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Prehistoric cave art suggests ancient use of complex astronomy

As far back as 40,000 years ago, humans kept track of time using relatively sophisticated knowledge of the stars, new research shows.

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Hidden history of Rome revealed under world's first cathedral

An international team of archaeologists has revealed new insights into the history of Rome following years of work under the Archbasilica of St John Lateran in Rome.

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Prehistoric cave art reveals ancient use of complex astronomy

Some of the world's oldest cave paintings have revealed how ancient people had relatively advanced knowledge of astronomy.

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Papadopoulos’s Russia Ties Continue to Intrigue

George Papadopoulos, a Trump campaign adviser who pleaded guilty to lying to federal agents about his interactions with a Russia-linked professor in 2016, went to jail on Monday after fighting, and failing, to delay the start of his two-week prison sentence. But a letter now being investigated by the House Intelligence Committee and the FBI indicates that Papadopoulos is still in the crosshairs o

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The Deal Nancy Pelosi Wouldn't Make

Around lunchtime on Wednesday, Nancy Pelosi gathered in her Capitol office with three of her harshest critics. Representatives Seth Moulton, Kathleen Rice, and Tim Ryan were the de facto leaders of a coterie of House Democrats trying to prevent Pelosi from becoming speaker in the next Congress. For two months, the group has broadcast their desire for new leadership, many of them adamant that unde

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The Lawsuit That’s Claiming a Constitutional Right to Education

Nearly all of the world’s 180-plus countries include the term education in their constitution. Most guarantee every child the right to free education, and many make participation in some form of schooling mandatory; some even provide universal access to affordable college. For the remaining handful, the UN’s decades-old treaty on children’s rights, which stipulates various educational protections

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DOJ Indicts 2 Iranian Hackers for Harmful SamSam RansomwareUS DoJ Iranian SamSam

A string of attacks hobbled the city of Atlanta, multiple hospitals, and more. The feds now think they know who did it.

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How Did That Big Cow Get So Huge?

The internet literally had a cow yesterday when news of a giant steer in Australia spread across the interwebs like a fire set by a cow kicking over a lantern.

14min

The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: The Once and Future Speaker?

Written by Olivia Paschal ( @oliviacpaschal ), Elaine Godfrey ( @elainejgodfrey ), and Madeleine Carlisle ( @maddiecarlisle2 ). Today in 5 Lines By a vote of 203–32, House Democrats officially nominated Representative Nancy Pelosi, who ran unopposed despite facing early vocal opponents, to be speaker. Pelosi will need to secure several more votes to win the vote of the full House in January. A Se

18min

This virtual island isn’t a video game. It’s the offices of a $610 million company.

The virtual island can host hundreds of visitors simultaneously and provides each person with customizable features. Visitors can select from various communication modes, including private meeting rooms. An increasing number of employees worldwide are working remotely, and most seem to enjoy doing so. None More employees are working remotely than ever before. A study published in May shows that a

21min

Dude, where's my amphibious car?

Cars Building a car that's also a boat is hard, but their numbers are increasing. Duck boat dramas and Nazi origins can't suppress the dream of an amphibious car. Another tragedy—climate change—may ensure its future.

27min

Margaret Atwood is writing a sequel to ‘The Handmaid’s Tale’Margaret Atwood HT

The sequel will take place 15 years after the end of the first book. The Handmaid's Tale has sold more than 8 million copies in English since it was first published in 1985. Atwood said she was inspired to write a follow-up, in part, by the "world we've been living in." None Margaret Atwood is writing a sequel to her novel The Handmaid's Tale . The sequel, titled The Testaments , is set to be rel

33min

Reading rats' minds

Place cells in the hippocampus fire when we are in a certain position — this discovery by John O'Keefe, May-Britt Moser and Edvard Moser brought them the Nobel Prize in Medicine in 2014. Based on which place cell fires, scientists can determine were a rat is. Neuroscientists are now able to tell where a rat will go next, just from observing which neuron fires in a task that tests rats' reference

43min

Flexible electronic skin aids human-machine interactions

Human skin contains sensitive nerve cells that detect pressure, temperature and other sensations that allow tactile interactions with the environment. To help robots and prosthetic devices attain these abilities, scientists are trying to develop electronic skins. Now researchers report a new method that creates an ultrathin, stretchable electronic skin, which could be used for a variety of human-m

43min

Scientist Who Edited Babies' Genomes Faces Widespread Criticism

Experts say the risks of a controversial procedure outweigh the benefits for twin newborns — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

46min

Second CRISPR-Modified Pregnancy May Be Underway

He Jiankui, who reportedly edited the genomes of two babies already, broke the news at a conference in Hong Kong.

48min

Can you make an AI that isn’t ableist?

IBM researcher Shari Trewin on why bias against disability is much harder to squash than discrimination based on gender or race.

52min

Lab-Grown Miniplacentas Resemble the Real Thing So Much, They Fooled a Pregnancy Test

Miniature placentas grown in a laboratory behave much like real placentas.

54min

Kids born in August are diagnosed with ADHD more than kids born in September

August-born kids have higher rates of ADHD diagnosis than kids born in September in U.S. states with a September 1 cutoff for starting kindergarten.

55min

Scientists discovered a set of enzymes to create glowing organisms

There are over 100 species of mushrooms that emit light. Now, scientists have for the first time identified the biochemical pathway that allows bioluminescent fungi to light up. But they went even further: by putting the three genes necessary to generate luminescence into a non-glowing yeast, they created an artificially luminescent eukaryote.

57min

Researchers rise to challenge of predicting hail, tornadoes three weeks in advance

A prediction lead time of about 2 to 5 weeks is sorely lacking in current forecasting capabilities for severe weather. In a new paper, Colorado State University atmospheric scientists demonstrate the ability to make skillful predictions of severe weather across the Plains and southeastern United States, including hail and tornadoes, in that coveted "subseasonal" time scale. To do it, they use a re

1h

7 of the best psychedelic books ever written

Psychedelic literature contains some of the richest prose and musings on the human condition. A great deal of these books hail from the 20th century. These are gateway books to a rich and other worldly adventure Much has been said about the psychedelic experience and its rich and thrilling history. Luckily for us, some of the greatest pioneers who pushed forward into the choppy waters of the mind

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Here's How Cannabis Got Its High

How did we end up with THC and CBD in the first place?

1h

New device widens light beams by 400 times

Scientists have now developed a highly efficient device that enlarges the diameter of a light beam by 400 times. Wider light beams have many applications, including boosting the speed and sensitivity of medical imaging and diagnostic procedures.

1h

Single cell sequencing sheds light on why cancers form in specific cell types

Researchers build, then use single cell sequencer to identify and characterize a subpopulation of cells in the eye where cancer originates.

1h

Ointment to counter the effects of brown recluse spider bites is tested on humans

Brazil reports more than 7,000 cases a year of poisoning as a result of the bite of the brown recluse spider; there are also reports of occurrences in North America and Europe.

1h

Views of ideal female appearance in China are changing

A researcher found that young women in China, living in a rapidly changing society with more personal independence, disposable income and exposure to Western media than ever before, are also altering their views of female beauty. Her research aims to determine whether these factors are leading to increasing body image concerns such as eating disorders and weight and shape concerns that have been r

1h

Many regions increasingly suffer hot, dry conditions at the same time

Odds are rising that warm, dry conditions — the kind that can hurt crop yields, destabilize food prices and exacerbate wildfires — will strike multiple regions at once. A new study shows just how much the risk is increasing.

1h

People with more knowledge about benefits of physical activity may also exercise more

Most people have a poor understanding of how much physical activity is good for you, and what health benefits such activity conveys. But the better your knowledge on these topics, the more physical activity you're likely to get, according to a new study.

1h

Whale songs' changing pitch may be response to population, climate changes

Blue whales have been dropping pitch incrementally over several decades, but the cause has remained a mystery. A new study finds a seasonal variation in the whales' pitch correlated with breaking sea ice in the southern Indian Ocean. The new research also extends the mysterious long-term falling pitch to related baleen whales and rules out noise pollution as the cause of the global long-term trend

1h

Study finds biases in widely used dementia identification tests

Quick tests used in primary care settings to identify whether people are likely to have dementia may often be wrong, according to a study published in the Nov. 28, 2018, online issue of Neurology® Clinical Practice, an official journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

1h

US groundwater in peril: Potable supply less than thought

Many rural areas in parts of the US rely exclusively on groundwater for both agricultural and domestic use. Drilling deeper wells may not be a good long-term solution to compensate for increasing demands on groundwater, because there is potential for contamination of deep fresh and brackish water in areas where the oil and gas industry injects wastewaters into or in close proximity to aquifers.

1h

Checkmating tumors

Chess and cancer research have one thing in common: one must act strategically to defeat the opponent. And that's exactly what scientists are doing. They are seeking to selectively make only those cancer cells aggressive that would otherwise evade chemotherapy — and then lure them into a trap.

1h

High-throughput platform enables activity mapping of emerging cancer drug targets

A powerful new biochemical platform is fueling the study of a family of enzymes that are promising targets for cancer treatment. The new method provides a high-resolution view of how these enzymes, called lysine methyltransferases, selectively mark proteins with chemical tags that alter their function. Because of their central role in health and disease, proteins and the molecules that edit and in

1h

'Stash your trash,' say rat researchers

Rat complaints are indicators of rat abundance, finds a new study — as are the availability of uncontained garbage and neighborhoods with a high rate of rental units (vs. owned).

1h

Easy to use 3D bioprinting technique creates lifelike tissues from natural materials

Bioengineers have developed a 3D bioprinting technique that works with natural materials and is easy to use, allowing researchers of varying levels of technical expertise to create lifelike tissues, such as blood vessels and a vascularized gut. The goal is to make human organ models that can be studied outside the body or used to test new drugs ex vivo.

1h

What the new climate report says about where you live

Environment There's a lot of info in here about what we're in for. Here’s a look at how climate change is already affecting—and will continue to affect—your own corner of the contiguous United States.

1h

Swapping bacteria may help 'Nemo' fish cohabitate with fish-killing anemones

Nemo, the adorable clownfish in the movie Finding Nemo, rubs himself all over the anemone he lives in to keep it from stinging and eating him like it does most fish. That rubbing leads the makeup of microbes covering the clownfish to change, according to a new study.

1h

Re-programming the body's energy pathway boosts kidney self-repair

A team of researchers has discovered a pathway for enhancing the self-repair efforts of injured kidneys. The finding may pave the way for new drugs to stop or even reverse the progression of serious kidney disease in humans — and other potentially lethal conditions of the heart, liver, and brain as well.

1h

Why does second-hand experience of neighborhood violence affect some youth, but not others?

Neighborhood violence has been associated with adverse health effects on youth, including sleep loss, asthma and metabolic syndrome. Yet some youth living in high-crime neighborhoods manage to avoid these effects. A new study aims to answer a resilience puzzle: Why does a second-hand or indirect experience of neighborhood violence affect some youth, but not others?

1h

To replicate physical objects for virtual reality, just turn on your smartphone

A global team of computer scientists have developed a novel method that replicates physical objects for the virtual and augmented reality space just using a point-and-shoot camera with a flash, without the need for additional, and oftentimes expensive, supporting hardware.

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Baby up at night? Inactivity may be a culprit

New Michigan State University research suggests babies who are less active get less sleep, something new parents may want to consider when looking for possible solutions for the long, sleepless nights.

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Swapping bacteria may help 'Nemo' fish cohabitate with fish-killing anemones

The fish killer and the fish live in harmony: But how the clownfish thrive in the poisonous tentacles of the anemone remains a mystery. A new study tackles the iconic conundrum from the microbial side.

1h

Scientists Make See-Through Fruit Flies

Scientists Make See-Through Fruit Flies Cells in the fly specimens' nervous systems can be seen glowing through the insects' transparent bodies. TransparentFly_topNteaser.jpg The optical and nervous system of the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster . Image credits: TU Wien Creature Wednesday, November 28, 2018 – 15:30 Catherine Meyers, Editor (Inside Science) — While fruit flies may bother people

2h

The researcher who created CRISPR twins defends his work but fails to quell controversy

After getting a glimpse of data behind the birth of the first gene-edited babies, many scientists question the study’s ethics and medical necessity.

2h

When a city feels good, people take more risks

What makes people take risks? Not stunt women or Formula 1 drivers. Just ordinary people like you and me. Research suggests that unexpected improvements in everyday life (sunshine after many days of rain or a win by a local sports team) are correlated with a change in a city's mood and an increased likelihood that it's citizens will do risky things like gamble.

2h

Earth's polar regions communicate via oceanic 'postcards,' atmospheric 'text messages'

Scientists have documented a two-part climatic connection between the North Atlantic Ocean and Antarctica, a fast atmospheric channel and a much slower oceanic one, that caused rapid changes in climate during the last ice age — and may again.

2h

Fires fueled spread of grasslands on ancient Earth

Ancient wildfires played a crucial role in the formation and spread of grasslands like those that now cover large parts of the Earth.

2h

Device could provide refrigeration for off-grid locations

A new system can provide passive cooling without the need for power, and could be used to preserve food or vaccines in hot, off-grid locations.

2h

Germany's CEBIT computer show scrapped after 32 years

Organizers say they are scrapping the annual CEBIT computer show in Germany, an event that has drawn tech enthusiasts to Hannover for more than three decades.

2h

Increasing Number of iPS Cell Therapies Tested in Clinical Trials

Since their discovery in 2006, induced pluripotent stem cells have been poised to reprogram regenerative medicine. Twelve years on, here's how far they've come.

2h

Vaccine signatures in humanized mice point to better understanding of infectious diseases

Researchers at Princeton have developed a systematic way to compare the immune responses of humanized mice versus humans. They used this new testing platform to show that a newly developed humanized mouse shares significant immune-system responses with humans.

2h

Women May Earn Just 49 Cents on the Dollar

Do women earn 80 cents on the dollar compared with men, as is commonly cited ? Or is the pay gap just pennies, as one recent survey found ? Or do women earn a shocking 49 cents on the dollar, as calculated by the social scientists Stephen Rose and Heidi Hartmann in a new analysis published by the Institute for Women’s Policy Research? The answer is all of the above. Each number highlights a diffe

2h

America Doesn’t Understand Gateway Drugs

Everything my teen self knew about gateway drugs, I learned from a frying pan and a college basketball player. They were both tentpoles of the “Just say no” heyday in the 1980s and ’90s, beamed into my brain through after-school television or guest speakers at school assemblies. The frying pan played the part of a drug in an extended-metaphor public-service announcement in which my brain was an e

2h

Google extends telecom service Fi to iPhonesProject Google Fi iPhones

Google said Wednesday it was expanding its "virtual" telecommunication service that was limited to select Android-powered smartphones to a wider range of devices, including iPhones.

2h

Online sex ads rebound, months after shutdown of Backpage

Smaller escort websites are vying for the lucrative online sex-for-hire market Backpage.com dominated before U.S. authorities shut it down earlier this year, a move that fractured the industry and forced law enforcement to adapt their efforts combating sex trafficking.

2h

Virtual library of 1 million new macrolide scaffolds could help speed drug discovery

Researchers from North Carolina State University have created the largest publicly available virtual library of macrolide scaffolds. The library—called V1M—contains chemical structures and computed properties for 1 million macrolide scaffolds with potential for use as antibiotics or cancer drugs.

2h

Method turns plastic bottle waste into lightweight ‘supermaterial’

Researchers have created a way to convert plastic bottle waste into aerogels for a variety of useful applications. Plastic bottles are commonly made from polyethylene terephthalate (PET), which is the most recycled plastic in the world. The researchers found a way to turn plastic bottle waste into ultralight polyethylene terephthalate aerogels that are soft, flexible, durable, extremely light, an

2h

Virtual library of 1 million new macrolide scaffolds could help speed drug discovery

Researchers from North Carolina State University have created the largest publicly available virtual library of macrolide scaffolds. The library — called V1M — contains chemical structures and computed properties for 1 million macrolide scaffolds with potential for use as antibiotics or cancer drugs.

2h

mRNA antibody delivery could prevent RSV infection

A new way to deliver antibodies directly to the lungs could help children ward off respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), according to new research. RSV sends some 57,000 US children younger than 5 to the hospital each year. There’s no vaccine for the virus, which usually only causes cold-like symptoms. Medications doctors sometimes use to prevent it in high-risk children aren’t always effective. The

2h

Views of ideal female appearance in China are changing

Young women in China, living in a rapidly changing society with more personal independence, disposable income and exposure to Western media than ever before, are also altering their views of female beauty.

2h

Indian peafowls' crests are tuned to frequencies also used in social displays

Indian peafowl crests resonate efficiently and specifically to the same vibration frequencies used in peacock social displays, according to a paper published November 28, 2018 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Suzanne Amador Kane from Haverford College, USA, and colleagues.

2h

Surgical adhesions can be treated, prevented in mice

A cellular culprit — as well as a possible treatment — for a common, sometimes life-threatening post-surgical complication has been identified.

2h

Potential arthritis treatment prevents cartilage breakdown

In an advance that could improve the treatment options available for osteoarthritis, engineers have designed a new material that can administer drugs directly to the cartilage.

2h

Fossil algae reveal 500 million years of climate change

Scientists have succeeded in developing a new indicator (proxy) of ancient CO2 levels, using the organic molecule phytane, a debris product of chlorophyll. This new organic proxy not only provides the most continuous record of CO2 concentrations ever, it also breaks a record in its time span, covering half a billion years.

2h

Atomic jet: First lens for extreme-ultraviolet light developed

Scientists have developed the first refractive lens that focuses extreme ultraviolet beams. Instead of using a glass lens, which is non-transparent in the extreme-ultraviolet region, the researchers have demonstrated a lens that is formed by a jet of atoms. The results provide novel opportunities for the imaging of biological samples on the shortest timescales.

2h

Next step towards replacement therapy in type 1 diabetes

Scientists have discovered the signals that determine the fate of immature cells in the pancreas. This breakthrough will facilitate the manufacturing of pancreatic islet cells from stem cells and might help combating type 1 diabetes.

2h

Vaccination may reduce the severity of the flu in vaccinated but still infected patients

When influenza vaccination is ineffective in preventing the flu, it could have an additional effect reducing the severity of the infection, according to an epidemiological study.

2h

Innate fingerprint could detect tampered steel parts

Researchers using magnetic signals have found unique "fingerprints" on steel, which could help to verify weapons treaties and reduce the use of counterfeit bolts in the construction industry.

2h

We Could Spray Cheap Chemicals in the Air to Slow Climate Change. Should We?

A new paper reveals that it would cost less to slow climate change than it would to fix New York City's subway system.

2h

Siberian unicorns lived alongside humans, and they were so much cooler than the mythical version

Animals Ancient rhinos were basically magic. In a sense, all rhinos are unicorns—they just aren’t pearly white and magical the way our myths say they should be.

2h

The Pontoon Bridges That Carry Millions at Kumbh Mela

Preparing for one of the world’s largest religious gatherings takes months of planning and hard work. Starting on January 15, 2019, and lasting until March 4, 2019, the Hindu festival of Kumbh Mela will take place in Allahabad, India. Authorities are expecting approximately 100 million visitors to come for a holy dip at Sangam, the confluence of the Ganges, Yamuna, and mythical Saraswati Rivers.

2h

Letters: As Congregations Dwindle, Churches Sit Empty. What Comes Next?

America’s Epidemic of Empty Churches As donations and attendance decrease, many churches struggle with the cost of maintaining their large physical structures. These churches , Jonathan Merritt writes , face a choice: Sell their buildings or repurpose their space. Jonathan Merritt brings up an important and often overlooked issue: what to do with church buildings as congregations dwindle. The wor

2h

'Mini-placentas' could provide a model for early pregnancy

Researchers say that new 'mini-placentas' — a cellular model of the early stages of the placenta — could provide a window into early pregnancy and help transform our understanding of reproductive disorders.

2h

Cod: Loss of breeding grounds in warmer world

The chances of survival for the offspring of important fish species will dramatically worsen, if the 1.5 ° C target of the Paris Climate Agreement is not achieved.

2h

Atomic clocks now keep time well enough to improve models of Earth

Experimental atomic clocks have now achieved three new performance records, now ticking precisely enough to not only improve timekeeping and navigation, but also detect faint signals from gravity, the early universe and perhaps even dark matter.

2h

Great apes and ravens plan without thinking

Planning and self control in animals do not require human-like mental capacities, according to a new study. Newly developed learning models, similar to models within artificial intelligence research, show how planning in ravens and great apes can develop through prior experiences without any need of thinking.

2h

Researchers map light and sound wave interactions in optical fibers

Earlier this year researchers developed sensing protocols that allow optical fibers to 'listen' outside an optical fiber where they cannot 'look', based on an interplay between light waves and ultrasound. Now they have constructed a measurement protocol that can map local power levels of multiple optical wave components over many kilometers of fiber. This new insight may be applied to sensor syste

2h

Despite common obesity gene variants obese children lose weight after lifestyle changes

Children who are genetically predisposed to overweight, due to common gene variants, can still lose weight by changing their diet and exercise habits, according to a new study.

2h

Audi's E-tron GT Brings Battery Power to a Speedy, Svelte SedanAudi Tron GT Porsche

The automaker's electric charge builds on the E-tron SUV with the E-tron GT, a four-door that will do 0 to 60 mph in 3.5 seconds.

2h

Study shows high costs of fetal alcohol spectrum disorder

Fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD) is a common condition with a high economic impact in both children and adults, concludes an updated review in the Journal of Addiction Medicine, the official journal of the American Society of Addiction Medicine (ASAM). The journal is published in the Lippincott portfolio by Wolters Kluwer.

3h

Scientists solve longtime mystery in innate immunity

Scientists have long wondered how one protein, NLRP3, can promote inflammation in response to a wide range of seemingly unrelated stimuli.

3h

Only 12 percent of American adults are metabolically healthy, study finds

The prevalence of metabolic health in American adults is 'alarmingly low,' even among people who are normal weight, according to a new study. Only one in eight Americans is achieving optimal metabolic health. This carries serious implications for public health since poor metabolic health leaves people more vulnerable to developing Type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease and other serious health is

3h

Platelets grown from stem cells may be alternative to donated platelets

Researchers have developed a way to grow human platelets in the laboratory from stem cells derived from fat tissue. The achievement suggests manufactured platelets could eventually reduce the reliance on donated platelets to help patients with cancer and other disorders.

3h

A golden age for particle analysis

Engineers have developed a method which allows the size and shape of nanoparticles in dispersions to be determined considerably quicker than ever before. Based on gold nanorods, they demonstrated how length and diameter distributions can be measured accurately in just one step instead of the complicated series of electron microscopic images which have been needed up until now.

3h

First risk genes for ADHD found

An international collaboration has for the first time identified genetic variants which increase the risk of ADHD. The new findings provide a completely new insight into the biology behind ADHD.

3h

91 percent response rate for venetoclax against newly diagnosed AML in older adults

Clinical trial results published in the journal Nature Medicine and being presented this weekend at the American Society for Hematology Annual Meeting show 91 percent response rate to the combination of venetoclax with azacitidine in older adults newly diagnosed with acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Of 33 patients given combination venetoclax and azacitidine, 20 experienced a complete response (aka c

3h

Innate fingerprint could detect tampered steel parts

Researchers using magnetic signals have found unique 'fingerprints' on steel, which could help to verify weapons treaties and reduce the use of counterfeit bolts in the construction industry.

3h

10 of the greatest ancient and pagan holidays

A great deal of modern holidays derived from Ancient Roman festivities. The changes of the seasons was a popular time to hold reverence for local gods and goddesses. Nearly every culture in the past had a unique holiday in which they celebrated, venerated and worshipped. For as long as there has been humankind, there has been celebration. Whether it's the changing of the seasons or worshipping of

3h

How your brain can predict the future

Two systems work together to predict the future based on past actions or events stored in the brain. Researchers worked with people with Parkinson's disease or cerebellar degeneration to test their hypothesis. Researchers compared how people with these conditions used temporal clues respond to specific tests. None The brain uses many complex mechanisms for both timing and predicational actions. S

3h

Flounder now tumor-free in Boston Harbor

In the late 1980s, more than three-quarters of the winter flounder caught in Boston Harbor — one of the most polluted harbors in America — showed signs of liver disease, many of them with cancerous tumors. But now, a scientist at Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) has documented a dramatic rebound in flounder health spurred by decades of remediation efforts.

3h

US groundwater in peril: Potable supply less than thought

Many rural areas in parts of the US rely exclusively on groundwater for both agricultural and domestic use. Drilling deeper wells may not be a good long-term solution to compensate for increasing demands on groundwater, because there is potential for contamination of deep fresh and brackish water in areas where the oil and gas industry injects wastewaters into or in close proximity to aquifers. Th

3h

Indian peafowls' crests are tuned to frequencies also used in social displays

Indian peafowl crests resonate efficiently and specifically to the same vibration frequencies used in peacock social displays, according to a paper published November 28, 2018 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Suzanne Amador Kane from Haverford College, USA, and colleagues.

3h

Why do some plants live fast and die young?

An international team led by researchers at the University of Manchester have discovered why some plants 'live fast and die young' whilst others have long and healthy lives.

3h

New stem-cell therapy to improve fight against leukemia

Stem-cell transplantation is an effective form of therapy to fight leukemia. In many cases, however, the transferred immune cells of the donor also attack the recipients' healthy tissue – often with fatal consequences. Researchers at the University of Zurich have now identified a molecule that plays a key role in this process. Blocking this molecule could significantly improve the outcome of patie

3h

High-throughput platform enables activity mapping of emerging cancer drug targets

A powerful new biochemical platform is fueling the study of a family of enzymes that are promising targets for cancer treatment.Published today in Science Advances, the new method provides a high-resolution view of how these enzymes, called lysine methyltransferases, selectively mark proteins with chemical tags that alter their function. Because of their central role in health and disease, protein

3h

Parkinson's therapy creates new brain circuits for motor function, study finds

Scientists have uncovered that an emerging gene therapy for Parkinson's disease creates new circuits in the brain associated with improved motor movement.

3h

When a city feels good, people take more risks

What makes people take risks? Not stunt women or Formula 1 drivers. Just ordinary people like you and me. Research published this week in PLOS ONE suggests that unexpected improvements in everyday life (sunshine after many days of rain or a win by a local sports team) are correlated with a change in a city's mood and an increased likelihood that it's citizens will do risky things like gamble.

3h

Fossil algae reveal 500 million years of climate change

Scientists at the Netherlands Institute for Sea Research (NIOZ) and Utrecht University succeeded in developing a new indicator (proxy) of ancient CO2 levels, using the organic molecule phytane, a debris product of chlorophyll. This new organic proxy not only provides the most continuous record of CO2 concentrations ever, it also breaks a record in its time span, covering half a billion years. Thes

3h

Cardiac stem cells integrated into microneedle patches to treat heart attack

Scientists seeking to improve stem cell-related treatment options for heart attack survivors have engineered a patch that can better integrate stem cells into viable heart tissue. The patch features an arrangement of prickly microneedles to 'communicate' between the stem cells and the injured heart, a task that has not yet been accomplished in an internal organ.

3h

Surgical adhesions can be treated, prevented in mice, Stanford researchers find

A cellular culprit — as well as a possible treatment — for a common, sometimes life-threating post-surgical complication has been identified by researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine.

3h

Going from negative to positive in the treatment of osteoarthritis

A scientific team has designed a charged molecule that improved the delivery of osteoarthritis drugs to knee joint cartilage in rodent models of the debilitating joint disorder.

3h

Potential arthritis treatment prevents cartilage breakdown

In an advance that could improve the treatment options available for osteoarthritis, MIT engineers have designed a new material that can administer drugs directly to the cartilage.

3h

Climate refugee cod

The latest research conducted by AWI experts that the chances of survival for the offspring of important fish species will dramatically worsen, if the 1.5 ° C target of the Paris Climate Agreement is not achieved.

3h

The ‘Satanic Evil’ of Child Sex Abuse in the Catholic Church

It’s no longer a secret that the Catholic Church suffers from a pervasive, decades-old child-sex-abuse epidemic, perpetrated by “a huge network of men: priests and bishops and cardinals and possibly even the Pope himself,” writer Caitlin Flanagan says. But, as Flanagan points out in the latest Atlantic Argument, children aren’t the only ones the Church has failed. Now mothers—including Flanagan h

3h

Trends in opioid prescriptions in children and adolescents

Researchers observed a downward shift in opioid prescriptions in children and adolescents, which aligns with previously reported trends in adult populations.

3h

A Universal Law for the ‘Blood of the Earth’

About five centuries ago, Leonardo da Vinci surveyed the Arno River, likely for a scheme — devised with Niccolò Machiavelli — to divert the strategically important waterway from Pisa to Florence. Their grand plan never went forward. But at some point in the process, da Vinci envisioned what the entire hydrological system would look like from above. He sketched the Arno’s main stem, which split in

3h

DJI Osmo Pocket Camera Gimbal: Price, Specs, Release Date

For YouTubers and video influencers, this tiny face-tracking video camera might be the best thing since, well, the previous Osmo—and rival the GoPro.

3h

Russian Hackers Haven't Stopped Probing the US Power Grid

Researchers warn that utilities hackers don't need to cause blackouts to do damage.

3h

Smart foam and artificial intelligence could help robots know if they're injured

Technology This foam creation can figure out what's happening to it. Foam that can sense how it is being deformed could help robots know what's going on with their own bodies.

3h

A patch studded with tiny needles may help heart attack survivors recover

A bandage that sticks to the surface of the heart exudes proteins and other molecules that help muscle cells grow.

3h

New Porsche 992 Listens to the Road to Weather the Wet

The new $113,200 911 continues the evolution of the famed model with a refined design, pepped up performance, and a trick for detecting slick streets.

3h

Gene therapy eases Parkinson’s symptoms by rewiring parts of the brain

A gene therapy treatment for Parkinson's blocks faulty brain circuits. This seems to help create alternate neural pathways for movement and eases symptoms

3h

How Google plans to eradicate dangerous mosquitoes: Breed more.

The method involves breeding thousands of male mosquitoes, infecting them with a particular kind of bacterium that renders female eggs unviable, and releasing them into the wild. It's proven to be very effective in a test area in Southern California. The method could be used to combat mosquito populations in areas where the insects carry deadly diseases. In 2017, Verily, a research organization r

3h

Venus: Hot, toxic, hellish… home?

When we think of colonizing space, our first thoughts are to the Moon and Mars. Venus, despite being incredibly inhospitable on the surface, might actually be a better target for colonization. Suspending blimps in the Venusian clouds is not only feasible, but offers some of the most Earth-like conditions in the solar system. None Venus, the second planet from our sun, is a downright terrifying pl

3h

Google employees sign open letter demanding end to Project Dragonfly

More than 80 employees have signed the letter so far. The protest comes in the wake of Google employees protesting sexual misconduct within the company and Project Maven, in which Google was helping the U.S. government analyze military drone footage. Google employees are planning walkouts over Project Dragonfly, according to reports. Scores of Google employees have signed an open letter protestin

3h

Resilience may be neurobiological

Neighborhood violence has been associated with adverse health effects on youth, including sleep loss, asthma and metabolic syndrome. Yet some youth living in high-crime neighborhoods manage to avoid these effects. A new Northwestern University study aims to answer a resilience puzzle: Why does a second-hand or indirect experience of neighborhood violence affect some youth, but not others?

3h

Re-programming the body's energy pathway boosts kidney self-repair

A team of researchers led by Jonathan Stamler, MD, of Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine and University Hospitals Cleveland Medical Center, has discovered a pathway for enhancing the self-repair efforts of injured kidneys The finding may pave the way for new drugs to stop or even reverse the progression of serious kidney disease in humans — and other potentially lethal conditions

3h

Views of ideal female appearance in China are changing

A University of Delaware researcher found that young women in China, living in a rapidly changing society with more personal independence, disposable income and exposure to Western media than ever before, are also altering their views of female beauty. Her research aims to determine whether these factors are leading to increasing body image concerns such as eating disorders and weight and shape co

3h

Ointment to counter the effects of brown recluse spider bites is tested on humans

Brazil reports more than 7,000 cases a year of poisoning as a result of the bite of the brown recluse spider; there are also reports of occurrences in North America and Europe.

3h

Single cell sequencing sheds light on why cancers form in specific cell types

Researchers build, then use single cell sequencer to identify and characterize a subpopulation of cells in the eye where cancer originates.

3h

New device widens light beams by 400 times

NIST scientists have now developed a highly efficient device that enlarges the diameter of a light beam by 400 times. Wider light beams have many applications, including boosting the speed and sensitivity of medical imaging and diagnostic procedures.

3h

Easy to use 3D bioprinting technique creates lifelike tissues from natural materials

Bioengineers have developed a 3D bioprinting technique that works with natural materials and is easy to use, allowing researchers of varying levels of technical expertise to create lifelike tissues, such as blood vessels and a vascularized gut. The goal is to make human organ models that can be studied outside the body or used to test new drugs ex vivo.

3h

When a city feels good, people take more risks

What makes people take risks? Not stunt women or formula 1 drivers. Just ordinary people like you and me. Research published this week in PLOS ONE suggests that unexpected improvements in everyday life (sunshine after many days of rain or a win by a local sports team) are correlated with a change in a city's mood and an increased likelihood that it's citizens will do risky things like gamble.

4h

Why do some plants live fast and die young?

An international team led by researchers at The University of Manchester have discovered why some plants "live fast and die young" whilst others have long and healthy lives.

4h

High-throughput platform enables activity mapping of emerging cancer drug targets

A powerful new biochemical platform is fueling the study of a family of enzymes that are promising targets for cancer treatment.

4h

Fossil algae reveal 500 million years of climate change

Earth scientists are able to travel far back in time to reconstruct the geological past and paleoclimate to make better predictions about future climate conditions. Using the organic molecule phytane, a debris product of chlorophyll, scientists at the Netherlands Institute for Sea Research (NIOZ) and Utrecht University succeeded in developing a new indicator (proxy) of ancient CO2 levels. This new

4h

Study shows regions increasingly suffer hot, dry conditions at the same time

A new study from Stanford University suggests that the kind of hot, dry conditions that can shrink crop yields, destabilize food prices and lay the groundwork for devastating wildfires are increasingly striking multiple regions simultaneously as a result of a warming climate.

4h

Hard limits on the postselectability of optical graph states

Since the discovery of quantum mechanics, in the early 20th century, physicists have relied on optics to test its fundamentals.

4h

Artificial joint restores wrist-like movements to forearm amputees

A new artificial joint restores important wrist-like movements to forearm amputees, something which could dramatically improve their quality of life.

4h

Online gaming addiction in men affects brain's impulse control

Researchers using functional MRI (fMRI) have found differences in the brains of men and women who are addicted to online gaming, according to a new study.

4h

Maps show electric fish have super-sized cerebellums

Researchers have mapped, in extremely high detail, the regions of the brain in mormyrid fish, known for having a brain-to-body size ratio similar to humans. They report that the cerebellum is bigger in members of this fish family compared to related fish, and this may be associated with their use of weak electric discharges to locate prey and to communicate with one another. There’s a great deal

4h

This breast reconstruction surgery limits shoulder motion

A study of three different types of breast reconstruction surgery shows one in particular hinders a woman’s long-term shoulder function—and her quality of life. After a prophylactic double mastectomy in 2015, Tina Harrison discovered that she had breast cancer—it just hadn’t been detected. She had predicted the cancer because it ran in her family. But she hadn’t anticipated the ongoing pain and l

4h

What Are Amphetamines?

Amphetamines are powerful central nervous system stimulants derived from the ephedra plant. They're used to treat disorders such as ADHD, narcolepsy and obesity. However, they can also be highly addictive and have harmful side effects.

4h

Amazon Wants You to Code the AI Brain for This Little Car

Inspired by do-it-yourselfers, Amazon is offering a radio controlled car that learns to drive by repeated trial and error.

4h

Google CEO to appear before US House panel December 5Google Sundar Pichai

Google chief executive Sundar Pichai will testify at a congressional hearing next week where he will be questioned on "transparency" and "filtering practices" used by the internet search giant, lawmakers said Wednesday.

4h

Two Iranian hackers charged in US ransomware scheme

Two Iranian computer hackers were charged Wednesday in connection with a multimillion-dollar cybercrime and extortion scheme that targeted government agencies, cities and businesses, the Justice Department said.

4h

US teens drawn to social media despite 'drama'

American teenagers remain generally upbeat about social media, saying it helps them feel included and connected, despite persistent problems of social pressure and bullying, a study showed Wednesday.

4h

Signup for the 6th Annual Eyewire Secret Santa Gift Exchange!

We’re delighted to invite you to sign up for the 6th annual Eyewire Secret Santa gift exchange ! Deadline to sign up: Monday, Dec 3 at noon, US EST Elves will deliver your match by midnight on Dec 4. For those of you who are new, this is a physical manifestation of the world of Eyewire that involves shipping a real gift to an actual human Eyewirer who may be in another country, so only sign up if

4h

Green Christmas: How to have an ethical and guilt-free festive season

If you celebrate Christmas, it doesn't have to be a feast of rampant consumerism and devastating gluttony. Read our guide to cleaning up your Yule

4h

Making AI research classified will harm US science

The US is mulling controls on the sharing of AI, but science can't grow in isolation, says Mark Riedl

4h

Putting a price on CO is a smokescreen that hides its human cost

Slashing the social cost of carbon emissions reveals the economic charade delaying real action on climate change, says Kevin Anderson

4h

Miniature placentas grown in lab give positive pregnancy test result

Researchers hope that tiny placentas grown from human cells can help research into why pregnancies sometimes lead to stillbirths or small babies

4h

CRISPR babies: new details on the experiment that shocked the world

He Jiankui has now revealed far more about his CRISPR project, in which he edited multiple embryos to make future children resistant to some strains of HIV

4h

With an eye on past problems, Facebook expands local feature

Facebook is cautiously expanding a feature that shows people local news and information, including missing-person alerts, road closures, crime reports and school announcements.

4h

Why the Gene-Edited Babies Will Never Have Genetic Privacy

Being born with an edited genome all but wipes out the chance of genetic privacy.

4h

Mechanism safeguarding unique epigenome of oocytes and maternal fertility

Recently, a joint research group led by Dr. ZHU Bing from the Institute of Biophysics of the Chinese Academy of Sciences reveals that Stella sequestered UHRF1 from the nucleus through an active nuclear export process, and the dysregulation of UHRF1 by loss of Stella resulted in an accumulation of aberrant DNA methylation during postnatal oogenesis.

4h

Earth's polar regions communicate via oceanic 'postcards,' atmospheric 'text messages'

Scientists have documented a two-part climatic connection between the North Atlantic Ocean and Antarctica, a fast atmospheric channel and a much slower oceanic one, that caused rapid changes in climate during the last ice age — and may again.

4h

Next step towards replacement therapy in type 1 diabetes

Scientists have discovered the signals that determine the fate of immature cells in the pancreas. This breakthrough published in the journal Nature will facilitate the manufacturing of pancreatic islet cells from stem cells and might help combating type 1 diabetes. Professor Dr. Henrik Semb who led the study recently joined Helmholtz Zentrum München.

4h

Atomic jet — the first lens for extreme-ultraviolet light developed

Scientists from the Max Born Institute have developed the first refractive lens that focuses extreme ultraviolet beams. Instead of using a glass lens, which is non-transparent in the extreme-ultraviolet region, the researchers have demonstrated a lens that is formed by a jet of atoms. The results, which provide novel opportunities for the imaging of biological samples on the shortest timescales, w

4h

NIST atomic clocks now keep time well enough to improve models of Earth

Experimental atomic clocks at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) have achieved three new performance records, now ticking precisely enough to not only improve timekeeping and navigation, but also detect faint signals from gravity, the early universe and perhaps even dark matter.

4h

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