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Nyheder2018november30

 

Black hole 'donuts' are actually 'fountains'

Based on computer simulations and new observations from the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA), researchers have found that the rings of gas surrounding active supermassive black holes are not simple donut shapes. Instead, gas expelled from the center interacts with infalling gas to create a dynamic circulation pattern, similar to a water fountain in a city park.

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Brilliant iron molecule could provide cheaper solar energy

For the first time, researchers have succeeded in creating an iron molecule that can function both as a photocatalyst to produce fuel and in solar cells to produce electricity. The results indicate that the iron molecule could replace the more expensive and rarer metals used today.

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Mammal-like milk provisioning and parental care discovered in jumping spider

Lactation is the production and secretion of milk for the young and is a mammalian attribute. However, there have been several examples of milk provisioning in non-mammals. In a study published in the journal Science on November 30, researchers at the Xishuangbanna Tropical Botanical Garden (XTBG) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences report milk provisioning in Toxeus magnus (Araneae: Salticidae), a

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New archaeological site revises human habitation timeline on Tibetan plateau

Human ancestors first set foot on the interior of the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau around 30,000-40,000 years ago, according to new research by scientists from the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS). This new finding moves back the earliest data of habitation in the interior by 20,000 years or more.

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Fruit flies can transmit their sexual preferences culturally

Researchers from the CNRS and Université Toulouse III – Paul Sabatier (UT3) report that fruit flies possess the cognitive capacity to culturally transmit their sexual preferences across generations. The study, published on November 30, 2018 in Science, provides the first experimental toolbox for studying the existence of animal cultures, thereby opening up an entire field of research.

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Artificial magnetic field produces exotic behavior in graphene sheets

A simple sheet of graphene has noteworthy properties due to a quantum phenomenon in its electron structure called Dirac cones. The system becomes even more interesting if it comprises two superimposed graphene sheets, and one is very slightly turned in its own plane so that the holes in the two carbon lattices no longer completely coincide. For specific angles of twist, the bilayer graphene system

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New research could fine-tune the gene scissors CRISPR

The introduction of the gene editing tool CRISPR in 2007 was a revolution in medical science and cell biology. But even though the potential is great, the launch of CRISPR has been followed by debate about ethical issues and the technology's degree of accuracy and side effects.

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Haunting, 9,000-Year-Old Stone Mask Discovered in a Field in the West Bank

The incredible mask elicited tears from one of its discoverers.

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A Map That Tracks Everything

Cryptocurrencies have had a rough year. Bitcoin has crashed more than 75 percent since its peak, and its competitors are faring no better . Even if the bubble has burst on non-fiat currency, the technology underlying those coins, the blockchain—which offers a way to record and validate transactions without a central authority, such as a bank or government—still excites many speculators outside fi

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Why Democrats’ Response to GM Matters

After General Motors announced Monday that it would lay off nearly 15,000 workers and cease production at five North American plants, Representative Tim Ryan of Ohio, whose district is home to one such plant, called on Congress to investigate the automaker. “The American people deserve to know if the tax cuts they paid for are being used to inflate corporate profits at the expense of their econom

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Stone tools date early humans in North Africa to 2.4 million years ago

When did early humans first arrive in the Mediterranean area? New archaeological evidence published today online by the journal Science (as a First Release) indicates their presence in North Africa at least 2.4 million years ago.

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How facial recognition technology aids police

Police officers' ability to recognise and locate individuals with a history of committing crime is vital to their work. In fact, it is so important that officers believe possessing it is fundamental to the craft of effective street policing, crime prevention and investigation. However, with the total police workforce falling by almost 20 percent since 2010 and recorded crime rising, police forces

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Image of the Day: One of These Things

An image of an adult penguin in a crowd of youngsters wins the top prize of an ecology photography competition.

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Success of Tiny Mars Probes Heralds New Era of Deep-Space Cubesats

Two pint-sized spacecraft, MarCO-A and MarCO-B, served as communications relays for NASA’s InSight lander — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Stone Age people may have ritually cut off their own fingers

Two French caves contain dozens of prehistoric images of hands that are missing fingers, suggesting people voluntarily had their fingers amputated

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Unearthed! The missing Native American city on the Great Plains

Following an enigmatic map and the footsteps of an ill-fated conquistador, archaeologists may have unearthed one of the biggest pre-Columbian settlements in the US

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On the cusp of valleytronics

Research into harnessing two-dimensional (2-D) materials for everyday devices has had some ups and downs. However, the emerging field of valleytronics is using energy troughs to offer renewed potential.

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Atomic nitrogen route to new 2-D semiconductors

A simple and non-destructive fabrication technique could aid the manufacture of more energy efficient two-dimensional (2-D) films needed to transform the electronics industry.

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Håndboldspillere lægger mobilen væk og sover sig til succes

– Det giver én en ro, siger stregspilleren Knud Ronau fra herrernes U21-landshold i håndbold om det nye tiltag.

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X-ray analysis reveals the charging mechanism of a promising electrode material

An experimental technique developed by A*STAR researchers has been used to track the chemical and structural changes in an electrode as a battery discharges. The X-ray-based technique should help to improve the performance of materials in next-generation batteries.

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A machine learning approach helps sort and label cell clusters in multiple dimensions

The sorting and automated labelling of cell clusters may be boosted by an algorithm developed by A*STAR researchers. The algorithm facilitates data analysis from a technique, known as cytometry, that effectively sorts and labels cells for use in research.

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Cracking open a cold one with the flies

Crack open a beer outside and it is a safe bet that you will soon be defending it from a few unwelcome drinking buddies. Fruit flies have a knack for appearing whenever someone opens up a can of beer or a bottle of wine, but how do they do it? In a study spanning six years and thousands of experiments, Caltech scientists discovered that fruit flies are attracted to carbon dioxide (CO2), a gas asso

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New study reveals common table salt may have been crucial for the origins of life

One of the most fundamental unexplained questions in modern science is how life began. Scientists generally believe that simple molecules present in early planetary environments were converted to more complex ones that could have helped jumpstart life by the input of energy from the environment. Scientists consider the early Earth was suffused with many kinds of energy, from the high temperatures

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Newly discovered supernova may rewrite exploding star origin theories

A supernova discovered by an international group of astronomers has provided an unprecedented look at the first moments of a violent stellar explosion. The team, led by the University of Hawaiʻi (UH) Institute for Astronomy's (IfA) Ben Shappee and Carnegie Observatories' Tom Holoien, found a mysterious signature in the light from the explosion's first hours. Their findings are published in a trio

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New report explores science of interventions to save coral reefs

A new report released by the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering and Medicine stated, while the management of local and regional stressors threatening coral reefs is critical, these efforts on their own will not be enough in the face of global climate change.

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Windy weather carries Britain to renewable energy record

Windfarms supplied third of UK’s electricity this week, with output hitting 14.9GW high Storm Diana brought travel chaos to road, rail and airports, but the clouds did have a silver lining: the strong winds helped set a renewable energy record. Windfarms supplied about a third of the UK’s electricity between 6pm and 6.30pm on Wednesday, a time of peak energy demand. Output hit a high of 14.9GW, b

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Sundhedsstyrelsen udskyder anbefalinger til akutområdet

De skulle være kommet på mandag, men nu udskyder Sundhedsstyrelsen sine anbefalinger til den akutte sundhedsindsats til 2019.

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TikTok Is a Short-Form Monetized Musical Meme Machine

Tween sensation TikTok is not-quite-Snapchat and not-quite-Vine. But it’s betting on 15-second clips, while other platforms pivot to longer videos.

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ZF's 'External Side Airbag' Could Make Crashing Way Safer

Auto supplier ZF's "external side airbag" would deploy moments before impact, in a bid to better protect the car’s passengers.

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The True Origins of ISIS

M ost historians of the Islamic State agree that the group emerged out of al-Qaeda in Iraq as a response to the U.S. invasion in 2003. They also agree that it was shaped primarily by a Jordanian jihadist and the eventual head of al-Qaeda in Iraq, Abu Musab al-Zarqawi. The Jordanian had a dark vision: He wished to fuel a civil war between Sunnis and Shiites and establish a caliphate. Although he w

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CDC Warns Against Honey Pacifier Use After 4 Texas Infants Develop Botulism

Experts are warning caregivers and healthcare professionals about pacifiers filled with raw honey after four infants in Texas were diagnosed with botulism. They are probably right. And you should probably listen.

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Professor om ny gigant-gasledning: Selv hvis det går godt, bliver jeg ked af det

Kritiske forskere og miljøorganisationer forsøgte forgæves at advare mod at investere seks milliarder kroner i at sende naturgas til Polen. Det kom der ikke noget ud af, og nu står kritikerne i kø.

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Hør ugens podcast: Dyrere fjernvarme og succes for cubesats

Din fjernvarme kan blive markant dyrere i de kommende år som følge af politiske aftaler og et udløbet tilskud. Insights landing på Mars blev en succes, og to små cubesat-satellitter var til stor hjælp.

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Animals Can Help Us Rediscover Our Nutritional Wisdom

Contemporary foods and cultures inhibit our body’s inborn ability to select nourishing diets — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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The Widening Chasm between Research and Clinical Practice

Medical progress depends on collaboration between physicians and scientists, and on professionals who are adept in both worlds — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Leaning Tower of Pisa Corrects Itself… a Little

Four centimeters of bonus straightening have occurred since engineering to lessen the list concluded in 2001 — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Nu er det helt sikkert: Gasledning til 12 milliarder bliver lagt gennem det danske landskab til Polen

Danske Energinet og polske Gazsystem har endelig besluttet at bygge gasledningen Baltic Pipe gennem Danmark. Energiministeren har godkendt den danske del af investeringen på 6,3 milliarder kroner.

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When America polices the world, everybody loses

Make no mistake, says Jeffrey Sachs, America is an empire. The end of World War I and the Treaty of Versailles put the United States on a trajectory to exercise political control over foreign governments and topple world leaders on a whim, which, Sachs reminds us, is quite crazy. "Remember when President Obama said Assad must go in Syria?" says Sachs. "I scratched my head and said: How can an Ame

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It is rocket science…

This week’s Upside digest on images sent back from Mars, and other scientific breakthroughs As technology advances at a seemingly exponential rate, it can be hard to keep up – and journalists don’t always get it right. A report from 2017 found that over half of newspaper articles surveyed on scientific studies were factually incorrect. This was mainly due to journalists writing on initial finding

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Er Grenaa-lægehus et ideal eller en nødløsning?

Arbejdsformen i Lægefællesskabet i Grenaa giver ikke megen lægetid pr. patient – er det resultatet af en nødløsning og er det en praksisform, som PLO ønsker fremmet?

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As China Seeks Scientific Greatness, Some Say Ethics Are an Afterthought

He Jiankui’s claim to have edited babies’ genes has caused soul-searching in China, where many believe scientists need more ethical supervision.

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An acid found in soil may make a disease killing deer less infectious

An incurable neurodegenerative disease crippling North American deer, elk and moose may be thwarted by an organic soil compound.

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The End of the NBA’s G.O.A.T. Era

Since LL Cool J released his album G.O.A.T. (Greatest of All Time) in 2000, the acronym has been a cultural touchstone—used to spark arguments about who deserves the title in any given profession. Perhaps nowhere is the debate over who holds that honor more intense than in professional basketball. Determining which NBA player is the G.O.A.T. requires consideration of both objective statistics (su

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Kinesisk genforsker om CRISPR-babyer: »Vi må nu sørge for, at det aldrig sker igen«

Genforsøg på babyer var en bombe i kinesisk forskning. Den kinesiske forsker Yonglun Luo har fra Danmark fulgt med i nyheden. Nu håber han, at det omstridte forsøg kan skabe positive forandringer.

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Forskere gentænker undervisning: Spil computer i skoletiden – og bliv god til fysik

Skolekonkurrencen ReGAMECUP skal vise elever at det ikke altid kræver en PhD at engagere sig i samfundets store problemer, lyder det fra Aarhus Universitet.

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Sådan finder og retter Facebook kodefejl med kunstig intelligens

Den skandaleombruste SoMe-gigant har taget hul på fremtiden, hvor machine learning skriver kode for udviklerne. På længere sigt skal teknologien blive open source.

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Babies kicking in the womb are creating a map of their bodies

The kicks a mother feels from her unborn child may allow the baby to 'map' their own body and enable them to eventually explore their surroundings, suggests new research led by UCL in collaboration with UCLH.For the study, published today in Scientific Reports, researchers measured brainwaves produced when newborns kick their limbs during rapid eye movement sleep, finding that fast brainwaves — a

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'Sudoku' X-Ray uncovers movements within opaque materials

Researchers from the University of Sydney have developed a new X-ray method which involves solving a giant 3D Sudoku problem to better understand these granular movements — and the findings could have a big impact on various industries.

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Virtual reality could serve as powerful environmental education tool

Stanford researchers took a virtual reality experience into a variety of educational settings, including high school classrooms, to test the impact on awareness and understanding of ocean acidification.

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Instagram 'Close Friends': What It Is and How to Use It

The photo-sharing platform now offers the ability to post photos and stories that are only visible to a tight circle of followers of your choosing.

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'Sudoku' X-ray uncovers movements within opaque materials

When strolling along the beach, our footprints tell us that the sand under the surface must have moved but not precisely where or how. Similar movements occur in many other natural and man-made substances, such as snow, construction materials, pharmaceutical powders, and even cereals.

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Virtual reality could serve as powerful environmental education tool

Utter the words "ocean acidification" in mixed company, and you'll probably get blank stares. Although climate change has grown steadily in the public consciousness, one of its most insidious impacts—a widespread die-off of marine ecosystems driven by carbon dioxide emissions—remains relatively unknown.

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Grøn omstilling i fare? Fjernvarme står ved en skillevej

Prisstigninger, effektiviseringskrav og tab af tilslutningspligt udfordrer fjernvarmen, som også presses af individuelle teknologier. Eksperter og branche frygter, at det kan bremse den grønne omstilling.

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Stor dansk undersøgelse: Mobilen ødelægger din søvn

Mobilen har sneget sig med i danskernes seng. Prisen er dårlig søvn, og det går særligt hårdt ud over de unge, viser ny undersøgelse.

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I 3D-printed every bit of my wedding—including my bouquet

The maker community helped me create everything from my bouquet to my cake toppers—and gave me an insight into the technology’s possibilities.

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Facebook says COO Sandberg asked for info on Soros

Facebook on Thursday said that chief operating officer Sheryl Sandberg asked staff to look into whether billionaire critic George Soros had a financial interest in tarnishing the social network.

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Green car tyres can generate energy while monitoring road conditions

Car tyres embedded with silica and nanogenerators can harvest energy from the tyre rolling while also keeping track of whether the road is in good repair

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The V-sign: now that’s what I call a digital message | Terry Victor

You can’t beat gestural slang, which is why the late Baroness Trumpington’s two-fingered salute spoke to our hearts Gestural slang has given us the best in communication for at least 2,500 years. The Roman poet Martial and the historian Suetonius both noted the use of the impudent or infamous digit. Nowadays, that classic middle finger decorates territorial claims from playgrounds to motorways. W

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Bringing MOFs into the industrial light

Researchers from Australia's national science agency, CSIRO, are part of an international collaboration which has made a major breakthrough that could change the way gases, liquids and chemicals are collected and filtered by industry.

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Eating out, breathing in

By now, most Americans are well aware of the air pollution created by power plants or heavy vehicle traffic. These sources discharge harmful particulate matter that becomes suspended in the air, creating what's called an aerosol.

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Researchers discover surface of 'ultra-smooth' nanomaterial steeper than Austrian Alps

People can usually tell if something is rough or smooth by running their fingers along its surface. But what about things that are too small or too big to run a finger over? The earth looks smooth from space, but someone standing at the foot of the Himalayas would disagree. Scientists measure surfaces at different scales to account for different sizes, but these scales don't always agree.

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ECB launches real-time payments in challenge to tech giants

The European Central Bank will on Friday unveil the first pan-eurozone instant payment service, hoping to become a dominant player in a field crowded by US and Asian tech giants.

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Indonesian island clean-up nets 40 tons of rubbish daily

Residents on a string of coral-fringed islands off Jakarta's coast are battling a tidal wave of trash, with more than 40 tons of rubbish collected daily over the past week, an official said.

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New Zealand whale strandings 'linked to ocean warming'

More than 50 beached pilot whales perished in New Zealand Friday, the latest in a spate of mass strandings this week that experts have linked to rising ocean temperatures.

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China's Weibo eyes global expansion, foreign-language products

Chinese social media giant Weibo is making a push into foreign markets and is considering launching new products in different languages, a senior executive told AFP, brushing off concerns over censorship and credibility.

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Japan prosecutors seek to extend Ghosn detention

Tokyo prosecutors were expected Friday to request an extension to Carlos Ghosn's detention over allegations of financial misconduct against the former Nissan chief that have shaken the auto industry.

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Honeywell expected to announce HQ move to North Carolina

Industrial conglomerate Honeywell International Inc. is expected to announce that it is moving its headquarters from New Jersey to Charlotte, North Carolina, a source familiar with the deal said Thursday.

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How the devil ray got its horns

If you ever find yourself staring down a manta ray, you'll probably notice two things right away: the massive, flapping fins that produce the shark cousin's 20-foot wingspan and the two fleshy growths curling out of its head that give it the nickname "devil ray." A new San Francisco State University study shows that these two very different features have the same origin—a discovery that reflects a

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Virtual training for aircraft carrier flight deck crews

One of the most dangerous environments in the United States Navy is the deck of an aircraft carrier. Catapult systems that can remove limbs, furious engines, whipping propellers and high winds create a hectic environment.

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Aid recipients call for more dignity and diversity in INGO campaigns

A new study reveals how aid communication is perceived in African countries.

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Bahne advarer kunder efter it-sikkerhedsangreb: Spær dit betalingskort – kan være blevet misbrugt

Mode-, brugskunst- og køkkenudstyrbutikken går nu ud og informerer kunder om, at et sikkerhedshul på bahne.dk potentielt kan have ført til misbrug af betalingsoplysninger og kreditkort.

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Climate Change Protest Draws Thousands of Australian Students

Frustrated by their government’s failure to curb carbon emissions, students across the country quit school for a day to protest instead.

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Whales stranded in New Zealand: Another 50 pilot whales die

The mass stranding on Chatham Island means more than 200 whales have died off NZ in the past week.

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Cross Section: Tim Peake – Science Weekly podcast

Tim Peake beat 8,172 applicants for a spot on the European Space Agency’s astronaut training programme. Ian Sample talks to him about the selection process and the intensive training he went through Have you got what it takes to be an astronaut? Major Tim Peake did. He beat 8,172 applicants for a spot on the European Space Agency’s astronaut training programme. He began his intensive training in

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Bowel movement: the push to change the way you poo

Are you sitting comfortably? Many people are not – and they insist that the way we’ve been going to the toilet is all wrong. By Alex Blasdel For their 27th wedding anniversary, the Breaking Bad star Bryan Cranston gave his wife, Robin, a gift that promises “to give you the best poop of your life, guaranteed”. The Squatty Potty is a wildly popular seven-inch-high plastic stool, designed by a devou

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A cure for HIV is in sight as science chases the holy grail

Medical research enters a new era to find ways to eradicate HIV from infected populations More than 50 years after it jumped the species barrier and became one of the most devastating viruses to affect mankind, HIV remains a stubborn adversary. Treatment has improved dramatically over the past 20 years, but people who are infected will remain so for the rest of their lives, and must take one pill

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Danske hospitaler afprøver ny metode til at teste effektiv kræftbehandling

Rigshospitalet er i gang med et forsøg, hvor man tester metoden Inditreat til at finde den mest effektive behandling af æggestokkekræft, og Vejle Hospital sætter gang i et forsøg, hvor metoden testes mod kræft i bugspytkirtlen.

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Cross Section: Tim Peake – Science Weekly podcast

Tim Peake beat 8,172 applicants for a spot on the European Space Agency’s astronaut training programme. Ian Sample talks to him about the selection process and the intensive training he went through

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Opgør med 100 års grøn dansk tradition: Fjernvarmen risikerer historisk dyk

En stribe politiske aftaler gør, at fjernvarmen står foran en historisk nedgang i tilslutningen. Skadeligt for den grønne omstilling, mener en forsker. Tiden har ændret sig, siger andre.

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The Wizard of Oz most 'influential' film of all time according to network science

The Wizard of Oz, followed by Star Wars and Psycho, is identified as the most influential film of all time in a new study.

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Donald Trump Gave Russia Leverage Over His Presidency

Shortly after President Donald Trump was inaugurated, he gave a combative press conference at which he was asked by a reporter, “I was just hoping that we could get a yes or no answer on these questions involving Russia. Can you say if you are aware that anyone who advised your campaign had contacts with Russia during the course of the election?” In reply, Trump lied to the American public. “Russ

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Berta Cáceres: Seven convicted of murdering anti-dam activist

A Honduran court finds seven men guilty of killing renowned environmental campaigner Berta Cáceres.

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Australian students in mass climate protest

Thousands skip school to urge action on climate change, despite criticism from PM Scott Morrison.

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Rough Drafts of Richard Feynman’s Ideas Head to Auction

The scribblings of a brilliant 20th-century physicist show that he did not get everything right on the first try, either.

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Extinction crisis: Five things you should know

The United Nations biodiversity chief on why extinction is a "silent killer" and deserves more attention.

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Carmichael project: Visiting Australia's controversial Adani mine

The BBC's Vineet Khare visited the controversial Carmichael project by Indian energy giant Adani.

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Bagsiden: Særpræget ‘vinkelmåler’ fra Samsø

Loppemarkedsfund: Hvad er det for et mærkeligt instrument?

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Tænkeboks: Med fire snit fås maksimalt 11 stykker pizza

Her får du løsningen på tænkeboksen fra uge 47

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The Wizard of Oz most 'influential' film of all time according to network science

The Wizard of Oz, followed by Star Wars and Psycho, is identified as the most influential film of all time in a study published in the open access journal Applied Network Science.

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The Wizard of Oz most 'influential' film of all time according to network science

The Wizard of Oz, followed by Star Wars and Psycho, is identified as the most influential film of all time in a study published in the open access journal Applied Network Science.

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The Atlantic Daily: To What End?

What We’re Following We’re working on improving our email newsletters and your opinion is important to us. Will you help us by answering this short survey , so we can make our newsletters a better fit for you? Life Expectancy: Americans are dying younger, according to new reports from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Death rates are increasing among young people, particularly those

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Satellites warn African farmers of pest infestations

UK researchers develop an early warning system to prevent crops in Africa being devastated.

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As Measles Surges, ‘Decades of Progress’ Are in Jeopardy

Health officials expressed alarm about a rebound in measles, once nearly eradicated in many regions. Reported cases surged by nearly a third worldwide.

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Fur Trapper Kills Grizzly Bear After His Wife and Baby Were Mauled in the Yukon

Gjermund Roesholt shot the bear near a remote cabin where he had been living with his wife, Valerie Theoret, and their 10-month-old daughter, Adele.

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Pregnancy losses linked with increased risk of cardiovascular disease

Women who experience pregnancy loss and do not go on to have children are at greater risk of cardiovascular disease, such as heart disease and stroke, compared with women who have only one or two children, according to new research from the University of Cambridge and the University of North Carolina.

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First UK estimates of children who could have conditions caused by drinking in pregnancy

Up to 17 percent of children could have symptoms consistent with fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD) according to new research published today in Preventative Medicine.

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The best alternatives to 2018’s hottest toys

Gadgets Some gifts sell out. Or are very annoying. These are just as good. Sometimes you forget to pre-order the new hot gift and it sells out. Fear not, these are the best alternatives to 2018’s hottest holiday toys for kids.

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'Miss Environment': The 11-year-old girl 'saving Lagos'

Misimi Isimi is an 11-year-old environmentalist on a mission to clean up Lagos.

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Lyft Expands Citi Bike in NYC, and Uber Is None Too Happy

Now the owner of the continent's largest bike-share company, Lyft's moving further into NYC's outer boroughs, in a move that Uber and Lime consider a snub.

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Meeting the challenge of engaging men in HIV prevention and treatment

A new commentary from National Institutes of Health scientists asserts that engaging men in HIV prevention and care is essential to the goal of ending the HIV pandemic. The article by Adeola Adeyeye, M.D., M.P.A., and David Burns, M.D., M.P.H., of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) and Michael Stirratt, Ph.D., of the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) also di

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Jysk underspillethed med en snert af utålmodighed

PORTRÆT: Efter en afstikker til det nordjyske har Svend Særkjær, der er barn af lige dele Kronjylland og Slotsholmen, kurs mod Hovedstaden, hvor monumentale udfordringer står klar til en mand, der går for at være utålmodig uden at hæve stemmen.

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Astronomers measure total starlight emitted over 13.7bn years

Stars have radiated 4×10 84 photons since the universe begun with formation peaking 11bn years ago All the light from all the stars that have ever existed. It is a quantity of unimaginable magnitude, but now astronomers have put a number on it. From the earliest, faintest stars, to the largest galaxies, an international team has managed to measure the total amount of starlight emitted over the en

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How the devil ray got its horns

If you ever find yourself staring down a manta ray, you'll probably notice two things right away: its massive fins and the two fleshy growths curling out of its head that give it the nickname 'devil ray.' A new study shows that these two very different features have the same origin — a discovery that reflects an important lesson for understanding the diversity of life.

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Certain state lawmakers aim to loosen childhood vaccine requirements, but legal barriers persist

An analysis of proposed vaccine legislation between 2011 and 2017 shows that although the majority of proposed bills would have allowed more parents to exempt their children from school immunization requirements, those that favored vaccines were more likely to become law.

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Weight cycling is associated with a higher risk of death

Weight cycling is associated with a higher risk of death, according to a new study published in the Endocrine Society's Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism.

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New tools illuminate mechanisms behind overlooked cellular components' critical roles

Creating new tools that harness light to probe the mysteries of cellular behavior, researchers have made discoveries about the formation of cellular components called membraneless organelles and the key role these organelles play in cells.

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Scientists find a way to enhance the performance of quantum computers

Scientists have demonstrated a theoretical method to enhance the performance of quantum computers works, an important step to scale the transformative technology.

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Switching identities: Revolutionary insulator-like material also conducts electricity

Researchers have made a material that can transition from an electricity-transmitting metal to a nonconducting insulating material without changing its atomic structure.

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Functional nasal surgery relieves chronic headache for some patients

Nasal surgery to relieve obstructed breathing can reduce or eliminate chronic headaches in selected patients, reports a new article.

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Scary 'New' Tick Has US Officials Worried

A newfound tick in the United States is spreading.

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These spiders make protein-packed milk for their young

Animals We should all be drinking spidey milk. Spider milk may sound like a fictional substance, but scientists in China have found at least one species of creepy crawlers that produces a milk-like fluid to nourish…

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Deputy AG Rod Rosenstein Is Still Calling for an Encryption Backdoor

At a cybercrime conference Thursday, Rod Rosenstein once again decried "going dark."

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Trump’s ‘Energy Dominance’ Doctrine Is Undermined by Climate Change

Rising temperatures undermine the president’s vision of an energy-dominant America, affecting coal-fired power plants, oil production and the electrical grid, a federal report says.

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Dr. Gerald Berenson, 96, Dies; Traced Heart Disease to Childhood

He was the chief researcher of the marathon Bogalusa Heart Study, which found that reducing childhood risk factors could allay cardiac conditions in adults.

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The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: A Bridge Too Farr

Written by Elaine Godfrey ( @elainejgodfrey ), Madeleine Carlisle ( @maddiecarlisle2 ), and Olivia Paschal ( @oliviacpaschal ). We’re working on improving our email newsletters and your opinion is important to us. Will you help us by answering this short survey , so we can make our newsletters a better fit for you? Today in 5 Lines Michael Cohen, President Donald Trump’s former personal lawyer, a

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Canadian healthcare system shows how much money America could save

The United States scores dramatically lower than other high-income countries in healthcare benchmarks, despite overspending them. A recent report published in JAMA suggests this discrepancy results from runaway administrative costs and U.S. practitioners charging more for the same medical services. By taking lessons from Canada's single-payer system, the U.S. may be able to reduce its healthcare

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An opioid epidemic may be looming in Mexico — and the US may be partly responsible

Though opioid use in Mexico has been low, national and international factors are converging and a threat of increased drug and addiction rates exists. Many of these factors may have originated in the US, making this a potential joint US-Mexico epidemic. The authors of this analytic essay came to this conclusion based on a study of published academic literature, Mexican federal documents and guidel

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More pregnant women are using meth and opioids, study finds

Amphetamine and opioid use in pregnancy increased substantially over the last decade in the United States, a new study finds. And a disproportionate rise occurred in rural counties.

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Dagens Medicin rapporterer fra ASH – og det bliver vildt i år

Vi er på plads i San Diego, når 20.000 eksperter mødes for at opsamle den nyeste videnskabelige viden om hæmatologi.

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NASA Administrator on Elon Musk: ‘That Was Not Appropriate Behavior’

If Elon Musk wants to launch American astronauts into space, he can’t smoke weed and drink whiskey on a podcast again. That’s a message from Jim Bridenstine, the NASA administrator, to the founder of SpaceX, which, along with Boeing, is developing transportation systems that would allow the United States to fly NASA astronauts from American soil for the first time since the space shuttle was reti

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Facility-level variations in diabetic kidney disease care within the VA health system

Concerning adherence to certain recommended measures of kidney disease care for veterans with diabetes within the Veterans Affairs Health Care System, there is modest facility-level variation for some measures and larger facility-level variation for others.

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Found: Missing Link in Whale Evolutionary History

A toothless whale fossil without signs of baleen could help explain how the whale filtration system evolved.

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All of the starlight ever produced by the observable universe measured

From their laboratories on a rocky planet dwarfed by the vastness of space, scientists have collaborated to measure all of the starlight ever produced throughout the history of the observable universe.

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The whole of Africa was the cradle of humankind

A new study breaks with the paradigm that the cradle of humankind lies in East Africa, based on the archaeological remains found at sites in the region of Ain Hanech (Algeria), the oldest currently known in the north of Africa. New research shows that ancestral hominins actually made stone tools in North Africa that are near contemporary with the earliest known stone tools in East Africa dated to

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How the devil ray got its horns

If you ever find yourself staring down a manta ray, you'll probably notice two things right away: its massive fins and the two fleshy growths curling out of its head that give it the nickname 'devil ray.' A new study shows that these two very different features have the same origin — a discovery that reflects an important lesson for understanding the diversity of life.

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Triple combination cancer immunotherapy improves outcomes in preclinical melanoma model

In adoptive cell transfer immunotherapy, T cells able to recognize a tumor are harvested, expanded in the laboratory, and then reintroduced to attack the tumor. However, they often do not persist long enough to finish the job. A triple combination regimen of adoptive T cell transfer, a PIM kinase inhibitor, and a PD1 inhibitor improved T cell persistence and tumor control in a mouse model of melan

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Michael Cohen Takes Mueller Inside the Trump Organization

In a Manhattan federal court on Thursday, President Donald Trump’s longtime personal lawyer Michael Cohen pleaded guilty to lying to Congress about the timing of his negotiations to build a Trump Tower Moscow in 2016, and about how often he discussed the deal with Trump during the campaign. The guilty plea is the first Mueller has secured that is related directly to Trump’s business dealings—and

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Three Remarkable Things About Michael Cohen's Plea

Michael Cohen’s decision to plead guilty to lying to Congress on Thursday was remarkable for three reasons. The first was that Cohen walked into a Manhattan federal courtroom unannounced. He did it by surprise. We live in a political environment characterized by constant leaks, each choreographed more carefully than a public announcement. The drama of learning what’s going to happen at an event,

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Spacewatch: Nasa to launch new crewed craft in 2019

Capsules being developed to act as taxis between Earth and International Space Station Nasa and its commercial partners, Boeing and SpaceX, are nearing the end of their programme to develop new crew capsules that will act as taxis between Earth and the International Space Station (ISS). Two final uncrewed test flights have been confirmed for next year, which will be followed by the first astronau

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Trilobites: Meet the Spiders That Feed Milk to Their Young

The jumping arachnids’ secretions have four times as much protein as cow milk.

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Harvard Medical School Dean Weighs In On Ethics Of Gene Editing

NPR's Mary Louise Kelly talks with George Daley, dean of Harvard Medical School, about this week's international summit on gene editing and how the birth of babies with edited genes was received.

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Mammal-like milk provisioning and parental care discovered in jumping spider

Researchers report milk provisioning in Toxeus magnus (Araneae: Salticidae), a jumping spider that mimics ants. Milk provisioning in T. magnus involves a specialized organ over an extended period, similar to mammalian lactation. The study demonstrated that mammal-like milk provisioning and parental care for sexually mature offspring have also evolved in invertebrates.

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New archaeological site revises human habitation timeline on Tibetan plateau

Human ancestors first set foot on the interior of the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau around 30,000-40,000 years ago, according to new research. This new finding moves back the earliest data of habitation in the interior by 20,000 years or more.

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When it comes to using birth control, both intention and attitude matter

A new study adds to the evidence that women's intentions around becoming pregnant don't fully explain whether and how they use contraception. Rather, their attitudes toward becoming pregnant also play a role.

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An opioid epidemic may be looming in Mexico — and the US may be partly responsible

Though opioid use in Mexico has been low, national and international factors are converging and a threat of increased drug and addiction rates exists. Many of these factors may have originated in the US, making this a potential joint US-Mexico epidemic. The authors of this analytic essay came to this conclusion based on a study of published academic literature, Mexican federal documents and guidel

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Study: Rise in meth and opioid use during pregnancy

Amphetamine and opioid use in pregnancy increased substantially over the last decade in the United States, a new Michigan Medicine-led study finds. And a disproportionate rise occurred in rural counties.

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State lawmakers want to loosen childhood vaccine requirements, but legal barriers persist

An analysis of proposed vaccine legislation between 2011 and 2017 shows that although the majority of proposed bills would have allowed more parents to exempt their children from school immunization requirements, those that favored vaccines were more likely to become law.

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Facebook and Six4Three’s Bikini App Lawsuit Is Getting Ugly

It’s an international he said, he said showdown where somehow every party looks bad.

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German environment minister backs contentious carbon pricing

Germany's environment minister has thrown her weight behind proposals to price carbon dioxide and kick-start the country's stalled efforts to cut greenhouse gas emissions.

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A jumping spider mom nurses her brood for weeks on milk

Even after spiderlings start hunting for themselves, they come to mom for milk.

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Triple combination cancer immunotherapy improves outcomes in preclinical melanoma model

In adoptive cell transfer immunotherapy, T cells able to recognize a tumor are harvested, expanded in the laboratory, and then reintroduced to attack the tumor. However, they often do not persist long enough to finish the job. A triple combination regimen of adoptive T cell transfer, a PIM kinase inhibitor, and a PD1 inhibitor improved T cell persistence and tumor control in a mouse model of melan

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Quirky glacial behavior explained

In August 2012, the Jakobshavn Glacier was flowing and breaking off into the sea at record speeds, three times faster than in previous years. As the glacier flowed faster, it became thinner and more unstable and in a twist, a pileup of thick ice replenished the glacier's terminus, slowing it down again. New work explaining the fast-then-slow movement of Jakobshavn may help scientists better predic

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Insight into swimming fish could lead to robotics advances

The constant movement of fish that seems random is actually precisely deployed to provide them at any moment with the best sensory feedback they need to navigate the world.

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How viruses hijack part of your immune system and use it against you

An enzyme intended to prevent autoimmune disease can be hijacked and used by some viruses to avoid immune detection. There's also good news. The same team also defined how much viral genetic material is needed to reverse the process and instead activate the immune system against the virus.

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With these nanoparticles, a simple urine test could diagnose bacterial pneumonia

Researchers have now developed a nanoparticle-based technology that could be used distinguish between bacterial and viral forms of pneumonia. The technology could also be used to monitor whether antibiotic therapy has successfully treated the infection.

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Discovering a new compound that illuminates the sulfur cycle

Researchers have discovered a new compound that helps us better understand how microbes keep the sulfur cycle turning, making it possible for us to enjoy ocean views and survive near the water.

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It's not a shock: Better bandage promotes powerful healing

A new, low-cost wound dressing could dramatically speed up healing in a surprising way. The method leverages energy generated from a patient's own body motions to apply gentle electrical pulses at the site of an injury.

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Thriving reef fisheries continue to provide food despite coral bleaching

The unexpected results of a 20-year study into reef fisheries showed fisheries being maintained despite extreme coral bleaching. Remarkably, rapid proliferation of fishes with low dependence on corals led to catches remaining stable or even increasing. But the results also showed fishing success was 'patchy' and more dependent on fewer species.

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The decline in U.S. life expectancy is unlike anything we've seen in a century

Health The CDC identified three things shortening American lives. A new report from the Centers for Disease Control shows that the small decrease in life expectancy, from 78.7 to 78.6 years is part of a continuing trend. Even as we…

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Epic history of light reveals the universe peaked 10 billion years ago

A gamma ray telescope has revealed that the rate of star formation across the Universe peaked 10 billion years ago and has been going downhill ever since

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Some spiders produce milk – and it’s more nutritious than cow’s milk

One species of spider seems to have worked out how to recycle unused eggs into a milk that contains four times the protein of cow’s milk

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Stone tools hint that our first human ancestors lived all over Africa

We thought the first Homo species evolved in East Africa 2.8 million years ago, but stone tools from Algeria suggest our origins may have spanned the continent

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Extinct ‘Denisovan’ people may have lived on Earth’s highest plateau

The Tibetan Plateau is a tough environment so we thought humans arrived only about 12,000 years ago, but it seems someone was there 40,000 to 30,000 years ago

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What Are Gamma-Rays?

Gamma-rays are a form of electromagnetic radiation. They can be used to treat cancer, and gamma-ray bursts are studied by astronomers.

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Microsoft to supply U.S. Army with thermal, night-vision AR goggles

Microsoft is set to make prototypes of AR headsets that will feature capabilities including night vision, thermal sensing and instruments that measure vital signs. The military already uses AR in some applications, but it's yet to implement the relatively new technology on a large scale. It's unclear whether Microsoft employees will protest the recently announced contract. None Microsoft is set t

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An Ingenious Autodidact in the Mountains of Tajikistan

Maxime Lacoste-Lebuis and Maude Plante-Husaruk, both filmmakers, were researching their upcoming trip to Central Asia when they first heard a man named Raïmberdi talk about plants. “We stumbled upon a French TV program about [Tajikistan] where Raïmberdi had briefly appeared, and we immediately thought he was a very interesting man and that there was definitely more to his story,” Lacoste-Lebuis t

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Trump Suddenly Takes a Stand Against Russia

This morning it was “ probably ” on. Now it appears it’s off: President Trump said Thursday he was canceling his bilateral meeting with Russian President Vladimir Putin over the seizure by Russia of three Ukrainian naval vessels off the coast of Crimea. “Based on the fact that the ships and sailors have not been returned to Ukraine from Russia, I have decided it would be best for all parties conc

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Soil compound fights chronic wasting disease

A major compound in soil organic matter degrades chronic wasting disease prions and decreases infectivity in mice, according to a new study.

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How HIV DNA is blocked from entering the cell nucleus

Multiple components of the nuclear pore complex and nuclear import machinery enable a protein called human myxovirus resistance 2 (MX2) to inhibit HIV-1 infection, according to a new study.

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Some blood cells have a surprising source: Your gut

The human intestine may provide up to 10 percent of blood cells in circulation from its own reservoir of blood-forming stem cells, a surprising new study has found.

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Whales lost their teeth before evolving hair-like baleen in their mouths

Rivaling the evolution of feathers in dinosaurs, one of the most extraordinary transformations in the history of life was the evolution of baleen — rows of flexible hair-like plates that blue whales, humpbacks and other marine mammals use to filter relatively tiny prey from gulps of ocean water. Now, scientists have discovered an important intermediary link in the evolution of this innovative fee

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Curry spice boosts exercise performance in mice with heart failure

New research suggests that curcumin, a main ingredient in curry, may improve exercise intolerance related to heart failure.

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Revealing hidden information in sound waves

By essentially turning down the pitch of sound waves, engineering researchers have devised a way to unlock greater amounts of data from acoustic fields than ever before.

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NASA Chooses Private Companies for Future Moon Landings

Nine companies will vie for a share of more than $2 billion dollars to build small landers to carry experimental payloads to the lunar surface.

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Otter versus koi: the battle that has gripped Canada

An epic battle has been playing out in a classical Chinese garden in Canada's Pacific coast city of Vancouver between a ravenous wild otter and prized ornamental carp, cheered on by locals who have declared themselves for "Team Otter" versus "Team Koi."

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Climate change is more extensive and worse than once thought

Climate scientists missed a lot about a quarter century ago when they predicted how bad global warming would be.

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'Blade Runner' Goes Anime, 'Cowboy Bebop' Goes Live-Action

Adult Swim network will be airing 13 episodes of a 2032-set 'Blade Runner' spinoff—just part of a broader cultural push toward anime.

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It doesn’t take long to believe your own lies

We believe the lies we tell are the truth in as little as 45 minutes, according to a new study. Researchers used electroencephalography (EEG) to monitor the brain activity of younger and older adults while they gave truthful and false answers on questionnaires. In the study, the older cohort, ages 60-92, were significantly more likely than the 18-24-year-olds to accept as the truth a lie they had

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Jeff Tweedy Says It’s Okay to Be Okay

The famously inscrutable Jeff Tweedy has at last clarified his opinion on American interventionism. Kinda, maybe. “All my life I’ve played a part in the bombs above the ones you love,” the Wilco front man sings over hesitant guitar twang in the opening moments of his first album of solo originals, Warm . “I’m taking a moment to apologize. I should have done more to stop the war.” In the next vers

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Deceptive and Dangerous: A Gallery of An Antarctic Volcano

Deception Island, Antarctica is an active volcano.

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Antarctic Island Exploded 4,000 Years Ago

A remote Antarctic island went boom, and now researchers know when.

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Safely on Mars, InSight unfolds its arrays and snaps some pics

After safely landing on Mars following its nearly seven month journey, NASA has released the first pictures taken by its InSight spacecraft, which has opened it solar arrays to charge batteries.

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Cruise control: GM's No. 2 exec to run self-driving car unit

General Motors' No. 2 executive is moving from Motor City to Silicon Valley to run the automaker's self-driving car operations as it attempts to cash in on its bet that robotic vehicles will transform transportation.

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Tumor-free flounder: Study underscores Boston Harbor rebirth

A canary in a coal mine? How about a flounder in a harbor?

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Next US moon landing will be by private companies, not NASA

America's next moon landing will be made by private companies—not NASA.

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Scientists find a way to enhance the performance of quantum computers

USC scientists have demonstrated a theoretical method to enhance the performance of quantum computers, an important step to scale a technology with potential to solve some of society's biggest challenges.

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Neighborhoods influence Chicagoans' transportation decisions

With the L, Divvy bikes, buses, Uber and Lyft, Chicago has no shortage of transportation options. But whether or not people actually explore all these options might be determined by the neighborhoods in which they live.

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What’s in an accent?

I was born and raised in the South, but never would have described myself as having any sort of accent until I moved to Southern California. Suddenly people could figure out where I was from as soon as I opened my mouth (a fellow SoCal Southerner was correctly able to pinpoint my accent to the […]

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Quirky glacial behavior explained

In August 2012, in the frigid wilderness of West Greenland, the Jakobshavn Glacier was flowing and breaking off into the sea at record speeds, three times faster than in previous years. An underwater calving event had caused the massive glacier to lose its footing. But the movement was not linear like a runaway train (as previous studies suggested), but dynamic: drastically speeding up, then slowi

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Insight into swimming fish could lead to robotics advances

The constant movement of fish that seems random is actually precisely deployed to provide them at any moment with the best sensory feedback they need to navigate the world, Johns Hopkins University researchers found.

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Toolbox for studying the existence of animal cultures

Fruit flies possess all of the cognitive capacities needed to culturally transmit their sexual preferences across generations, according to researchers. Their study provides the first experimental toolbox for studying the existence of animal cultures, thereby opening up an entire field of research.

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When good macrophages go bad

Researchers have discover how some cancer cells communicate with macrophages to protect tumors.

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How prions invade the brain

The spread of prions to the brain does not occur by direct transmission across the blood-brain barrier, according to a new study. As noted by the authors, insights into how prions enter the brain could lead to the development of effective strategies to prevent neurodegeneration, even after infection outside the nervous system has already taken place.

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How sounds going into our ears become words going through our brains

In a new study, researchers were able to see where in the brain, and how quickly — in milliseconds — the brain's neurons transition from processing the sound of speech to processing the language-based words of the speech.

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Shape-shifting protein protects bacteria from invaders

Researchers have discovered how bacteria manage to destroy enemy DNA, while keeping their own genetic material safe.

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Decoding sleeping sickness signals could aid quest for treatments

Scientists have discovered how the parasite that causes sleeping sickness initiates a physical change in order to spread the disease.

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What happens when materials take tiny hits

A team of researchers has just accomplished the first detailed high-speed imaging and analysis of the microparticle impact process, and used that data to predict when the particles will bounce away, stick, or knock material off the surface and weaken it.

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Artificial magnetic field produces exotic behavior in graphene sheets

Theoretical physics discovery paves the way for future technological applications.

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USC scientists find a way to enhance the performance of quantum computers

USC scientists have demonstrated a theoretical method to enhance the performance of quantum computers works, an important step to scale the transformative technology.

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Neighborhoods influence Chicagoans' transportation decisions

A new study from Northwestern University compared Evanston and Humboldt Park residents' attitudes toward various modes of transportation. The researchers found that Evanston residents more readily accepted new active mobility modes, such as bikeshare programs. But Humboldt Park residents exercised skepticism toward such programs, viewing them as signs of privilege and gentrification.

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NASA's Fermi traces the history of starlight across cosmos

Scientists using data from NASA's Fermi satellite have measured all the starlight produced over 90 percent of the universe's history.

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An unexplained seismic event ‘rang’ across the Earth in November

On November 11, seismologists began puzzling over a weird low-frequency rumble that rang the entire planet. The wave coming from somewhere was weirdly simple and tied to no known events. More comprehensive study of an uncharted area of the ocean floor could provide an explanation of the mystery. Someone who tracks earthquakes for fun noticed it first. On November 11, 2018, a Twitter user going by

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New tools illuminate mechanisms behind overlooked cellular components' critical roles

Creating new tools that harness light to probe the mysteries of cellular behavior, Princeton researchers have made discoveries about the formation of cellular components called membraneless organelles and the key role these organelles play in cells.

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NASA's IMERG analyzed Tropical Storm Usagi's rainfall

When Tropical Cyclone 33W, also known as Usagi strengthened to hurricane intensity as it approached Vietnam from the South China Sea it dropped a lot of rain. Although the storm weakened to tropical storm intensity when coming ashore in Vietnam, it continued to generate a lot of rain, and NASA added up that heavy rainfall.

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Moon rocks sell for $855,000 in New York: Sotheby's

Three moon rocks brought to Earth nearly half a century ago and the only known documented lunar samples in private hands, sold for $855,000 in New York on Thursday, Sotheby's said.

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Media portrayals of black men contribute to police violence, study says

Negative portrayals in the news media affect how police treat black men in the United States, according to a Rutgers School of Public Health study.

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Oldest-known ancestor of modern primates may have come from North America, not Asia

About 56 million years ago, on an Earth so warm that palm trees graced the Arctic Circle, a mouse-sized primate known as Teilhardina first curled its fingers around a branch.

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Den globale opvarmning går hurtigere end forventet: 2018 bliver et af de varmeste år

Organisationen WMO mener, at verden er på vej mod temperaturstigning på fem grader.

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Effective new target for mood-boosting brain stimulation found

Researchers have found an effective target in the brain for electrical stimulation to improve mood in people suffering from depression. Stimulation of a brain region called the lateral orbitofrontal cortex (OFC) reliably produced acute improvement in mood in patients who suffered from depression at the start of the study.

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Insight into swimming fish could lead to robotics advances

The constant movement of fish that seems random is actually precisely deployed to provide them at any moment with the best sensory feedback they need to navigate the world.

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Quirky glacial behavior explained

In August 2012, the Jakobshavn Glacier was flowing and breaking off into the sea at record speeds, three times faster than in previous years. As the glacier flowed faster, it became thinner and more unstable and in a twist, a pileup of thick ice replenished the glacier's terminus, slowing it down again. New work explaining the fast-then-slow movement of Jakobshavn may help scientists better predic

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New tools illuminate mechanisms behind overlooked cellular components' critical roles

Creating new tools that harness light to probe the mysteries of cellular behavior, Princeton researchers have made discoveries about the formation of cellular components called membraneless organelles and the key role these organelles play in cells.

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Weight cycling is associated with a higher risk of death

Weight cycling is associated with a higher risk of death, according to a new study published in the Endocrine Society's Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism.

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Companionable Capybaras

Native to most of South America, the capybara is the largest rodent on Earth. Capybaras can grow to be two feet tall (61 cm) and weigh as much as 175 pounds (79 kg). They are social animals by nature, and they have gained a level of fame worldwide for their seeming ability to make individuals from other species feel at ease in their presence. Collected here: images of capybaras young and old, in

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Why rising seas will force coastal residents to move – or spend

In the fourth part of our series looking at the climate report Trump tried to bury over Thanksgiving, we examine how sea-level rise will reshape the population Part 1: how air pollution kills Part 2: why some pollution action is far better than none Part 3: why water will be the next battleground The Trump administration published a major report on climate change the day after Thanksgiving. We wi

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Thriving reef fisheries continue to provide food despite coral bleaching

Reef fisheries can continue to provide food and income despite corals being lost to climate change, according to new research conducted in the Seychelles.

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Team uncovers new molecule with big implications

Almost 20 years ago, the University of Delaware's Tom Hanson started studying the bacterium Chlorobaculum tepidum (Cba. tepidum), an organism that only lives in volcanic hot springs, to understand how it captures energy from light and chemicals to grow in that environment. Among the reasons to study the organism, Cba. tepidum is one of the microbes that re-oxidizes sulfide, a compound toxic to hum

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It's not a shock: Better bandage promotes powerful healing

A new, low-cost wound dressing developed by University of Wisconsin-Madison engineers could dramatically speed up healing in a surprising way.

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Revealing hidden information in sound waves

By essentially turning down the pitch of sound waves, University of Michigan engineering researchers have devised a way to unlock greater amounts of data from acoustic fields than ever before.

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How a rat and bat helped heal a 90-year cultural rift

Tyrone Lavery, postdoctoral researcher at the Field Museum in Chicago, traveled nearly 8,000 miles to find two species—a giant rat and a monkey-faced bat—in Malaita, one of the Solomon Islands' largest provinces.

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Even if doing a good job, women CEOs more likely to be fired

Women CEOs are much more likely than male CEOs to be dismissed, even when the women are performing well, according to research from The University of Alabama.

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How Much Starlight Has the Universe Produced?

How Much Starlight Has the Universe Produced? Researchers calculate all the photons ever emitted by the observable universe and find an astronomical number. starlight.jpg Rights information: Public domain Space Thursday, November 29, 2018 – 13:45 Charles Q. Choi, Contributor (Inside Science) — Scientists may have for the first time measured all the starlight ever produced in the observable unive

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Some blood cells have a surprising source: Your gut

The human intestine may provide up to 10 percent of blood cells in circulation from its own reservoir of blood-forming stem cells, a surprising new study from researchers at Columbia University Vagelos College of Physicians and Surgeons has found.

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Fruit flies can transmit their sexual preferences culturally

Researchers from the CNRS and université Toulouse III – Paul Sabatier (UT3) show that fruit flies possess all of the cognitive capacities needed to culturally transmit their sexual preferences across generations. The study, published on November 30, 2018 in Science, provides the first experimental toolbox for studying the existence of animal cultures, thereby opening up an entire field of research

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Mammal-like milk provisioning and parental care discovered in jumping spider

Recently, researchers at the Xishuangbanna Tropical Botanical Garden of the Chinese Academy of Sciences report milk provisioning in Toxeus magnus (Araneae: Salticidae), a jumping spider that mimics ants. Milk provisioning in T. magnus involves a specialized organ over an extended period, similar to mammalian lactation. The study demonstrated that mammal-like milk provisioning and parental care for

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New archaeological site revises human habitation timeline on Tibetan plateau

Human ancestors first set foot on the interior of the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau around 30,000-40,000 years ago, according to new research by scientists from the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS). This new finding moves back the earliest data of habitation in the interior by 20,000 years or more.

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Switching identities: Revolutionary insulator-like material also conducts electricity

University of Wisconsin-Madison researchers have made a material that can transition from an electricity-transmitting metal to a nonconducting insulating material without changing its atomic structure.

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Illuminating the mysterious cultures of fruit flies

The lady fruit flies that inhabit your banana bowl may find green-colored mates with curly wings simply irresistible — conforming to the 'local dating culture' of generations of female flies before them, a new study finds.

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A new approach to automation of chemical synthesis

Researchers have used a robotic platform to produce — with no physical intervention — three pharmaceutical compounds with yields and purities comparable to those achieved by manual efforts, they say.

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Until leaving the nest, jumping spiders suckle spider milk from their moms

Much like baby mammals nursing at the teats of their mothers, some baby jumping spiderlings are entirely dependent on nutritious spider milk secreted and fed to them by their mothers.

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Chipped stones and cut bones show early hominin presence in North Africa

Ancient stone tools and cut-marked animal bones discovered in Algeria suggest that modern humans' ancestors called northern Africa home much earlier than archaeologists once thought, a new study reports.

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How viruses hijack part of your immune system and use it against you

An enzyme intended to prevent autoimmune disease can be hijacked and used by some viruses to avoid immune detection. That discovery from Mayo Clinic researchers and collaborators appears in PLOS Biology. There's also good news. The same team also defined how much viral genetic material is needed to reverse the process and instead activate the immune system against the virus.

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Clemson scientists measure all of the starlight ever produced by the observable universe

From their laboratories on a rocky planet dwarfed by the vastness of space, Clemson University scientists have collaborated to measure all of the starlight ever produced throughout the history of the observable universe.

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How prions invade the brain

The spread of prions to the brain does not occur by direct transmission across the blood-brain barrier, according to a study published Nov. 29, 2018, in the open-access journal PLOS Pathogens by Annika Keller and Adriano Aguzzi of the University Hospital Zürich, and colleagues. As noted by the authors, insights into how prions enter the brain could lead to the development of effective strategies t

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Soil compound fights chronic wasting disease

A major compound in soil organic matter degrades chronic wasting disease prions and decreases infectivity in mice, according to a study published Nov. 29 in the open-access journal PLOS Pathogens by Judd Aiken of the University of Alberta, and colleagues.

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How HIV DNA is blocked from entering the cell nucleus

Multiple components of the nuclear pore complex and nuclear import machinery enable a protein called human myxovirus resistance 2 (MX2) to inhibit HIV-1 infection, according to a study published Nov. 29 in the open-access journal PLOS Pathogens by Michael Malim of King's College London, and colleagues.

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The Google Pixel Slate mixes great hardware with a slight identity crisis

Gadgets Google's high-end tablet is like a fancy condo in which Chrome and Android apps live. Slick hardware and improving software make Google's convertible tablet an interesting option.

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Formyl-methionine as an N-degron of a eukaryotic N-end rule pathway

In bacteria, nascent proteins bear the pretranslationally generated N-terminal (Nt) formyl-methionine (fMet) residue. Nt-fMet of bacterial proteins is a degradation signal, termed fMet/N-degron. By contrast, proteins synthesized by cytosolic ribosomes of eukaryotes were presumed to bear unformylated Nt-Met. Here we found that the yeast formyltransferase Fmt1, although imported into mitochondria,

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Substrate-engaged 26S proteasome structures reveal mechanisms for ATP-hydrolysis-driven translocation

The 26 S proteasome is the primary eukaryotic degradation machine and thus is critically involved in numerous cellular processes. The heterohexameric adenosine triphosphatase (ATPase) motor of the proteasome unfolds and translocates targeted protein substrates into the open gate of a proteolytic core while a proteasomal deubiquitinase concomitantly removes substrate-attached ubiquitin chains. How

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News at a glance

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Forgotten no more

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Buying time

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The Story of Soy

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Trendsetting flies

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Turning many into one

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Spider nursery

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Colossal grain growth yields single-crystal metal foils by contact-free annealing

Single-crystal metals have distinctive properties owing to the absence of grain boundaries and strong anisotropy. Commercial single-crystal metals are usually synthesized by bulk crystal growth or by deposition of thin films onto substrates, and they are expensive and small. We prepared extremely large single-crystal metal foils by "contact-free annealing" from commercial polycrystalline foils. T

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Cultural flies: Conformist social learning in fruitflies predicts long-lasting mate-choice traditions

Despite theoretical justification for the evolution of animal culture, empirical evidence for it beyond mammals and birds remains scant, and we still know little about the process of cultural inheritance. In this study, we propose a mechanism-driven definition of animal culture and test it in the fruitfly. We found that fruitflies have five cognitive capacities that enable them to transmit mating

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A gamma-ray determination of the Universes star formation history

The light emitted by all galaxies over the history of the Universe produces the extragalactic background light (EBL) at ultraviolet, optical, and infrared wavelengths. The EBL is a source of opacity for gamma rays via photon-photon interactions, leaving an imprint in the spectra of distant gamma-ray sources. We measured this attenuation using 739 active galaxies and one gamma-ray burst detected b

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The multiple merger assembly of a hyperluminous obscured quasar at redshift 4.6

Galaxy mergers and gas accretion from the cosmic web drove the growth of galaxies and their central black holes at early epochs. We report spectroscopic imaging of a multiple merger event in the most luminous known galaxy, WISE J224607.56–052634.9 (W2246–0526), a dust-obscured quasar at redshift 4.6, 1.3 billion years after the Big Bang. Far-infrared dust continuum observations show three galaxy

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Isostructural metal-insulator transition in VO2

The metal-insulator transition in correlated materials is usually coupled to a symmetry-lowering structural phase transition. This coupling not only complicates the understanding of the basic mechanism of this phenomenon but also limits the speed and endurance of prospective electronic devices. We demonstrate an isostructural, purely electronically driven metal-insulator transition in epitaxial h

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Uniaxial pressure control of competing orders in a high-temperature superconductor

Cuprates exhibit antiferromagnetic, charge density wave (CDW), and high-temperature superconducting ground states that can be tuned by means of doping and external magnetic fields. However, disorder generated by these tuning methods complicates the interpretation of such experiments. Here, we report a high-resolution inelastic x-ray scattering study of the high-temperature superconductor YBa 2 Cu

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Fast track to the neocortex: A memory engram in the posterior parietal cortex

Models of systems memory consolidation postulate a fast-learning hippocampal store and a slowly developing, stable neocortical store. Accordingly, early neocortical contributions to memory are deemed to reflect a hippocampus-driven online reinstatement of encoding activity. In contrast, we found that learning rapidly engenders an enduring memory engram in the human posterior parietal cortex. We a

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The earliest human occupation of the high-altitude Tibetan Plateau 40 thousand to 30 thousand years ago

The Tibetan Plateau is the highest and one of the most demanding environments ever inhabited by humans. We investigated the timing and mechanisms of its initial colonization at the Nwya Devu site, located nearly 4600 meters above sea level. This site, dating from 40,000 to 30,000 years ago, is the highest Paleolithic archaeological site yet identified globally. Nwya Devu has yielded an abundant b

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Prolonged milk provisioning in a jumping spider

Lactation is a mammalian attribute, and the few known nonmammal examples have distinctly different modalities. We document here milk provisioning in a jumping spider, which compares functionally and behaviorally to lactation in mammals. The spiderlings ingest nutritious milk droplets secreted from the mother’s epigastric furrow until the subadult stage. Milk is indispensable for offspring surviva

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Human tumor genomics and zebrafish modeling identify SPRED1 loss as a driver of mucosal melanoma

Melanomas originating from mucosal surfaces have low mutation burden, genomic instability, and poor prognosis. To identify potential driver genes, we sequenced hundreds of cancer-related genes in 43 human mucosal melanomas, cataloging point mutations, amplifications, and deletions. The SPRED1 gene, which encodes a negative regulator of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling, was inacti

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Single-cell multiomics sequencing and analyses of human colorectal cancer

Although genomic instability, epigenetic abnormality, and gene expression dysregulation are hallmarks of colorectal cancer, these features have not been simultaneously analyzed at single-cell resolution. Using optimized single-cell multiomics sequencing together with multiregional sampling of the primary tumor and lymphatic and distant metastases, we developed insights beyond intratumoral heterog

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Pathogen blockade of TAK1 triggers caspase-8-dependent cleavage of gasdermin D and cell death

Limited proteolysis of gasdermin D (GSDMD) generates an N-terminal pore-forming fragment that controls pyroptosis in macrophages. GSDMD is processed via inflammasome-activated caspase-1 or -11. It is currently unknown whether macrophage GSDMD can be processed by other mechanisms. Here, we describe an additional pathway controlling GSDMD processing. The inhibition of TAK1 or IB kinase (IKK) by the

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New Products

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Response to Comment on "Contrasting carbon cycle responses of the tropical continents to the 2015-2016 El Nino"

Chevallier showed a column CO 2 () anomaly of ±0.5 parts per million forced by a uniform net biosphere exchange (NBE) anomaly of 2.5 gigatonnes of carbon over the tropical continents within a year, so he claimed that the inferred NBE uncertainties should be larger than presented in Liu et al . We show that a much concentrated NBE anomaly led to much larger perturbations.

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Comment on "Contrasting carbon cycle responses of the tropical continents to the 2015-2016 El Nino"

Liu et al . (Research Articles, 13 October 2017) inferred carbon flux anomalies in tropical continents with enough confidence to constrain the driving carbon-exchange processes. I show that they underestimated their error budget and that more effort must be invested in the satellite concentration retrievals and in the atmospheric transport models before such precision can be achieved.

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An electron transfer path connects subunits of a mycobacterial respiratory supercomplex

We report a 3.5-angstrom-resolution cryo–electron microscopy structure of a respiratory supercomplex isolated from Mycobacterium smegmatis. It comprises a complex III dimer flanked on either side by individual complex IV subunits. Complex III and IV associate so that electrons can be transferred from quinol in complex III to the oxygen reduction center in complex IV by way of a bridging cytochrom

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Colonocyte metabolism shapes the gut microbiota

An imbalance in the colonic microbiota might underlie many human diseases, but the mechanisms that maintain homeostasis remain elusive. Recent insights suggest that colonocyte metabolism functions as a control switch, mediating a shift between homeostatic and dysbiotic communities. During homeostasis, colonocyte metabolism is directed toward oxidative phosphorylation, resulting in high epithelial

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Adoption of mobile payment shifts consumer spending patterns, habits

Paying for a cup of coffee with a smartphone instead of a credit card is gaining prominence among consumers—and is disrupting their spending patterns and consumption habits, according to new research co-written by a University of Illinois expert who studies operations management.

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UMD and Resilinc Corp. create index of climate change risk to company supply chains

Last year a series of severe weather events including the late-winter storm that hit the U.S. Northeast, followed by weather-related damage that closed the U.S.-Mexico Laredo border, and subsequent U.S. landfall hurricanes Harvey, Irma and Maria contributed to a doubling of global supply chain disruption and, for the first time, made the United States the region most-impacted by such disruption. T

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Wetland experts explain role of vital carbon sinks carbon cycle in new report

The Second State of the Carbon Cycle Report (SOCCR2), released simultaneously with the fourth U.S. National Climate Assessment (NCA4), puts needed numbers to the rates of carbon loss and accumulation in North American terrestrial, aquatic and atmospheric systems.

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New arthritis treatment uses nanoparticles to take drugs directly into cartilage

Osteoarthritis is a debilitating drug that affects millions of people worldwide, and the only treatments available merely reduce the pain. The new treatment delivers a growth factor into cartilage rather than into the surface of a joint, where it'd be less effective. The treatment represents a "significant step for nanomedicines," one professor said, and it could someday be used to slow age-relat

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The original marshmallow test was flawed, researchers now say

A team of psychologists have repeated the famous marshmallow experiment and found the original test to be flawed. It joins the ranks of many psychology experiments that cannot be repeated, which presents a considerable problem for its findings. The finding that children with similar demographics had similar success as teenagers no matter what they did as toddlers raises questions about how flexib

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Tony Beets' Tugboat Is Running out of Fuel up River | Gold Rush

On its maiden voyage to Thistle Creek, Tony's Kid Commando tugboat is struggling to get up river. Stream Full Episodes of Gold Rush: https://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/gold-rush/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/GoldRush/ https://www.facebook.com/Discovery Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/Gold_Rush https://twitter.com/

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Scientists Improve Mood By Stimulating A Brain Area Above The Eyes

People with symptoms suggesting depression felt better immediately when tiny pulses of electricity reached a brain area called the lateral orbitofrontal cortex. (Image credit: Getty Images)

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Scientists discover spider species that feeds its young milk

Spider milk containing four times the protein of cow’s milk is secreted by mothers, scientists in China find The ability of mothers to produce milk for their babies is commonly considered a unique feature of mammals, but now scientists have discovered a species of spider that also nurses its young. Spider mothers were observed feeding a milk-like substance to their spiderlings and continuing to l

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Stone-tool makers reached North Africa and Arabia surprisingly early

Ancient Homo species spread advances in toolmaking far beyond East Africa.

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Astronomers have measured all the starlight ever emitted

Astronomers used distant blazars to tally up all the stray photons roaming through space.

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Here's How Much Starlight Has Been Created Since the Beginning of the Universe

All the light that has ever been created is still lurking among the stars.

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2.4-Million-Year-Old Stone Tools Turn Up in an Unexpected Place

To the untrained eye, the rock would have looked like any other. But when Mohamed Sahnouni pulled it out of the ground in the summer of 2006, he immediately recognized it as a chopper: a palm-size tool deliberately flaked to create a sharp cutting edge. It looked exactly like something from the so-called Oldowan culture, a style of stone tools that existed between 1.9 and 2.6 million years ago, p

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There’s a Spider That Makes Milk

From the start, Zhanqi Chen realized that something was odd about the spiders. He had first spotted the species, known as Toxeus magnus , in a park in Singapore, and whenever he’d peer into their silken nests, he’d usually find a centimeter-long adult female surrounded by several smaller youngsters. That was weird. Most spiders are solitary, and even cannibalistic toward their own kind. There are

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The Strange Phenomenon of L.O.L. Surprise Dolls

Kids like weird things: Yellow sponge-boys, talking doe-eyed ponies, ruddy-cheeked rodents that say only “pika pika,” and, especially in the past few years, unboxing videos. Kids’ unboxing videos are YouTube series in which children, or in some cases just disembodied hands , take toys out of their packaging and play with them as uplifting music plays in the background. One particularly popular vi

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When good macrophages go bad

Researchers at Children's Hospital Los Angeles discover how some cancer cells communicate with macrophages to protect tumors.

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NASA's IMERG analyzed Tropical Storm Usagi's rainfall

When Tropical Cyclone 33W, also known as Usagi strengthened to hurricane intensity as it approached Vietnam from the South China Sea it dropped a lot of rain. Although the storm weakened to tropical storm intensity when coming ashore in Vietnam, it continued to generate a lot of rain, and NASA added up that heavy rainfall.

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Jumping Spiders Produce Milk to Feed Their Young

Without access to their mothers' milk, Toxeus magnus offspring die within the first 10 days of life.

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How HIV DNA is blocked from entering the cell nucleus

Multiple components of the nuclear pore complex and nuclear import machinery enable a protein called human myxovirus resistance 2 (MX2) to inhibit HIV-1 infection, according to a study published November 29 in the open-access journal PLOS Pathogens by Michael Malim of King's College London, and colleagues.

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Switching identities: Revolutionary insulator-like material also conducts electricity

University of Wisconsin-Madison researchers have made a material that can transition from an electricity-transmitting metal to a nonconducting insulating material without changing its atomic structure.

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Scientists measure all of the starlight ever produced by the observable universe

From their laboratories on a rocky planet dwarfed by the vastness of space, Clemson University scientists have managed to measure all of the starlight ever produced throughout the history of the observable universe.

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Soil compound fights chronic wasting disease

A major compound in soil organic matter degrades chronic wasting disease prions and decreases infectivity in mice, according to a study published November 29 in the open-access journal PLOS Pathogens by Judd Aiken of the University of Alberta, and colleagues.

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What comes first: Marijuana use or behavior problems?

Cannabis use among teens does not appear to lead to greater conduct problems, a new study shows. Instead, it’s the other way around: adolescents with conduct problems or whose friends use cannabis who are more likely to gravitate toward cannabis use. And that “cascading chain of events” appears to predict cannabis use disorder as the teens become young adults, according to the study, which appear

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The Khashoggi Tape and the Limits of ‘Raw’ Intelligence

There’s an especially gruesome clue in a notorious international murder case. The killing of the journalist Jamal Khashoggi, and the widespread suspicion that the Saudi crown prince himself directed it, have roiled U.S.-Saudi relations and politics in the United States, where the Senate is challenging the Trump administration to take stronger measures against the Saudis. And the hit was, reported

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Oldest-known ancestor of modern primates may have come from North America, not Asia

A new fossil analysis suggests the earliest-known ancestor of modern primates may have come from North America, not Asia, as previously thought.

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Six antibodies produced to combat Zika virus

Researchers have generated six Zika virus antibodies that could be used to test for and possibly treat a mosquito-borne disease that has infected more than 1.5 million people worldwide.

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Climate change risks 'extinction domino effect'

New research reveals the extinction of plant or animal species from extreme environmental change increases the risk of an 'extinction domino effect' that could annihilate all life on Earth. This would be the worst-case scenario of what scientists call 'co-extinctions', where an organism dies out because it depends on another doomed species.

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Ending the HIV epidemic: Where does Europe stand?

From diagnosis of HIV to successful viral suppression: Researchers summarize the progress towards HIV elimination in 52 countries in Europe and Central Asia. The main issues: diagnosing those who are unaware of their HIV infection and treating them.

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Climate change and air pollution damaging health and causing millions of premature deaths

Researchers are looking at the effects of climate change on human health, and the implications for society.

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Promising lead in genetic approach to treating glioblastoma

Scientists hope they have made progress toward a next-generation drug that may slow tumor growth and boost radiation's effectiveness in patients with the deadly brain cancer.

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New research could fine-tune the gene scissors CRISPR

When researchers and doctors use the tool CRISPR to correct genetic errors, it may have side effects on the human genome. Now, researchers have learned how the molecular machinery behind CRISPR works and thus expect to be able to fine-tune CRISPR and remove the undesired effects.

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Four billion people lack an address. Machine learning could change that.

Researchers at MIT and Facebook are proposing a new way to generate street addresses by extracting roads from satellite images.

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En teori for krøllede papirkugler

Harvard-forskere har et bud på, hvordan man definerer ‘krølletheden’ af papir, og den viden er mere anvendelig, end man skulle tro.

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High-energy star system is one of the ‘weirdest’ in Milky Way

Researchers have, for the first time, detected extremely high-energy gamma rays from a powerful star system—a microquasar known as SS 433. The discovery marks the most energetic radiation researchers have ever detected from a microquasar in our galaxy and will help scientists better understand some of the astrophysical processes happening in deep space, says Segev BenZvi, an assistant professor o

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Media portrayals of black men contribute to police violence, Rutgers study says

Negative portrayals in the news media affect how police treat black men in the United States, according to a Rutgers School of Public Health study.

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Climate change: Can 12 billion tonnes of carbon be sucked from the air?

Is it remotely feasible to remove 12 billion tonnes of carbon dioxide from the air?

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Scientists share the most dangerous things they work with

Science Acid, lasers, snakes—the laboratory isn't always a safe haven. The laboratory isn't always a safe haven. Here are some of the most dangerous substances scientists work with.

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Researchers produce six antibodies to combat Zika virus

Researchers have generated six Zika virus antibodies that could be used to test for and possibly treat a mosquito-borne disease that has infected more than 1.5 million people worldwide, according to a study published in the journal PLOS ONE.

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Oldest-known ancestor of modern primates may have come from North America, not Asia

A new fossil analysis suggests the earliest-known ancestor of modern primates may have come from North America, not Asia, as previously thought.

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Artificial magnetic field produces exotic behavior in graphene sheets

Theoretical physics discovery paves the way for future technological applications. Study led by young Brazilian researcher featured on cover of Physical Review Letters.

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Mathematical Simplicity May Drive Evolution’s Speed

Creationists love to insist that evolution had to assemble upward of 300 amino acids in the right order to create just one medium-size human protein. With 20 possible amino acids to occupy each of those positions, there would seemingly have been more than 20 300 possibilities to sift through, a quantity that renders the number of atoms in the observable universe inconsequential. Even if we discou

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Tre arme, øjne i nakken og hukommelseskort i hjernen: Hils på fremtidens menneskerobotter

Menneskerobotter findes allerede. Men i fremtiden giver videnskaben os mange flere og vildere muligheder.

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What happens when materials take tiny hits

A team of researchers at MIT has just accomplished the first detailed high-speed imaging and analysis of the microparticle impact process, and used that data to predict when the particles will bounce away, stick, or knock material off the surface and weaken it. The new findings are described in a paper appearing in the journal Nature Communications.

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Climate change and air pollution damaging health and causing millions of premature deaths

IIASA researchers have contributed to a major new report in The Lancet medical journal looking at the effects of climate change on human health, and the implications for society.

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Lizards adapt to invasive fire ants, reversing geographical patterns of lizard traits

Some lizards in the eastern U.S. have adapted to invasive fire ants — which can bite, sting, and kill lizards — reversing geographical trends in behavioral and physical traits used to avoid predators.

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Making it easier to transform freeform 2D sketching into 3D Models

A new computational approach, built on data-driven techniques, is making it possible to turn simple 2D sketch into a realistic 3D shape, with little or no user input necessary.

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Hubble uncovers thousands of globular star clusters scattered among galaxies

Astronomers using Hubble found a whopping 22,426 globular star clusters in a nearby neighborhood of galaxies.

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Opinion: Don't Ban the Use of CRISPR in Embryos

Despite a premature and ethically sketchy claim of genome editing in twin girls, an outright prohibition could blunt promising, responsible progress.

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Spinning Grains of Cosmic Dust Could Explain Weird Signals at the North Pole

A mysterious cosmic signal that was detected above the North Pole could be coming from fast-spinning grains of dust.

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Renewable Quotas Don't Cut CO2 Emissions on Their Own

Incentives for renewables must be accompanied by phasing out fossil fuels to reduce greenhouse gases — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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The Hard Lessons of Amanda Bynes’s Comeback

In 2008, writing for The Atlantic about the slow-motion car crash and paparazzi dissection of Britney Spears’s apparent mental breakdown, David Samuels assessed the significance of the moment when the pop star shaved her head in full view of photographers in a Los Angeles hair salon in 2007. After that point, Samuels wrote: Britney Spears departed the planet of normal bubblegum celebrity story li

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Thriving reef fisheries continue to provide food despite coral bleaching

The unexpected results of a 20-year study into reef fisheries published in the journal Nature Ecology and Evolution this week showed fisheries being maintained despite extreme coral bleaching. Remarkably, rapid proliferation of fishes with low dependence on corals led to catches remaining stable or even increasing. But the results also showed fishing success was 'patchy' and more dependent on fewe

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Revealing hidden information in sound waves

By essentially turning down the pitch of sound waves, University of Michigan engineering researchers have devised a way to unlock greater amounts of data from acoustic fields than ever before.

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It's not a shock: Better bandage promotes powerful healing

A new, low-cost wound dressing developed by University of Wisconsin-Madison engineers could dramatically speed up healing in a surprising way. The method leverages energy generated from a patient's own body motions to apply gentle electrical pulses at the site of an injury.

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Curry spice boosts exercise performance in mice with heart failure

New research suggests that curcumin, a main ingredient in curry, may improve exercise intolerance related to heart failure. The study is published ahead of print in the Journal of Applied Physiology.

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Ending the HIV epidemic: Where does Europe stand?

From diagnosis of HIV to successful viral suppression: in a rapid communication published in Eurosurveillance today, ECDC and co-authors from Public Health England and The National AIDS Trust summarise the progress towards HIV elimination in 52 countries in Europe and Central Asia. The main issues: diagnosing those who are unaware of their HIV infection and treating them.

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UA team uncovers promising lead in genetic approach to treating glioblastoma

University of Arizona scientists hope they have made progress toward a next-generation drug that may slow tumor growth and boost radiation's effectiveness in patients with the deadly brain cancer.

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How a rat and bat helped heal a 90-year cultural rift

Mammalogists went to the Solomon Islands in search of a giant rat and monkey-faced bat — and ended up playing a role in fostering peace between the Kwaio people of Malaita and the Western world. A reconciliation ceremony between the Kwaio and Australian scientists began the healing process for acts of violence committed in 1927, when the Solomon Islands were a British protectorate.

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Do kids need more hands-on experience with money?

To prepare your kids for financial success, consider giving them experience with money. Past research has shown that children learn more about finances from their parents than any other source. Studies on “financial socialization” have focused on the example parents set for their children, and what moms and dads directly teach their kids about money. However, a new paper says not to neglect the i

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Mueller: Cohen Lied About Trump Organization's Moscow Project

Trump's former lawyer has testified that the Trump Organization pursued a real estate deal with Moscow deep into the 2016 presidential campaign.

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The Hoberman Sphere Maker Toys With Origami Structures

Chuck Hoberman is looking to make "transformative designs" that borrow from the art of paper folding.

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Balneo-phototherapy: Studies now show greater benefit also in atopic eczema

For psoriasis, it has been known since 2007 that UV light therapy should be combined with brine baths. New data have now shown this also for atopic eczema.

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Hospital-wide scores underestimate readmission risk in neurocritical care patients

Scoring models used to predict 30-day readmission risk in the general hospital population may not accurately predict readmissions for patients in the neurocritical care unit, reports a study in the Journal of Neuroscience Nursing, official journal of the American Association of Neuroscience Nurses. The journal is published in the Lippincott portfolio by Wolters Kluwer.

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New research could fine-tune the gene scissors CRISPR

When researchers and doctors use the tool CRISPR to correct genetic errors, it may have side effects on the human genome. Now, researchers from the University of Copenhagen have learned how the molecular machinery behind CRISPR works and thus expect to be able to fine-tune CRISPR and remove the undesired effects.

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Discovering a new compound

Researchers have discovered a new compound that helps us better understand how microbes keep the sulfur cycle turning, making it possible for us to enjoy ocean views and survive near the water.

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We've Forgotten the "Human" in "Humane"

Inmates in solitary confinement have far fewer protections than the nonhuman species we use in lab experiments — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Adoption of mobile payment shifts consumer spending patterns, habits

Paying for goods with a smartphone not only increases the overall transaction amount and frequency of purchases by consumers, it also effectively replaces the actual, physical credit cards in their wallets.

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Fall in twin stillbirth rates: What about singleton births?

A leading expert in fetal medicine has warned that there is 'little room for complacency' over a fall in twin stillbirth rates as the reason for this phenomenon are complex.

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HIV in liver cells found to be inactive, narrowing potential treatment targets

In a proof-of-principle study, researchers revealed that certain immune system cells found in the human liver, called liver macrophages, contain only inert HIV and aren't likely to reproduce infection on their own in HIV-infected people on long-term antiretroviral therapy (ART). ART is a regimen containing combinations of HIV-targeting drugs that prevents the growth of the virus but does not eradi

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