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Nyheder2018oktober02

Molecule flight speed for detecting drugs

The presence of cannabinoids in textile and pharmacological goods and the need to distinguish them from those found in drugs and psychotropics has led to the development of analytical techniques to differentiate them. A University of Cordoba research group headed by Analytical Chemistry Professor Lourdes Arce, along with institutional collaborators, participated in the development of a new methodo

11h

Studded winter tires cost more lives than they save, contribute to global conflict

Researchers from Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden, have now shown that studded winter tires cost more lives than they save. The new study takes a holistic view of the tires' impact on wider public health. At the same time, they show that using snow tires contributes to the bloody conflict in the Democratic Republic of Congo, and fatal accidents in their production phase.

11h

How a Teacher in Rural Oklahoma Started a Science-Fair Dynasty

Editor’s Note: In the next five years, most of America’s most experienced teachers will retire. The Baby Boomers are leaving behind a nation of novice educators. In 1988, a teacher most commonly had 15 years of experience. Less than three decades later, that number had fallen to just five years leading a classroom. The Atlantic ’s “On Teaching” project is crisscrossing the country to talk to vete

11h

Why Did No One Save Gabriel?

A t the Los Angeles County Department of Children and Family Services, administrators had a well-worn routine they followed anytime a child died, or came close to dying, at the hands of a parent or guardian—something that typically happened at least a couple of times a month. As soon as a call came in from a hospital, caseworkers would be dispatched to interview any surviving siblings and remove

11h

Laser Physicists, Including Third Woman Ever, Win Physics Nobel

The Nobel Prize in Physics was awarded this morning to three researchers for advances in laser physics. Arthur Ashkin , who spent his career at Bell Laboratories, took half of the prize for inventing “optical tweezers,” while Gérard Mourou and Donna Strickland split the other half for their work on high-intensity ultra-short laser pulses. Strickland became the first woman to be awarded a Nobel Pr

11h

Nobel Prize in Physics Awarded to Scientists Who Put Light to WorkDonna Strickland Nobel

Arthur Ashkin, Gérard Mourou and Donna Strickland developed tools made of light beams. Dr. Strickland is just the third woman to win the physics prize.

11h

Why only individual thinking can reunite America

Inequality is the root cause of America's political circus. Americans are sacrificing their future for their political team To win against populism, foster individual thinking

11h

2018 Nobel Prize awarded to cancer immunotherapy pioneers

The two researchers, from the U.S. and Japan, made key discoveries about the immune system's response to cancer. Their work showed how to block cancer cells from crippling white blood cells. Still in its early stages, immunotherapy is a promising field in cancer research. James Allison and Tasuku Honjo have won the 2018 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine for their innovative work in developing

11h

Farmers Can Now Buy Designer Microbes to Replace Fertilizer

Pivot Bio is the first company to offer US corn farmers a new 'probiotic for plants' as a replacement for expensive, greenhouse-gassy fertilizer.

11h

These Tech Companies Will Need More Women on Their Boards

A new California law requires more representation for women in the boardroom for companies like Apple and Facebook, but the law may face legal challenges.

11h

How Ants Turn Into Zombies

Allow us to explain the gruesome process by which ordinary ants become the pawns of an insidious and spectacularly clever fungus.

11h

Giraffe babies inherit spot patterns from their mothers

Some features of a giraffe's spot pattern are passed on from mother to baby, according to a new study led by researchers from Penn State. The study also reveals that survival of young giraffes is related to spot pattern, which may help provide camouflage from predators. The new study, published October 2 in the journal PeerJ, confirms a 49-year-old hypothesis about the inheritance of giraffe spots

11h

Don't Brag about Your Large Brain, Pres. Trump

Neandertals and other extinct hominin species had big brains, too. It’s not a sign of intelligence — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

11h

A Very Unsual Tsunami: The 2018 Sulawesi Earthquake

"There was no time to save ourselves," survivor Dwi Haris said. The story behind the quake and tsunami no one could outrun. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

11h

Decline in native fish species—invasive species on the increase

The majority of Bavaria's watercourses are in poor ecological condition. A team from the Technical University of Munich (TUM) has now conducted the first systematic analysis of long-term data on fish stocks in the Upper Danube, Elbe and Main rivers. The team concluded that native fish species are on the verge of extinction, while the populations of some invasive species are increasing.

11h

Computer installerer opdatering imens patient ligger i narkose

Måtte sende patient, som lå i narkose, hjem efter it-brøler: »Det må bare ikke ske.«

11h

Nobelpris i fysik: Optiske pincetter og ultrakorte optiske pulser

Donna Strickland bliver den kun tredje kvinde, der modtager en Nobelpris i fysik. Men flere kommer i fremtiden, lover generalsekretæren for det svenske videnskabsakademi.

11h

Scientists propose that vibrios have significant roles in marine organic carbon cycle

The genus Vibrio is one of the best model marine heterotrophic bacterial groups, and many Vibrio species grow very quickly with short generation times. In addition, many Vibrio spp. are well-known bacterial pathogens, causing disease in humans or marine animals. For example, Vibrio cholerae is the causative agent of cholera. Over the past 40 years, many nonpathogenic species of Vibrio have also be

11h

Hver femte har forstoppelse: Se her om din afføring er normal

Tjek dig selv på tønden – har du en sund og normal afføring?

11h

Yes, Violent Video Games Trigger Aggression, but Debate Lingers

A study tries to find whether slaughtering zombies with a virtual assault weapon translates into misbehavior when a teenager returns to reality — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

11h

Eco-friendly nanoparticles for artificial photosynthesis

Researchers at the University of Zurich have developed a type of nanoparticle by adding zinc sulfide to the surface of indium-based quantum dots. These quantum dots produce clean hydrogen fuel from water and sunlight—a sustainable source of energy. They introduce new eco-friendly and powerful materials to solar photocatalysis.

12h

Amazon ups wages for 350K, says it will advocate better pay

Amazon, which has faced political and economic pressure to raise pay for thousands of employees, is boosting its minimum wage for all U.S. workers to $15 per hour starting next month.

12h

Lazer pioneers win Nobel Physics PrizeDonna Strickland Nobel

Three scientists on Tuesday won the Nobel Physics Prize, including the first woman in 55 years, for inventing optical lasers that have paved the way for advanced precision instruments used in corrective eye surgery, the jury said.

12h

Donna Strickland is the third woman ever to win a physics Nobel PrizeDonna Strickland Nobel

The winner of the Nobel Prize in physics includes a woman for the first time in 55 years, going to Arthur Ashkin, Gérard Mourou and Donna Strickland

12h

A web-based program is as effective as group counseling for patients with NAFLD

Lifestyle changes are the cornerstone of preventing and treating non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). Scientists report success in using web-based intervention to manage lifestyle changes in patients with NAFLD in a new six-year single-center study comparing group-based and web-based interventions. Their results are published in the Journal of Hepatology.

12h

Study finds albiglutide reduces cardiovascular events in patients with type 2 diabetes and existing cardiovascular disease

New research presented at this year's annual meeting of the European Association for the Study of Diabetes (EASD) and published in The Lancet shows that treatment with albiglutide (a type of drug called a glucagon-like peptide 1 receptor agonist) results in fewer cardiovascular events in people with type 2 diabetes and existing cardiovascular disease than treatment with placebo.

12h

Canada's first 'state of the nation' report on children's physical literacy

The results from a large national research project led by the Healthy Active Living and Obesity Research Group (HALO) at the CHEO Research Institute shows that about two-thirds of Canadian children haven't achieved an acceptable level of physical literacy. Physical literacy is more than just fitness or motor skill; it includes the motivation, confidence, physical competence, knowledge and understa

12h

A web-based program is as effective as group counseling for patients with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease

Lifestyle changes are the cornerstone of preventing and treating non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). Scientists report success in using web-based intervention to manage lifestyle changes in patients with NAFLD in a new six-year single-center study comparing group-based and web-based interventions. Their results are published in the Journal of Hepatology.

12h

Forskertrio vinder Nobelpris for laserfysik

De tre forskere har opfundet genstande, der muliggør ny og banebrydende forskning.

12h

Lindsey Graham Used to Care About Lying Under Oath

All that’s standing between Brett Kavanaugh and the Supreme Court is an FBI investigation. A few key Senators are waiting to hear if the agency finds some form of corroboration for Christine Blasey Ford’s allegation that Kavanaugh sexually assaulted her in high school. But lawmakers should be looking into another issue: whether Kavanaugh lied under oath when he testified before the Senate last we

12h

A Star Is Born Is a Magnificent New Take on a Hollywood Myth

A Star Is Born begins with Jackson Maine (Bradley Cooper), an old-fashioned, gravel-voiced, rock-and-roll star, maniacally jamming out onstage in front of a screaming crowd of thousands. He plays with a trancelike intensity, but when the concert’s over, he becomes a zombie; his ears are still ringing when he commands his driver to take him to the nearest place he can get a drink. He parks himself

12h

The 'Queen of Green's' Coming Bout With Trump

LOS ANGELES —In 1972, as a young lawyer fresh out of Yale, she filed the first test case under the federal Clean Air Act, suing the Environmental Protection Agency to compel California to impose air-quality standards under the law. More than two decades later, as a senior official at the EPA, she drafted the first national standards regulating fine-particle air pollution. And now, in her second t

12h

The Coders Programming Themselves Out of a Job

I n 2016, an anonymous confession appeared on Reddit: “From around six years ago up until now, I have done nothing at work.” As far as office confessions go, that might seem pretty tepid. But this coder, posting as FiletOFish1066, said he worked for a well-known tech company, and he really meant nothing . He wrote that within eight months of arriving on the quality assurance job, he had fully aut

12h

Scientists From U.S., Canada, France Split Nobel Prize In Physics For Laser Work

The Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences says American Arthur Ashkin has won half the prize, while Gérard Mourou of France and Donna Strickland of Canada, the third female winner ever, share the rest. (Image credit: University of Waterloo/The Canadian Press via AP)

12h

Ivy League Football Saw Large Reduction in Concussions After New Kickoff Rules

The Ivy League adjusted its kickoff and touchback lines by just five yards. The number of concussions per 1,000 kickoff plays dropped from 11 to two, a new study found.

12h

Arthur Ashkin, Gérard Mourou and Donna Strickland win physics Nobel

American, Frenchman and Canadian share 9m Swedish kronor (£770,000) prize for work on advances in laser physics • Nobel physics prize awarded – as it happened Three scientists have been awarded the 2018 Nobel prize in physics for creating tools from light. Arthur Ashkin in the US, Gérard Mourou from France, and Donna Strickland in Canada will share the 9m Swedish kronor (£770,000) prize announced

12h

Climate change, pests, fallen trees a deadly recipe for US forests

Severe drought, insect infestation and poor forest management have combined in recent years to kill millions of trees in the American West—130 million in California alone—and provide fuel for huge wildfires.

12h

First woman Physics Nobel winner in 55 yearsDonna Strickland Nobel

The 2018 Nobel Prize in Physics is awarded to a woman for only the third time since the award began.

12h

Nobel physics prize winners include first female laureate for 55 years – live

American Arthur Ashkin, Frenchman Gérard Mourou and Canadian Donna Strickland share annual award for advances in laser physics 11.22am BST My colleagues Hannah Devlin and Ian Sample have put together a first take on this year’s award – check it out here . 11.20am BST Optical tweezers sound a bit sci-fi, but they allow scientists to use radiation pressure to hold and move very tiny objects. This m

13h

Rundspørge: Politikere arbejder på en løsning for de store kulkraftværker

En rundringning til energipolitikerne viser, at de er indstillet på en hurtig løsning for store kulkraftværker, der ønsker at konvertere.

13h

Computer model may help scientists split up, reassemble proteins on command

A computer-guided algorithm may help scientists find just the right spot to split a protein and then reassemble it to functionality, according to a team of biochemists and biophysicists who report their findings today in Nature Communications. They add this could be another step — perhaps even a dance step — toward using chemical and light signals to create new medical treatments and biosensors.

13h

First experiments at new X-ray laser reveal unknown structure of antibiotics killer

An international collaboration led by DESY and consisting of over 120 researchers has announced the results of the first scientific experiments at Europe's new X-ray laser European XFEL. The pioneering work not only demonstrates that the new research facility can speed up experiments by more than an order of magnitude, it also reveals a previously unknown structure of an enzyme responsible for ant

13h

How the African elephant cracked its skin to cool off

An intricate network of crevices adorns the skin surface of the African bush elephant. By retaining water, these micrometer-wide channels greatly help elephants in regulating their body temperature. Today, researchers at the UNIGE report that African elephant skin channels are true fractures of the animal brittle and desquamation-deficient skin outermost layer. The scientists show that the elephan

13h

Text messages quickly track health care use during Ebola outbreak

A new study from the NYU College of Global Public Health and NYU Tandon School of Engineering, published in Nature Digital Medicine, used text message surveys to determine in real time how people used maternal health services during a recent Ebola outbreak and measured a drop in hospital-based births during the outbreak.

13h

Taste is key in promoting insect-based food

Eating insects, instead of meat, could have significant environmental and health benefits. However, many people are disgusted by the idea of insects as food, so researchers are working to increase their appeal. A recent study finds that promoting insect-based food as pleasurable, luxurious and exotic — rather than healthy or environmentally friendly — could be an effective marketing strategy.

13h

3 Scientists Win Nobel Prize In Physics

Arthur Ashkin, a U.S. physicist won for work with optical tweezers and Gérard Mourou of France and Donna Strickland of Canada won for generating high-intensity ultra-short optical pulses.

13h

Why More Men Don't Get Into The Field Of Nursing

Only about 10 percent of nurses in the U.S. are men. Research indicates that ideas of masculinity prevent men from pursuing a career in nursing.

13h

Computer model may help scientists split up, reassemble proteins on command

Splitting up and getting back together is always hard to do, but for proteins, it's almost impossible.

13h

Liquefaction: When terra firma turns to mush

Survivors of the enormous 7.5-magnitude earthquake and tsunami in Sulawesi, Indonesia that killed 1,234 people have given harrowing testimony of how the ground beneath their feet seemed to churn and suddenly rise up—swallowing everything in its path.

13h

Musk to workers: Perform for profit, prove 'naysayers wrong'

Tesla founder Elon Musk is telling his employees to work hard on the last day of the quarter to prove "the naysayers wrong."

13h

Trådløs stråling: Borgerforslag kræver helbredssikre grænseværdier

Sundhedsstyrelsen anerkender, at folk er syge. Men der er stadig ingen forskning, der ifølge de danske sundhedsmyndigheder kan koble symptomerne med stråling fra mobiltelefoner, mobilmaster eller trådløse netværk.

14h

On patrol with India's anti-plastic 'blue squad'

Wearing matching blue Nehru jackets, the dozen inspectors fan out across Mumbai's hectic Crawford Market, each scouring for violators of an ambitious plastic ban.

15h

These Cholesterol-Reducers May Save Lives. So Why Aren’t Heart Patients Getting Them?

Powerful PCSK9 inhibitors were supposed to revolutionize care for cardiac patients. But insurers and other payers balked at sky-high prices.

15h

More About Flu Vaccine

More evidence that flu shots work, that they are safe during pregnancy, and that they don't cause autism.

15h

Google teams with Ubisoft to test video game streamingGoogle Project Stream

Google on Monday announced that it will test a video game streaming platform with the release of "Assassin's Creed Odyssey" by Ubisoft this week.

16h

Carmakers brace for shocks as electrified future looms

Auto industry executives gathering this week for the Paris Motor Show will be rubbing shoulders with unusual company: dozens of tech experts eager to tackle what many consider the ultimate connected device.

16h

An Indian village's fight to take the 'poo to the loo'

Indian farmer Kokila Damor always looked forward to visiting the city hospital, but only so that she could use its toilet.

16h

Indonesia tsunami worsened by shape of Palu bay: scientists

The tsunami that ravaged the Indonesian city of Palu was outsized compared to the earthquake that spawned it, but other factors—including a long, narrow bay—conspired to create monster waves, scientists say.

16h

The most dangerous celebrity online is revealed

Ruby Rose has played some dangerous characters, like an inmate in "Orange Is the New Black" and a scientist battling a prehistoric shark in "The Meg." But the actress herself is now officially dangerous.

16h

Germany to present plan for polluting diesel cars

The German government will Tuesday present its compromise on the way forward for millions of people with older, more polluting diesel cars, with manufacturers potentially facing a steep bill for the crisis precipitated by an emissions cheating scandal.

16h

DOJ's lawsuit may delay California's new net neutrality law

A U.S. Department of Justice lawsuit could delay the rollout of California's toughest-in-the country net neutrality law, which is set to take effect Jan. 1.

16h

Nobel Prize in physics to be announced TuesdayDonna Strickland Nobel

The Nobel Prize for physics honors researchers for discoveries in phenomena as enormous as The Big Bang and as tiny as single particles of light.

16h

New species of hummingbird identified in Ecuador

A team of ornithologists in Ecuador has identified a new species of hummingbird: a lovely blue-green creature that lives in a cold, barren highland area and is danger of extinction.

16h

Community satisfaction demands interaction

Being a good neighbor can have a powerful effect on residents' attitudes and behaviors even for those living in highly disadvantaged communities, according to the results of a new study by a University at Buffalo sociologist.

16h

Researchers publish discoveries on antibiotic resistance

University of Montana researchers recently published their new insights into how pathogenic bacteria resist antibiotic treatment in Proceedings of the Natural Academy of Sciences.

16h

NASA sees Walaka becoming a powerful Hurricane

The Global Precipitation Measurement mission or GPM core satellite passed over the Central Pacific Hurricane Center and analyzed Walaka's rainfall and cloud structure as it was strengthening into a hurricane.

16h

Typhoon Kong-rey Moving through northwestern Pacific

At 11 am EDT (1500 UTC) on Oct 1 , Kong-rey was located near 16.8 north and 134.4 east, about 488 miles north-northwest of Yap. It was moving to the northwest and had maximum sustained winds near 125 knots gusting to 150 knots. Currently the only threatened landmasses are the Ryuku Islands.

16h

Aggressive breast cancer cells hijack natural stress protector to thrive

A member of a protein family known for protecting our cells also protects cancer cells in aggressive, metastatic breast cancer, scientists report.

18h

Studded winter tires cost more lives than they save

Researchers from Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden, have now shown that studded winter tyres cost more lives than they save. The new study takes a holistic view of the tyres' impact on wider public health. At the same time, they show that their use contributes to the bloody conflict in the Democratic Republic of Congo, and fatal accidents in their production phase.

18h

Stor rapport: Alvorlig stigning i brugen af resistensskabende antibiotika

I 2017 faldt danskernes antibiotikaforbrug generelt. Men forbruget steg af de antibiotikatyper, som er vores sidste våben mod multiresistente bakterier. Stik imod planen.

18h

Conflict management improves ICU team knowledge, mindfulness, and awareness

The Intensive Care Unit is a stressful place, and conflicts invariably arise. To better understand the relationships between physicians, nurses, respiratory therapists, and advanced practitioners, researchers created a conflict management education intervention. The study paid close attention to diagnosing the conflict type and cause, recognizing the internal dialogue, introducing conflict managem

18h

A look at 377 metros: Can local food product meet local household demand?

Many US cities have established goals to increase local food self-reliance, suggesting that metropolitan areas do not produce enough food to support local household demand. However, a new study found this isn't the case for many metropolitan areas.

18h

Scientists uncover why you can't decide what to order for lunch

Researchers explore the choice overload effect, a phenomenon that hampers the brain's ability to make a decision when there are too many options.

18h

Experiencing extreme weather is not enough to convince climate change skeptics

Experiencing extreme weather is not enough to convince climate change skeptics than humans are damaging the environment, a new study shows.

18h

New weather model could increase tornado-warning times

Researchers have obtained data from recent next-generation satellites in a numerical weather-prediction model used to provide guidance for tornadic thunderstorm forecasting.

18h

Stress reduces fertility in women

In North America, 20 to 25 percent of women and 18 to 21 percent of men of reproductive age report daily psychological stress. Although previous research has suggested that stress can decrease the odds of conception, few studies have examined this association among couples from the general population. Now, a new study finds higher levels of stress are associated with lower odds of conception for w

18h

Facebook 'viable method' for implementing critical care ultrasound curriculum

Critical care ultrasound (CCUS) is an important skill for all critical care physicians to understand. However, currently there is no standard approach to how to teach CCUS. Researchers aimed to investigate the feasibility of implementing a CCUS curriculum via a social platform in order to evaluate the impact it has on fellow's self-perceived competency. Results found that utilizing a social media

18h

Providers often fail to consider ehrlichia when treating tick-borne infections

When patients present to providers in North Carolina for a possible tick bite, clinicians are not testing them for Ehrlichia, a tick-borne illness that occurs more frequently than Lyme disease and as frequently as Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever.

18h

Databeskyttelseskommissær: Offentlige Facebook-sider er på dybt vand

Hele den danske offentlige sektor venter på afklaring af, hvorvidt kommuner og andre må have sider på Facebook. It-gigantens hidtige tiltag løser næsten intet, mener tysk privacy-kommissær.

19h

Ringstedbanen får den dårligst mulige tilslutning for at spare penge her og nu

Der spares 200 millioner kroner lige nu. Men det koster en samfundsøkonomisk gevinst på over en milliard kroner.

19h

Nearly the entire sky in the early universe is glowing with Lyman-alpha emission

Deep observations made with the MUSE spectrograph on ESO's Very Large Telescope have uncovered vast cosmic reservoirs of atomic hydrogen surrounding distant galaxies. The exquisite sensitivity of MUSE allowed for direct observations of dim clouds of hydrogen glowing with Lyman-alpha emission in the early Universe — revealing that almost the whole night sky is invisibly aglow.

22h

Asking questions, testing improves student learning of new material

Researchers know memory retrieval is beneficial for learning, but their new meta-analysis found there are limits. The research shows the frequency and difficulty of questions can reverse the effect and be detrimental to learning. It also is not enough to simply ask a question; students must respond to see a positive effect on learning.

22h

'Spacesuits' protect microbes destined to live in space

Scientists have created a unique system that pairs light-absorbing semiconductors with anaerobic bacteria to capture light and fix carbon dioxide: an artificial leaf. The bacteria turn carbon dioxide into chemicals useful in space colonies. One problem is that the process generates reactive oxygen species that kill the bacteria. To shield them from damage, the researchers developed a 'spacesuit' o

22h

130-year-old brain coral reveals encouraging news for open ocean

Researchers studied nitrogen levels in the skeleton of a 130-year-old brain coral living 620 miles from the North American mainland and found that the nitrogen from human sources was less than had been estimated.

22h

What does 1.5C mean in a warming world?

1.5C has become the new "safe" upper-limit for global warming – but whatever happened to the two-degree target?

22h

Plastics Watch: Could seaweed replace plastic packaging?

One Indonesian inventor has found a unique solution to the problem of plastic food packaging.

22h

Cancer Center’s Board Chairman Faults Top Doctor Over ‘Crossed Lines’

The executive told Memorial Sloan Kettering’s staff that the hospital had not done enough to limit the industry conflicts of its chief medical officer, who has resigned.

23h

When Earthquakes Liquefy Soil, Devastation Can Follow

It’s called liquefaction, and it causes soil to flow like a liquid. When that happens, the soil can no longer support the structures on top of it.

23h

Finding middle ground on the range

Cattle ranching and conservation may seem an unusual pair in the American West, but new research reveals a clear link between the economic health of ranches and the ability to maintain habitat for an iconic wild bird that for years has been at the center of public land policy debate: the greater sage grouse.

23h

Corked Tiger Wine? Enter to Win This Book on Wildlife Smuggling

Have you ever joined a poacher as he checks traps for pangolins and otters in Vietnam? Join us on Facebook Live at 12:30 p.m. EDT on Wednesday (Oct. 3) to see Live Science interview an investigative reporter who has scrutinized wildlife trafficking.

23h

Half of women 'will develop dementia or Parkinson's or have a stroke'

Third of men and one in two women aged 45 are likely to go on to be diagnosed with one of the conditions, study says One in two women will develop dementia or Parkinson’s disease, or have a stroke, in their lifetime, new research suggests. About a third of men aged 45 and half of women of the same age are likely to go on to be diagnosed with one of the conditions, according to a study of more tha

23h

Dogs aren't especially smart, but they have a particular set of skills

Animals Yes, you are a good dog! A new study points out that dogs aren't especially smart—but that doesn't mean they're not special.

23h

Nurseries may trump informal or childminder care for kids' psychological development

Attendance at a nursery/crèche staffed by professionals may be linked to better psychological development than being looked after by family/friends or a childminder in early childhood, suggests research published online in the Journal of Epidemiology & Community Health.

1d

Dutch study estimates 1 in 2 women and 1 in 3 men set to develop dementia/parkinsonism/stroke

One in two women and one in three men will likely be diagnosed with dementia, Parkinson's disease, or stroke in their lifetime, estimate Dutch researchers in an observational study published online in the Journal of Neurology Neurosurgery & Psychiatry.

1d

Insufficient sleep associated with risky behavior in teens

Researchers examined a national data sample of risk-taking behaviors and sleep duration self-reported by high school students over eight years and found an association between sleep duration and personal safety risk-taking actions.

1d

The Atlantic Daily: The World Will Not Keep Them Safe

What We’re Following It’s My Party: Political tribalism seems to have arrived at the steps of the Supreme Court, which begins a new term on Monday without a ninth justice. If Brett Kavanaugh becomes Justice Kavanaugh, following an openly partisan defense last week , he’ll carry “a virus of illegitimacy” to the court’s decisions, Ronald Brownstein argues. Elsewhere in the GOP: Will Republican whit

1d

New study reveals association between diuretic drug use in type 2 diabetes and risk of lower limb amputation

New research presented at this year's annual meeting of the European Association for the Study of Diabetes (EASD) in Berlin, Germany, reveals that the use of diuretic drugs in individuals with type 2 diabetes (T2D) is associated with a significantly increased risk of serious problems in their lower limbs which can lead to amputation.

1d

Nine Seasons in, 'Bob's Burgers' Remains as Well Done as Ever

After 150 episodes, Loren Bouchard's family sitcom is still primetime animation's perfectly off-kilter moral center.

1d

The World Has More Confidence in Putin Than in Trump

It’s well known by now that President Donald Trump isn’t particularly popular in Europe: He has withdrawn from the Paris climate accord and the nuclear pact with Iran, imposed punitive tariffs on steel and aluminum imports from the European Union, and questioned NATO ’s usefulness. For a bloc that functions (or doesn’t, if you ask its critics) through unanimity and consensus building, Trump is a

1d

The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: One NAFTA Another

Written by Elaine Godfrey ( @elainejgodfrey ) Today in 5 Lines The White House has reportedly authorized the FBI to interview anyone necessary in its investigation into sexual-assault allegations against Brett Kavanaugh, after the administration previously limited the scope of the agency’s probe. In a wide-ranging press conference , President Trump said he wants the investigation to be “comprehen

1d

NASA unveils new goals for Moon, Mars, including space privatization ​

NASA's new plan will span the next 10 to 20 years. First, the Moon, and things around the Moon. Then, Mars. One of the primary goals? To privatize and get industry to eventually fund all of it. None NASA this week unveiled its new plan that many are calling "bold" and other lofty adjectives, with a 10-to-20-year span, each phase of which is somewhat dependent on what is learned during the first m

1d

Don't treat e-cigarettes like cigarettes, say expertsFDA Juul Documents

Assuming e-cigarettes are equal to cigarettes could lead to misguided research and policy initiatives, argue experts in a new commentary, which distills articles and published studies that compare e-cigarettes to cigarettes and supports the importance of investigating e-cigarettes as a unique nicotine delivery system.

1d

Vitamin E: Sources, Benefits & Risks

Vitamin E is vital to keeping healthy and preventing various diseases. A healthy diet should provide all that you need.

1d

A Man Died After Being Infected With a Brain-Eating Amoeba. Here Are the Facts.

A New Jersey man contracted the infection after visiting a surf and water park in Texas. Experts say the amoeba is found in warm bodies of fresh water.

1d

Typhoon Kong-rey Moving through northwestern Pacific

At 11 am EDT (1500 UTC) on Oct 1 , Kong-rey was located near 16.8 north and 134.4 east, about 488 miles north-northwest of Yap.

1d

Community satisfaction demands interaction

Being a good neighbor can have a powerful effect on residents' attitudes and behaviors even for those living in highly disadvantaged communities, according to the results of a new study by a University at Buffalo sociologist.

1d

Dyno Testing the Arclight Rally Car | Shifting Gears with Aaron Kaufman

The Arclight crew take Aaron Kaufman's rally car into the shop for some precision testing and tuning. Stream Full Episodes of Shifting Gears: https://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/shifting-gears/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Discovery Follow on Twitter: https://twitter.com/Discovery We're on Instagram! https://instagram.com/Di

1d

Simulations show new phenomenon with nanopore DNA sequencing

Any truck operator knows that hydraulics do the heavy lifting. Water does the work because it's nearly incompressible at normal scales. But things behave strangely in nanotechnology, the control of materials at the scale of atoms and molecules. Using supercomputers, scientists found a surprising amount of water compression at the nanoscale. These findings could help advance medical diagnostics thr

1d

Why Cops Can Use Face ID to Unlock Your iPhone

For the first publicly documented time, law enforcement has used Face ID to forcibly unlock someone's iPhone. It won't be the last.

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Satellite sees extra-Tropical Cyclone Trami moving past Japan

NOAA's NOAA-20 satellite captured a visible image of Typhoon Trami on Oct. 1 after it had become extra-tropical and moved away from Japan.

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UM researchers publish discoveries on antibiotic resistance

University of Montana researchers recently published their new insights into how pathogenic bacteria resist antibiotic treatment in Proceedings of the Natural Academy of Sciences.

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NASA sees Walaka becoming a powerful Hurricane

The Global Precipitation Measurement mission or GPM core satellite passed over the Central Pacific Hurricane Center and analyzed Walaka's rainfall and cloud structure as it was strengthening into a hurricane.

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A Man Died After Being Infected With Brain-Eating Amoeba. Here’s What You Should Know.

A New Jersey man contracted the infection after visiting a surf and water park in Texas. Experts say the amoeba is found in warm bodies of fresh water.

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Trump: 'I Have a Very Open Mind' on Kavanaugh Investigation

Does President Donald Trump believe Brett Kavanaugh? For most of the 20 minutes the president spent discussing his nominee for the Supreme Court with reporters on Monday afternoon, it seemed clear that he did—that Trump accepted Kavanaugh’s repeated and angry denials that he sexually assaulted Christine Blasey Ford when they were teenagers in 1982. The FBI is now investigating Ford’s claims along

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Is this protein the culprit behind Alzheimer’s disease?

Researchers have discovered a new mechanism that may contribute to Alzheimer’s disease and traumatic brain injury. They now hope to launch a clinical trial to test a potential treatment in humans. What causes Alzheimer’s disease is unknown, but a popular theory suggests a protein known as amyloid-beta slowly builds up a plaque in the brains of people with the disease. But in a recent study in the

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2018 Nobel Prize awarded to cancer immunotherapy pioneers

The two researchers, from the U.S. and Japan, made key discoveries about the immune system's response to cancer. Their work showed how to block cancer cells from crippling white blood cells. Still in its early stages, immunotherapy is a promising field in cancer research. James Allison and Tasuku Honjo have won the 2018 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine for their innovative work in developing

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Does workplace meditation actually work?

Roughly 22% of companies offer mindfulness training programs to their employees… but it doesn't appear to be paying off. Meditation itself can truly improve overall health and wellbeing. Yet that that doesn't translate to increased performance. Financial desire and the stresses of the regular office may be more of a motivator than achieving mindfulness. None It makes sense that the idea of harn

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Don't treat e-cigarettes like cigarettes

Assuming e-cigarettes are equal to cigarettes could lead to misguided research and policy initiatives, reports a new Northwestern Medicine commentary, published Friday, Sept. 28, in the journal Nicotine & Tobacco Research. The commentary distills articles and published studies that compare e-cigarettes to cigarettes and supports the importance of investigating e-cigarettes as a unique nicotine del

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Satellite sees extra-Tropical Cyclone Trami moving past Japan

NOAA's NOAA-20 satellite captured a visible image of Typhoon Trami on Oct. 1 after it had become extra-tropical and moved away from Japan.

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Maryland Health Enterprise Zones linked to reduced hospitalizations and costs

Maryland's Health Enterprise Zones, state-funded initiatives designed to improve health care outcomes and prevent unnecessary hospitalizations in underserved communities, were associated with large reductions in inpatient stays, according to a study by researchers at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health.

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Do price spikes on some generic drugs indicate problems in the market?

Sudden price spikes in certain generic drugs occur more often, causing concern for USC scientists who studied the problem.

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Medicaid expansion improved immigrants' access to health care, but disparities persist

Though the percentage of uninsured noncitizens decreased after the ACA went into effect, noncitizens were still nearly three times more likely to be uninsured than native citizens in 2015.

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On NASA’s 60th birthday, our readers say it’s still looking good

Space A universe of emotion. On October 1, 1958 NACA (National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics) formally turned into NASA (the National Aeronautics and Space Administration).

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A wrench in Earth's engine

Researchers at CU Boulder report that they may have solved a geophysical mystery, pinning down the likely cause of a phenomenon that resembles a wrench in the engine of the planet.

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A look at 377 metros—can local food product meet local household demand?

Many U.S. cities have established goals to increase local food self-reliance, suggesting that metropolitan areas do not produce enough food to support local household demand. However, a new study from researchers with the Sustainable Healthy Cities Network at the University of Minnesota's Humphrey School of Public Affairs found this isn't the case for many metropolitan areas.

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Experiencing extreme weather is not enough to convince climate chance sceptics

Experiencing extreme weather is not enough to convince climate change sceptics than humans are damaging the environment, a new study shows.

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US Supreme Court opens term with case of endangered frog

The US Supreme Court opened its new term Monday by handling a case involving a small, critically endangered frog.

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Experiencing extreme weather is not enough to convince climate change skeptics

Experiencing extreme weather is not enough to convince climate change skeptics that humans are damaging the environment, a new study shows.

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A wrench in Earth's engine

Researchers from CU Boulder report that they may have pinned down the cause of 'stagnant slabs,' which resemble a wrench in the engine of the planet.

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Scientists uncover why you can't decide what to order for lunch

Caltech researchers explore the choice overload effect, a phenomenon that hampers the brain's ability to make a decision when there are too many options.

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Research brief: A look at 377 metros — can local food product meet local household demand?

Many US cities have established goals to increase local food self-reliance, suggesting that metropolitan areas do not produce enough food to support local household demand. However, a new study from researchers with the Sustainable Healthy Cities Network at the University of Minnesota's Humphrey School of Public Affairs found this isn't the case for many metropolitan areas.

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Red glow helps identify nanoparticles for delivering RNA therapies

A new screening process could dramatically accelerate the identification of nanoparticles suitable for delivering therapeutic RNA into living cells. The technique would allow researchers to screen hundreds of nanoparticles at a time, identifying the organs in which they accumulate—and verifying that they can successfully deliver an RNA cargo into living cells.

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All Those Other James Allisons

All Those Other James Allisons A common first- and last-name combination for one of 2018's Nobel laureate's plucks a brood of namesakes from the almost anonymous to the pseudo-eponymous. jimallison_top.jpg Image credits: Abigail Malate, Staff Illustrator Rights information: Copyright American Institute of Physics Culture Monday, October 1, 2018 – 15:15 Jason Socrates Bardi, Editor (Inside Science

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U.S. political division is only going to get worse

Political party polarization in the United States is even worse than most people think, according to a new study. And since it doesn’t much matter which party is in charge, neither one can be said to shoulder the blame, says Zachary Neal, associate professor of psychology and global urban studies at Michigan State University. “Today, we’ve hit the ceiling on polarization…” “What I’ve found is tha

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The Messy Soul of Lil Wayne’s Tha Carter V

The fact that Lil Wayne survived a self-inflicted gunshot wound at age 12 is the kind of biographical tidbit that gets subsumed by stardom: It’s often discussed as just another reason why The Best Rapper Alive ™ is Not a Human Being ™. But at age 36, Wayne now wants his listeners to really envision what his childhood suicide attempt—which he only recently said was not an accident—felt like. On th

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New weather model could increase tornado-warning times

Penn State researchers are the first to use data obtained from recent next-generation satellites in a numerical weather-prediction model used to provide guidance for tornadic thunderstorm forecasting.

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Stanford students deploy machine learning to aid environmental monitoring

As Hurricane Florence ground its way through North Carolina, it released what might politely be called an excrement storm. Massive hog farm manure pools washed a stew of dangerous bacteria and heavy metals into nearby waterways.

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Maternal Obesity and Diabetes Linked to Autism in Children

Inflammation may be a strong contender for the connection between mom's weight and children's neurodevelopment, according to lab studies on animals.

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'Spacesuits' protect microbes destined to live in space

Just as spacesuits help astronauts survive in inhospitable environments, newly developed "spacesuits" for bacteria allow them to survive in environments that would otherwise kill them.

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Trump Makes a Return to Improv

Go ahead and call it a comeback . Donald Trump has been here for years, sure, but at two press conferences over the past week, the nation has gotten a glimpse of an older edition of Trump—the freewheeling, improvisatory man who ran for president in 2016, rather than the comparatively cloistered, sclerotic one who has lived in the Oval Office. First came the president’s bizarre press conference la

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Bold male birds fall faster and harder for their partners

Research has revealed that bold male birds focus on forming strong relationships with their future breeding partners while shy male birds play the field.

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Super-resolution microscopy builds multicolor 3-D from 2-D

A new technique overcomes the noise and color limitations of super-resolution microscopy by creating three-dimensional reconstructions from single-color two-dimensional images of protein complexes.

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Genetic variants reveal new targets for chronic kidney disease treatment

By investigating how genetic variations drive the expression of genes within the filtering cells of the kidney, researchers have found new pathways to explain CKD development and could inform its treatment.

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3-D bioprinting of living structures with built-in chemical sensors

A new method enables non-invasive monitoring of oxygen metabolism in cells that are 3-D-bioprinted into complex living structures. This has great implications for studies of cell growth and interactions e.g. under tissue-like conditions, as well as for the design of 3-D printed constructs facilitating higher productivity of microalgae in biofilms or better oxygen supply for stem cells used in bone

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Children's violent video game play associated with increased physical aggressive behavior

Violent video game play by adolescents is associated with increases in physical aggression over time, according to a Dartmouth meta-analysis published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS).

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Researchers: Redesign dating apps to overcome racial bias

Mobile dating apps that allow users to filter their searches by race — or rely on algorithms that pair up people of the same race — reinforce racial divisions and biases, according to a new paper by Cornell University researchers. As more and more relationships begin online, dating and hookup apps should discourage discrimination by offering users categories other than race and ethnicity to desc

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Checked off 'the talk' with your teen? Not so fast: Once isn't enough

New BYU research shows that one vague conversation with your teen about sex is not enough. Laura Padilla-Walker found that ongoing communication between parents and their adolescent children benefits the parent-child relationship and leads to safer sexual activity at age 21.

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New weather model could increase tornado-warning times

Penn State researchers are the first to use data obtained from recent next-generation satellites in a numerical weather-prediction model used to provide guidance for tornadic thunderstorm forecasting.

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Providers often fail to consider ehrlichia when treating tick-borne infections

When patients present to providers in North Carolina for a possible tick bite, clinicians are not testing them for Ehrlichia, a tick-borne illness that occurs more frequently than Lyme disease and as frequently as Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever.

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'Spacesuits' protect microbes destined to live in space

UC Berkeley researchers have created a unique system that pairs light-absorbing semiconductors with anaerobic bacteria to capture light and fix carbon dioxide: an artificial leaf. The bacteria turn CO2 into chemicals useful in space colonies, e.g. One problem is that the process generates reactive oxygen species that kill the bacteria. To shield them from damage, they developed a 'spacesuit' of me

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Red glow helps identify nanoparticles for delivering RNA therapies

A new screening process could dramatically accelerate the identification of nanoparticles suitable for delivering therapeutic RNA into living cells. The technique would allow researchers to screen hundreds of nanoparticles at a time, identifying the organs in which they accumulate — and verifying that they can successfully deliver an RNA cargo into living cells.

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A golden ticket to faster muscle recovery

Anyone who has ever torn or injured a muscle knows that swelling, redness, and pain soon follow the injury: classic signs of inflammation. Now, a new technique from the Wyss Institute and Harvard SEAS that involves attaching many copies of IL-4 to nanoparticles of gold and injecting them directly into an injured muscle improved muscle structure and strength two weeks following injury.

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Set in amber, fossil ants help reconstruct evolution of fungus farming

A new study makes it clear that the constant threat of crop parasites repeatedly pushed evolution in strikingly similar directions in ants, creating structures that helped the ants reinforce their partnership with bacteria.

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Drought losses in China will soar with continuing global warming: Study

Economic losses caused by drought in China may double, if the global temperature rises by 1.5°C to 2.0°C above pre-industrial levels, with increasing drought intensity and areal coverage across China, a new economic assessment study by Chinese scientists found.

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Model predicts fewer human-made earthquakes in these states

A new model forecasts a drop in man-made earthquakes in Oklahoma and Kansas through 2020. Earthquakes in Oklahoma and Kansas had been on the rise due to injection of wastewater—a byproduct of oil and gas operations—before regulations started limiting injections. The model is based on publicly available data on wastewater injection into the Arbuckle formation, a nearly 7,000-foot-deep sedimentary

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Unleashing Immunity against Cancer: Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine

James P. Allison and and Tasuku Honjo shared the Nobel Prize for their discovery of inhibition of negative immune regulation, the basis of new drugs against cancer. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Supreme Court Turns Away Billionaire Who Wanted To Turn People Away From Calif. Beach

The lengthy case pitted surfers against a venture capitalist. On Monday, advocates for public access are hailing the court's decision to decline the case as a victory. (Image credit: Marcin Wichary / flickr)

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What a Beetle’s Genital Worms Reveal About the Concept of Individuality

When Cristina Ledón-Rettig first noticed worms in the little balls of poop, she thought something had gone wrong. Ledón-Rettig studies dung beetles, and she breeds one species—the taurus scarab —in her lab at Indiana University. That involves collecting fresh cow dung, wringing out some of the moisture through cheesecloth, partitioning it into small balls, and putting a single beetle egg on each

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Set in amber, fossil ants help reconstruct evolution of fungus farming

Some 50 million years before humans figured it out, agriculture arrived in the world in a seemingly unlikely place: an ant hill.

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Animal study suggests deep space travel may significantly damage GI function in astronauts

Simulations with animal models meant to mirror galactic cosmic radiation exposure to astronauts are raising red flags for investigators at Georgetown University Medical Center (GUMC) about the health of astronauts during long voyages, such as to Mars.

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130-year-old brain coral reveals encouraging news for open ocean

When nitrogen-based fertilizers flow into water bodies, the result can be deadly for marine life near shore, but what is the effect of nitrogen pollution far out in the open ocean?

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Drought losses in China will soar with continuing global warming, study says

Economic losses caused by drought in China may double if the global temperature rises by 1.5°C to 2.0°C above pre-industrial levels, with increasing drought intensity and areal coverage across China, a new economic assessment study by Chinese scientists found.

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Mathematical model explains why some bacteria cause illness even in small doses

Just a few Shigella bacteria are enough to make anyone develop gastroenteritis, while illness from cholera requires ingestion of thousands to millions of Vibrio cholerae bacteria. Why does the disease-causing dosage differ so much between bacteria?

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Study: Improvement in glycemic parameters by adding dapagliflozin to metformin in T2D

Researchers used continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) to assess the effects of adding dapagliflozin to a regimen of either metformin or insulin in patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D) and found significant reductions in mean glucose and other glycemic factors, with greater improvements seen in patients taking metformin compared to insulin.

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Myth-busting study of teenage brains wins Royal Society prize

Inventing Ourselves by Sarah-Jayne Blakemore wins £25,000 prize with investigation praised by judges as ‘truly a book that everyone should read’ A radical reframing of our understanding of the teenage mind, that explains typically ridiculed behaviours such as risk-taking, emotional instability and heightened self-consciousness as outward signs of great transformation, has won the prestigious Roya

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The Power of Untold Slave Narratives

Precolonial black history is often reduced to a troubling binary: Africans as a uniformly subservient arm of the triangular trade and Africa through the lens of monarchies like ancient Egypt and Haile Selassie’s Ethiopia. Consider Nas’s 2003 song “ I Can ” (his highest-charting single to date), which was widely lauded for its uplifting message. To open his last verse, he pleads with black childre

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A Photo Trip to the Yucatán Peninsula

The Yucatán is a 70,000-square-mile peninsula in southern Mexico, rich with history and life. Its beaches on the Gulf of Mexico and Caribbean have become huge tourist draws, while inland, Maya archaeological sites are still being discovered, some dating back to the fifth century A.D . The underlying landscape is almost entirely made of limestone, and is punctuated by caverns and occasional sinkho

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Dormant genes brought to life in new generations

The genetic differences in phyloplankton living in close geographic proximity can be great, something which long has surprised researchers. Now new research shows that the ability of phyloplankton to generate resting stages can be an important part of the explanation.

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Immune cells help older muscles heal like new

The immune system's macrophage cells are critical to growing muscle tissues in a lab, say the biomedical engineers who earlier reported the world's first self-healing lab-grown muscles. The discovery is expected to play important roles in developing platforms for studying degenerative muscle diseases and enhancing the survival of engineered tissue grafts in future cell therapy applications.

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Thought-reading AI helps a person with quadriplegia play Guitar Hero

Science The brain interface learns—and remembers—how to read thoughts. A recently updated interface can teach itself to read Ian Burkhart's thoughts, and move his paralyzed hand accordingly.

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CRISPR tames the wild groundcherry

The delicious groundcherry is a nutritional powerhouse, packed with Vitamin C, Vitamin B, antioxidants, medicinal properties, and much more! However, several characteristics make them unsuitable for large-scale agriculture. BTI associate professor Joyce Van Eck and colleagues present research in the recent edition of Nature Plants which could change that and make groundcherries a common household

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Facebook 'viable method' for implementing critical care ultrasound curriculum

Critical care ultrasound (CCUS) is an important skill for all critical care physicians to understand. However, currently there is no standard approach to how to teach CCUS. Researchers aimed to investigate the feasibility of implementing a CCUS curriculum via a social platform in order to evaluate the impact it has on fellow's self-perceived competency. Results found that utilizing a social media

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Every day spent in the hospital, readmission likelihood increases by 2.9 percent in rural cities

Hospital readmissions, cost hospitals about $26 billion annually. Systems like the Hospital Readmission Reduction Program (HRRP) within the Affordable Care Act penalize hospitals with higher readmission rates for targeted diagnoses. Healthcare data reveals that healthcare facilities located in rural Southern Appalachia show readmission rates that are above the national average, which results in pe

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Discovery of how to prod a patient’s immune system to fight cancer wins a Nobel

Two scientists share the 2018 medicine Nobel for identifying proteins that act as brakes on tumor-fighting T cells.

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Molecule flight speed is the new key for detecting drugs

Scientists are developing an analytical methodology able to quickly differentiate cannabinoids in plant material and in waste remaining after being manipulated.

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Like a butterfly, immune protein 'flutters' in search of viruses

Researchers have identified an important step in the process that allows our bodies to fight viruses. Their work also explains how mutations that derail this process cause autoimmune disorders. This research provides the framework to develop new treatments for viral infections.

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Chemists develop highly porous material, more precious than diamonds

Researchers broke a world record: DUT-60 is a new crystalline framework with the world's highest specific surface and the highest specific pore volume measured so far among all known crystalline framework materials.

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Microresonators offer a simpler approach to sensing with light pulses

Researchers have found a way to implement an optical sensing system by using spatial multiplexing, a technique originally developed in optical-fiber communication. The method, which produces three independent streams of ultrashort optical pulses using a single continuous-wave laser and a single optical microresonator, is far simpler than existing technologies.

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This wild plant could be the next strawberry

By combining genomics and gene editing, researchers have figured out how to rapidly bring a plant known as the groundcherry toward domestication.

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Story tips From the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory, October 2018

ORNL story tips: Recycled hard drives give magnets new life in motors; new organ-on-a-chip design to test radiation effects on cells that mimic breathing; supercomputers analyze molecules that could increase yield of certain rare earth elements important for energy applications

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BU: Stress reduces fertility in women

In North America, 20 to 25 percent of women and 18 to 21 percent of men of reproductive age report daily psychological stress. Although previous research has suggested that stress can decrease the odds of conception, few studies have examined this association among couples from the general population.Now, a new study led by Boston University School of Public Health (BUSPH) researchers finds higher

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Disruption in combination inhaled corticosteroid therapy may lead to an increased rate of costly exacerbations and hospitalizations for Medicare patients

Disruption of the refill of patients' regular combination inhaled corticosteroid therapy brand may have impacted symptoms and disease control and potentially lead to an increased rate of costly exacerbations and hospitalizations.

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Stanford students deploy machine learning to aid environmental monitoring

Cash-strapped environmental regulators have a powerful and cheap new weapon. Machine learning methods could more than double the number of violations detected, according to Stanford researchers.

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Delayed pregnancy: Heart health risks for moms and sons, study shows

Delaying pregnancy may increase the risk of cardiovascular disease in both women and their children, with boys at higher risk of disease, according to a new study.

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'Turbocharging' photosynthesis in corn hikes yield

Scientists have boosted a carbon-craving enzyme called RuBisCO to turbocharge photosynthesis in corn. The discovery promises to be a key step in improving agricultural efficiency and yield, according to new research.

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Longtime Facebook exec Adam Mosseri new head of Instagram

Facebook is naming Adam Mosseri, a 10-year veteran at the company, as the head of Instagram.

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Monthly Stats for Eyewire: September 2018

September, September! Things have picked up since summer: this last month we finished 37 cells, completed a 25 hour 9 minute marathon cell, and oh yeah, we capped off Sector 11! Give yourselves a big round of applause and snuggle up with a mug of hot cider to check out the rest of the stats. New Scouts: Gruenewitwe antem l3erdnik New Millionaire Milestones: 40M – susi, Atani 35M – galarun 5M – he

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Four dead after typhoon batters Japan

Four people have been killed in a powerful typhoon that battered Japan over the weekend, local media reported Monday, as the storm's aftermath brought travel chaos to Tokyo.

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Naked Servant Depicted in Newly Discovered 2,200-Year-Old Tomb Mural

A naked man holding a wine jug and a vase is just one of many figures depicted in a 2,200-year-old mural of a banquet that's decorating a newly discovered tomb in Italy.

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Last week in tech: Facebook's breach, HP’s leather laptop, and a new Oculus

Technology It was also an exciting week for cameras. Check out the latest episode of our podcast!

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NASA finds Tropical Storm Sergio on the verge of hurricane status

The National Hurricane Center noted that Tropical Storm Sergio was on the verge of becoming a hurricane in the Eastern Pacific Ocean and NASA's Aqua satellite confirmed very powerful storms within.

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Americans favor women politicians over men, says study

As midterm elections approach with an unprecedented number of women candidates running for Congress, researchers at Stevens Institute of Technology reveal that both women and men prefer female politicians, with men rating women politicians significantly higher than male politicians.

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NASA finds bulk of Tropical Storm Leslie's storms northwest of center

Infrared imagery from NASA's Aqua satellite showed the location of the strongest storms in reborn Tropical Storm Leslie is it moved through the Central North Atlantic Ocean.

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Conflict management improves ICU team knowledge, mindfulness, and awareness

The Intensive Care Unit is a stressful place, and conflicts invariably arise. To better understand the relationships between physicians, nurses, respiratory therapists, and advanced practitioners, researchers created a conflict management education intervention. The study paid close attention to diagnosing the conflict type and cause, recognizing the internal dialogue, introducing conflict managem

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Adherence to annual lung cancer screening needs improvement

A study from the Thoracic Oncology Research Group (TORG), Division of Pulmonary Critical Care, Medical University of South Carolina aimed to examine the adherence to annual low-dose computed tomography (LDCT) screening after baselines LDCT within the Veteran Health Administration Lung Cancer Screening Demonstration Project (LCDSDP). The study will be presented at the CHEST Annual Meeting 2018 in S

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Chromosome-tending enzymes ‘buddy up’ to speed cancer

New research identifies cellular processes that appear to supercharge both growth and shrinkage of telomeres—the chemical “caps” on chromosomes associated with aging. The work, which focused on two enzymes in yeast, could lead to new insights on stopping runaway cellular growth in cancer tumors and the treatment of premature aging disorders such as progeria (aka “Benjamin Button disease”). “This

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Grazing access to public lands in the western US can be good for ranching and wildlife

Cattle ranching and conservation may seem an unusual pair in the American West, but new research reveals a clear link between the economic health of ranches and the ability to maintain habitat for an iconic wild bird that for years has been at the center of public land policy debate: the greater sage grouse.

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Like a butterfly, immune protein 'flutters' in search of viruses

Researchers at Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School have identified an important step in the process that allows our bodies to fight viruses. Their work also explains how mutations that derail this process cause autoimmune disorders. This research, published Thursday in Molecular Cell, provides the framework to develop new treatments for viral infections.

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California law sets up fresh legal clash over 'net neutrality'

The US Justice Department's lawsuit to block a California law aimed at ensuring all online data to be treated equally sets up a legal clash over so-called "net neutrality" and the authority to regulate the internet.

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A 'recipe book' that creates color centers in silicon carbide crystals

Silicon carbide (SiC), a material known for its toughness with applications from abrasives to car brakes, to high-temperature power electronics, has enjoyed renewed interest for its potential in quantum technology. Its ability to house optically excitable defects, called color centers, has made it a strong candidate material to become the building block of quantum computing.

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Blue light special—researcher finds new chemical clusters emit highly efficient light

A Florida State University research team has discovered that a unique organic-inorganic compound containing zero-dimensional molecular clusters emits a highly efficient blue light.

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Scientists develop new method to more efficiently generate brain stem cells

In two newly published papers, a scientific team at Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine reports on the discovery and implementation of a new, more efficient method for generating an important brain stem cell in the laboratory. The findings pave the way for greater understanding of the underlying mechanisms of neurological disorders of myelin and ultimately, possible new treatment an

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NASA's infrared vision reveals Rosa's extent into the US southwest

Hurricane Rosa continued weakening as NASA's Aqua satellite passed overhead and collected temperature information. Satellite data showed that Rosa's center still off-shore from northwestern Mexico, but its clouds and rains had already stretched into Arizona and infrared data showed that rainfall potential.

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UN report on global warming target puts governments on the spot

Diplomats gathering in South Korea Monday find themselves in the awkward position of vetting and validating a major UN scientific report that underscores the failure of their governments to take stronger action on climate.

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Tesco Bank fined by UK regulator over hacking

Britain's Tesco Bank has been fined £16.4 million ($21.4 million, 18.4 million euros) for failing to protect customers during a 2016 cyber attack, regulators said Monday.

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Health-related quality of life overlooked in cancer drug studies

A McMaster University-led review and analysis of randomized clinical trials is questioning whether interventions which prolong progression-free survival in cancer patients, improve their health-related quality of life.

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Nitrite's got to be cruel to be kind

The research group of Felipe Cava at Umea University studied this bacteria now under low-oxygen and different pH-conditions. Together with their colleagues in Boston, USA, the scientists discovered an elegant pH-dependent metabolic mechanism which permits the pathogen to switch to a resting mode with preserved viability. A smart strategy that provides competitive advantage against commensal bacter

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Atom Smasher Detects Hints of New Unstable Particle

The world's largest atom smasher has identified two totally new particles.

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New research aims to help catch child killers

Violent crimes against children are especially abhorrent. New research will help law enforcement learn more from juvenile and infant remains in order to help bring perpetrators to justice.

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Designing a more productive corn able to cope with future climates

An international research team has found they can increase corn productivity by targeting the enzyme in charge of capturing CO2 from the atmosphere.

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New, rare mechanism for ALL to relapse after CAR T cell therapy

A single leukemia cell, unknowingly engineered with the leukemia-targeting chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) lentivirus and infused back into a patient, was able to reproduce and cause a deadly recurrence of B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL).

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How can we reduce concussions in football? Change kickoffs, experts say

A new study points to one way to make American football safer: move the kickoff line.

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Pioneering biologists create a new crop through genome editing

For the first time, researchers have created, within a single generation, a new crop from a wild plant — the progenitor of our modern tomato — by using a modern process of genome editing. Starting with a 'wild tomato' they have, at the same time, introduced a variety of crop features without losing the valuable genetic properties of the wild plant.

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To timer foran skærmen dagligt kan skade dit barns indlæring

Børn fra 8-11 år kan få dårligere kognitive evner, hvis de sidder for meget foran skærmen, viser amerikansk undersøgelse.

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CERN suspends scientist over 'offensive' address on women and science

Europe's physics lab CERN on Monday suspended a scientist over a lecture that suggested physics was "built by men" and accused women of demanding specialist jobs without suitable qualifications.

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Dutch ban electric carts following crash that killed 4 kids

The Dutch government is banning a type of electric cart used by many childcare centers to transport young children, saying that an initial investigation into a deadly collision last month has uncovered "potential security risks" with the vehicles.

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Global Health: Over 80,000 Americans Died of Flu Last Winter, Highest Toll in Years

Among the dead were 180 babies, children and teenagers, more than in any year since the C.D.C. began tracking pediatric deaths.

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Nonfiction: The Bizarre Tale of the ‘Dinosaur Artist’ Who Trafficked in Stolen Fossils

Paige Williams tells a panoramic story that has, at its center, a man who tried to sell a stolen Tyrannosaurus skeleton from Mongolia.

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Democrat/republican divide is worst it's ever been

Party polarization is even worse than most people think, according to a new Michigan State University study.

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A free electronic management repository for zebrafish

Effective and efficient electronic systems for managing zebrafish colony operations are available but expensive. Researchers now offer an open-source electronic husbandry repository based on free Google applications that is cloud-based and can be managed using an everyday smartphone, making it accessible to all lab members. This new electronic system is described in Zebrafish.

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The Fraught Language of Adoption

“When you think of someone as your gift from God, maybe you can never see them as anyone else,” writes Nicole Chung in the opening pages of All You Can Ever Know , her new memoir about growing up as a Korean American adopted by white parents in Oregon. Throughout Chung’s childhood, her deeply religious parents told her that God had meant for the three of them to be a family, and so when Chung was

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High water bills can unintentionally harm disadvantaged tenants

Landlords in disadvantaged communities can be so unsettled by increasing water bills and nuisance fees that they take it out on their tenants, threatening the housing security of those who need it most, a new Johns Hopkins University study concludes.

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Asking questions, testing improves student learning of new material

Jason Chan makes a point to periodically interrupt his lecture and ask students a question about the material they've covered. The associate professor of psychology at Iowa State University does this to regain students' attention, but more importantly, to enhance their ability to learn new information.

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How Facebook friends hurt our feelings and our thinking

Social media sites can make us feel left out—and can actually inhibit intelligent thought, research shows. A new study takes a critical look not just at Facebook and other similar platforms, but at the peculiarities of the systems on which they operate. The short-term effects of social exclusion posts create negative emotions in people who read them, and may affect thought processes in ways that

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Learning to see friendly faces in different places

Meaningful social interactions train visual cortex neurons to recognize a familiar face in different visual locations, suggests new research published in eNeuro. The study demonstrates how the brain learns to perceive other people as individuals.

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Eighth-century skeleton found at Torcello

On the island of Torcello, at the Ca' Foscari University of Venice excavation site, some protagonists of the island's thousand-year history have begun to emerge. A tomb datable to around 700 A.D. has recently been unearthed by the site's team of scholars.

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Decline in native fish species: Invasive species on the increase

The majority of Bavaria's watercourses are in poor ecological condition. A team has now conducted the first systematic analysis of long-term data on fish stocks in the Upper Danube, Elbe and Main rivers. The team concluded that native fish species are on the verge of extinction, while the populations of some invasive species are increasing.

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High carbon dioxide levels cause plants to thicken their leaves, could worsen climate change effects

When levels of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere rise, most plants do something unusual: They thicken their leaves. Now scientists have shown that this reaction by plants will actually worsen climate change by making the global 'carbon sink' contributed by plants less productive.

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When Jefferson Airplane landed on water | Brief letters

Jefferson airplane | Crosswords | Male sluts Adam Sweeting references the three classic US rock festivals of the 1960s at which Jefferson Airplane performed ( Marty Balin obituary , 1 October). JA also played at the Bath Festival of 1970, progenitor of the Glastonbury series, at which they were famously rained off halfway through their planned set. John Edmondson Holywell, Flintshire • Sexist sett

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Letters: ‘Life Philosophy Is More Than a Credential’

The Humanities Are in Crisis In August, Benjamin Schmidt wrote about the decline in college humanities majors. “Students aren’t fleeing degrees with poor job prospect,” he wrote. “They’re fleeing humanities and related fields specifically because they think they have poor job prospects.” Regarding the crisis of declining humanities degrees, I, an old STEM- degree holder, offer an alternative hypo

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New research aims to help catch child killers

Violent crimes against children are especially abhorrent. New research from North Carolina State University will help law enforcement learn more from juvenile and infant remains in order to help bring perpetrators to justice.

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High CO2 levels cause plants to thicken their leaves, could worsen climate change effects

Plant scientists have observed that when levels of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere rise, most plants do something unusual: They thicken their leaves.

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Songbird data yields new theory for learning sensorimotor skills

Songbirds learn to sing in a way similar to how humans learn to speak—by listening to their fathers and trying to duplicate the sounds. The bird's brain sends commands to the vocal muscles to sing what it hears, and then the brain keeps trying to adjust the command until the sound echoes the one made by the parent.

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Climate models might overestimate plants’ ability to suck up CO2

Current climate change models might overestimate how much carbon dioxide plants can suck from the atmosphere, according to a new study. Thanks to molecular research on photosynthesis, atmospheric scientists have now factored in lesser understood photosynthetic limitation into their models, which suggest that atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations might increase more rapidly than previously exp

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'Turbocharging' photosynthesis in corn hikes yield

Scientists from the Boyce Thompson Institute (BTI) and Cornell University have boosted a carbon-craving enzyme called RuBisCO to turbocharge photosynthesis in corn. The discovery promises to be a key step in improving agricultural efficiency and yield, according to new research in Nature Plants, Oct. 1.

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NASA's infrared vision reveals Rosa's extent into the US southwest

Hurricane Rosa continued weakening as NASA's Aqua satellite passed overhead and collected temperature information. Satellite data showed that Rosa's center still off-shore from northwestern Mexico, but its clouds and rains had already stretched into Arizona and infrared data showed that rainfall potential.

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Special issue of Health Physics highlights women in radiation protection

A special November issue of Health Physics journal presents 13 original research papers, reviews, and commentaries related to women's contributions to and experiences in radiation protection and safety. Health Physics, the official journal of the Health Physics Society (HPS) is published in the Lippincott portfolio by Wolters Kluwer.

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Americans favor women politicians over men, says Stevens study

As midterm elections approach with an unprecedented number of women candidates running for Congress, researchers at Stevens Institute of Technology reveal that both women and men prefer female politicians, with men rating women politicians significantly higher than men in politics.

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Blue light special: FSU researcher finds new chemical clusters emit highly efficient light

A Florida State University research team has discovered that a unique organic-inorganic compound containing zero-dimensional molecular clusters emits a highly efficient blue light.

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Like a butterfly, immune protein 'flutters' in search of viruses, says Rutgers scientists

Researchers at Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School have identified an important step in the process that allows our bodies to fight viruses. Their work also explains how mutations that derail this process cause autoimmune disorders. This research, published Thursday in Molecular Cell, provides the framework to develop new treatments for viral infections.

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NASA finds bulk of Tropical Storm Leslie's storms northwest of center

Infrared imagery from NASA's Aqua satellite showed the location of the strongest storms in reborn Tropical Storm Leslie is it moved through the Central North Atlantic Ocean.

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Molecule flight speed is the new key for detecting drugs

The University of Cordoba is participating in the development of an analytical methodology able to quickly differentiate cannabinoids in plant material and in waste remaining after being manipulated.

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Journey to precision cancer treatment takes off with new passports tool

Cancer research and the future of precision cancer treatment will be accelerated by a new tool developed by scientists at the Wellcome Sanger Institute. The novel tool, called Cell Model Passports, acts as a central hub for the rapidly expanding number of cancer models, which are critically needed for cancer research.

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NASA finds Tropical Storm Sergio on the verge of hurricane status

The National Hurricane Center noted that Tropical Storm Sergio was on the verge of becoming a hurricane in the Eastern Pacific Ocean and NASA's Aqua satellite confirmed very powerful storms within.

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New study finds nanoparticles show promise in therapy for triple-negative breast cancer

Approximately 10-20 percent of diagnosed breast cancers are found to be triple-negative, meaning the breast cancer cells test negative for estrogen and progesterone receptors as well as HER2 receptors, genes that can play a role in the development of breast cancer. Triple-negative breast cancer can be more aggressive and difficult to treat as the cancer cells do not respond to hormonal therapies o

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2 Hurricanes Lay Bare the Vulnerability of America's Poor

For disadvantaged communities in low-lying areas, post-storm living is precarious — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Attosecond pulse leads to highest molecular level probe resolution

Attosecond pulses enable physicists to probe dynamic processes in matter with unprecedented time resolution. This means such technology can provide better insights into the dynamics of electrons in molecules. Devising a source of ultra-fast X-ray pulsating in the attosecond range is no mean feat.

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Researchers discover highly active organic photocatalyst

Scientists from the University of Liverpool, University College London and East China University of Science and Technology have synthesized a new organic material that can convert water into hydrogen fuel using sunlight.

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MUSE spectrograph reveals that nearly the entire sky in the early Universe is glowing with Lyman-alpha emission

Deep observations made with the MUSE spectrograph on ESO's Very Large Telescope have uncovered vast cosmic reservoirs of atomic hydrogen surrounding distant galaxies. The exquisite sensitivity of MUSE allowed for direct observations of dim clouds of hydrogen glowing with Lyman-alpha emission in the early Universe—revealing that almost the whole night sky is invisibly aglow.

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Diagnostic advance: gas-sensing capsule set to hit market by 2022

An electronic capsule that measures gases in the gut to revolutionise the diagnosis of gut disorders could be available within four years, following an agreement between Australia's RMIT University and Atmo Biosciences.

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Drinking more water reduces bladder infections in women

Drinking an additional 1.5 liters of water daily can reduce recurring bladder infections in premenopausal women by nearly half, a yearlong study of otherwise healthy women with a history of repeated infections has found.

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Irreversible damage to color vision linked to popular erectile dysfunction drug

In a first-of-its-kind study, Mount Sinai researchers have shown that color vision problems caused by retinal damage on a cellular level can result from a high dose of sildenafil citrate, the popular erectile-dysfunction medication sold under the brand name Viagra. The results demonstrate that excessive use of the drug could lead to long-term vision problems, including possible irreversible damage

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Finding middle ground on the range

Cattle ranching and conservation may seem an unusual pair in the American West, but new research reveals a clear link between the economic health of ranches and the ability to maintain habitat for an iconic wild bird that for years has been at the center of public land policy debate: the greater sage grouse.

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A 'recipe book' that creates color centers in silicon carbide crystals

Silicon carbide has enjoyed renewed interest for its potential in quantum technology. Its ability to house optically excitable defects, called color centers, has made it a strong candidate material to become the building block of quantum computing. Now, researchers have created a list of 'recipes' physicists can use to create specific types of defects with desired optical properties in SiC. The te

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CWRU scientists develop new method to more efficiently generate brain stem cells

In two newly published papers, a scientific team at Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine reports on the discovery and implementation of a new, more efficient method for generating an important brain stem cell in the laboratory. The findings pave the way for greater understanding of the underlying mechanisms of neurological disorders of myelin and ultimately, possible new treatment an

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MilliporeSigma: Meet Immobilon NOW!

Western blots made better

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Study finds that DFMO increases survival for children with high risk neuroblastoma

A paper published September 27 in Scientific Reports shows the positive results of a phase II clinical trial using the oral medication DFMO to prevent relapse in children with High Risk Neuroblastoma (HRNB).

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Asking questions, testing improves student learning of new material

Iowa State University researchers know memory retrieval is beneficial for learning, but their new meta-analysis found there are limits. The research shows the frequency and difficulty of questions can reverse the effect and be detrimental to learning. It also is not enough to simply ask a question; students must respond to see a positive effect on learning.

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High water bills can unintentionally harm disadvantaged tenants

Landlords in disadvantaged communities can be so unsettled by increasing water bills and nuisance fees that they take it out on their tenants, threatening the housing security of those who need it most.

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Progressive movement

Benchmark data and the standard of living in the regions of Russia affect student mobility, according to a study by HSE Centre for Institutional Studies researchers Ilya Prakhov and Maria Bocharova. Strong graduates from more educated and wealthy families are more likely to enroll in a university far from home, but the economy usually affects such a decision. High wages draw students towards the r

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New best practices recommended for feeding tube location verification in pediatric patients

Placement of nasogastric (NG) tubes (feeding tubes) in pediatric patients is a common practice, however, the insertion procedure carries risk of serious or even potentially lethal complications. While there are numerous methods of verifying an NG tube has been placed correctly, none of those methods are considered universally standard.

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European Psychiatric Association comprehensive review demonstrates that exercise is an effective treatment for major mental health conditions and should form a core part of treatment

Based on compelling evidence from a meta-review of existing research, the European Psychiatric Association (EPA) has issued new guidelines to promote exercise as a key additional treatment for mental health conditions.

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A free electronic management repository for zebrafish

Effective and efficient electronic systems for managing zebrafish colony operations are available but expensive.

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New study finds nanoparticles show promise in therapy for triple-negative breast cancer

A team led by Dr. Adam Friedman from the GW School of Medicine and Health Sciences found nanoparticle technology shows promise in therapy for triple-negative breast cancer.

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Songbird data yields new theory for learning sensorimotor skills

During such trial-and-error processes of sensorimotor learning, a bird remembers not just the best possible command, but a whole suite of possibilities, suggests a study by scientists at Emory University.

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Exercise helps bones, but not metabolism, in ovarian function loss

Exercise may reduce the risk of osteoporosis associated with the loss of ovarian function, but fitness may not protect against related metabolic changes and weight gain, a new study reports. The findings will be presented today at the American Physiological Society's (APS) Cardiovascular, Renal and Metabolic Diseases: Sex-Specific Implications for Physiology conference in Knoxville, Tenn.

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Delayed pregnancy — heart health risks for moms and sons, study shows

Delaying pregnancy may increase the risk of cardiovascular disease in both women and their children, with boys at higher risk of disease, according to a new study. Researchers from the University of Alberta in Canada will present their findings today at the American Physiological Society's (APS) Cardiovascular, Renal and Metabolic Diseases: Sex-Specific Implications for Physiology conference in Kn

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3D simulation delves into blue star mystery

A new three-dimensional simulation sheds light on the luminous blue variable (LBV), a relatively rare and still somewhat mysterious type of star. The star sparkles with an exceptional blue-toned brilliance and exhibits wild variations in both brightness and spectrum. Its appearance tends to fluctuate radically over time, and that has piqued the curiosity of astrophysicists who wonder what process

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Cern scientist Alessandro Strumia suspended after comments

Prof Alessandro Strumia, of Pisa University, had said "physics was invented and built by men".

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Genetics of cholesterol point to possible drug targets for heart disease, diabetes

From the DNA of nearly 300,000 veterans, scientists have singled out a handful of genetic mutations that not only govern levels of cholesterol, but may also inform the development and use of drugs for cardiovascular disease and diabetes, according to researchers.

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Macedonia’s Name Change Wins—But Its Opponents Do Too

In a historic referendum on Sunday, Macedonian voters backed by an overwhelming majority a deal to rename their country the “Republic of North Macedonia.” The move came with the promise of ending the country’s decades-long dispute with Greece over who gets to claim the name Macedonia, and of unlocking the country’s path to European Union and NATO membership. But even with polls projecting a decis

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BioLegend: Intracellular Phospho Staining Protocol for Flow Cytometry

Step-by-step protocol for intracellular phospho staining

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Has Your Health Insurance Really Got You Covered?

When it comes to making sure patients take their medications as prescribed, the answer is no — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Removal of ovary for fertility preservation found safe in girls as young as 5 months

In the first publication from the U.S. on surgical techniques and outcomes of single ovary removal for fertility preservation in girls, surgeons from Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children's Hospital of Chicago report that the procedure caused no complications and can be performed laparoscopically, on an outpatient basis, without delaying treatment for cancer or other therapies posing high risk of inferti

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Populations served by CPC+ medical home model are wealthier, use fewer inpatient services

Researchers from The Dartmouth Institute for Health Policy and Clinical Practice examined participation in the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services' Comprehensive Primary Care Plus (CPC+) program to determine what types of practices joined the CPC+ model. The study also compared hospital service areas with and without CPC+ practices. The CPC+ model is a voluntary multipayer model that combines

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Disease causing mutation found in French-Canadians

A team of Canadian scientists, including researchers at the Montreal Neurological Institute and Hospital (The Neuro) has discovered the first French-Canadian founder mutation gene linked to synucleinopathies, a group of neurodegenerative diseases that includes Parkinson's disease (PD), dementia with Lewy-Bodies (DLB) and multiple system atrophy (MSA).

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A universe aglow

Deep observations made with the MUSE spectrograph on ESO's Very Large Telescope have uncovered vast cosmic reservoirs of atomic hydrogen surrounding distant galaxies. The exquisite sensitivity of MUSE allowed for direct observations of dim clouds of hydrogen glowing with Lyman-alpha emission in the early universe — revealing that almost the whole night sky is invisibly aglow.

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Researchers discover highly active organic photocatalyst

Scientists from the University of Liverpool, University College London and East China University of Science and Technology have synthesized a new organic material that can convert water into hydrogen fuel using sunlight.

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Virtual reality can reduce pain and increase performance during exercise

Using Virtual Reality (VR) headsets while exercising can reduce pain and increase how long someone can sustain an activity, according to new research.

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Democrat/Republican divide is worst it's ever been

Party polarization is even worse than most people think, according to a new Michigan State University study. And neither party can shoulder the blame, as it doesn't matter which party is in charge, said Zachary Neal, associate professor of psychology and global urban studies.

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New research aims to help catch child killers

Violent crimes against children are especially abhorrent. New research will help law enforcement learn more from juvenile and infant remains in order to help bring perpetrators to justice.

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Climate change is inevitable—but not in the way the EPA thinks

Environment Lowering car emissions isn't a silver bullet, but it would help. Perhaps more troubling than the resulting policy is the implied justification: that climate change is inevitable, so why bother trying.

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Breakthrough Leukemia Treatment Backfires in a Rare Case

The groundbreaking treatment that genetically engineers a patient’s own cells to fight leukemia turned lethal in one patient, reversing his remission.

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Fluke experiment hints deep brain stimulation really treats depression

People with depression treated with deep brain stimulation suffered unexpected relapses when the batteries went flat, hinting the treatment isn’t just a placebo

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Domesticating tomatoes took millennia – we can now redo it in 3 years

With CRISPR gene editing technology we can now rapidly domesticate wild plants to create tasty and healthy food

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Drug cocktail may treat postmenopausal PCOS complications

A combination of a diabetes drug and a high blood pressure medication may effectively treat all symptoms of postmenopausal polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS).

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Anxious and forgetful after menopause? Low estrogen may be to blame

Lack of estrogen may play a role in the development of anxiety and memory problems, according to a new rodent study.

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Doctors issue caution over missed cancer diagnoses tied to immune disorder

Physicians who specialize in a devastating and aggressive immune disorder called hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH) report in a new study that extra care should be taken to ensure an HLH diagnosis doesn't obscure possible underlying cancers. They caution that expediting HLH treatment may miss underlying malignancies that could end up being fatal to the patient.

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Attosecond pulse leads to highest molecular level probe resolution

Devising a source of ultra-fast X-ray pulsating in the attosecond range is no mean feat. It enables physicists to probe dynamic processes in matter with unprecedented time resolution. Now, a team of physicists has exploited an optical phenomenon, opening the door to creating high-order oscillations in existing light sources and a beam source pulsating in an ultra-fast manner to reach the attosecon

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No 'reservoir': Detectable HIV-1 in treated human liver cells found to be inert

In a proof-of-principle study, researchers report that a certain liver immune cell called a macrophage contains only defective or inert HIV-1 copies, and aren't likely to restart infection on their own in HIV-1-infected people on long-term antiretroviral therapy (ART).

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Psychotropic polypharmacy is common in Alzheimer's disease

Up to half of people with Alzheimer's disease (AD) use a psychotropic drug, and one in five uses two or more psychotropics concomitantly, according to a new study.

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Leishmaniasis: Genes key to identifying drug resistant parasites in Brazil

Researchers have identified genes in a parasite that could help clinicians predict drug treatment outcomes for patients with visceral leishmaniasis in Brazil.

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Dormant genes brought to life in new generations

The genetic differences in phyloplankton living in close geographic proximity can be great, something which long has surprised researchers. Now new research shows that the ability of phyloplankton to generate resting stages can be an important part of the explanation.

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Chemists of TU Dresden develop highly porous material, more precious than diamonds

Researchers of the TU Dresden's Faculty of Chemistry broke a world record: DUT-60 is a new crystalline framework with the world's highest specific surface and the highest specific pore volume (5.02 cm3g-1) measured so far among all known crystalline framework materials

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Insufficient sleep associated with risky behavior in teens

In a new study, researchers at Brigham and Women's Hospital examined a national data sample of risk-taking behaviors and sleep duration self-reported by high school students over eight years and found an association between sleep duration and personal safety risk-taking actions.

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Pioneering biologists create a new crop through genome editing

For the first time, researchers from Brazil, the USA and Germany have created, within a single generation, a new crop from a wild plant — the progenitor of our modern tomato — by using a modern process of genome editing. Starting with a 'wild tomato' they have, at the same time, introduced a variety of crop features without losing the valuable genetic properties of the wild plant.

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How can we reduce concussions in football? Change kickoffs, experts say

A new study published today in JAMA points to one way to make American football safer: move the kickoff line.

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Genetic variants reveal new targets for chronic kidney disease treatment

By investigating how genetic variations drive the expression of genes within the filtering cells of the kidney, researchers have found new pathways to explain CKD development and could inform its treatment.

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Penn discovers new, rare mechanism for ALL to relapse after CAR T cell therapy

A single leukemia cell, unknowingly engineered with the leukemia-targeting chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) lentivirus and infused back into a patient, was able to reproduce and cause a deadly recurrence of B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL).

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Microresonators offer a simpler approach to sensing with light pulses

Researchers at EPFL have found a way to implement an optical sensing system by using spatial multiplexing, a technique originally developed in optical-fiber communication. The method, which produces three independent streams of ultrashort optical pulses using a single continuous-wave laser and a single optical microresonator, is far simpler than existing technologies.

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Super-resolution microscopy builds multicolor 3D from 2D

A new technique developed by EPFL overcomes the noise and color limitations of super-resolution microscopy by creating three-dimensional (3D) reconstructions from single-color two-dimensional (2D) images of protein complexes.

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Did rate of concussions change following experimental kickoff rule in Ivy League football?

The kickoff return in football has been associated with a substantial number of concussions because players run toward each other and there is potential for significant hits. In 2015, kickoffs accounted for 6 percent of all plays but 21 percent of concussions in the Ivy League, a Division 1 conference of eight private universities. Ivy League football coaches recommended a rule change and, in 2016

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Expert: Keep up with latest discoveries through automated updates in reporting genetic test results

A genome informatics scientist proposes a new model to generate ongoing automated updates to account for new evidence after a previous genetic test report. Genetic counselors and physicians could better communicate clinically relevant information to patients and families, not just when the test results are initially reported, but for years to come as new knowledge accumulates.

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How have mortality rates changed over time for infants, children?

Mortality rates for death from any cause declined in all age groups from 1999 to 2015 in a study that analyzed death certificate data for people younger than 25 in the United States, Canada and England/Wales. More than 1.1 million deaths occurred during the study period in the United States, where mortality rates for death from any cause were the highest. The study identifies leading causes of dea

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Women who drank more water had less frequent urinary tract infections

Premenopausal women with recurrent urinary tract infections (cystitis) who drank more water had less frequent infections in a randomized clinical trial. The study included 140 women with recurrent cystitis who reported drinking less than 1.5 liters of total fluid daily (about six 8-ounce glasses). During the 12 months of the trial, half the women were assigned to drink 1.5 liters of water in addit

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University of Oxford: Bold male birds fall faster and harder for their partners

Research from Oxford University has revealed that bold male birds focus on forming strong relationships with their future breeding partners while shy male birds play the field.

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A new way to manufacture small batches of biopharmaceuticals on demand

MIT researchers have developed a new way to rapidly manufacture biopharmaceuticals on-demand. Their system can be easily reconfigured to produce different drugs, enabling flexible switching between products as they are needed.

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This wild plant could be the next strawberry

By combining genomics and gene editing, researchers have figured out how to rapidly bring a plant known as the groundcherry toward domestication.

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Genetics of cholesterol point to possible drug targets for heart disease, diabetes

From the DNA of nearly 300,000 veterans, scientists have singled out a handful of genetic mutations that not only govern levels of cholesterol, but may also inform the development and use of drugs for cardiovascular disease and diabetes, according to researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine and the Palo Alto Veteran Affairs Health Care System.

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Designing a more productive corn able to cope with future climates

An international research team has found they can increase corn productivity by targeting the enzyme in charge of capturing CO2 from the atmosphere.

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Immune cells help older muscles heal like new

The immune system's macrophage cells are critical to growing muscle tissues in a lab, say the biomedical engineers at Duke University who earlier reported the world's first self-healing lab-grown muscles. The discovery is expected to play important roles in developing platforms for studying degenerative muscle diseases and enhancing the survival of engineered tissue grafts in future cell therapy a

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Artificial sweeteners have toxic effects on gut microbes

The collaborative study indicated relative toxicity of six artificial sweeteners (aspartame, sucralose, saccharine, neotame, advantame, and acesulfame potassium-k) and 10 sport supplements containing these artificial sweeteners. The bacteria found in the digestive system became toxic when exposed to concentrations of only one mg./ml. of the artificial sweeteners.

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Eco-friendly nanoparticles for artificial photosynthesis

Researchers have developed a nanoparticle type for novel use in artificial photosynthesis by adding zinc sulfide on the surface of indium-based quantum dots. These quantum dots produce clean hydrogen fuel from water and sunlight — a sustainable source of energy. They introduce new eco-friendly and powerful materials to solar photocatalysis.

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Focus on neuroscience, nociception to improve anesthesia, paper says

By focusing on nervous system circuits of nociception, the body's sensing of tissue damge, anesthesiologists can achieve unconsciousness in patients using less drug and manage post-operative pain better, leading to less need for opioids.

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Introducing The Atlantic Crossword

Editor’s Note: The Atlantic Crossword is a mini puzzle that gets more challenging each weekday. See if you can solve today’s puzzle . The miracle and menace of each era is original, but the debate over how Americans spend their time remains extraordinarily consistent over the decades. Today, the smartphone is the attention portal that stirs the most awe and anxiety. A century ago, the crossword p

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Unexpected Diversity Found in 16 New Lab Mouse Genomes

No animals have done more to help science unravel the complex genetics of human disease than laboratory mice. Their usefulness as guides may rise further, however, with the announcement today in Nature Genetics that European researchers have completed draft genomic maps for 16 of the most commonly used strains of mouse. It’s a boon to researchers who until now have had to rely on a single referen

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Attosecond pulse leads to highest molecular level probe resolution

Devising a source of ultra-fast X-ray pulsating in the attosecond range is no mean feat. It enables physicists to probe dynamic processes in matter with unprecedented time resolution. Now, a team of physicists from China has exploited an optical phenomenon, opening the door to creating high-order oscillations in existing light sources and a beam source pulsating in an ultra-fast manner to reach th

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Doctors issue caution over missed cancer diagnoses tied to immune disorder

Physicians who specialize in a devastating and aggressive immune disorder called hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH) report in a new study that extra care should be taken to ensure an HLH diagnosis doesn't obscure possible underlying cancers. They caution in the journal Pediatric Blood & Cancer that expediting HLH treatment may miss underlying malignancies that could end up being fatal to the

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Newborns face increased risk of thrombosis

Russian scientists have carried out tests to compare the process of blood coagulation in adults and newborns and discovered that the latter face an increased risk of thrombosis. The researchers also compared this process in infants carried to term and in preterm babies. The work was carried out as part of a project funded by the Presidential Program of Research Projects of the Russian Science Foun

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Drug cocktail may treat postmenopausal PCOS complications

A combination of a diabetes drug and a high blood pressure medication may effectively treat all symptoms of postmenopausal polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). The findings will be presented today at the American Physiological Society's (APS) Cardiovascular, Renal and Metabolic Diseases: Sex-Specific Implications for Physiology conference in Knoxville, Tenn.

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Anxious and forgetful after menopause? Low estrogen may be to blame

Lack of estrogen may play a role in the development of anxiety and memory problems, according to a new rodent study. The findings will be presented today at the American Physiological Society's (APS) Cardiovascular, Renal and Metabolic Diseases: Sex-Specific Implications for Physiology conference in Knoxville, Tenn.

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Bold male birds fall faster and harder for their partners

Research from Oxford University has revealed that bold male birds focus on forming strong relationships with their future breeding partners while shy male birds play the field.

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A new way to manufacture small batches of biopharmaceuticals on demand

Biopharmaceuticals, a class of drugs comprising proteins such as antibodies and hormones, represent a fast-growing sector of the pharmaceutical industry. They're increasingly important for "precision medicine"—drugs tailored toward the genetic or molecular profiles of particular groups of patients.

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Super-resolution microscopy builds multicolor 3-D from 2-D

Super-resolution microscopy is a technique that allows researchers to see beyond the diffraction limit of light. The technique has garnered increasing interest, especially since its developers won the Nobel Prize in Chemistry in 2014. By exploiting fluorescence, super-resolution microscopy now allows scientists to observe cells and their interior structures and organelles in a way never before pos

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Designing a more productive corn able to cope with future climates

An international research team has found they can increase corn productivity by targeting the enzyme in charge of capturing CO2 from the atmosphere.

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Microresonators offer a simpler approach to sensing with light pulses

Ultrashort optical pulses are becoming increasingly relevant in a number of applications, including distance measurement, molecular fingerprinting and ultrafast sampling. Many of these applications rely not only on a single stream of pulses—also known as "optical frequency combs"—but require two or even three of them. Nonetheless, these multi-comb approaches significantly speed up acquisition time

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We need a cyber arms control treaty to keep hospitals and power grids safe from hackers

A fresh diplomatic push could help put vital public services off limits to nation-state cyberattacks.

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Gene editing can speed up plant domestication

CRISPR/Cas9 replays domestication to make better ground cherries and tomatoes.

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'Physics was built by men': Cern suspends scientist over remarks

Italian professor’s presentation deemed ‘unacceptable’ by Geneva research centre A senior Italian scientist has been suspended after he sparked fury during a presentation at Cern, the European nuclear research centre in Geneva, when he said physics was “invented and built by men, it’s not by invitation”. Prof Alessandro Strumia of Pisa University claimed during a seminar on gender issues in physi

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Future cars to be made from revolutionary new material

A new material that is as stiff as metal but flexible enough to withstand strong vibrations could transform the car manufacturing industry, say experts.

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Where did broadleaved evergreen trees survive during the last glacial period in Japan?

Scientists have modeled the phylogeographic relationships and demographic changes of Castanopsis sieboldii, which is a dominant tree of the broadleaved evergreen forests of Japan, dating back to about 100,000 years ago. The model strongly suggested that C. sieboldii survived in at least 4 areas through the last glacial maximum (LGM). The results present new evidence concerning conservation of gene

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Ciprofloxacin has dramatic effects on the mitochondrial genome

A study investigated the effect of ciprofloxacin on mitochondria, the important cell organelles in our body that produce the energy for cellular function. Ciprofloxacin stopped normal maintenance and transcription of mitochondrial DNA by changing mtDNA topology, causing impaired mitochondrial energy production and blocking cellular growth and differentiation.

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Mediterranean diet prevents a leading cause of blindness, study suggests

Evidence is mounting that a poor diet plays an important role in the development of age-related macular degeneration (AMD), a leading cause of blindness in the United States.

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Keeping our cells stable: A closer look at microtubules

Microtubules help to regulate cell structure throughout our bodies. A group of researchers have used cryo-electron microscopy to shed light on how a certain protein keeps microtubules stable, and regulates microtubule-based transport within cells. The new insights could help to develop medical treatment for diseases such as dementia and heart failure.

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Forsker om indonesisk tsunami: Ingen systemer kan nå at advare i sådan en situation

Over tusind mennesker frygtes døde, efter at en tsunami i fredags ramte Indonesien. Jordskælvets placering og type kan være en årsag til, at man ikke nåede at reagere i tide, mener dansk forsker.

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Rambøll ingeniør kræver 1,3 millioner i erstatning – blev fyret på grund af én e-mail

En norsk sag fra 2017 mod rådgiveren Rambøll kommer i oktober til ny behandling i den norske appelret. Sidst blev Rambøll dømt til at betale 789.000 norske kroner i erstatning – nu kræver ingeniøren 1,3 millioner.

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3 lessons on decision-making from a poker champion | Liv Boeree

Is it better to be lucky or good? Should we trust our gut feelings or rely on probabilities and careful analysis when making important decisions? In this quick talk, professional poker player Liv Boeree shares three strategies she's learned from the game and how we can apply them to real life.

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Eighth-century skeleton found at Torcello

On the island of Torcello, at the Ca' Foscari University of Venice excavation site, some protagonists of the island's thousand-year history have begun to emerge. A tomb datable to around 700 A.D. has recently been unearthed by the site's team of scholars, who hail from universities throughout Italy, under the scientific direction of archaeologist Diego Calaon

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No 'reservoir': detectable HIV-1 in treated human liver cells found to be inert

In a proof-of-principle study, researchers at Johns Hopkins report that a certain liver immune cell called a macrophage contains only defective or inert HIV-1 copies, and aren't likely to restart infection on their own in HIV-1-infected people on long-term antiretroviral therapy (ART).

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Decline in native fish species — invasive species on the increase

The majority of Bavaria's watercourses are in poor ecological condition. A team from the Technical University of Munich (TUM) has now conducted the first systematic analysis of long-term data on fish stocks in the Upper Danube, Elbe and Main rivers. The team concluded that native fish species are on the verge of extinction, while the populations of some invasive species are increasing.

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Familiar voices are easier to understand, even if we don't recognize them

Familiar voices are easier to understand and this advantage holds even if when we aren't able to identify who those familiar voices belong to, according to research in Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science.

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3D bioprinting of living structures with built-in chemical sensors

A new method enables non-invasive monitoring of oxygen metabolism in cells that are 3D bioprinted into complex living structures. This has great implications for studies of cell growth and interactions e.g. under tissue-like conditions, as well as for the design of 3D printed constructs facilitating higher productivity of microalgae in biofilms or better oxygen supply for stem cells used in bone a

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Top Stories in September: Infinite Loop and Beyond

An Apple story a day keeps readers clicking away.

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It is 2018, so why are we still debating whether women can do physics?

A talk by a physicist at CERN suggesting that women aren’t as good as men at physics has sparked outrage. I was there, and people are right to be offended says Jess Wade

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Image: Comet landscape

On 30 September 2016, ESA's Rosetta spacecraft came closer than ever to the target it had studied from afar for more than two years, concluding its mission with a controlled impact onto the surface of Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko (67P/C-G).

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What's in your DNA? Poll of older adults shows high interest, with a dose of skepticism

A new poll shows that only a small percentage of people in their 50s and early 60s have had their DNA tested — either for medical reasons, to learn their ancestry or out of curiosity — but far more have an interest in getting tested. However, that desire to know more about their disease risk or heritage comes with a caveat: two-thirds said genetic testing could lead them to worry too much about

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A biofuel for automated heat generation

Biomass is an obvious resource for energy generation with a lower environmental impact. Researchers from Tomsk Polytechnic University revealed in experiments that the most common type of biomass straw, chips, sawdust and peat are feasible for self-sustained pyrolysis. Thermal effect is sufficient for automated heat generation.

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High CO2 levels cause plants to thicken their leaves, could worsen climate change effects

When levels of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere rise, most plants do something unusual: They thicken their leaves. Now two University of Washington scientists have shown that this reaction by plants will actually worsen climate change by making the global 'carbon sink' contributed by plants was less productive.

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Ciprofloxacin has dramatic effects on the mitochondrial genome

A study carried out at the University of Eastern Finland and published in Nucleic Acids Research investigated the effect of ciprofloxacin on mitochondria, the important cell organelles in our body that produce the energy for cellular function. Ciprofloxacin stopped normal maintenance and transcription of mitochondrial DNA by changing mtDNA topology, causing impaired mitochondrial energy production

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Where did broadleaved evergreen trees survive during the last glacial period in Japan?

Japanese scientists modeled the phylogeographic relationships and demographic changes of Castanopsis sieboldii, which is a dominant tree of the broadleaved evergreen forests of Japan, dating back to about 100,000 years ago. The model strongly suggested that C. sieboldii survived in at least four areas through the last glacial maximum (LGM). The results present new evidence concerning conservation

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Future cars to be made from revolutionary new material

A new material that is as stiff as metal but flexible enough to withstand strong vibrations could transform the car manufacturing industry, say experts from the University of Surrey.

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Virtual reality can reduce pain and increase performance during exercise

Using Virtual Reality (VR) headsets while exercising can reduce pain and increase how long someone can sustain an activity, according to new research from the School of Engineering and Digital Art.

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Psychotropic polypharmacy is common in Alzheimer's disease

Up to half of people with Alzheimer's disease (AD) use a psychotropic drug, and one in five uses two or more psychotropics concomitantly, according to a study conducted at the University of Eastern Finland.

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Clinical trials, radiation oncology research to be featured at ASTRO's Annual Meeting

The American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) announced today the 10 top-rated studies that will be highlighted in the press program for the 2018 ASTRO Annual Meeting. Researchers will present their findings in three news briefings held October 21 through 23 in room 225-D of the Henry B. Gonzalez Convention Center in San Antonio and via live webcast. Reporters can register to cover the meeti

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Viking Link: Kun 15 procent kan graves ned

Kun 26 kilometer af den 170 kilometer lange 400kV luftledning gennem Jylland kan graves ned.

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Mountains create biodiversity

Mountains are among the most biodiverse places on Earth, but scientists have struggled to fully understand why they are so important in creating high species richness. An international research team, including four scientists from the University of Amsterdam, has now shed new light on answering this long-standing question.

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HP Spectre Folio Leather Laptop: Price, Specs, Release Date

It's called the HP Spectre Folio, and it'll set you back at least $1,300.

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Ted Turner Opens Up About Having Lewy Body Dementia

On Sunday morning, CBS aired an interview with the CNN founder, who told Ted Koppel about his struggle with a disease he could describe but wryly struggled to name. (Image credit: John Amis/AP)

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Cross-country study looks at social integration among minority adolescents

An international research group has published the conclusions of a study focused on juvenile delinquency among ethnic and religious minorities from five different Western countries. Through the prism of delinquency, the study examines the social integration of minorities and concludes that interaction with public institutions and the living conditions of these young people contribute to different

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A Setback for Trump's Plan to Slash Public Lands

If environmentalists defeat President Donald Trump’s order to strike conservation protections from more than 2 million acres of public land, they will likely have a minor legal ruling issued last week to thank. On Tuesday, a federal judge in Washington, D.C., handed a procedural victory to the coalition of indigenous nations, outdoor-activity companies, and environmental groups suing the U.S. gov

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Scientists track nighthawks' migration route in search of clues to species' steep decline

In a quest to develop conservation strategies to protect a threatened species whose population has declined 80 per cent in the last 50 years, scientists at the University of Alberta have discovered the enigmatic nighthawk travels 20,000 kilometres each year in its annual migration from north of Fort McMurray to the Amazon rainforest in Brazil.

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Siberian paleontologists discovered the oldest macro-skeleton remains

The oldest skeleton remains known to fossil chronicle of the Earth belonged to the microorganisms that lived 700-650 million years ago. International research team proved that a larger organisms of the same period, such as Palaeopascichnus linearis up to 20 centimeters long, also had a skeleton. The research is published in Precambrian Research.

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Genes key to identifying drug resistant parasites in Brazil

Researchers at the University of York have identified genes in a parasite that could help clinicians predict drug treatment outcomes for patients with visceral leishmaniasis in Brazil.

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Focus on neuroscience, nociception to improve anesthesia, paper says

By focusing on nervous system circuits of nociception, the body's sensing of tissue damge, anesthesiologists can achieve unconsciousness in patients using less drug and manage post-operative pain better, leading to less need for opioids.

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New study confirms Mediterranean diet prevents a leading cause of blindness

Evidence is mounting that a poor diet plays an important role in the development of age-related macular degeneration (AMD), a leading cause of blindness in the United States.

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Does Autism Raise the Risk of PTSD?

The two conditions share many traits, but the connection has been largely overlooked until now — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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2018 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine

The 2018 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine is being awarded jointly to James P. Allison and Tasuku Honjo for their discovery of cancer therapy by inhibition of negative immune regulation.

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Arctic warming may drive long heat waves or cold spells

Persistent weather conditions, including dry and wet spells, that have increased in the United States may be a result of rapid Arctic warming, according to a new study. The conditions can lead to weather extremes such as drought, heat waves, prolonged cold, and storms that can cost millions of dollars in damage and disrupt societies and ecosystems, researchers say. Scientists examined daily preci

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Lift heavy stuff without wrecking your back

DIY Move-in time doesn't have to be injury season. When you have to do a lot of lifting and carrying, your mind should be on your back—and how to avoid injuring it.

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Jemele Hill Joining The Atlantic as Staff Writer

Journalist Jemele Hill is joining The Atlantic as a staff writer, The Atlantic’s editor in chief Jeffrey Goldberg and editor of TheAtlantic.com Adrienne LaFrance announced today. She begins with The Atlantic next week. Hill will be covering issues related to sports, race, politics, and culture for both the magazine and TheAtlantic.com. She will be based in Los Angeles, where The Atlantic is estab

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Trump Is Winning on Trade

President Trump hailed Monday a last-minute agreement with Canada that would in effect rebrand the North American Free Trade Agreement. He called the pact, which also includes Mexico, “a great deal for all three countries [that] solves the many deficiencies and mistakes in nafta .” The new agreement, announced late Sunday, is being labeled the United States Mexico Canada Agreement, or USMCA, and

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Researchers win top prize in Nikon International Small World imaging contest

Henry He, a researcher at the Morgridge Institute for Research and doctoral student in the Dresden International Ph.D. Program, Germany, and Liz Haynes, a postdoctoral fellow in the Department of Integrative Biology at UW-Madison, won first place in the 2018 Nikon Small World in Motion Competition for a video depicting neural development in a zebrafish embryo.

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Modern modulators for Fermilab accelerators

Take a walk along the hall that houses Fermilab's linear accelerator, and you'll see tall sets of brightly lit shelves that resemble fancy vending machines. But instead of snacks and beverages, they hold boxy structures that resemble gleaming car batteries. Arranged in neat columns and rows, these cells—known as Marx cells and installed during the last 36 months—have rejuvenated the aging Fermilab

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Future cars could be made from revolutionary new material

A new material that is as stiff as metal but flexible enough to withstand strong vibrations could transform the car manufacturing industry, say experts from the University of Surrey.

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Study: Atomic contamination similar to that of gemstones serves as a quantum information carrier

Impurities in materials are responsible for the colours of gemstones or the performance of modern semiconductors. The same applies to quantum systems, although research has been limited. For the first time, Kaiserslautern researchers were able to implant individual impurities formed by caesium atoms into an ultracold quantum gas of rubidium atoms in a controlled manner. They observed how the impur

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Drugmaker Pfizer's CEO Read to leave in January

The biggest U.S.-based drugmaker will change leaders in January when Pfizer Chief Operating Officer Albert Bourla replaces CEO Ian Read, who has led the company for nearly eight years.

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Rossing: EASD er højdepunktet på den europæiske diabeteskalender

I det europæiske diabetesunivers bliver det ikke meget større end EASD, siger forskningsleder Peter Rossing fra Steno i København, der igen i år skal afsted.

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Midtjyllands vagtcentral får ny ledende overlæge

Stefan Schousboe er fra 1. oktober ansat som ledende overlæge i Præhospitalets AMK-vagtcentral.

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Statistiker: Værdifuldt at give mundtlig EASD-præsentation

Sidste år havde seniorstatistiker Bendix Carstensen fra Steno i København en poster med til EASD, men i år får han lov at give en mundtlig præsentation, og det skulle gerne kaste nye muligheder og forbindelser af sig.

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A new global marine environmental forecasting system will serve the public soon

Since September 2016, a project entitled 'Development of a Global High-resolution Marine Dynamic Environmental Forecasting System' has been funded by the 'Program on Marine Environmental Security Guarantee' of the National Key Research and Development Program of China. Thus far, a series of results have been obtained including multi-source ocean observation datasets, the setup of models, vertical

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Determinations of air flow behaviors in the human upper airway by visualizing flowing air directly

Understanding airflow characteristics in the human upper airway is crucial in investigating obstructive sleep apnea, particle sedimentation, drug delivery, and many biomedical problems. However, direct visualization of air flow patterns in in-vitro models with complex geometrical structures is a big challenge. Now researchers in the Capital Medical University, Beijing, China have successfully deve

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Hard-hit Indonesian city buries its dead as toll tops 840

Brightly colored body bags were placed side-by-side in a freshly dug mass grave Monday, as a hard-hit Indonesian city began burying its dead from the devastating earthquake and tsunami that killed more than 840 people and left thousands homeless.

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A research project in the French West Indies for repurposing Sargassum seaweed

A research team including the CNRS and l'Université des Antilles has just launched an 18-month interdisciplinary research project, largely financed by Ademe, on the brown seaweed known as Sargassum that has periodically invaded the coasts of the West Indies since 2011. The central objective is to find a way to repurpose this seaweed, which is a cause of public health problems in the Caribbean regi

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Humans delayed the onset of the Sahara desert by 500 years

Humans did not accelerate the decline of the 'Green Sahara' and may have managed to hold back the onset of the Sahara desert by around 500 years, according to new research led by UCL.

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Female gametes prefer sperm with different immune genes

Through clever partner selection, animals can increase the future success of their offspring. With some species, this process continues even after the sex act. Researchers at the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Biology in Plön have discovered that among sticklebacks, the egg cells of the fish are involved in the decision regarding fertilisation. An accumulation of genes in the genetic materi

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The robot eye with an all-round field of view

Where am I? Like humans, robots also need to answer that question, while they tirelessly glue, weld or apply seals to workpieces. After all, the production of precision products depends on robot control systems knowing the location of the adhesive bonding head or welding head to the nearest millimeter at all times. This means the robot needs some sort of eye. In the automotive industry and many ot

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James Allison and Tasuku Honjo Win Nobel Prize

The immunologists, honored with the 2018 award in Physiology or Medicine, pioneered immunotherapy, which harnesses the body’s immune system to fight cancer.

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Fossil of Oldest Flowering Tree in North America Discovered. And It Was Huge.

Flowering trees were part of the North American landscape in the Cretaceous period.

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These algae thieves could survive climate change

Green algae that evolved to tolerate hostile and fluctuating conditions in salt marshes and inland salt flats could survive climate change, thanks to hardy genes they stole from bacteria, according to new research. Single-celled Picochlorum green algae offer clues as to how nature can modify genomes—and suggest ways scientists may someday engineer more robust algae to serve as biofuels, according

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Brett Kavanaugh Is Patient Zero

If Supreme Court Chief Justice John Roberts is truly concerned about preserving the Court’s legitimacy in American life, as he’s often suggested, Brett Kavanaugh has become his worst nightmare. After Friday’s Senate Judiciary Committee session, Kavanaugh is facing a renewed FBI investigation into the sexual-assault charges against him from Christine Blasey Ford. But even if that inquiry fails to

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Even If You Hate Zuckerberg Now, You’ll Love Him Later

A certain distaste for Facebook’s chief Mark Zuckerberg underlies much of the recent reaction to the company’s annus horribilis. Just last week, the company announced a data breach affecting 50 million people , right on the heels of Instagram’s prominent founders leaving Facebook. Whether it’s a hack or a corporate battle, Zuckerberg does not get the benefit of the doubt, let alone the awe and re

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Sex-ed is crucial to the rights of children

Young people today live in a complex, fast-paced and perpetually connected world and face issues and pressures that were not even anticipated two decades ago.

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Why do people work? Respect trumps money in South Africa case study

In South Africa, more than 50% of working age adults don't have jobs. But is the country asking the right questions when it comes to understanding what drives people's employment-related decisions? Research on unemployment mostly focuses on getting wages right. But there are also many non-monetary reasons that motivate South Africans' work-related decisions.

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More bad news for artificial sweetener users according to Ben-Gurion University researchers

The collaborative study indicated relative toxicity of six artificial sweeteners (aspartame, sucralose, saccharine, neotame, advantame, and acesulfame potassium-k) and 10 sport supplements containing these artificial sweeteners. The bacteria found in the digestive system became toxic when exposed to concentrations of only one mg./ml. of the artificial sweeteners.

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Eco-friendly nanoparticles for artificial photosynthesis

Researchers at the University of Zurich have developed a nanoparticle type for novel use in artificial photosynthesis by adding zinc sulfide on the surface of indium-based quantum dots. These quantum dots produce clean hydrogen fuel from water and sunlight — a sustainable source of energy. They introduce new eco-friendly and powerful materials to solar photocatalysis.

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Keeping our cells stable: A closer look at microtubules

Microtubules help to regulate cell structure throughout our bodies. A group of Japanese researchers have used cryo-electron microscopy to shed light on how a certain protein keeps microtubules stable, and regulates microtubule-based transport within cells. The new insights could help to develop medical treatment for diseases such as dementia and heart failure. These findings were published on Oct.

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Scientists propose that vibrios have significant roles in marine organic carbon cycle

Vibrios are genetically and ecologically diverse heterotrophic bacteria that are ubiquitous in marine environments. Vibrios can utilize a wide range of organic carbon compounds, and have very short replication times, enabling them to proliferate explosively in response to various nutrient pulses. Now researchers in Qingdao have proposed that vibrios may exert large impacts on marine organic carbon

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Finding new combination therapies for neuroblastoma

A phase 2 clinical trial has found that combining a novel compound called alisertib with chemotherapy has anti-tumor activity in children with high-risk, relapsed neuroblastoma. The New Approaches to Neuroblastoma Therapy (NANT) consortium study was led by Araz Marachelian, MD, MS, of the Children's Center for Cancer and Blood Diseases at Children's Hospital Los Angeles and Steven G. DuBois, MD, o

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An energy-efficient means of water damage restoration

Over a million cases of water damage due to rotten pipes are reported in Germany every year. Infrared heating panels and plastic enclosures are used to restore damaged walls, but they consume large amounts of energy. A new electric, vapor-permeable, flexible drying system developed by Fraunhofer researchers reduces the moisture evenly throughout building components in an energy-efficient manner. F

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Aarhusianske Steno-folk gør en tur ud af EASD

Steno Diabetes Center Aarhus bruger EASD som en ryste-sammen-tur og til at møde nye, gamle og fremtidige samarbejdspartnere, fortæller direktør Troels Krarup Hansen.

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EASD-veteran: Kvaliteten af abstracts er forskellig

Direktør for Steno i Region Sjælland Lise Tarnow har været med til at udvælge abstracts til årets EASD-kongres. Hun har ikke været særligt imponeret over den bunke, hun har set.

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Læger vil diskutere kommende sundhedsreform med statsministeren

Sundhedsvæsenets medarbejdere vil gerne høres, inden regeringen lægger sig fast på en sundhedsreform.

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Pliable micro-batteries for wearables

There is a new technology gripping the markets of the future – technology to wear. Wearables, as they are known, are portable systems that contain sensors to collect measurement data from our bodies. Powering these sensors without wires calls for pliable batteries that can adapt to the specific material and deliver the power the system requires. Micro-batteries developed by the Fraunhofer Institut

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Smart algorithms boost planning

Organizing care services is a complex task and a lot of planning goes into ensuring that they operate smoothly. Developed by adiutaByte, a spin-off project of the Fraunhofer Institute for Algorithms and Scientific Computing SCAI, adiuta.PLAN is a software package that can automatically create plans and factor in variables such as traffic levels and weather conditions in real time. The software als

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Yo-yoing weight, blood pressure, cholesterol and blood sugar readings may raise heart attack and stroke risk

People with fluctuating weight, blood pressure, cholesterol and/or blood sugar levels are at higher risk of heart attack and stroke than those with more stable readings. Having more measures that fluctuate adds to the risk.

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New evidence suggests particles detected in Antarctica don't fit Standard Model

A team of researchers at Penn State University has found new evidence that suggests some particles detected in Antarctica do not fit the Standard Model. They have written a paper outlining their arguments and have posted it on the arXiv preprint server.

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Smuggling a CRISPR gene editor into staph bacteria can kill the pathogen

A new way fight antibiotic-resistant bacteria co-opts toxin-producing genes.

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Ex-Apple Engineers Build a Speed-Spotting Lidar for Self-Driving Cars

The young startup Aeva has $45 million in funding and a sensor it says can give self-driving cars a whole new view of the world.

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Regulating upconversion core@shell structures for double-model fluorescence security encoding

Wei Wu and co-workers, who were devoted to the preparation of double-model NIR irradiation NaYF4 upconversion inks and their applications in information encoding and security application, from Wuhan University, demonstrated a modified high-temperature coprecipitation to synthesize core-triple-shell Ln3+ ions-doped NaYF4 upconversion nanocrystals for screen-printing designable, complex and multicol

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Binding energies of near proton-drip line Z = 22-28 isotopes determined

A new method is proposed to determine the binding energy(B) of near proton-drip line isotopes from isotopic cross section distribution. To determine B, the lack of cross sections for isotopes in the 345A MeV 78Kr + 9Be is overcome by a newly discovered scaling phenomenon found in the 140A MeV 40;48Ca(58;64Ni) + 9Be reactions. The determined B are justified from obeying the scaling phenomenon of th

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China has seen remarkable progress in diabetes research over the past two decades

The prevalence of diabetes has increased dramatically over the past three decades, and currently, China owns the largest number of diabetics worldwide. Researchers reviewed the diabetes research conducted in China between 1995 and 2015, with the goal of providing new insights regarding the current status and future perspectives for researchers, diabetes health providers, and respective policy-make

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Symbiotic star AG Pegasi observed after ourburst

Using ESA's XMM-Newton space telescope, two researchers have observed the symbiotic star AG Pegasi after the end of its outburst in 2015. The observations, detailed in a paper published September 24 on the arXiv pre-print server, could reveal the real nature of this peculiar object.

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Retraction of a journal article doesn't make its findings false

The American Medical Association recently retracted six papers co-authored by food consumption and psychology researcher, Brian Wansink, in three of its journals. These studies include two showing that large bowl sizes encourage us to eat more, and that shopping when hungry leads us to buy more calorie-dense foods.

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We all put too much emphasis on test scores

We live in testing times. We also live in a time of globalization, immigration and the internationalization of schools and universities around the world. Our current obsession with school accountability and student learning outcomes has resulted in the increased use and abuse of test scores —in particular language test scores.

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Construction using concrete reinforced with renewable materials

Tomorrow's building material is here today. Textile-reinforced concrete (TRC) is durable, formable in diverse shapes and suitable for lightweight construction. As the name suggests, conventional TRC is reinforced with carbon or glass-fiber fabrics rather than steel. A research team at the Fraunhofer Institute for Wood Research, Wilhelm-Klauditz-Institut WKI is now replacing these fabrics with eco-

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For better multiple-choice tests, avoid tricky questions, study finds

Multiple-choice tests and quizzes are an effective tool for:

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Keeping our cells stable: A closer look at microtubules

Microtubules help to regulate cell structure. A group of Japanese researchers have used cryo-electron microscopy to shed light on how a certain protein keeps microtubules stable and regulates microtubule-based transport within cells. The new insights could help to develop medical treatment for diseases such as dementia and heart failure. These findings were published on October 1 in the online edi

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This year's Nobel Prize in medicine is shared by a cancer-fighting (and harmonica-playing) Texan

Health The 2018 Nobel Prize honors what might be our best shot at beating cancer. The 2018 season kicked off on Monday with the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine, which this year honors two researchers for their work on cancer therapy.

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Physicist sparks gender row after claiming women are worse at physics

Physicist Alessandro Strumia gave a talk at CERN, home of the Large Hadron Collider, claiming that women are inferior to men when it comes to physics research

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Perovskite solar cells leap toward commercialization

Scientists' research on perovskite solar cells indicates a promising future towards sustainability.

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Invasive plants can boost blue carbon storage

When invasive species enter the picture, things are rarely black and white. A new article has revealed that some plant invaders could help fight climate change by making it easier for ecosystems to store 'blue carbon' — the carbon stored in coastal environments like salt marshes, mangroves and seagrasses. But other invaders, most notably animals, can do the exact opposite.

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Dog intelligence 'not exceptional'

People who think dogs are exceptionally intelligent are barking up the wrong tree, new research shows.

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Can chiropractic care disrupt vision?

For those in the habit of getting their neck adjusted by a chiropractor, there's an interesting case to know about: High velocity neck manipulation has been shown to create stress on the eye and lead to spotty vision.

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Defects promise quantum communication through standard optical fiber

An international team of scientists has identified a way to create quantum bits that emit photons that describe their state at wavelengths close to those used by telecom providers. These qubits are based on silicon carbide in which molybdenum impurities create color centers.

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Great Southern Reef to lose huge seaweed habitat to ocean warming

Research into the future of Australia's "other reef" – the Great Southern Reef – shows that even under the most optimistic carbon emission scenarios, ocean warming is likely to cause substantial loss of critical habitat-forming seaweeds by 2100.

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Kræft-forskere bag immunterapien får Nobelpris i medicin

James. P. Allison og Tasuku Honjo modtager Nobelprisen i medicin for deres opdagelse af immunterapi til behandlingen af kræft.

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Etisk råd vil have styrket prioritering i sundhedsvæsenet

Ny anbefaling fra Det Etiske Råd vil gøre op med uretfærdig forskelsbehandling i det danske sundhedsvæsen. Råd anbefaler at oprette nyt behandlingsråd.

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Where did broadleaved evergreen trees survive during the last glacial period in Japan?

Japanese researchers investigated whether a dominant tree of warm temperate broadleaved forests in Japan, Castanopsis sieboldii, underwent northward migration over hundreds of kilometres from Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) (about 21,000 years ago) refugia in the Ryukyu archipelago and southern Kyushu. Fossil pollen there indicates the LGM survival of broadleaved evergreen forests. Or it may in fact ha

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Virus-detecting analysis kit developed

Researchers at the Institute of Cellular and Molecular Biology of Plants (IBMCP), a joint venture of Valencia's Polytechnic University (UPV) and the Spanish National Research Council (CSIC), have developed a new analysis kit that makes it possible to detect all Potyvirus species, comprising the largest vegetable virus genus, with just one test and at a reduced cost.

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Scientists Who Sparked Revolution In Cancer Treatment Share Nobel Prize In Medicine

James P. Allison and Tasuku Honjo were cited for their work in harnessing the immune system to arrest the development of cancer. (Image credit: Richard Drew/AP)

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Nobel Prize Awarded for Cancer Immunotherapy

Two researchers on opposite sides of the Pacific were awarded the 2018 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine today for their identification of molecules that normally act as a brake on the immune system. That work became the foundation for an entirely novel form of cancer treatment — immune checkpoint therapy — which has been credited with saving thousands of lives within the first few years sinc

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Space-borne quantum source to secure communication

Soon, powerful quantum computers will be able to easily crack conventional mathematically encrypted codes. Entangled photons generated by a spaceborne quantum source could enable hack-proof key exchange for ultra high security applications. A Fraunhofer research team has developed a high performance quantum source robust enough for deployment in space. They aim to launch the first European quantum

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Palaeontology: A way of reaching into the past to build lessons for the present

South Africa has an unparalleled fossil record of prehistoric life. It also holds a key position within the African nursery of humankind. And so, the country's palaeontology tells the story not just of those who live in it, but of every person living on earth.

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Is a polygraph a reliable lie detector?

Attorneys for Christine Blasey Ford, the woman who's accused Supreme Court justice nominee Brett Kavanaugh of sexual assault, released the results of a polygraph test focused on the decades-old incident. They suggest that Ford's responses to two questions about her allegations were "not indicative of deception."

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How a new vaccine could save cattle herds – and livelihoods

For 10,000 years, the bacterium Mycoplasma mycoides has infected goats, cows and other livestock, annihilating entire herds in days.

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The Dark World of Wildlife Trafficking, Martin Rees on the Future and Other New Science

Book recommendations from the editors of Scientific American — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Nobel Prize for Medicine Goes to Cancer Immune Therapy Pioneers

Two men are recognized for basic research that unleashed the immune system against cancer, becoming a new pillar of therapy — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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NASA unveils sustainable campaign to return to moon, on to Mars

In December of 2017, President Donald Trump signed Space Policy Directive-1, in which the president directed NASA "to lead an innovative and sustainable program of exploration with commercial and international partners to enable human expansion across the solar system and to bring back to Earth new knowledge and opportunities."

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Overcoming antibiotic resistance

Antibiotic resistance is a growing medical crisis, as disease-causing bacteria have developed properties that evade or overcome the toxic effects of many available drugs. More of these microbes are resistant to multiple medications, limiting physicians' options to combat patients' infections. As a result, a range of conditions – including pneumonia, bloodstream infections and gonorrhea – have beco

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New concept to cool boiling surface may help prevent nuclear power plant accidents

A new University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa study has produced a new technique involving heat that could help prevent nuclear power plant accidents.

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More research on permanent supportive housing needed, report finds

Suzanne Wenzel has devoted years to studying homelessness – in particular, how putting a roof over someone's head can improve their entire well-being. However, a new report from the National Academies of Science, Engineering and Medicine concluded there's not been nearly enough research done on the topic.

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All the Rules Are Changing

The Senate Judiciary Committee’s hearing into the sexual-assault allegations against the Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh was largely useless as a substitute for a meaningful fact-finding inquiry. It was depressingly informative in another respect, marking further deterioration in the norms undergirding the Senate’s discharge of its constitutional advice and consent duties. Honored imperfect

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To Apollo

Whose songs, whose lyre, whose careless sighs are these? You taught us to divide the air in melodies when all we knew to do with it was breathe. You’ve never worked a day of your gorgeous career, striking a cheesecake pose on that lifeguard chair, soaking up sun (and every mortal being’s stare) to tan, but never burn. Who needs sunblock when you can haul the sun behind the clouds when not horsing

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New research traces impact of weather safety training

Does knowledge about severe weather translate into meaningful planning that helps the public protect themselves? A new study authored by University of Georgia researchers demonstrates the effectiveness of weather science and safety education for teachers, their students, and the students' parents.

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I tracked dust mites through 300 homes

Science Can Western allergy kits diagnose patients in Pakistan? To find out, Rubaba Hamid visited hundreds of homes to collect their dust—and dust mites. Can Western allergy kits diagnose patients in Pakistan? To find out, Rubaba Hamid visited hundreds of homes to collect their dust—and dust mites.

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A whole issue of JACM devoted to “integrative oncology” propaganda? Oh, goody.

Last week, The Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine published a Special Focus Issue on "integrative oncology." In reality, it's propaganda that promotes pseudoscience and the "integration" of quackery into oncology.

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The Human Cell Atlas Is Biologists' Latest Grand Project

The goal is to create a massive map of everything we know about all the cells in the human body, like the human genome did with DNA.

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The 9 Best Soundbars For Every Budget (Fall 2018)

Every TV deserves a soundbar to call its own, and these are some of the best.

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It's Not Just Telltale Games: We Need to Change the Way We Talk About Studios Shutting Down

Games are made by people. And if we care about games, at all, we need to care about the people who make them.

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Image of the Day: Change of Tune

Southeast Alaska’s humpback whales haven’t changed their calls for close to four decades.

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New approach offers high-resolution seismic monitoring of the shallow subsurface

Scientists have long sought accurate monitoring of seismic activity to identify natural phenomena such as earthquakes, volcanic eruptions and the leakage of fluids stored deep underground. Time-lapse four-dimensional seismic monitoring surveys that employ an active seismic source can accurately map the subsurface, and comparing results from different surveys can show how fluids such as CO2 move in

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Repurposing Existing Drugs Could Let Us Treat Intractable Illnesses

Repurposing medications could let us treat intractable illnesses — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Scientists created proteins controlled by light

Researchers have developed fluorescent proteins that can be controlled by orange and green light. These proteins will help to study processes in living cells. Results were published in Nature Methods.

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Pluto Should Be a Planet and So Should Earth's Moon, New Study Claims

Sing along if you know the words: When the moon hits your eye, like a big pizza pie, that's a planet!

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New Jersey Man Dies from 'Brain-Eating' Amoeba

A New Jersey man died after contracting a "brain-eating" amoeba called Naegleria fowleri, according to news reports.

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EASD-debutant: Det bliver spændende at høre, hvad der rør sig

Ph.d.-kandidat Mads Thomsen glæder sig til sin første EASD-kongres.

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Fra barsel til Berlin: Det bliver dejligt med noget fagligt input

Ph.d.-studerende Pernille Mensberg fra Steno Diabetes Center i København holder pause fra sin barselsorlov for at fremlægge sine resultater på EASD i Berlin. Hun glæder sig til at komme afsted.

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DTU-forsker ser frem til nyt om ’Big Data’

Postdoc Caroline Brorsson fra DTU har læst over 200 abstracts og nøje sat sig ind i programmet til årets EASD-kongres.

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Regioner på vej med ny app: Hver tredje konsultation kan ske online

Danske Regioner vil lancere en ny app, hvor patienterne kan få onlinekonsultationer hos de praktiserende læger og på hospitalerne. PLO er skeptiske for det nye initiativ.

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Image: Apollo 7 crew trains to test technology for missions to the moon

This Aug. 5 1968 image was taken aboard the MV Retriever in the Gulf of Mexico, where the Apollo 7 crew, Walter Schirra, Walter Cunningham and Donn Eisele practiced water egress procedures in preparation for the October 1968 mission.

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Researchers release endangered crows into the forests of South Pacific island

For more than 2 million years, the native forests on the South Pacific islands of Guam and Rota were home to several thousand crows, members of a species found nowhere else on Earth. But over the last 60 years, the Mariana crow—called the Aga in the Chamorro language—has completely disappeared from the island of Guam and rapidly declined on neighboring Rota. Today there are only about 175 Aga left

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Research collaboration works toward timely coastal flood adaptation

A research collaboration between Victoria University of Wellington and NIWA is working towards a better method for adapting to coastal flooding as sea levels continue to rise due to climate change.

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Defects promise quantum communication through standard optical fiber

An international team of scientists led by the University of Groningen's Zernike Institute for Advanced Materials created quantum bits that emit photons that describe their state at wavelengths close to those used by telecom providers. These qubits are based on silicon carbide in which molybdenum impurities create color centers. The results were published in the journal npj Quantum Information on

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New Horizons team rehearses for New Year's flyby

You never know what you're going to see when you visit a world for the first time—particularly when it's on the solar system's most distant frontier – but you can get ready to see it.

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Unveiling the mechanism protecting replicated DNA from degradation

Researchers from Tokyo Metropolitan University and the FIRC Institute of Molecular Oncology (IFOM) in Italy have succeeded in depleting AND-1, a key protein for DNA replication, by using a recently developed conditional protein degradation system. They have gained unprecedented access to the underlying mechanism and determined that during DNA replication and cell proliferation in vertebrate cells,

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Researchers discover how bird feathers resist tearing

Chinese researchers have discovered and characterized a sophisticated mechanism in bird feathers that enhances tear resistance, overturning a centuries-old explanation of how bird feathers work. The newly discovered cascaded slide-lock system is composed of flexible hooklets, a slide rail, and spines at the end of the slide rail as terminating structures.

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Grinning-Skull Asteroid Set to Whiz by Earth

The "Halloween asteroid" will be a little late this year.

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How Fake News Will Get Worse

Artificial intelligence is making it possible for anyone to manipulate audio and video. The biggest threat is that we stop trusting anything at all — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Two Share 2018 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine for Cancer Discoveries

Two Share 2018 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine for Cancer Discoveries James P. Allison and Tasuku Honjo share prize for discovery of checkpoint inhibitors for cancer therapy. nobel2018_physio-med_winner3.jpg Image credits: Abigail Malate, Staff Illustrator Rights information: Copyright American Institute of Physics Culture Monday, October 1, 2018 – 07:00 Brian Owens, Contributor (Inside Sci

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Machine learning helps improving photonic applications

Photonic nanostructures can be used for many applications besides solar cells—for example, optical sensors for cancer markers or other biomolecules. A team at HZB using computer simulations and machine learning has now shown that the design of such nanostructures can be selectively optimised. The results are published in Communications Physics.

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Ciprofloxacin has dramatic effects on the mitochondrial genome—antibiotics should be used cautiously

Antibiotics have saved many lives by rescuing patients with bacterial or fungal infections, but these valuable drugs also have a dark side. As with most clinical drugs, many antibiotics can also have undesired effects on the body's metabolism, causing more or less severe symptoms.

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Four newly discovered Milky Way neighbors

Ultra-faint dwarf galaxies are the smallest, most dark matter dominated, and least chemically enriched stellar systems in the universe, and are important targets for understanding dark matter and galaxy formation. They comprise by number the majority of galaxies in the universe, and not least, dwarf galaxies around the Milky Way provide crucial empirical input for verifying formation scenarios of

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What's in your DNA? Poll of older adults shows high interest, with a dose of skepticism

A new poll shows that only a small percentage of people in their 50s and early 60s have had their DNA tested — either for medical reasons, to learn their ancestry or out of curiosity — but far more have an interest in getting tested. However, that desire to know more about their disease risk or heritage comes with a caveat: two-thirds said genetic testing could lead them to worry too much about

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Cancer immunotherapy wins the 2018 medicine Nobel Prize

Therapies that unleash immune system brakes against cancer have earned the 2018 Nobel Prize in physiology or medicine.

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Dear Therapist: My Husband Doesn’t Want to Have Sex Anymore

Editor’s Note: Every Monday, Lori Gottlieb answers questions from readers about their problems, big and small. Have a question? Email her at dear.therapist@theatlantic.com . Dear Therapist, My husband and I have been married for 30 years and have a mostly happy, friendly, and supportive relationship. His interest in sexual relations declined after our children were born and came to a full stop fi

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A New Clue in the Search for Forests on Distant Planets

Astronomers remotely detected signs of life on a planet for the first time in history in December 1990. “The Galileo spacecraft found evidence of abundant gaseous oxygen, a widely distributed surface pigment with a sharp absorption edge in the red part of the visible spectrum, and atmospheric methane in extreme thermodynamic disequilibrium,” astronomers wrote in a paper in Nature . “Together, the

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When an AI Goes Full Jack Kerouac

On March 25, 2017, a black Cadillac with a white-domed surveillance camera attached to its trunk departed Brooklyn for New Orleans. An old GPS unit was fastened atop the roof. Inside, a microphone dangled from the ceiling. Wires from all three devices fed into Ross Goodwin’s Razer Blade laptop, itself hooked up to a humble receipt printer. This, Goodwin hoped, was the apparatus that was going to

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Nobel for Helping the Immune System Fight Cancer

James P. Allison and Tasuku Honjo share the Nobel Prize for their work on harnessing the cancer patient's own immune system to destroy tumors. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Why “I’m not racist” is only half the story

How white fragility blocks the prospect of racial equality Why white guilt is a roadblock to equality If you're not racist, why is racism still America's biggest problem?

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Decision looms for Berlin on diesel refits

German Chancellor Angela Merkel's government is slated to agree late Monday how to clean up city air polluted by diesel exhaust and who will foot the bill, after protracted wrestling with the powerful car industry.

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Nobel Prize in Medicine Awarded to Scientists Who Developed Breakthrough Cancer Treatment

The two men, James P. Allison and Tasuku Honjo, figured out how to use a person's immune system to attack tumors.

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2018 Nobel Prize in Medicine Awarded to 2 Cancer Immunotherapy ResearchersNobel Prize Cancer

James P. Allison and Tasuku Honjo were recognized for a discovery that the body’s immune system can be used to attack cancer cells.

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Majestic Photos Capture the Golden Age of the Space Shuttle Program

Photographer John A. Chakeres attended nearly every launch from 1982 to 1986.

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Inside The Black Mirror World of Polygraph Job Screenings

Want to become a police officer, firefighter, or paramedic? A WIRED investigation finds government jobs are one of the last holdouts in using—and misusing—otherwise debunked polygraph technology.

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The Physics of Launching a Lunar Lander From the Moon's Surface

How fast was the acceleration of NASA's lunar lander when it took off from the Moon in the Apollo 17 mission? Using video analysis, we can figure that out.

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The rare-leopard spotter who accidentally caught gunmen in her traps

Priya Singh spent months in the wilds of north-east India tracking elusive clouded leopards and marbled cats, but caught more than she bargained for in her camera traps

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Massive Facebook data breach left 50 million accounts exposed

Facebook has suffered the biggest hack in its history. It left the personal details of 50 million accounts exposed, including Mark Zuckerberg's

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Conservationists: Don't Give Up on the "Living Dead"

Small, remnant populations might look like they’re doomed, but a new study says they could still deserve protection — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Tiden er ved at løbe ud for klassisk Skype

Skype 7 til pc'er vil ophøre med at fungere efter den 1. november.

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Nobelpris i medicin: Frigørelse af immunforsvaret i kampen mod kræft

Amerikaneren James P. Allison og japaneren Tasuku Honjo er blevet tildelt Nobelprisen i medicin for deres forskning i proteiner, der agerer 'bremser' for kroppens immunforsvar i kampen mod kræftceller.

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Can We Find the Home of Our First Interstellar Visitor?

The most detailed study yet identifies four candidates for ‘Oumuamua’s cosmic birthplace — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Sådan kan vi redde 400 patienter fra amputation

Steno Diabetes Center Copenhagen har udviklet en tværfaglig metode, der kan nedsætte antallet af amputationer med hele 80 pct. hos borgere med diabetes. Vi vil opfordre til, at metoden også tages brug i resten af landet.

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New study finds incredibly high carbon pollution costs – especially for the US and India | Dana Nuccitelli

As a wealthy, warm country, the US would benefit from implementing a carbon tax to slow global warming The social cost of carbon is a measure of the economic damages caused (via climate change) by each ton of carbon pollution that we produce today. It’s difficult to estimate because of physical, economic, and ethical uncertainties. For example, it’s difficult to predict exactly when various clima

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Scientists Who Sparked Revolution In Cancer Treatment Share Nobel Prize In Medicine

James P. Allsion and Tasuku Honjo were cited for their work in harnessing the immune system to arrest the development of cancer. (Image credit: Richard Drew/AP)

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James P. Allison, Tasuku Honjo Win 2018 Nobel Prize In Physiology Or Medicine

The pair of immunologists won for their discovery of cancer therapy that works by harnessing the body's own immune system.

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Klimarådet: Derfor er det OK, at danskerne får flere biler

Klimarådet ser det ikke som et selvstændigt mål at reducere antallet af biler herhjemme, eller hvor mange kilometer de kører. Det er helt enkelt for dyrt, argumenterer rådets transportekspert.

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Techtopia #72: $$$ til danske tech-startups

Der flyder mere risikovillig kapital til danske tech-iværksættere end tidligere.

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Peter Gøtzsche melder Nordic Cochrane Center ud af Cochrane-samarbejdet

Efter længere tids uenigheder har Nordic Cochrane Center ifølge Peter Gøtzsche trukket sig fra samarbejdet med det internationale Cochrane Center.

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Fem råd til at undgå influenza: Du kan gøre mere end at vaske hænder

Influenzasæsonen starter i dag. Du kan selv gøre meget for at undgå en uge i elendighed under dynen.

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Kræft-forskere får Nobelpris i medicin

Årets Nobelpris i medicin gives til forskning i at få immunforsvaret til at bekæmpe kræftceller i kroppen.

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How the Kavanaugh Allegations Are Rallying Conservatives Behind Trump

As Friday’s 1:30 p.m. Judiciary Committee vote neared on advancing Brett Kavanaugh’s Supreme Court nomination to the full Senate, Republican Senator Jeff Flake announced that he had a condition for voting yes: The FBI must be given a week to further investigate sexual-assault allegations against the judge. And yet, after that dramatic capitulation, the official Twitter account of the Women’s Marc

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Here’s Why White Women Are Abandoning the GOP

Shortly after the 2016 election, Tina Fey took to task the white women who had helped elect Donald Trump, providing him with 52 percent of their support. Fey particularly focused her remarks on college-educated white women, 44 percent of whom voted for Trump, chastising them for wanting to “go back to watching HGTV” and forget about the election. “You can’t look away,” Fey implored . “Because it

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Writing an Iranian Cookbook in an Age of Anxiety

Whenever my Iranian grocer in Los Angeles reminds me that this may be the last week for a given fruit, I tend to buy pounds and pounds of it, as if the season will cruelly pass me by. Or as if I might trip, fall, take too long dusting myself off, and pass it by. I panic with the arrival of fall’s first annab —jujubes. Winter’s anar and beh —pomegranates and quince—fill me with both joy and appreh

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Cancer immune therapy recognised with Nobel Prize for medicine

The Nobel Prize in physiology or medicine has been awarded to James Allison and Tasuku Honjo for discovering how cancer can be treated by targeting the immune system

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Thought police: Spotting cyber criminals before they break the law

Hackers regularly purchase malware online for carrying out cyber-attacks, but a new system could automatically spot those considering doing so before they do it

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Discarded waste could be a treasure trove of rare metals

Miners could soon be scouring mounds of industrial waste to extract rare metals that are needed for products such as electronics, pacemakers, aircraft parts and bicycle gears.

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James P Allison and Tasuku Honjo win Nobel prize for medicine

American and Japanese immunologists win 2018 award for their work on cancer therapy Nobel prize for medicine awarded – as it happened An American and a Japanese scientist have won the 2018 Nobel prize in physiology or medicine for their discovery of a revolutionary approach to cancer treatment. James Allison and Tasuku Honjo will share the 9m Swedish kronor (£775,000) prize, announced by the Nobe

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Vi har ikke brug for en ny tredje sektor

Der er mange bud på aflastning af de praktiserende læger. I stedet for at skabe en ny, såkaldt ‘3. sektor’ har vi et alternativt bud, der bl.a. involverer oprettelse af en slags attestklinikker.

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Row over Moon film's flag moment

Not everyone is happy with a missing detail in a new film about the 1969 Moon landing.

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Over 800 people have died after a massive tsunami hit Indonesia

A massive earthquake and tsunami has hit the island of Sulawesi in Indonesia. Over 800 people have died and another 50,000 people have been displaced

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The 2018 Nobel Prizes In Physiology or Medicine, Physics and Chemistry

Culture The announcements of this year's winners begin on October 1. Click on the image to see all of our related coverage. 10/01/2018 Inside Science Staff To read more…

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Defects promise quantum communication through standard optical fiber

An international team of scientists led by the University of Groningen's Zernike Institute for Advanced Materials has identified a way to create quantum bits that emit photons that describe their state at wavelengths close to those used by telecom providers. These qubits are based on silicon carbide in which molybdenum impurities create color centers. The results were published in the journal npj

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Specific protein identified as regulator of glioblastoma tumor migration

Mount Sinai study has important implications for treatment of the most common and devastating brain tumor.

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Yo-yoing weight, blood pressure, cholesterol and blood sugar readings may raise heart attack and stroke risk

People with fluctuating weight, blood pressure, cholesterol and/or blood sugar levels are at higher risk of heart attack and stroke than those with more stable readings. Having more measures that fluctuate adds to the risk.

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200 brintbusser på vej til Danmark i hemmelighedsfuldt projekt

Brintvirksomheden Nel i Herning har sammen med sit norske moderselskab fået 300 millioner EU-kroner til at sende 600 brintbusser ud at køre på de europæiske veje.

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Cern scientist: 'Physics built by men – not by invitation'

Cern removes "highly offensive" slides from website from a talk on women in particle physics

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Nobel prize for medicine won by cancer researchers – live

Two immunologists, American James P Allison and Japanese Tasuku Honjo, win annual award for work on a new approach to cancer treatment 11.00am BST “Let the data speak for itself” – and other Allison lab tenets Jim Allison’s friends & colleagues recently organized a 70th birthday symposium for him at @MDAndersonNews . A slide from that on “Allison Lab Tenets” featuring @WillieNelson (of course). A

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The speed of #MeToo gives me hope – we can still stop climate change | Andrew Simms

These days new social norms can be swift and profound. It could be our saving grace After smoking and drink-driving, could climate change provide the next big behaviour-change challenge? The latest science tells us that nothing short of rapid, transformative change in our infrastructure and behaviour can prevent the loss of the climate we depend on – yet the message is only now being officially e

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2 Immunologists Win 2018 Nobel Prize In Physiology Or Medicine

James P. Allison, 70, and Tasuku Honjo, 76, won the prize for their discovery of cancer therapy that works by harnessing the body's own immune system.

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Audi-designer: Mange spørger, hvorfor elbiler skal være grimme

Interview med E-tron-designer: Mange designtrends i elbilverdenen er meningsløse.

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US sues California over 'net neutrality'

The US Justice Department on Sunday sued California to force it to abandon a law, passed earlier in the day, to protect "net neutrality" aimed at requiring all online data to be treated equally.

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String of disasters exacts heavy damage, human toll in Asia

A recent string of natural disasters, the latest a deadly earthquake and tsunami in Indonesia, have exacted a severe toll both in economic damage and human lives throughout Asia. The U.N. Office for Disaster Risk Reduction, or UNISDR, says up to 1.6 million people could be affected by the magnitude 7.5 earthquake and the tsunami it created Friday in a central region of Sulawesi island.

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IPCC, the world's top authority on climate science

The UN's Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), which compiles comprehensive reviews of climate science, meets this week to vet and validate a report on limiting global warming to 1.5 degrees Celsius (2.7 degrees Fahrenheit).

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UN report spotlights government inaction on climate

Diplomats gathering in South Korea Monday will find themselves in the awkward position of vetting and validating a major UN scientific report that underscores the failure of their governments to take stronger action on climate.

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New California internet neutrality law sparks US lawsuit

California Gov. Jerry Brown has approved the nation's strongest net neutrality law, prompting an immediate lawsuit by the Trump administration and opening the next phase in the battle over regulating the internet.

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UN report on 'mission impossible' climate target: key points

An executive summary of the UN special report on limiting global warming to 1.5 degrees Celsius will be vetted in South Korea this week, line-by-line, by diplomats under the 195-nation Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC).

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Can wireless challenge cable for home internet service?

Cellular companies such as Verizon are looking to challenge traditional cable companies with residential internet service that promises to be ultra-fast, affordable and wireless.

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Dog intelligence 'not exceptional'

People who think dogs are exceptionally intelligent are barking up the wrong tree, new research shows.

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Invasive plants can boost blue carbon storage

When invasive species enter the picture, things are rarely black and white. A new paper has revealed that some plant invaders could help fight climate change by making it easier for ecosystems to store "blue carbon"—the carbon stored in coastal environments like salt marshes, mangroves and seagrasses. But other invaders, most notably animals, can do the exact opposite.

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Invasive plants can boost blue carbon storage

When invasive species enter the picture, things are rarely black and white. A new paper has revealed that some plant invaders could help fight climate change by making it easier for ecosystems to store 'blue carbon' — the carbon stored in coastal environments like salt marshes, mangroves and seagrasses. But other invaders, most notably animals, can do the exact opposite.

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Which cities will sink into the sea first? Maybe not the ones you expect | Mark Miodownik

The Earth isn’t solid – which makes it hard to predict how the submerging of our coastlines will unfold Better scientific understanding of global warming makes the discussion about its geopolitical consequences increasingly urgent. Put simply, there are going to be winners and losers: hotter places and colder places; wetter places and drier places; and, yes, places that disappear under the sea. B

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Gasudslip i Nordsøen: Operatører vidste ikke, at der var gas i brønden

555 kg gas slap ud fra boreplatformen Dan F i december sidste år, da to operatører fjernede tryk fra en brønd, de troede var fyldt med vand. Ingen havde fortalt dem, at der var gas i brønden.

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Danske specialister finder alvorligt it-sikkerhedshul i Yousee-udstyr

Med hjælp fra en loddekolbe opdagede whitehat-hacker, hvordan Yousee-kunders internetudstyr kunne kompromitteres.

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Dog intelligence 'not exceptional'

People who think dogs are exceptionally intelligent are barking up the wrong tree, new research shows.

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Can chiropractic care disrupt vision?

For those in the habit of getting their neck adjusted by a chiropractor, there's an interesting case from Kellogg Eye Center to know about: High velocity neck manipulation has been shown to create stress on the eye and lead to spotty vision.

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Mayo researchers develop new genetics-based prognostic tool for myelodysplastic syndrome

Researchers at Mayo Clinic have developed a new genetics-based prognostic tool for myelodysplastic syndrome. Their findings are published in the October print issue of Mayo Clinic Proceedings.

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How to improve health care in Canada

Expanding public funding for cost-effective treatments, investing in primary care, embracing technology and engaging patients are some of the ways Canada can improve the quality of health care, according to an analysis in CMAJ.

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Shifting causes of death in Shanghai, China, over many decades

A large study conducted over 42 years in Shanghai — China's largest city — indicates that socioeconomic development most likely contributed to lower death rates for most diseases (except for cancer and diabetes, for which death rates increased), likely because of lifestyle factors. The study is published in CMAJ.

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Rotem Sorek Searches for Bacteria’s Defenses Against Viruses

Using his expertise in microbiology and bioinformatics, he is bringing a new understanding to microbial immune systems.

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Ancient Teeth Tell the History of Equine Dentistry

Researchers studied 3,000-year-old skeletal remains from Mongolia to understand the origins of veterinary dental practices.

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Infographic: The Omentum's Role in Health and Disease

Belly fat helps fight infection, but is also a common site of metastasis.

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Infographic: The Search for Life Below the Surface

The recent expansion of large-scale scientific drilling programs, combined with intensified efforts to take advantage of existing portals into the crust, has led to an explosion of research on the deep biosphere.

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October 2018 Crossword Answers

See how well you did.

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Genes and Blues

Learning about your own genetic idiosyncrasies comes with complex emotions.

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Visualizing Gene Expression in Individual Cells in Thick Tissues

STARmap enables simultaneous analysis of multiple RNAs in intact, bulky samples.

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Infographic: Effects of Satellite DNA–Binding Proteins

The linkers gather chromosomes together into chromocenters.

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October 2018 Crossword

Try your hand at a sciency brain teaser.

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Hackers Are Breaking into Medical Databases to Protect Patient Data

Agencies such as the NIH reward the discovery of vulnerabilities in their computer systems, before criminals can exploit them.

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In Their Earliest Days, Embryos Record Their Environments

Methylation patterns at so-called metastable epialleles in the genome stamp a memory into each of our cells.

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Sports Videos Give Clues to Climate Change

Archived footage of cycling races and other events can help ecologists track the timing of plants' leafing and flowering.

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Ten-Minute Sabbatical

Take a break from the bench to puzzle and peruse.

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Alzheimer's gene Affects Energy Consumption in Mouse Brains

One variant limited the brain's ability to use glucose.

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Integrating Multiple -Omics in Individual Cells

New techniques combine DNA, RNA, and protein information from single cells.

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Startups Plan the Health Data Gold Rush

Companies are building platforms based on blockchain technology to let individuals control and directly profit from their genomic and medical information.

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Why Forgetting Is a Critical Part of Remembering

The Østby sisters, one a neuroscientist and the other a writer, explore the uncharted territory of memory in their new book.

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Infographic: Visualizing Gene Expression

STARmap reveals expression levels of multiple genes within thick tissue sections.

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Genome Collector: A Profile of Charles Rotimi

The NIH epidemiologist has worked to ensure genetic health and population genetics studies contain data from African—not just European—populations.

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Caught on Camera

Selected Images of the Day from the-scientist.com

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Infographic: Light Pollution Threatens Species

As artificial light increases in volume and geographical coverage around the world, a variety of animals are suffering ill effects.

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Chromosome Clusters Help Keep the Genome Together

Without certain DNA-binding proteins, chromosomes can escape the cell nucleus.

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Charting Crescents, 1910

James Herrick, a Chicago doctor, was the first to describe sickled red blood cells in a patient of African descent.

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Contributors

Meet some of the people featured in the October 2018 issue of The Scientist.

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Life Thrives Within the Earth's Crust

From journeys into mines to explorations of volcanoes on the ocean floor, deep voyages reveal the richness of the planet's deep biosphere.

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Belly Fat Has a Role to Play in Fighting Infections

Hanging in front of the abdomen like an apron, the depot of visceral fat known as the omentum helps regulate immune responses.

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The Vanishing Night: Light Pollution Threatens Ecosystems

The loss of darkness can harm individual organisms and perturb interspecies interactions, potentially causing lasting damage to life on our planet.

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Climate Change: Planet Under Pressure

From increasingly severe storms to collapsing coral reefs to the displacement of Syrian citizens, in this eBook we examine the effects of Earth’s changing climate on weather systems, ecosystems… — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Ask the Experts: Chemistry

In this installment of the Ask the Experts series, Chemistry, our professors, scientists and researchers tackle reader questions about the substances that compose all matter, their properties and how… — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Blasey Ford Spells Out Trauma Memory Formation

Christine Blasey Ford's professional expertise came into play during her testimony regarding the Supreme Court nomination. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Justice Department Sues to Block California Net Neutrality LawJD Trump California

The Justice Department immediately challenged the law, saying only the federal government can regulate broadband providers.

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IPCC: Climate scientists consider 'life changing' report

Scientists discuss a report aimed at keeping global temperature rise under 1.5C this century.

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Dana Foundation to Expand Podcasts

Today is International Podcast Day, which seems an appropriate opportunity to announce that the Dana Foundation plans to expand our podcast platform in the next few months. I hope you’ve listened to our podcasts , which have been online since May of 2016 and feature the authors of Cerebrum, our monthly, magazine-style series . We think they fit nicely with Dana’s mission, which is to advance brai

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FAIR Health releases state-by-state visualizations of opioid abuse and dependence

FAIR Health has released an online interactive heat map showing new findings on opioid abuse and dependence diagnoses and procedures for each of the 50 states and the District of Columbia. The innovative visualizations, issued in conjunction with a white paper on regional and state variations in opioid-related treatment, allow Americans throughout the country to see a snapshot of the opioid crisis

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Where There's a Wills There's a Way to Explain the Home Run Rise

Astrophysicist and sports data scientist Meredith Wills talks about why a subtle change in major league baseballs may be behind the jump in home runs after 2014. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Trump Administration Prepares a Major Weakening of Mercury Emissions Rules

The proposal is designed to provide legal justification for weakening not only the rules on mercury emissions from coal-burning power plants, but also other pollution controls as well.

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Indonesia Tsunami’s Power After Earthquake Surprises Scientists

Catastrophic tsunamis often result from quakes that move vertically along a fault. Friday’s was different, moving mostly horizontally.

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Eye discovery to pave way for more successful corneal transplants

A team of eye specialists at The University of Nottingham has made another novel discovery that could help to improve the success of corneal transplants for patients whose sight has been affected by disease.

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New antibody treatment controls HIV for months

A new immunotherapy—a combination of two anti-HIV antibodies—can suppress HIV for months at a time. Thanks to antiretroviral therapy, HIV is now a manageable condition. Yet even the best drugs don’t entirely eliminate the virus, which latently lingers in the body, threatening to rise to dangerous levels if a patient forgets or forgoes treatment. To remain healthy, people infected with HIV must ad

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Tariffs could have a big impact on these farmers

New research reveals how current trade disruptions will affect farmers and consumers in Iowa and the state’s economy. Overall, the new study which examined different scenarios, study shows losses to Iowa’s gross state product in the range of $1 billion to $2 billion. Iowa’s 2017 Generalized System of Preferences (GSP) was $190 billion. The US Census Bureau estimates Iowa’s export value for 2017 a

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Overlooked MRI data may help diagnose brain disorders

A new technique that analyzes overlooked data from MRI scans reveals how many and which brain cells patients have—and shows where they’ve lost cells through injury or disease. The method eventually may lead to new ways to diagnose Alzheimer’s disease, multiple sclerosis, traumatic brain injury, autism, and other brain conditions through a simple brain scan. “There’s no easy way to detect the loss

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Studies in men reveal higher chance of secondary fractures, value of bone strengthening exercises

Two new studies released this week shine a spotlight on men's bone health which is often overshadowed by the focus on osteoporosis and fracture risk in women. The findings are being presented at the American Society for Bone and Mineral Research (ASBMR) 2018 Annual Meeting in Montréal, the premier scientific meeting in the world on bone, mineral and musculoskeletal science.

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Female politicians bolster trust in government decisions

New research shows that the presence of women in a decision-making body increases the public’s perception of that body’s legitimacy, especially when that group makes decisions that have an impact on women. To conduct the study, which appears in the American Journal of Political Science , the researchers varied the gender composition of a hypothetical bipartisan legislative committee and the decis

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Soft materials could replace silicon to cut solar cell costs

The way a certain class of photovoltaic materials y converts sunlight into electricity could position them to replace traditional silicon solar cells, researchers say. The study, which appears in Chem , reveals the unique properties of these inexpensive and quick-to-produce halide perovskites, information that will guide the development of next generation solar cells. “Since the development of si

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EU countries unprepared to move future Alzheimer's treatment into rapid clinical use

The burden of Alzheimer's disease in high-income countries is expected to nearly double by 2050 and recent positive results from clinical trials give hope that a disease-changing treatment could become available for routine use within a few years. But a new study finds that the health care systems in some European countries lack the capacity to rapidly move a disease-modifying treatment for Alzhei

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