chemistry.

9h

Computing faces an energy crunch unless new technologies are found

There's little doubt the information technology revolution has improved our lives. But unless we find a new form of electronic technology that uses less energy, computing will become limited by an "energy crunch" within decades.

9h

Algae testbed experiment yields data useful for future projects

A unique experiment that explored how well algae grows in specific regions of the United States yielded data that could prove useful as the industry moves forward, according to research from the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and Arizona State University (ASU).

9h

Hydrogel-based electrodes for brain implants developed

Hydrogels are physical and chemical polymer networks capable of retaining large quantities of liquid in aqueous conditions without losing their dimensional stability. They are used in a whole host of applications, and in combination with other components and they acquire specific properties such as electrical conductivity. The Materials + Technology research group in the Department of Chemical Eng

9h

Scientists produce high-strength plaster entirely from waste

About 5 tons of phosphogypsum is generated per ton of phosphoric acid production, and worldwide, phosphogypsum generation is estimated to be around 100 to 280 MT per year. Globally, 15 percent is recycled as building materials, agricultural fertilizers or soil stabilization amendments and as setting controller in the manufacture of Portland cement. The rest is stored near factories, which not only

9h

Early humans hooked up with other species a whole bunch

Science It's probably time to stop acting surprised. One thing about our ancestors has become increasingly clear: early humans loved to get down, even with other species…

9h

Study reveals mechanisms that promote icing responsible for power disruptions

Chinese scientists have shed light on the meteorological conditions responsible for the rate of icing growth on electric power transmission lines. Having a clearer understanding of what promotes icing on transmission lines during cold surges can help researchers better forecast and mitigate against crippling power outages caused by these events.

9h

Researchers use 3-D imaging to improve diagnosis of muscle diseases

Biotechnologists at Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg (FAU) have developed a system to accurately measure muscle weakness caused by structural changes in muscle tissue. The new method allows muscle function to be assessed using imaging without the need for sophisticated biomechanical recordings, and could in future even make taking tissue samples for diagnosing myopathy superfluous

9h

From turkeys to turn-keys

Last week, millions of Americans unwrapped a shrink-wrapped turkey for Thanksgiving. If so, they owe thanks to electron beams, which made the shrink-wrapping possible. But the electron beam can do a lot more: It can sterilize medical equipment, treat wastewater and print metal parts. Industrial accelerators that generate these electron beams are rapidly expanding. The Illinois Accelerator Research

9h

Scientists develop minimally invasive brain probe

Researchers from the Leibniz Institute of Photonic Technology (Leibniz-IPHT) in Jena and the University of Edinburgh have succeeded in using a hair-thin fiber endoscope to gain insights into previously inaccessible brain structures. This study has been published in Light: Science & Applications. This could be a major step toward a better understanding of the functions of deeply hidden brain compar

9h

Another Net Neutrality Day of Action Draws Fewer Big Names

Etsy and Tumblr will prod users to call legislators ahead of a Dec. 10 deadline for Congress to restore net neutrality protections.

9h

Tassie devils' decline has left a feast of carrion for feral cats

The decline of Tasmanian devils is having an unusual knock-on effect: animal carcasses would once have been gobbled up in short order by devils are now taking many days longer to disappear.

9h

An important step towards completely secure quantum communication network

The quest for a secure information network is on. Researchers at the Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, have recently succeeded in boosting the storage time of quantum information, using a small glass container filled with room temperature atoms, taking an important step towards a secure quantum encoded distribution network.

9h

Scientists direct bacteria with expanded genetic code to evolve extreme heat tolerance

In recent years, scientists have engineered bacteria with expanded genetic codes that produce proteins made from a wider range of molecular building blocks, opening up a promising front in protein engineering.

9h

We can eat our fish and fight climate change too

Kwan Phayao, a large, crescent moon of a lake in Northern Thailand, is home to about 50 fish species, several hundred small-scale farmers and fishers, and the city of Phayao, where 18,000 people live.

9h

"Lava-Lamp" Proteins May Help Cells Cheat Death

With proteins that reversibly self-assemble into droplets, cells may control their metabolism—and harden themselves against harsh conditions — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

10h

Why So Many People Hate Winter

I do not know if “winter people” actually exist. All I know is that I’m definitely not one. I view this wretched season’s icy winds, frozen slush, and musty parkas not as a natural and unavoidable part of life in the American North, but as a personal attack on me. To be clear, this is not darkness-induced seasonal affective disorder, or SAD . This is me being MAD that it’s not 80 degrees out. I d

10h

Image of the Day: Gut Feeling

An unusual population of immune cells appears to exist in zebrafish as well as mammals.

10h

Scientists obtain a hexagonal modification of silicon

A team of scientists from Lobachevsky University (Nizhny Novgorod, Russia) has obtained a material with a new structure for applications in next-generation optoelectronics and photonics. This material is one of the hexagonal modifications of silicon, which have better radiative properties compared to conventional cubic silicon, which is traditionally used in microelectronics.

10h

Study explains the dominance of non-native ants

Could the behavior of an invasive species of ants explain the way humans interact?

10h

Food webs essential for nature conservation efforts in the future

Lake ecosystems make annual environmental changes more predictable. Nature conservation should not focus on individual species but on whole food webs, because the protection of their functioning is important for the predictability of species, especially when global warming is increasing environmental variability.

10h

Great apes and ravens plan without thinking

Planning and self control in animals do not require human-like mental capacities, according to a study from Stockholm University. Newly developed learning models, similar to models within artificial intelligence research, show how planning in ravens and great apes can develop through prior experiences without any need of thinking.

10h

Scientists achieve direct electrocatalytic reduction of carbon dioxide, raising hopes for smart carbon capture

Chemists at Tokyo Institute of Technology (Tokyo Tech) have proposed an innovative way to achieve carbon capture using a rhenium-based electrocatalytic system that is capable of reducing low-concentration CO2 (even 1 percent) with high selectivity and durability, which could potentially enable direct utilization of CO2 in exhaust gases from heavy industries.

10h

Rogue science strikes again: The case of the first gene-edited babies

The idea of scientists tinkering with the genes of babies was once the provenance of science fiction, but now it's apparently entered the realm of reality: On Nov. 26, Chinese scientist He Jiankui reported the historic live births of twin girls whose genes he had edited. The goal may have been noble: to use CRISPR to alter their genes to include a variant protective against transmission of HIV. Bu

10h

New device widens light beams by 400 times, broadening possibilities in science and technology

By using light waves instead of electric current to transmit data, photonic chips—circuits for light—have advanced fundamental research in many areas from timekeeping to telecommunications. But for many applications, the narrow beams of light that traverse these circuits must be substantially widened in order to connect with larger, off-chip systems. Wider light beams could boost the speed and sen

10h

Britons are swallowing conspiracy theories. Here’s how to stop the rot | Hugo Drochon

Aliens exist and global warming is a hoax – these unbelievable beliefs are symptoms of people feeling threatened Who believes in conspiracy theories, and why? That is the question asked in a five-year study at Cambridge University , which commissioned three surveys from YouGov (2015, 2016 and 2018) to get a sense of the phenomenon. It turns that out 60% of British people believe in at least one o

10h

Hard limits on the postselectability of optical graph states

Since the discovery of quantum mechanics, in the early 20th century, physicists have relied on optics to test its fundamentals.

10h

300 Million Letters of DNA Are Missing From the Human Genome

In March 1997, a man answered an ad in The Buffalo News . He agreed to give 50 milliliters of blood. He did not leave a name, as the researchers who took his blood wanted to keep things anonymous. They called him RP11 . The ad RP11 answered turned out to be for the Human Genome Project. And it happened that, as the race to complete the first human genome heated up , it was RP11’s sample that was

10h

Piloter kæmpede med anti-stall-system op til Lion Air-styrt

Det nedstyrtede Boeing 737 fly fra Lion Air var så plaget af problemer op til styrtet, at flyselskabet burde have holdt det på jorden, siger efterforskere, der også dokumentere problemer med flyets anti-stall-system på den sidste tur.

10h

Hard limits on the postselectability of optical graph states

Since the discovery of quantum mechanics, in the early 20th century, physicists have relied on optics to test its fundamentals.

10h

The Era of Cheap and Easy STD Treatment Is Over. What Went Wrong?

Better drugs and easily accessible clinics had stemmed the spread of diseases like gonorrhea and syphilis. Now, a perfect storm is tearing this system apart.

10h

SpaceX Is Launching a Piece of Trevor Paglen's Art Into Orbit

Artist Trevor Paglen has built a balloon satellite intended to evoke awe and wonder back on Earth.

10h

The Widely-Spoken Languages We Still Can’t Translate Online

People who speak languages missing from Google Translate, Siri, and Wikipedia will face future crises—leaving aid organizations scrambling.

10h

Companies fed up with crappy Wi-Fi are deploying 5G instead

Automakers, oil companies, and shipping ports plan to build private 5G networks for faster, more reliable connectivity.

10h

The Search for Alien Life Begins in Earth’s Oldest Desert

M ary Beth Wilhelm’s right arm shot out of the passenger window, and the convoy of vehicles behind her crunched to a stop. Spread among two trucks and an SUV, her four colleagues and I squinted and craned our necks, wondering what had caught her eye in the colorless wasteland of the northern Atacama Desert. She opened the door of our SUV and hoisted herself out. The temperature was somewhere arou

11h

Region Hovedstaden skal have besat 196 lægekapaciteter på fem år

I forbindelse med den årlige lægedækningsundersøgelse har Region Hovedstaden udarbejdet en ny femårig prognosemodel. Den viser, at 196 kapaciteter i almen praksis skal besættes de næste fem år, hvis lægedækningen i hovedstaden skal bevares.

11h

Scientists and Artists Must Work Together

We need to engage people emotionally, not just intellectually, to address the plight of the planet — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

11h

Tryg-direktør: Det er forbrugernes eget ansvar, at de i årevis bliver GPS-tracket

Både kunder og virksomheder skal oppe sig, når det gælder modenhed inden for afgivelse og anvendelse af data.

11h

FN-Rapport advarer: Vi skal tredoble indsatsen for at redde klimaet

Hvis temperaturgrænsen på maksimalt to grader skal overholdes, skal der drastiske midler til, advarer en ny FN-rapport. 1,5-graders målsætningen er i dag urealistisk, fastslår rapporten.

11h

Cosmic Airburst May Have Wiped Out Part of the Middle East 3,700 Years Ago

In an instant, the airburst devastated an area north of the Dead Sea.

11h

The Biology of Sugars Points to a Sweet Strategy for Treating Cancer

Long-ignored field attracts interest from companies trying to develop next-generation immune therapies — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

11h

Radioaktive sten smelter Antarktis nedefra

Forskere fra blandt andet DTU har opdaget et område på størrelse med Fyn, der smelter hurtigere, end det burde.

11h

Atlantis Found (Again)! And Exasperated Scientists (Again) Raise Their Eyebrows

In a new documentary, a U.K.-based group claims to have discovered the ruins of Atlantis.

11h

Nanoscale blood test technique set to springboard cancer discoveries

A technique to get more information from the blood of cancer patients than previously possible has been developed.

11h

World faces 'impossible' task at post-Paris climate talks

Three years after sealing a landmark global climate deal in Paris, world leaders are gathering again to agree on the fine print.

11h

North American checklist identifies the fungus among us

Some fungi are smelly and coated in mucus. Others have gills that glow in the dark. Some are delicious; others, poisonous. Some spur euphoria when ingested. Some produce antibiotics.

11h

Nanoscale blood test technique set to springboard cancer discoveries

A technique to get more information from the blood of cancer patients than previously possible has been developed. The discovery could potentially accelerate early diagnosis, speed up drug discovery and lead to advancements in personalized medicines. The Cancer Research UK-funded study is published in Advanced Materials today.

11h

North American checklist identifies the fungus among us

Some fungi are smelly and coated in mucus. Others have gills that glow in the dark. Some are delicious; others, poisonous. Some spur euphoria when ingested. Some produce antibiotics. All of these fungi — and hundreds of thousands, if not millions, more — occur in North America. Of those that are known to science, 44,488 appear in a new checklist of North American fungi, published this month in t

11h

How overparenting backfired on Americans

American childhood is going, going… gone, says Professor Jonathan Haidt. In the mid-'90s there was a sharp shift to overprotective parenting. In previous generations, kids were allowed to out of the house unsupervised from age 5-8, which has now become age 12-16. As a result, their independence, resilience, and problem-solving skills suffer. "Give childhood back to kids so that they do what they

11h

S. Korea conducts successful rocket engine test

South Korea has launched a single-stage rocket to test a locally made engine as part of efforts to place a satellite into orbit.

11h

Porsche shows off new edition of mainstay 911 sports car

Porsche says its future is in electric cars but for now it is rolling out a more powerful version of its internal combustion mainstay, the sleek 911 sports car.

11h

How Creed Forever Changed the Rocky Series

Updated at 11:33 a.m. Rocky Balboa sits in a Philly bar as Apollo Creed, in a three-piece suit, holds forth on a grainy black-and-white TV screen. The bartender complains about the “jig clown” on the screen, and asks where the “real fighters” have gone. Rocky scolds the bartender not for his racism, but for questioning the champ, and walks off. Had the Rocky franchise never existed, that scene, w

11h

The Beginning of the End of the Korean War

In a sense, Donald Trump’s campaign to denuclearize North Korea is bearing fruit: The Korean War is beginning to end—not with the U.S. president achieving a dramatic breakthrough in nuclear negotiations, but with a series of incremental measures barely noticed outside the Korean peninsula. Rather than Kim Jong Un trading in his nuclear weapons for a peace treaty, or the countries that fought each

11h

Death on a Small Farm

A s the dim early light washed over the Appalachian countryside, Jason Kingsley began his climb up the side of an 80-foot silo. Kingsley was not a morning person. But he was also broke and unemployed. So when a dairy farmer named Ronald Wood called to ask him to help rescue a piece of machinery that had accidentally been buried under tons of hay and legumes, Kingsley said yes. Not long before, Ki

11h

Study reveals why older women are less healthy than older men

Genes that act late in life could explain why women have poorer health than men in older age, according to new research.

12h

Løse fibre drysser af dit gamle asbesttag: »Man kan ikke afvise, at der er en sundhedsrisiko«

Over 1 million bygninger er ifølge BBR-registret beklædt med asbesttag. Det medfører eksponering af sundhedsfarlige asbestfibre, advarer eksperter.

12h

Climate change: EU aims to be 'climate neutral' by 2050

The European Union says it wants to become the first major economy to achieve net zero emissions by 2050.

12h

Regeringen udskyder sundhedsreform til efter nytår

Forhandlinger om finanslov og folkeskoler får regeringen til at udskyde sundhedsreformen yderligere. Den nye deadline lyder på januar 2019.

12h

The potentially deadly bacterium that's on everyone's skin

Forget MRSA and E. coli, there's another bacterium that is becoming increasingly dangerous due to antibiotic resistance — and it's present on the skin of every person on the planet.

12h

Scientists achieve direct electrocatalytic reduction of CO2, raising hopes for smart carbon capture

Chemists at Tokyo Tech propose an innovative way to achieve carbon capture using a rhenium-based electrocatalytic system that is capable of reducing low-concentration CO2 (even 1 percent) with high selectivity and durability, which is a new potential technology to enable direct utilization of CO2 in exhaust gases from heavy industries.

12h

Got menopause? Healthy lifestyle now is crucial for heart health

A healthy lifestyle in middle-aged women was strongly associated with healthier arteries.

12h

Study reveals why older women are less healthy than older men

Genes that act late in life could explain why women have poorer health than men in older age, according to new research.

12h

Cryoablation shows promise in treating low-risk breast cancers

Cryoablation — the destruction of cancer cells through freezing — shows early indications of effectiveness in treating women with low-risk breast cancers, according to new. Researchers said that over the four years of the study, there has only been one case of cancer recurrence out of 180 patients.

12h

Online gaming addiction in men affects brain's impulse control

Researchers using functional MRI (fMRI) have found differences in the brains of men and women who are addicted to online gaming, according to a new study.

12h

New study supports mammography screening at 30 for some women

A new, large-scale study of more than 5 million mammograms found that annual mammography screening beginning at age 30 may benefit women with at least one of three specific risk factors: dense breasts, a personal history of breast cancer or a family history of breast cancer.

12h

Black Friday and Cyber Monday have come and gone, but sales continue

Perhaps you never got around to shopping on Black Friday, and when Cyber Monday blew in, you had other things on your mind.

12h

DTU: Mineaffald kan erstatte 10 procent af cementen i beton

Affald fra minedrift er ofte dyrt at håndtere miljømæssigt forsvarligt. Men affaldet fra flere miner kan faktisk erstatte cement i beton og dermed blive en klimagevinst, viser DTU-studie.

12h

CRISPR scientist says another woman is pregnant with an edited embryo

He Jiankui, the Chinese scientist who claims to have created the world’s first genetically-edited babies, says another may be on the way

12h

UK's first carbon capture and storage project 'operational by mid 2020s'

Ministers give a timeline for the UK's first carbon capture and storage project, as research funding is announced.

12h

Chinese Scientist Who Says He Edited Babies’ Genes Defends His Work

The scientist, He Jiankui, said at a conference on Wednesday that his actions were safe and ethical. Some of his colleagues seemed unconvinced.

12h

Knickers Isn’t a Cow, but He’s Real, and Enormous

The gigantic size of this Australian beast saved him from the slaughterhouse. He wouldn’t fit.

12h

13h

Seal colony in Norfolk expects more than 2,700 pups

England's largest grey seal colony, in Norfolk, could see record numbers this pupping season.

13h

YouTube adds student plans in latest attempt to challenge Hulu, Spotify and Apple Music

Hoping for a student plan for YouTube? You now can have one.

13h

Blue Brain Project releases first-ever digital 3D brain cell atlas

The Blue Brain Cell Atlas is like "going from hand-drawn maps to Google Earth" — providing previously unavailable information on major cell types, numbers and positions in all 737 brain regions. This comprehensive, interactive and dynamic online resource allows anyone to visualize every region in the mouse brain, cell-by-cell and in 3D, and freely download data for new analyses and modelling. It

13h

Vil du være med til at finde de mest interessante nyheder? Send email herom til BioNyt

Se nyheder fra en tidligere dato

Tegn abonnement på

BioNyt Videnskabens Verden (www.bionyt.dk) er Danmarks ældste populærvidenskabelige tidsskrift for naturvidenskab. Det er det eneste blad af sin art i Danmark, som er helliget international forskning inden for livsvidenskaberne.

Bladet bringer aktuelle, spændende forskningsnyheder inden for biologi, medicin og andre naturvidenskabelige områder som f.eks. klimaændringer, nanoteknologi, partikelfysik, astronomi, seksualitet, biologiske våben, ecstasy, evolutionsbiologi, kloning, fedme, søvnforskning, muligheden for liv på mars, influenzaepidemier, livets opståen osv.

Artiklerne roses for at gøre vanskeligt stof forståeligt, uden at den videnskabelige holdbarhed tabes.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *


CAPTCHA Image
Reload Image