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Nyheder2018oktober03

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How to 'Turn Off' the Presidential Emergency Text Alert Test

If you really don't want to receive today's emergency test text message, there's one pretty simple workaround.

1h

Scientists push microscopy to sub-molecular resolution

Notorious asphyxiator carbon monoxide has few true admirers, but it's favored by University of California, Irvine scientists who use it to study other molecules.

5h

Budgetoverskridelse på Ringstedbanen spænder ben for jernbaneprojekter landet over

Fornyelse af jernbanen for 325 millioner kroner må udskydes på ubestemt tid for at finansiere ombygning af Ringsted Station. Helt urimeligt for togpassagererne, siger transportpolitiker.

16h

LATEST

3min

New 3D-printed cement paste gets stronger when it cracks — just like structures in nature

Purdue University researchers have 3D-printed cement paste, a key ingredient of the concrete and mortar used to build various elements of infrastructure, that gets tougher under pressure like the shells of arthropods such as lobsters and beetles. The technique could eventually contribute to more resilient structures during natural disasters.

7min

New nuclear medicine tracer will help study the aging brain

A new PET imaging radiotracer could help researchers understand neurodegenerative disease and the aging brain. The study is featured in the October issue of The Journal of Nuclear Medicine.

7min

A new brain-inspired architecture could improve how computers handle data and advance ai

IBM researchers are developing a new computer architecture, better equipped to handle increased data loads from artificial intelligence. Their designs draw on concepts from the human brain and significantly outperform conventional computers in comparative studies. They report on their recent findings in the Journal of Applied Physics.

7min

Yale approach bases decision-making on older adults' own health priorities

In a pilot project, researchers at Yale, New York University School of Medicine and Baylor College of Medicine have shown that an innovative approach to health care for older adults with complex health needs can be integrated into a real-world clinical practice. Known as patient priorities care, the approach helps patients and clinicians focus decision-making and health care on what matters most –

7min

Brett Kavanaugh’s Friend Mark Judge Edited His High School Yearbook

It’s easy to blame the editors. Last week, during a hearing before the Senate Judiciary Committee, Brett Kavanaugh suggested his classmates working on the yearbook—and not him—were responsible from the material that appeared on his page. “I think some editors and students wanted the yearbook to be some combination of Animal House, Caddy Shack and Fast Times at Ridgemont High , which were all rece

8min

More Images From Indonesia’s Devastating Earthquake and Tsunami

Indonesia’s disaster response agency now says the death toll from the September 28 earthquake and tsunami has risen to more than 1,400, with another 2,500 injured. Aid and supplies are starting to arrive in some harder-hit areas near the town of Palu. Rescue teams are still searching for possible survivors, as some 200,000 quake-affected residents face critical shortages of food, water, and fuel.

8min

Improving Accuracy in Serial Dilutions Using the Electronic Pipette

Electronic pipettes provide more accurate sample concentrations, reduced error propagation, and improved ergonomics. Download this application note from Sartorius to learn more!

16min

3,500-year-old pumpkin spice? Archaeologists find the earliest use of nutmeg as a food

A new study describes the earliest-known use of nutmeg as a food ingredient, found at an archaeological site in Indonesia.

17min

Low self-esteem connected to greater risk for opioid use

New research reveals that life stressors are most associated with an increased risk for using opioids to cope.

17min

Flowing salt water over this super-hydrophobic surface can generate electricity

Engineers have developed a super-hydrophobic surface that can be used to generate electrical voltage. When salt water flows over this specially patterned surface, it can produce at least 50 millivolts.

17min

Drinking more water reduces bladder infections in women, study finds

Drinking an additional 1.5 liters of water daily can reduce recurring bladder infections in premenopausal women by nearly half, a yearlong study of otherwise healthy women with a history of repeated infections has found.

17min

Unmasking corrosion to design better protective thin films for metals

Corrosion of metals is an age-old problem, but they are normally protected from catastrophic damage by naturally forming, super-thin oxide films. Traditionally, these protective films have been viewed as simple oxides of well-anticipated compounds. Now researchers have found the protective films develop new structures and compositions that depend on how fast the oxide film grows.

17min

6 ways the places where we grow up shape our lives

Researchers have created an interactive, map-based tool—the Opportunity Atlas—that can trace the root of people’s outcomes, such as poverty or incarceration, to the neighborhoods in which they grew up. Social scientists have long understood that prospects for social and economic mobility among American adults are intimately linked to the neighborhoods in which they grew up. The new research and i

18min

Landlords may penalize tenants for ‘killer’ water bills

Spiking water bills and nuisance fees can so unsettle landlords in disadvantaged communities that they screen potential tenants more rigorously, threatening housing security for those who need it most, according to a new study. The research, which followed nearly 60 owners of smaller properties in Cleveland for more than two years, shows that city policies that sanction landlords for tenant activ

18min

23min

Benefits of Electronic Pipette Use for Pipetting PCR Master Mix

Download this application note from Sartorius to explore how electronic pipettes can help ensure reproducible and reliable results when performing PCR-based assays.

23min

Nasa casts doubt on Russian theory ISS air leak was sabotage

Nasa said ruling out defects doesn’t mean ‘hole was created intentionally’ after Russian agency said it was investigating the possibility Nasa has expressed doubts over a Russian theory that a tiny hole that caused an air leak on the International Space Station (ISS) was the result of sabotage . Related: 'All is calm': Russian cosmonaut shows space station hole Continue reading…

24min

ReFRAME drug repurposing collection yields hope for treating diseases that kill millions

Drugs that have been previously tested for safety in humans offer a major advantage over new compounds, as the time and cost of conducting preclinical trials in animals and early trials in humans represents a major hurdle to bringing new drugs to the clinic.

29min

Toward a smaller carbon footprint

Researchers have made a breakthrough in carbon nanotube technology that removes carbon dioxide from the air and converts it into useful chemicals.

31min

Revolutionary ultra-thin 'meta-lens' enables full-color imaging

Engineers have created the first flat lens capable of correctly focusing a large range of colors of any polarization to the same focal spot without the need for any additional elements. Only a micron thick, their revolutionary 'flat' lens is much thinner than a sheet of paper and offers performance comparable to top-of-the-line compound lens systems.

31min

Glow-in-the-dark paper as a rapid test for infectious diseases

Researchers have found a practicable and reliable way to test for infectious diseases: All you need are a special glowing paper strip, a drop of blood and a digital camera.

45min

New model of polarization sheds light on today's politics

Americans are no longer voting for just the candidates who suit them best — they're also voting strategically to empower their preferred political party in the legislature, and it's driving us apart, according to a new model of electoral competitiveness.

45min

Risk of dying during pregnancy is five times higher for women with epilepsy

The risk of dying during pregnancy is negligible for the average Danish woman, but if the woman in question has epilepsy, the probability must be multiplied by five, according to a comprehensive epidemiological study.

45min

Social class determines whether buying experiences or things brings greater happiness

What is the best way to spend money to increase your happiness? It may depend, in part, on how wealthy you are, according to new findings.

45min

Newly discovered compounds shed fresh light on whole grain health benefits

Scientists have discovered new compounds that may explain whole grain health benefits. A high intake of whole grains increased the levels of betaine compounds in the body which, in turn, was associated with improved glucose metabolism, among other things. The findings shed new light on the cell level effects of a whole grain-rich diet, and can help in development of increasingly healthy food produ

45min

Lilly Pilly fossils reveal snowless Snowy Mountains

Leaf fossils discovered high in Australia's Snowy Mountains have revealed a past history of warmer rainforest vegetation and a lack of snow, in contrast with the alpine vegetation and winter snow-covered slopes of today.

45min

Discovery of first genetic variants associated with meaning in life

For the first time, locations on the human genome have been identified that can explain differences in meaning in life between individuals. This is the result of research conducted in over 220,000 individuals. The researchers identified two genetic variants for meaning in life and six genetic variants for happiness.

45min

It pays to be pessimistic, shows new research into entrepreneurs

Optimistic thinking is leading people to set up businesses that have no realistic prospect of financial success, shows new research which may help explain why only fifty per cent of businesses in the UK survive their first five years.

45min

Complex factors can drive the emergence and evolution of plant pathogens

New research sheds light on factors that contribute to the rise and spread of plant diseases.

45min

A grape constituent protects against cancer

Lung cancer is the deadliest form of cancer in the world, and 80% of death are related to smoking. In addition to tobacco control, effective chemoprevention strategies are therefore needed. A team of scientists studied a well-known natural product, resveratrol, which is found in grapes and in red wine. While its chemopreventive properties against cancers affecting the digestive tract have been doc

45min

For the sleep-deprived, small distractions can have dire results

Small distractions can have serious consequences for people deprived of sleep, according to the largest experimentally controlled study on sleep deprivation to date. The findings reveal just how detrimental operating without sleep can be in a range of situations, from bakers adding too much salt to cookies to surgeons botching surgeries. While sleep deprivation research isn’t new, the level at wh

46min

A Stunning Discovery in the Search for Moons Beyond the Solar System

For a long time, the only moon human beings knew of was our own. In the early 17th century, the invention of the telescope extended our vision into the cosmos and allowed Galileo to discover four new moons, in orbit around Jupiter. Five moons around Saturn were found in that century, and two more in the next. By the 19th century, astronomers had detected moons around Mars, Neptune, and Uranus. To

54min

Republicans and Democrats Are Stuck Debating Who Benefits From Kavanaugh

Joe Manchin, the Democratic senator running for re-election in red West Virginia, was amiably ambling down the street last weekend at a Pumpkin Festival when some of his constituents decided to speak their minds : “Vote for Kavanaugh!” “Are you going to vote for the judge?” “If you don’t vote for him, I won’t vote for you.” To which Manchin replied: “I get that a lot.” Meanwhile, in red North Dak

54min

The Problem With #BelieveSurvivors

We are now in a time of chronic national convulsions, and the latest, over the nomination of Brett Kavanaugh to the U.S. Supreme Court, has resulted in the wrenching public and private testimony of women who have been sexually assaulted and who have never before spoken about it. Of course, this outpouring has a hashtag: #BelieveSurvivors. Women who tell their stories should have the support, and

54min

Success! Hopping, Shoebox-Size Lander Touches Down Safely on Asteroid Ryugu

The European-built MASCOT lander successfully deployed from Japan’s Hayabusa1 spacecraft to begin its ambitious-but-brief mission — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

58min

Two Plant Biologists Penalized by CNRS in France

Olivier Voinnet and Patrice Dunoyer face consequences for misconduct that led to the retractions of numerous high-profile papers.

59min

Security failure at Facebook—what we know

The security breach revealed on September 28 by Facebook affected tens of millions of accounts at the social network, which boasts more than 2.2 billion monthly users.

1h

Reducing mutant Huntington disease protein can restore cognitive function in mice

New research from the University of British Columbia suggests that reducing mutated Huntington disease protein in the brain can restore cognitive and psychiatric impairments in mice.

1h

Inflammatory bowel disease drug attacks safe haven for HIV

A first in human study of patients with both inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and HIV found that administering a drug for IBD disrupts congregating T cells infected with HIV in the gut — which form a persistent reservoir of infection.

1h

Thanks to help from Hubble, the first confirmed exomoon?

Taking advantage of observations from the Hubble Space Telescope, researchers provide evidence of what could be the first exomoon — a moon orbiting a planet outside our solar system. While the authors were rigorous in their evaluations, they caution that their results must be confirmed by subsequent work. Recently, NASA's Kepler space telescope surveyed for

1h

T cell bispecific antibody for the immune-mediated killing of HER2+ breast cancer cells

Researchers at the Vall d'Hebron Institute of Oncology in Barcelona show that the p95HER2-T cell bispecific antibody (TCB) can successfully guide immune cells, known as lymphocytes, directly to cancerous ones for their targeted killing. This direct delivery is achieved thanks to the p95HER2 protein, which is only located in tumor cells.

1h

Couples showing off: Songbirds are more passionate in front of an audience

Both sexes of a songbird called the blue-capped cordon-bleu intensify courtship performances that involve singing and dancing in the presence of an audience, especially if it is a member of the opposite sex, an international team of researchers has discovered.

1h

Columbia astronomers find first compelling evidence for a moon outside our solar system

On the hunt for distant worlds, Columbia researchers have identified an exomoon candidate around the transiting exoplanet Kepler-1625b that indicates the presence of a previously unknown gas-giant moon.

1h

Evolution: Genetics doesn't matter much in forming society

Genetics isn't as important as once thought for the evolution of altruistic social behavior in some organisms, a new insight into a decade-long debate.

1h

Anti-integrin therapy effect on intestinal immune system in HIV-infected patients

In a study published today in Science Translational Medicine, Mount Sinai researchers describe for the first time a mechanism that may shrink collections of immune cells in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract, called lymphoid aggregates, where HIV may lay sequestered.

1h

Teeth of Homo antecessor shed light on trends in Pleistocene hominin dental evolution

Some of the dental features characteristic of Neanderthals were already present in Early Pleistocene Homo antecessor, according to a study published in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Laura Martín-Francés of the University of Bordeaux, France and colleagues.

1h

Neanderthal-like features in 450,000-year-old fossil teeth from the Italian Peninsula

Fossil teeth from Italy, among the oldest human remains on the Italian Peninsula, show that Neanderthal dental features had evolved by around 450,000 years ago, according to a study published Oct. 3, 2018, in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Clément Zanolli of the Université Toulouse III Paul Sabatier in France and colleagues.

1h

Bone knife from Morocco is oldest specialized tool associated with Aterian culture

A single bone artifact found in a Moroccan cave is the oldest well-dated specialized bone tool associated with the Aterian culture of the Middle Stone Age, according to a study released Oct. 3, 2018, in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Abdeljalil Bouzouggar of the Institut National des Sciences de l'Archéologie et du Patrimoine in Morocco and colleagues.

1h

Green algae, white noise: Gas bubbles produced during photosynthesis 'ring' upon release

Gas bubbles released by marine algae during photosynthesis produce sound whose intensity correlates with the degree of algal cover on coral reefs, according to a study published Oct. 3 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Simon and Lauren Freeman, a husband-and-wife team of the US Naval Undersea Warfare Center and colleagues.

1h

Hugs may help protect against conflict-related distress

Receiving hugs may buffer against deleterious changes in mood associated with interpersonal conflict, according to a study published Oct. 3 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Michael Murphy of Carnegie Mellon University, along with co-authors Denise Janicki-Deverts and Sheldon Cohen.

1h

Lemur study suggests why some fruits smell so fruity

A new test with lemurs and birds suggests there’s more to fruit odors than simple ripening.

1h

Astronomers discover first suspected 'exomoon' 8,000 light years away

Neptune-sized body would be the first known moon outside solar system and the largest moon yet discovered Astronomers believe they have discovered the first known moon beyond our solar system, in orbit around a gigantic planet 8,000 light years away. The so-called exomoon, which is estimated to be the size of Neptune, would also be the biggest known moon, far exceeding anything known to exist in

1h

Astronomers think they’ve found a moon the size of Neptune in a distant star systemNeptune Solar System

Space It could be the largest moon we’ve ever seen Nearly eight thousand light-years away from Earth, there’s a star about the same size as our sun. Like our own solar system, that distant star is orbited by a planet…

1h

Could Nobel-Winning Laser Tech Make Sci-Fi 'Tractor Beams' a Reality?

Could Nobel-Winning Laser Tech Make Sci-Fi 'Tractor Beams' a Reality? Optical tweezers developed by a new Nobel laureate could potentially be used on slightly larger objects, but not spacecraft. Lasers.jpg Image credits: Pavel L Photo and Video/ Shutterstock Physics Wednesday, October 3, 2018 – 14:00 Ramin Skibba, Contributor (Inside Science) — American physicist Arthur Ashkin figured out at Bel

1h

It's a beautiful game, but how you see it is all in the mind

Researchers have used MRI scanning to try and find out how people can have such different takes on soccer/football.

1h

Is replying to online reviews always good? New research shows downside of over-responding

When managers respond to online reviews, it's possible that those responses could actually stimulate additional reviewing activity and an increased number of negative reviews, a new study finds.

1h

A warmer spring leads to less plant growth in summer

Due to climate change, springtime growth begins earlier each year. Up to now, it was thought that this phenomenon was slowing climate change. However, as evaluations of satellite data have now shown, the opposite is the case.

1h

Combination therapy targets latent reservoir of HIV

Medical researchers demonstrate that administering broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAb) designed to target HIV in combination with agents that stimulate the innate immune system delayed viral rebound following discontinuation of ART in monkeys. The findings suggest that this two-pronged approach represents a potential strategy for targeting the viral reservoir.

1h

Recording device for cell history

Researchers are using the CRISPR-Cas system to develop a novel recording mechanism: the snippets of DNA it produces can provide information about certain cellular processes. In future, this cellular memory might even be used in diagnostics.

1h

Stem cells organize themselves into pseudo-embryos

The three axes of the mammalian body, established shortly after implantation of the embryo in the uterus, becomes organized under the control of gene networks that coordinate the transcription of DNA. Researchers report the ability of mouse stem cells to produce pseudo-embryos that display similar capacities.

1h

Scientists Find What Could Be A History-Making MoonNeptune Solar System

Scientists have detected plenty of planets outside our solar system. Now, they say, they've found the first moon circling one of them. (Image credit: Courtesty of NASA)

1h

Hubble may have spotted the first known exomoon

A single sighting with the Hubble Space Telescope seems to confirm that there’s a Neptune-sized moon orbiting exoplanet Kepler 1625b.

1h

A 90,000-year-old bone knife hints special tools appeared early in Africa

The discovery of a bone knife in a Moroccan cave points to the ancient emergence of specialized toolmaking in the region.

1h

Scientists discover new nursery for superpowered photons

A strange star system in our own Milky Way is producing some of the most powerful gamma rays ever seen. Messengers from this microquasar may offer a glimpse into bizarre objects at the centers of distant galaxies.

1h

New geriatrics research offers roadmap to 'revolutionary change' for person-centered care

Published today in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society, two new research articles and a corresponding commentary from preeminent geriatrics leaders describe ways to make person-centered care–a novel approach to health that puts personal values and preferences at the forefront of decision-making–more actionable for older people.

1h

8.000 lysår væk: Hubble finder tungtvejende beviser for første exomåne

Den britiske astronom David Kipping og hans hold tager med Hubble-observationer et massivt skridt mod det første bekræftede fund af en måne uden for vores solsystem.

1h

Green algae, white noise: Gas bubbles produced during photosynthesis 'ring' upon release

Gas bubbles released by marine algae during photosynthesis produce sound whose intensity correlates with the degree of algal cover on coral reefs, according to a study published October 3 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Simon and Lauren Freeman, a husband-and-wife team of the US Naval Undersea Warfare Center and colleagues. The finding may allow a simple and rapid way to measure algal cover

1h

Couples showing off: Songbirds are more passionate in front of an audience

Both sexes of a songbird called the blue-capped cordon-bleu intensify courtship performances that involve singing and dancing in the presence of an audience, especially if it is a member of the opposite sex, an international team of researchers has discovered.

1h

Astronomers find first compelling evidence for a moon outside our solar systemNeptune Solar System

A pair of Columbia University astronomers using NASA's Hubble Space Telescope and Kepler Space Telescope have assembled compelling evidence for the existence of a moon orbiting a gas-giant planet 8,000 light-years away.

1h

Neanderthal-like features in 450,000-year-old fossil teeth from the Italian Peninsula

Fossil teeth from Italy, among the oldest human remains on the Italian Peninsula, show that Neanderthal dental features had evolved by around 450,000 years ago, according to a study published October 3, 2018 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Clément Zanolli of the Université Toulouse III Paul Sabatier in France and colleagues. These teeth also add to a growing picture of a period of complex h

1h

Bone knife from Morocco is oldest specialized tool associated with Aterian culture

A single bone artefact found in a Moroccan cave is the oldest well-dated specialized bone tool associated with the Aterian culture of the Middle Stone Age, according to a study released October 3, 2018 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Abdeljalil Bouzouggar of the Institut National des Sciences de l'Archéologie et du Patrimoine in Morocco and colleagues. The make and manufacture of the tool a

1h

Evolution: Genetics doesn't matter much in forming society

Genetics isn't as important as once thought for the evolution of altruistic social behavior in some organisms, according to a new insight into a decade-long debate. This is the first empirical evidence that suggests social behavior in eusocial species—organisms that are highly organized, with divisions of infertile workers—is only mildly attributed to how related these organisms are to each other.

1h

Teeth of Homo antecessor shed light on trends in Pleistocene hominin dental evolution

Some of the dental features characteristic of Neanderthals were already present in Early Pleistocene Homo antecessor, according to a study published September 19, 2018 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Laura Martín-Francés of the University of Bordeaux, France and colleagues.

1h

Astronomers Tiptoe Closer to Confirming First Exomoon

Signals seen by the Hubble Space Telescope suggest a Neptune-size moon may orbit a gas-giant planet around a star some 8,000 light-years from Earth — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

1h

These tools helped scientists win the Nobel Prize

Technology From optical tweezers to multiplexed cell imaging, this is what it takes to break through. These are the tools that enabled the 2018 Nobel laureates to go for gold.

1h

Live TV Is All But Dead

Live television, as we know it, is becoming more and more of a boutique experience. It’s essential for sports, of course, and breaking news, but apart from that, fewer viewers than ever tuned in to the major broadcast networks to check out the new fall TV offerings . That doesn’t mean the slew of debuting shows such as God Friended Me and New Amsterdam will go ignored. Plenty of viewers will inst

1h

Why Canada just stripped Aung San Suu Kyi's honorary citizenship

Suu Kyi won a Nobel Peace Prize in 1991 for her work in promoting democracy in Myanmar, and Canada voted to grant her honorary citizenship in 2007. Suu Kyi has stayed silent about and opposed investigations into human rights violations against the Rohingya by Myanmar security forces. The vote comes in the wake of a U.N. report that found evidence that Myanmar military officials had committed the

1h

Kanye West’s 13th Amendment outburst was baffling, but worth considering

On Sunday, rapper Kanye West tweeted that we should abolish the 13th Amendment, later backtracking that he meant "amend." The 13th Amendment abolished slavery in the United States, but its punishment clause allowed an exception for convicted inmates. The punishment clause isn't the exception but the rule, one that many argue continues America's slavery tradition to this day. None Should we abolis

1h

Female Nobel prize winner deemed not important enough for Wikipedia entry

Site moderator rejected submission for Donna Strickland, the first female physics winner in 55 years, in March When the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences in Stockholm announced the Nobel prize for physics this week, anyone wanting to find out more about one of the three winners would have drawn a blank on Wikipedia. Related: Physics Nobel prize won by Arthur Ashkin, Gérard Mourou and Donna Strick

1h

Doubling down on trendy phrasal verbs | Brief letters

Severn tolls | No clapping | Doubling down | Planet Nine | Sluts and slums A reason to celebrate ( Severn bridge tolls to be scrapped before Christmas , 3 September). No more hard border! Free movement of goods and people! Easier access for us from Essex, to the most beautiful place in Wales, Pembrokeshire. But please ensure no one will be out of a job when the barriers are removed. Irene Jones Br

1h

Is Your Dog Super Smart? No, LOL

The authors of a new paper suggested that scientists have overstated dog smarts. But a dog researcher tells Live Science we should study canines anyway.

1h

Brown Rice: Health Benefits & Nutrition Facts

Brown rice is a highly nutritious grain. It is good for the heart, aids digestion and may reduce the risk of cancer, diabetes and high cholesterol.

1h

HAWC: Microquasar SS 433 reveals the nature of the brightest lanterns of the universe

They shine even from billions of light years away. Intriguing and enigmatic, quasars are loath to uncover their secrets. Fortunately, we can find out more about them by looking at their star counterparts — microquasars. Many years of observation of the microquasar SS 433, carried out in the HAWC observatory, have made it possible to identify, for the first time, spectacular details of the process

1h

Honda's Helping GM on Its Quest to Deliver Self-Driving CarsHonda GM Cruise Self

The Japanese automaker will help develop a new design for a self-driving vehicle, and pitch in $2.75 billion.

1h

NASA skeptical on sabotage theory after mystery ISS leak

NASA expressed doubts Wednesday over a theory floated in Russia that a tiny hole that caused an air leak on the International Space Station was the result of sabotage.

1h

Fresh insights help unlock mysteries of the first stages of life

Key insights into how sperm and egg cells are formed have been discovered by scientists, shedding light on the earliest stages of their development.

1h

Leon Lederman, 96, Explorer (and Explainer) of the Subatomic World, Dies

A Nobel laureate who deepened science’s understanding of the building blocks of matter, he was called “the best ambassador of physics to the general public since Einstein.”

1h

Japan Set to Allow Gene Editing in Human Embryos

Draft guidelines permit gene-editing tools for research into early human development, but would discourage manipulation of embryos for reproduction — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

1h

Unmasking corrosion to design better protective thin films for metals

Corrosion is an age-old problem that is estimated to cost about $1 trillion a year, or about 5 percent of the U.S. gross domestic product. Corrosion of metals can be particularly bad, but fortunately they are normally protected from catastrophic damage by naturally forming, super-thin oxide films.

2h

Unmasking corrosion to design better protective thin films for metals

Corrosion of metals is an age-old problem, but they are normally protected from catastrophic damage by naturally forming, super-thin oxide films. Traditionally, these protective films have been viewed as simple oxides of well-anticipated compounds, but new work led by Northwestern University reveals new insights. The research team found the protective films develop new structures and compositions

2h

Combination therapy targets latent reservoir of HIV

In a new study, Dan H. Barouch, MD, PhD, Director of the Center for Virology and Vaccine Research at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, and colleagues demonstrate that administering broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAb) designed to target HIV in combination with agents that stimulate the innate immune system delayed viral rebound following discontinuation of ART in monkeys. The findings sugges

2h

Fresh insights help unlock mysteries of the first stages of life

Key insights into how sperm and egg cells are formed have been discovered by scientists, shedding light on the earliest stages of their development.

2h

A warmer spring leads to less plant growth in summer

Due to climate change, springtime growth begins earlier each year. Up to now, it was thought that this phenomenon was slowing climate change. However, as evaluations of satellite data undertaken at TU Wien have now shown, the opposite is the case.

2h

Recording device for cell history

ETH researchers are using the CRISPR-Cas system to develop a novel recording mechanism: the snippets of DNA it produces can provide information about certain cellular processes. In future, this cellular memory might even be used in diagnostics.

2h

Mountaintop observatory sees gamma rays from exotic Milky Way object

The High-Altitude Water Cherenkov Gamma-Ray Observatory (HAWC) collaboration has detected highly energetic light coming from a microquasar — a black hole that gobbles up stuff from a companion star and blasts out powerful jets of material. Data analysis indicates that electron acceleration and collisions at the ends of the microquasar's jets produced powerful gamma rays. Multi-wavelength messenge

2h

Warmer springs can reduce summer plant productivity

A new extensive study on the effects of warmer springs on plant growth in northern regions shows substantially reduced plant productivity in later months.

2h

Stem cells organize themselves into pseudo-embryos

The three axes of the mammalian body, established shortly after implantation of the embryo in the uterus, becomes organized under the control of gene networks that coordinate the transcription of DNA. Researchers from the University of Geneva, the University of Cambridge and the Federal Institute of Technology Lausanne report the ability of mouse stem cells to produce pseudo-embryos that display s

2h

The Costs of Succeeding While Black in America

New England winters are brutal affairs, with dry, driving winds that lash at those walking from here to there. On this night, but not just this one, anyone who spied me exiting one of Central Square’s liquor stores near the MIT campus with a large brown bag might well have thought that I had found some graduate-school comrades with whom to spend an evening, warming ourselves from the inside out w

2h

Cyprus invites bids to explore for offshore gas

Cyprus decided Wednesday to invite energy giants Total, Eni and ExxonMobil to bid for a license to explore for oil and gas in a new offshore block, officials said.

2h

Women scientists still 'undervalued' despite twin Nobel wins

With two Nobel prize winners in as many days, women scientists have welcomed the research community "waking up" to the feats of their female peers, but insist they remain underpaid and undervalued compared to men.

2h

3,500-year-old pumpkin spice? Archaeologists find the earliest use of nutmeg as a food

As all things pumpkin spice arrive in grocery store aisles and on restaurant menus, a new study published in the journal Asian Perspectives describes the earliest-known use of nutmeg as a food ingredient.

2h

Grad School Made Them Famous

Grad School Made Them Famous A look at five other Nobel Prize winners who share the uncommon achievement of having done their award-winning work as students. MarieCurieOtherScientists.jpg 1931 photograph from the Conference on Nuclear Physics in Rome, including, from left to right in the front row, Robert Millikan, Marie Curie, Guglielmo Marconi, and Niels Bohr. Picture also features Arthur Compt

2h

Flowing salt water over this super-hydrophobic surface can generate electricity

Engineers at the University of California San Diego have developed a super-hydrophobic surface that can be used to generate electrical voltage. When salt water flows over this specially patterned surface, it can produce at least 50 millivolts. The proof-of-concept work could lead to the development of new power sources for lab-on-a-chip platforms and other microfluidics devices. It could someday b

2h

NASA gets a look at the rainfall rates within Typhoon Kong-Rey

The Global Precipitation Measurement mission or GPM core satellite passed over Typhoon Kong-Rey moving through the Northwestern Pacific Ocean and found heaviest rainfall occurring in the storm's eyewall.

2h

Row with Russia and SpaceX delays could leave NASA unable to reach ISS

Talk of sabotage on the International Space Station has exposed cracks in the US-Russia space relationship that could see NASA unable to fly astronauts into orbit

2h

Mouse Stem Cells Made to Form Embryo-Like Structures

With just a molecular nudge, aggregates of embryonic stem cells take shape as a "gastroloid" bearing the genetic hallmarks and spatial organization of early development.

2h

Warmer springs can reduce summer plant productivity

A new extensive study on the effects of warmer springs on plant growth in northern regions shows substantially reduced plant productivity in later months. The results call into question the validity of current climate models that include plant productivity when assessing the amount of carbon captured by vegetation and what remains in the atmosphere.

2h

Mountaintop observatory sees gamma rays from exotic Milky Way object

The night sky seems serene, but telescopes tell us that the universe is filled with collisions and explosions. Distant, violent events signal their presence by spewing light and particles in all directions. When these messengers reach Earth, scientists can use them to map out the action-packed sky, helping to better understand the volatile processes happening deep within space.

2h

Stem cells organize themselves into pseudo-embryos

The definitive architecture of the mammalian body is established shortly after implantation of the embryo in the uterus. The antero-posterior, dorso-ventral and medio-lateral axes of the body become organized under the control of gene networks that coordinate the transcription of DNA in various regions of the embryo. Researchers from the University of Geneva (UNIGE), the University of Cambridge, U

2h

In Comments on New Climate Report, U.S. Plays Up Uncertainties, Fossil Fuels

Government representatives are weighing in before a final international report on limiting warming is released — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

2h

Flowing salt water over this super-hydrophobic surface can generate electricity

Engineers have developed a super-hydrophobic surface that can be used to generate electrical voltage. When salt water flows over this specially patterned surface, it can produce at least 50 millivolts. The proof-of-concept work could lead to the development of new power sources for lab-on-a-chip platforms and other microfluidics devices. It could someday be extended to energy harvesting methods in

2h

The U.S. Just Tore Up a Six-Decade-Old Treaty With Iran

The Trump administration has been tightening the screws on Iran ever since the U.S. withdrew in May from the nuclear deal. It has imposed sanctions, increased its hostile rhetoric, and threatened its own allies for working with Tehran. Now comes one more item on that list: On Wednesday, the Trump administration tore up the little-known, Eisenhower-era Treaty of Amity with the Islamic Republic on

2h

Will Canada run out of legal pot during the first year of sales?

Canada is set to legalize recreational marijuana on Oct. 17. Some economists say the industry won't be able to meet demand during the first year, and that prices will rise or supply will run out. Dispensary owners in Colorado expressed similar anxieties in 2014 when recreational pot was legalized. None Recreational marijuana will be legalized in Canada on Oct. 17, but some say the current supply

2h

New, MIT-made battery is powered by CO2

New research from an MIT team has resulted in a proof-of-concept battery that uses a CO2-based component. The research made innovative use of technology from existing carbon-capture processes and applied it to battery systems, potentially circumventing the high cost of carbon capture and the inefficiency in prior CO2-based batteries. The system could be installed in power plants to capture excess

2h

Nye Windows-computere er klædt i sort og læder

Nyt, sort design skal gøre Microsofts computere mere attraktive. HPs får til gengæld ‘lædervest’.

2h

Drinking more water reduces bladder infections in women

Drinking an additional 1.5 liters of water daily can reduce recurring bladder infections in premenopausal women by nearly half, a yearlong study of otherwise healthy women with a history of repeated infections has found.

2h

3,500-year-old pumpkin spice? Archaeologists find the earliest use of nutmeg as a food

A new study describes the earliest-known use of nutmeg as a food ingredient, found at an archaeological site in Indonesia.

2h

NASA gets a look at the rainfall rates within Typhoon Kong-Rey

The Global Precipitation Measurement mission or GPM core satellite passed over Typhoon Kong-Rey moving through the Northwestern Pacific Ocean and found heaviest rainfall occurring in the storm's eyewall.

2h

Lindsey Graham ‘Didn’t Particularly Like’ Trump’s Mockery of Christine Blasey Ford

Updated on October 3 at 12:58 p.m. ET Senator Lindsey Graham has emerged as the most vocal champion of Brett Kavanaugh’s Supreme Court nomination. But on Wednesday, he suggested that President Donald Trump’s recent attacks on Christine Blasey Ford, the judge’s accuser, aren’t useful—though they could, he noted, “be worse.” “President Trump went through a factual rendition that I didn’t particular

2h

Trump’s Shady Accounting Playbook for the Hyper-rich

Wealth begets wealth, and the wealthy are remarkably adept at figuring out how to get wealthier. That is one takeaway from The New York Times ’ mammoth investigation into the Trump family’s gymnastic accounting prowess, based on reams of tax returns and corporate documents. The family used perfectly legal and more questionable tax-avoidance strategies to bolster its net worth, the investigation b

2h

Here’s what you need to know about today’s unavoidable Presidential Alert notificationPA Trump FEMA Alert US

Technology You can't block it and you probably shouldn't try. This afternoon your smartphone—regardless of carrier or settings—will call out with an emergency alert. The notification is a test of a new system called the Integrated…

3h

Tiny critter swims in polygons to steer clear of light

Under some circumstances, single-cell organisms called Euglena gracilis halt their forward progress and begin tracing out elaborate triangles, squares, and pentagons in a mathematically defined effort to find a better environment. The way Euglena traces polygons could help researchers design swimming robots that are more efficient at maneuvering through the bloodstream or navigating watery enviro

3h

Why data matters for tracking biodiversity changes

New research highlights the importance of trait variability within species in measuring biodiversity changes and how ecologists can incorporate that data into their assessments. Around the world, ecologists are studying how species are responding to global changes in habitat, environment, and climate. Ecologists build essential biodiversity variables, or EBVs, from various sources of data and the

3h

Low self-esteem connected to greater risk for opioid use

Health, family and romance problems appear to be the particular life stressors most associated with increased risk for using opioids to cope, and individuals with low self-esteem appear to be at risk for these connections, according to a new paper including researchers at Binghamton University, State University at New York.

3h

Stepping toward a smaller carbon footprint

Burning fossil fuels such as coal and natural gas releases carbon into the atmosphere as CO2 while the production of methanol and other valuable fuels and chemicals requires a supply of carbon. There is currently no economically or energy efficient way to collect CO2 from the atmosphere and use it to produce carbon-based chemicals, but researchers at the University of Pittsburgh Swanson School of

3h

Study: Nursing homes increasingly pushing patients into rehab at end-of-life

A new study reveals a growing trend of potentially unnecessary — and harmful — high intensity rehabilitation services for residents of nursing homes. The study finds that this trend, which may be driven by a desire to maximize reimbursement rates, is on the rise for patients in the last 30 days of life, indicating that these services may be interfering with appropriate end-of-life care.

3h

Hormone therapy for 'low T' may not be safe for all men

Boosting testosterone levels with hormone supplements may not be safe or appropriate for all men with low testosterone (low T), according to new research. Recent findings will be presented today at the American Physiological Society's (APS) Cardiovascular, Renal and Metabolic Diseases: Sex-Specific Implications for Physiology conference in Knoxville, Tenn.

3h

The Most Striking Thing About Trump's Mockery of Christine Blasey Ford

On Tuesday evening, at a rally in Mississippi, Donald Trump did what Donald Trump is so often apt to do: He dispelled with the former niceties. The president who last week had been, in public settings, generally respectful of Christine Blasey Ford—the woman who had come forward to allege that the Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh had sexually assaulted her when she was 15—reverted to the mode

3h

New breakthrough in nanotechnology that uses atmospheric carbon to make useful chemicals

Burning fossil fuels such as coal and natural gas releases carbon into the atmosphere as CO2 while the production of methanol and other valuable fuels and chemicals requires a supply of carbon. There is currently no economically or energy efficient way to collect CO2 from the atmosphere and use it to produce carbon-based chemicals, but researchers at the University of Pittsburgh Swanson School of

3h

EU, Germany to fund Ivory Coast solar power station

German and EU cash will be used to finance the first solar power station in Ivory Coast, Germany's embassy in Abidjan said Wednesday, as the West African country attempts to boost its use of renewable energy.

3h

EU lawmakers want to cut car emissions by 40 percent by 2030

The European Parliament wants to cut CO2 emissions from new cars and vans by 40 percent by 2030 and will try to convince the European Union's 28 nations to back the idea despite objections from the powerful car industry.

3h

Child experts file FTC complaint against Facebook kids' app

Children's and public health advocacy groups say Facebook's kid-centric messaging app violates federal law by collecting kids' personal information without getting verifiable consent from their parents.

3h

Strange sights, sounds could herald California rocket return

The Air Force is warning residents on California's central coast to be prepared for unusual sights and sounds this weekend as SpaceX attempts its first return of a rocket to launch site on the West Coast.

3h

Trilobites: Why Elephants Don’t Shed Their Skin

The cracks in African elephants’ skin help them keep cool and stay healthy. A new explanation for how those cracks form could offer insights into treating a human skin disease.

3h

Expert roundtable discusses impact of thyroid autoimmune testing on women's health

A group of expert panelists gathered to discuss 'Thyroid Immune Testing — Guidelines, Testing Platforms, and Clinical Impact on Women's Health.'

3h

The risk of dying during pregnancy is five times higher for women with epilepsy

The risk of dying during pregnancy is negligible for the average Danish woman, but if the woman in question has epilepsy, the probability must be multiplied by five. This is the central result presented in a comprehensive epidemiological study that researchers from Health, Aarhus University, are behind.

3h

NASA peers into the large clear eye of Hurricane Walaka

An infrared look by NASA's Terra satellite found a ring of intense storms around the wide eye of Hurricane Walaka in the Central Pacific Ocean. Walaka remains a dangerous category 4 hurricane on the Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Wind Scale.

3h

NASA sees Atlantic's Leslie become a hurricane

NASA's Aqua satellite captured an infrared image of Hurricane Leslie that revealed strong storms circled the center.

3h

NASA peers into the large clear eye of Hurricane Walaka

An infrared look by NASA's Terra satellite found a ring of intense storms around the wide eye of Hurricane Walaka in the Central Pacific Ocean. Walaka remains a dangerous category 4 hurricane on the Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Wind Scale.

3h

Living with Fire in Northern California

A wave of conflagrations has altered both the land and human psyches — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

3h

Diabetes forbundet med gigt og osteoporose

Der er sammenhæng mellem diabetes og slidgigt, leddegigt og osteoporose. Det er vigtigt, at gigtpatienter bliver klar over, at de roligt kan fortsætte deres fysiske træning, siger seniorforsker.

3h

Steno-forsker skaber nyt diabetesregister

Igen i år har seniorstatistiker Bendix Carstensen fra Steno i København nye tal for diabetesprævalens, -incidens og -dødelighed med på EASD. Han kalder det for en opdateret udgave af Det Nationale Diabetesregister.

3h

Kulhydratfattig kur kan give mindre udsving i blodsukker

En kulhydratreduceret diæt giver mindre udsving i korttidsblodsukkeret end en traditionel diabetesdiæt hos yngre type 2-patienter.

3h

Mangel på D-vitamin forbundet med diabetisk neuropati hos unge

Både usædvanligt høje og usædvanligt lave vitamin D-værdier kan være en risikofaktor i forhold til diabetisk neuropati.

3h

Cooling effect of preindustrial fires on climate underestimated

The Industrial Revolution brought about many things: the steam engine, the factory system, mass production.

3h

Is replying to online reviews always good? New research shows downside of over-responding

A new study to be published in the INFORMS journal Marketing Science found that when managers respond to online reviews it's possible that those responses could actually stimulate additional reviewing activity and an increased number of negative reviews.

3h

NASA sees powerful storms circling major Hurricane Sergio's eye

Very powerful storms ringed the eye of Hurricane Sergio in infrared imagery from NASA's Aqua satellite. Sergio is a major hurricane in the Eastern Pacific Ocean.

3h

Rare bottle of Scotch whisky fetches record price

An extremely rare bottle of whisky was sold for a new world record at auction in Edinburgh on Wednesday.

3h

Even light drinking increases risk of death

Analyzing data from more than 400,000 people, researchers have found that consuming one to two drinks four or more times per week — an amount deemed healthy by current guidelines — increases the risk of premature death by 20 percent.

3h

Tropical frogs found to coexist with deadly fungus

In 2004, the frogs of El Copé, Panama, began dying by the thousands. The culprit: the deadly chytrid fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis. Within months, roughly half of native frog species there went locally extinct. A new study suggests that frogs remaining in El Copé developed the ability to coexist with chytrid fungus due to ecological and/or evolutionary changes. The results could mean good

3h

Physical therapy is highly effective for infants with congenital muscular torticollis

Congenital muscular torticollis (CMT) is a common postural deformity in infants, and one that can be effectively treated by physical therapy. A set of updated, evidence-based recommendations for physical therapy management of CMT is presented in the October issue of Pediatric Physical Therapy. The journal is published in the Lippincott portfolio by Wolters Kluwer.

3h

Social class determines whether buying experiences or things brings greater happiness

What is the best way to spend money to increase your happiness? It may depend, in part, on how wealthy you are, according to findings published in Psychological Science , a journal of the Association for Psychological Science.

3h

CU Anschutz scientists identify genetic causes of mitochondrial diseases

An international team of scientists led by researchers from the University of Colorado School of Medicine have identified previously unknown genetic causes of mitochondrial diseases.

3h

New model of polarization sheds light on today's politics

Americans are no longer voting for just the candidates who suit them best — they're also voting strategically to empower their preferred political party in the legislature, and it's driving us apart, according to a new model of electoral competitiveness developed by Vanderbilt economist Mattias Polborn.

3h

NASA sees powerful storms circling major Hurricane Sergio's eye

Very powerful storms ringed the eye of Hurricane Sergio in infrared imagery from NASA's Aqua satellite. Sergio is a major hurricane in the Eastern Pacific Ocean.

3h

Glow-in-the-dark paper as a rapid test for infectious diseases

Researchers from Eindhoven University of Technology (The Netherlands) and Keio University (Japan) present a practicable and reliable way to test for infectious diseases. All you need are a special glowing paper strip, a drop of blood and a digital camera. Not only does this make the technology very cheap and fast — after twenty minutes it is clear whether there is an infection — it also makes ex

3h

Is replying to online reviews always good? New research shows downside of over-responding

A new study to be published in the INFORMS journal Marketing Science found that when managers respond to online reviews it's possible that those responses could actually stimulate additional reviewing activity and an increased number of negative reviews.

3h

NASA sees Atlantic's Leslie become a hurricane

NASA's Aqua satellite captured an infrared image of Hurricane Leslie that revealed strong storms circled the center.

4h

It's a beautiful game, but how you see it is all in the mind…

Researchers from the University of York have used MRI scanning to try and find out how people can have such different takes on football.

4h

Riffyn launches Open Access for scientists at non-profits

Riffyn has launched Riffyn Open Access which provides free use of its patented Scientific Development Environment (SDE™) to any member of a non-profit organization. Open Access users have a full-featured Riffyn SDE™ account to create and openly share reusable experimental methods and data on the platform.

4h

New fuel cell concept brings biological design to better electricity generation

Fuel cells have long been viewed as a promising power source. But most fuel cells are too expensive, inefficient, or both. In a new approach, inspired by biology, a University of Wisconsin-Madison team has designed a fuel cell using cheaper materials and an organic compound that shuttles electrons and protons.

4h

Conservative Women Are Angry About Kavanaugh—And They Think Other Voters Are, Too

When many conservative women around the country watched Christine Blasey Ford appear before the Senate Judiciary Committee last week, they didn’t find her testimony compelling or convincing, as many liberals did. They saw a political farce. “Honestly, I don’t think I have ever been so angry in all of my adult life,” says Ginger Howard, a Republican national committeewoman from Georgia. “It brings

4h

Four women who changed the face of physics

Four pioneering women who changed the face of physics from the 1800s to the present day.

4h

50 years old, '2001: A Space Odyssey' still offers insight about the future

Watching a 50th anniversary screening of "2001: A Space Odyssey," I found myself, a mathematician and computer scientist whose research includes work related to artificial intelligence, comparing the story's vision of the future with the world today.

4h

Teen cannabis use is not without risk to cognitive development

A new study confirms that cannabis use is related to impaired and lasting effects on adolescent cognitive development.

4h

Submarines now have soft, robotic arms

The human arm can perform a wide range of extremely delicate and coordinated movements. The robotic 'arms' on underwater research submarines, however, lack the finesse to reach and interact with soft-bodied sea creatures. A new system lets biologists intuitively control a modular, highly flexible soft robotic arm by wearing a glove equipped with wireless soft sensors. This system also could one da

4h

Thermal imaging offers better diabetic foot ulcer checks

Thermal imaging may better predict the size of a diabetes-related foot ulcer, and how it may heal, according to a new study. It may also save money by offering better targeted treatment. About 415 million people globally have diabetes and up to 10 percent develop diabetes-related foot ulcers, the most common diabetes-related complication requiring hospital treatment. In Australia, diabetes-relate

4h

Cooling effect of preindustrial fires on climate underestimated

A new study, ;Reassessment of Pre-Industrial Fire Emissions Strongly Affects Anthropogenic Aerosol Forcing,' by a Cornell University postdoctoral researcher, published in Nature Communications, finds that emissions from fire activity were significantly greater in the preindustrial era, which began around 1750, than previously thought. As a result, scientists have underestimated the cooling effect

4h

Fly protein has protective effect on dopaminergic neurons

A team from Lehigh University recently identified the fruit fly protein known as Scarlet as a target gene whose function is required to prevent age-dependent loss of dopaminergic neurons in fruit flies. They found that loss of Scarlet activity causes a progressive loss of dopaminergic neurons and that Scarlet has a neuroprotective role in a model of Parkinson's disease. These results were recently

4h

Why we should give prejudiced students a voice in the classroom

In the space of a few years, Britain's political landscape has changed. Now, generally, young people are proportionately more likely to have socially liberal and socialist views, and want to remain part of the EU. Meanwhile, older demographics proportionately voted for Brexit, and were said to be largely responsible for voting the Conservatives into office in 2017.

4h

New fuel cell concept brings biological design to better electricity generation

Fuel cells have long been viewed as a promising power source. These devices, invented in the 1830s, generate electricity directly from chemicals, such as hydrogen and oxygen, and produce only water vapor as emissions. But most fuel cells are too expensive, inefficient, or both.

4h

Efter Grenfell-skandale: Storbritannien forbyder brændbare materialer på højhuse

Træ, plastik og andre produkter, der indeholder brændbare materialer, bliver forbudt på højhuse i Storbritannien.

4h

Why being nice to your coworkers is good for business | Christine Porath

Looking to get ahead in your career? Start by being nice to your coworkers, says leadership researcher Christine Porath. In this science-backed talk, she shares surprising insights about the costs of rudeness and shows how little acts of respect can boost your professional success — and your company's bottom line.

4h

Family of rodents may explain how some groups of animals become so diverse

How did a single species of rodent invade South America and then quickly branch off into 350 new species?

4h

Physical education is just as important as any other school subject

Physical education (PE) is often viewed as a marginal subject within the curriculum. And many secondary schools actively reduce PE time to make way for what are deemed more "serious" or "important" subjects.

4h

Female guppy fish choose sperm from preferred males

Researchers from The University of Western Australia have found that female guppy fish are highly selective when it comes to choosing the father of their babies.

4h

Indonesian Tsunami Was Powered by a Deadly Combo of Tectonics and Geography

The magnitude 7.5 earthquake that touched off the tsunami occurred amid a complex puzzle of tectonic plates — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

4h

New approach on the use of big data in clinical decision support

A new computational approach that allows the identification of molecular alterations associated with prognosis and resistance to therapy of different types of cancer was developed by the research grould led by Nuno Barbosa Morais, Group Leader at Instituto de Medicina Molecular João Lobo Antunes (iMM; Portugal), and now published open access in Nucleic Acids Research.

4h

Wraparound services hold great promise for reducing health costs and improving outcomes

When Eskenazi Health in Indianapolis began offering on-site dietetics, social work and other wraparound services at its clinics, it did more than improve patient outcomes. It potentially saved millions of dollars in hospitalization costs.

4h

Family of rodents may explain how some groups of animals become so diverse

FSU Professor of Biological Science Scott Steppan and his former postdoctoral researcher John Schenk, now at Georgia Southern University, developed a new model that shows how geography can play a major role in how families of animals evolve and result in many species.

4h

Best way to assess obstetrics programs? Measure outcomes for both mom, baby

Mothers and babies are dying due to birth-associated complications at higher rates now than a decade ago. In a new study appearing online in Birth, Katherine Campbell, assistant professor of obstetrics, gynecology and reproductive sciences at the Yale School of Medicine, and her team found that that jointly considering morbidity outcomes for mom and baby is the best way to measure the quality of a

4h

New method of producing optical materials reduces cost, improves performance

Optical material manufacturers now have the opportunity to license a game-changing production method for doped solid optical materials.

4h

Biased local news coverage contributes to rape culture

When the news media reflects a "rape culture" in communities, more rapes occur but few arrests are made by local police, according to a new study.

4h

Robotic mussels provide data on intertidal bed refugia

Summer is officially over. Gone are the days of sun, swimming, and neighborhood clambakes.

4h

In disaster's wake, novel computing techniques support emergency responders

As hurricanes barrel toward the coastlines and wildfires rage in arid regions of the United States, scientists at the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory are providing critical geospatial data to support first responders as they work to save lives and property.

4h

Educated children help women live longer, study says

Women's education, occupation and wealth are related to the length of their lives, social scientists have found. Simply put, women who attain more generally live longer.

4h

City-dwelling blue tits may lay bigger eggs because of what they eat

Blue tit eggs that were laid in urban parkland were 5% larger than eggs laid in a nearby forest, which could be due to differences in the amount of calcium available to birds in urban and forest environments, a study finds.

4h

Genome of sea lettuce that spawns massive 'green tides' decoded

Sea lettuce, a fast-growing seaweed that spawns massive 'green tides,' is a prolific thief, according to research that for the first time sequenced the genome of a green seaweed.

4h

Unveiling the mechanism protecting replicated DNA from degradation

Researchers have discovered how a key function of the AND-1 protein helps protect nascent DNA strands from degradation.

4h

This year’s Nobel Prize in chemistry ‘rewards a revolution based on evolution’Nobel Prize Chemistry

Science Chemistry that cures disease and creates a greener world. These breakthroughs have found applications that can affect people’s daily lives. The Academy predicts evolution still has much to teach us.

4h

AI has reimagined nature and it’s both amazing and terrifying

A pack of brown dogs look like majesties of nature, but they’ve actually been dreamt up by a DeepMind AI

4h

Research paper reveals conservation 'winners'

A group of academics, including Associate Professor Nicola Nelson from Victoria University of Wellington's School of Biological Sciences, has today published a paper showcasing New Zealand's success in conservation over the past 30 years. The paper, published in the Journal of the Royal Society of New Zealand, uses seven case studies to explore successful species conservation in New Zealand.

4h

It pays to be pessimistic, shows new research into entrepreneurs

Optimistic thinking is leading people to set up businesses that have no realistic prospect of financial success, shows new research which may help explain why only fifty per cent of businesses in the UK survive their first five years.

4h

Einstein's Religion-Bashing 'God Letter' Expected to Sell for $1.5 Million at Christie's

Einstein's famous letter about God is set to go up for auction.

4h

Free Speech Will Survive This Moment

Can you name five democratic values that all of the “tribes” in our nation share? That’s the question the historian Elizabeth Griffin posed Tuesday during a panel at The Atlantic Festival in Washington, D.C., prompting a debate about what, if anything, really unites today’s Americans. For Jeffrey Rosen, who leads the National Constitution Center, a nonpartisan organization charged by Congress to

4h

Big data helps large firms grow even bigger

Big data has big benefits for big companies. For small firms? Not so much.

4h

4h

Centerleder: »Nobelpris er den endegyldige blåstempling af immunterapi mod kræft«

James P. Allison og Tasuku Honjos forskning har revolutioneret kræftbehandlingen og gjort immunterapi mod kræft legitimt, fortæller Inge Marie Svane, der er professor og leder af Det Nationale Center for Immunterapi på Herlev Hospital.

4h

Proposed simple chemical reaction network of existing biological E. coli signaling data

Apparently, bacteria do not care about math and they do not have in their curricula a calculus course. Yet they are able to exhibit a behaviour which is characterized by statistics which can be described by power-law distributions. For example, the intrinsically random time intervals during which a single flagellum of the E.coli bacterium, an appendage that works as a screw-propeller of the cell,

5h

Russian scientists develop high-precision laser for satellite navigation

Scientists from ITMO University developed a laser for precise measurement of the distance between the Moon and Earth. Short pulse duration and high power of this laser help to reduce error in determining the distance to the Moon to just a few millimeters. This data can be used to specify the coordinates of artificial satellites in accordance with the lunar mass influence to make navigation systems

5h

What doesn't kill you

After suffering mass mortality for years due to infection with the deadly Batrachochytrium dendrobatridis fungus, or chytrid, some frog populations in El Copé, Panama, now seem to be co-existing with the pathogen and stabilizing their populations.

5h

Even light drinking increases risk of death

Analyzing data from more than 400,000 people, researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have found that consuming one to two drinks four or more times per week — an amount deemed healthy by current guidelines — increases the risk of premature death by 20 percent.

5h

Tropical frogs found to coexist with deadly fungus

In 2004, the frogs of El Copé, Panama, began dying by the thousands. The culprit: the deadly chytrid fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis. Within months, roughly half of native frog species there went locally extinct. A new study suggests that frogs remaining in El Copé developed the ability to coexist with chytrid fungus due to ecological and/or evolutionary changes. The results could mean good

5h

Researching mercury and Saharan dust levels in the Canary Islands

Mercury – the famously liquid, famously toxic metal – is a contaminant with a worldwide scope. Of course, the beauty of studying global contaminants is that you get to see the globe. If you had asked me a year ago if I wanted to go to the Canary Islands, my answer would have been a deep sigh, a murmured "yes," and a wistful gaze at the horizon. Imagine my delight on discovering there are legitimat

5h

Probe Lands On Ryugu Asteroid, In Latest Success For International Group

On Twitter, the craft echoed Alice in Wonderland , declaring, "And then I found myself in a place like no place on Earth. A land full of wonder, mystery and danger!" (Image credit: DLR)

5h

Complex factors can drive the emergence and evolution of plant pathogens

For many of us, bumper crops of zucchinis and cucumbers conjure up the sweltering days of summer, while pumpkins and gourds decorate our holiday tables throughout the fall. However, these iconic fruits and vegetables—known collectively as cucurbits—can also help us understand the spread of plant diseases that pose a significant risk to crops.

5h

Women winners of scientific Nobels throughout history

US scientist Frances Arnold became the fifth women to win a chemistry Nobel on Wednesday, the day after Canada's Donna Strickland became just the third woman—and first in 55 years—to clinch the physics award.

5h

Scientists 'virtually unravel' burnt 16th century scroll

Scientists are on the lookout for damaged and unreadable ancient scrolls as new techniques have revealed the hidden text inside a severely burnt 16th century sample.

5h

Reviewing Indonesia's tsunami early warning strategy: Reflections from PaluIndonesia Palu Tsunami

The 7,5 magnitude earthquake and subsequent tsunami that had hit Palu and Donggala in Central Sulawesi Indonesia last Friday, has killed at least 1,300 people. Some 99 people are missing, 799 injured and nearly 60 thousand are displaced in over 100 locations.

5h

New study shows cells produce specialised protein factories under stress

Prevailing dogma in biological research holds that the cell's protein factories, the ribosomes, function the same way in all cells and in all conditions. In an international study with participation from Weill Cornell Medicine and Uppsala University, published today in the journal Cell Reports, the researchers show that this is a truth that seems to not hold true.

5h

Finding the sweet spot for transparency and control in music recommendations

In music recommender systems, it's important to design user controls that hit the sweet spot between the perceived quality of recommendations and acceptable cognitive load, concludes TU Delft researcher Nava Tintarev. Together with colleagues from KU Leuven, and research with the Spotify API, she will present these findings at the ACM Conference on Recommender Systems in Vancouver, on Wednesday Oc

5h

Tracking exploding ice cracks on Himalayan glaciers

In 2017, Evgeny Podolskiy spent more than a week trekking through the Nepalese Himalayas to test the seismic activity of the Trakarding-Trambau Glacier system. In October, the research team and a group of sherpas and porters traveled to an open, debris-free glacier about five kilometers (3.1 miles) above sea level, in full view of Mount Everest.

5h

AI's first pop album ushers in a new musical era

Last December, the world ushered in a new era of popular music: human and artificial intelligence (AI) collaboration.

5h

DFMO increases survival for children with high risk neuroblastoma, study finds

New research shows the positive results of a phase II clinical trial using the oral medication DFMO to prevent relapse in children with High Risk Neuroblastoma (HRNB).

5h

There's Some Dodgy Physics in Solo: A Star Wars Story

Chewbacca is falling out of a moving train! Han rushes to save him! Turns out, ordinary physics would have saved him, too.

5h

Senior Dana Alliance Couple Demystifies Dyslexia

It was not long ago that dyslexia was believed to be a sign of laziness, unintelligence, or even bad vision. However, thanks to breakthroughs in research by couple Sally Shaywitz, M.D., and Bennett Shaywitz, M.D., stereotypes around the learning disorder have begun to fade. Affecting approximately one in five people, dyslexia is characterized by a difficulty reading due to problems identifying sp

5h

Tropical frogs found to coexist with deadly fungus

Amphibian biologists from around the world watched in horror in 2004, as the frogs of El Copé, Panama, began dying by the thousands. The culprit: Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis, a deadly fungus more commonly known as chytrid fungus. Within months, roughly half of the frog species native to the area went locally extinct.

5h

Alternatives to pesticides — Researchers suggest popular weeds

Research proves that extracts from S. nigrum and D. stramonium, globally existing weed species, may help to protect crop systems against agricultural pests.

5h

Complex factors can drive the emergence and evolution of plant pathogens

New research sheds light on factors that contribute to the rise and spread of plant diseases.

5h

Sexual Assault And Harassment May Have Lasting Health Repercussions For Women

In a small study of middle-aged women, a history of sexual assault and workplace harassment was linked to health problems like hypertension, sleeplessness and depression. (Image credit: Fabio Pagani/EyeEm/Getty Images)

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Patientjournaler røg med i hospitals møbelsalg

Sygehus Lillebælt kom i forbindelse med lukning ved et uheld til at sælge et arkivskab fyldt med patientjournaler.

5h

Eksperter: Forslag om sundheds­fællesskaber har mange løse ender

Frede Olesen, Kjeld Møller Pedersen og Leif Vestergaard Petersen er bekymrede for, hvordan de kommende sundhedsfællesskaber skal fungere i praksis. De går ikke ind for at nedlægge regioner og i stedet skabe statslig regulering.

5h

Svend Lings anker dom

Svend Lings vil frifindes og anker derfor sin dom til Landsretten.

5h

Topological material shows superconductivity—and not just at its surface

The special properties of topological materials typically occur at their surface. These materials, for example insulators that do conduct current at their surface, are expected to play a major role in future quantum computers. Scientists of the University of Twente and the University of Amsterdam now demonstrate a new property: the non-superconducting material bismuth shows lossless current conduc

5h

Kan du opdrage dit barn til at høre jazz, rap eller heavy?

Du kan godt påvirke dit barns musiksmag. Men det er ikke nemt, og flere faktorer spiller ind, siger forskere.

5h

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Study: Authentic leaders can address workplace bullying

When it comes to addressing workplace bullying, the solution might rest in training bosses to be more in tune with how their management styles impact colleagues, according to a recent study by Western Ph.D. Nursing student Edmund Walsh.

5h

Neanderthal healthcare practices crucial to survival

New research has suggested that Neanderthals embraced healthcare practices, such as assisting in cases of serious injury and the challenges of childbirth.

5h

It pays to be pessimistic, shows new research into entrepreneurs

Optimistic thinking is leading people to set up businesses that have no realistic prospect of financial success, shows new research which may help explain why only fifty per cent of businesses in the UK survive their first five years.

5h

Paradigm shift in tuberculosis treatment: genome sequencing replaces standard resistance testing

An international research team from the CRyPTIC Consortium has shown that genome sequencing can improve tuberculosis treatment.

5h

The dog, when treated with insecticide, is man's best friend

Treating dogs at a community level with systemic insecticide could considerably reduce the transmission of visceral leishmaniasis in Brazil, according to a modelling study led by ISGlobal, an institution supported by 'la Caixa' Foundation. The results, published in PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases, will help define which kind of insecticide is needed and how to apply it to achieve maximum effectiv

5h

Rare video captured of 'white' southern right whales as researchers examine the resurgent species

A University of Otago research team led by Professor Steve Dawson and Dr Will Rayment, have recently returned from a month-long expedition to the sub-Antarctic Auckland Islands where they have been collecting data on a recovering population of southern right whales.

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Why your online data isn't safe

Until recently, the presumptive targets for massive data theft were considered to be companies that lacked sophisticated cybersecurity or didn't take the issue seriously enough.

5h

Scientists seek a deeper understanding of how silver kills bacteria

Silver has been used for centuries as an antimicrobial to kill harmful bacteria. Ancient civilizations applied the metal to open wounds. Ship captains tossed silver coins into storage barrels to keep drinking water fresh.

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Psychedelic Mushrooms Are Closer to Medicinal Use (It’s Not Just Your Imagination)

Researchers say psilocybin, the active compound in the mushrooms, should be reclassified to treat anxiety and depression. But any such move would be years away.

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New model of polarization sheds light on today's politics

No politics is local anymore and it's driving us apart, according to a new mathematical model of political competitiveness developed by Mattias Polborn, professor of economics at Vanderbilt University, and Stefan Krasa, professor of economics at the University of Illinois. Their paper, "Political Competition in Legislative Elections," appears in the American Political Science Review.

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More big companies commit to addressing environmental impacts

Some of the world's biggest private sector companies are committing to address their environmental impacts and factoring biodiversity into their sustainability reports, according to new Oxford University research.

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City of Seattle fighting federal government's new 5G rules

The city of Seattle will appeal rules set last week by the federal government that seek to set a countrywide standard for how much cities can charge telecom providers to set up 5G technology for ultrafast cellular connectivity.

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Datatilsynet: Vi følger Facebook-sag tæt – sanktion kan komme på tale

De europæiske data-tilsynsmyndigheder har indledt et samarbejde om sagen, hvor Facebook har eksponeret millioner af brugeres konti som følge af sikkerhedshul.

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Mink og fravænningsgrise får mere antibiotika

Den nye Danmap-rapport fra bl.a. seruminstituttet og DTU peger på, at antibiotikaforbruget til dyr generelt er faldende – dog er mængden til fravænningsgrise svagt stigende og for mink kraftigt stigende.

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Diabetes øger risikoen for kræft

At lide af diabetes er koblet til øget risiko for at udvikle en kræftsygdom. Samtidig ser overlevelsesmulighederne ringere ud efter en diagnose, viser stort internationalt studie.

6h

Discovery of first genetic variants associated with meaning in life

For the first time, locations on the human genome have been identified that can explain differences in meaning in life between individuals. This is the result of research conducted in over 220,000 individuals by Professor Meike Bartels and PhD student Bart Baselmans from the Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam. The researchers identified two genetic variants for meaning in life and six genetic variants f

6h

A grape constituent protects against cancer

Lung cancer is the deadliest form of cancer, and 80 percent of death are related to smoking. In addition to tobacco control, effective chemoprevention strategies are therefore needed. A team of scientists from the University of Geneva, Switzerland, studied a well-known natural product, resveratrol, which is found in grapes and in red wine. It had so far shown no effect on lung cancers. Thanks to n

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Newly discovered compounds shed fresh light on whole grain health benefits

Scientists have discovered new compounds that may explain whole grain health benefits, reports a new study led by the University of Eastern Finland. A high intake of whole grains increased the levels of betaine compounds in the body which, in turn, was associated with improved glucose metabolism, among other things. The findings shed new light on the cell level effects of a whole grain-rich diet,

6h

Lilly Pilly fossils reveal snowless Snowy Mountains

Leaf fossils discovered high in Australia's Snowy Mountains have revealed a past history of warmer rainforest vegetation and a lack of snow, in contrast with the alpine vegetation and winter snow-covered slopes of today.

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New research could lead to more energy-efficient computing

Computers in the future could be more energy-efficient, thanks to new research from Binghamton University, State University at New York.

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Midwifery linked to lower odds of birth complications for low-income women

New research from the University of British Columbia and the University of Saskatchewan is adding new evidence in support of midwives as a safe option for prenatal care, especially for women who have low socioeconomic status.

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Study finds elementary school student support leads to lower high school dropout

Elementary-school students who participated in a comprehensive support intervention in the Boston public school district had about half the odds of dropping out of high school as students not in the intervention, according to a new study published online today in AERA Open, a peer-reviewed journal published by the American Educational Research Association.

6h

Articles examine aspects of sexual assault, harassment

Two articles are being published to coincide with the North American Menopause Society annual meeting. An original investigation by Rebecca C. Thurston, Ph.D., of the University of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, and coauthors looked at the association of sexual harassment and sexual assault with blood pressure, mood, anxiety and sleep among midlife women. In the study of 304 women between the ages of 4

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Sexual harassment and assault linked to worse physical/mental health among midlife women

A new study by researchers at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine suggests that experiences of sexual harassment and sexual assault could have a significant impact on the physical and mental health of midlife women.

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Directed Evolution, Phage Display Nab Chemistry Nobel

The 2018 award goes to Frances Arnold, Gregory Winter, and George Smith.

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Blazar LBQS 1319+0039 detected in hard X-rays

An international team of astronomers reports the detection of the blazar LBQS 1319+0039 in hard X-rays using NASA's Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR) space telescope. The finding, updating knowledge about this object, is available in a paper published September 26 on the arXiv pre-print repository.

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Report shows more work needed to advance gender equity

Significant barriers remain in the role of middle managers in advancing gender equity in the public service, according to a new report by researchers at Victoria University of Wellington, Massey University and Auckland University of Technology (AUT).

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Revolution in Evolution Wins 2018 Nobel Prize in Chemistry

Three scientists sped up evolutionary changes in the lab to make cleaner fuels and cancer drugs — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Sexual assault victims more likely to have anxiety and depression – study

Poor sleep and high blood pressure are also more common in women with experience of assault or harassment, research shows Women who have experienced sexual assault or harassment are more likely to suffer from poor sleep, anxiety, high blood pressure and symptoms of depression, new research has revealed. While the study cannot prove that the events are behind the greater likelihood of such health

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Protecting our thirsty urban trees from more harsh summers

With increasing heat in the Pacific Ocean making our weather both more variable and more powerful, the likelihood of a dry, hot El Nino summer is on the rise.

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Digitising social services could further exclude people already on the margins

Digital or e-government has been prominent on Australia's political agenda for at least a decade. It has led to improvements in e-services that allow you to pay rates online, submit a digital tax return, or claim rebates for medical bills.

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The $1 Tool That Might Curb the Overdose Epidemic

Fentanyl, which is 50 times more potent than heroin, laces many batches of heroin and cocaine, and it is now involved in at least half of all opioid overdose deaths. More than 70,000 people died of drug overdoses last year—the equivalent of about three 747 plane crashes each week. However, there’s evidence that a two-inch fentanyl test strip can help drug users avoid overdosing. When dipped into

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Nobel Prize in Chemistry 2018Nobel Prize Chemistry

The 2018 Nobel Prize in Chemistry is being awarded to Frances H. Arnold "for the directed evolution of enzymes" and jointly to George P. Smith and Sir Gregory P. Winter "for the phage display of peptides and antibodies."

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America’s Clergy Are Teaming Up With Scientists

Scientists and religious leaders joined forces to create programs on neuroscience, cosmology—and even some evolutionary science.

6h

Fiction Excerpt: A Prince Goes on a High-Tech Job Interview

Something is fishy at Anahata—and it’s not just the giant squid that serves as a mascot for the world’s largest tech company.

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The YouTube King of Useless Machines

Joseph Herscher builds ridiculously complex machines to make his life easier.

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The Russian Town That's Now a Shrine to Cosmonaut Yuri Gagarin

Photographer Daria Garnik documents the museums and monuments dedicated to the first man in space.

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While seeking Planet X, astronomers find a distant solar system object

2015 TG387 was discovered about 80 astronomical units (AU) from the sun. One AU is the distance between the Earth and Sun. For context, Pluto's distance is around 34 AU, so 2015 TG387 is about two-and-a-half times further away from the sun than Pluto is right now.

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For better multiple-choice tests, avoid tricky questions, study finds

Although people often think about multiple-choice tests as tools for assessment, they can also be used to facilitate learning. A new study in Journal of Applied Research in Memory and Cognition, offers straightforward tips for constructing multiple-choice questions that are effective at both assessing current knowledge and strengthening ongoing learning.

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Why Do People Kill Themselves?

Why do people die by suicide? — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Study finds elementary school student support leads to lower high school dropout

Elementary-school students who participated in a comprehensive support intervention in the Boston public school district had about half the odds of dropping out of high school as students not in the intervention, according to a new study published online today in AERA Open, a peer-reviewed journal published by the American Educational Research Association.

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Sundhedsøkonom: Videokonsultationer vil være en gevinst for alle parter

Ny app fra regionerne er et godt initiativ, mener sundhedsøkonom Kristian Kidholm. Han mener, at videokonsultationer kan have en lang række fordel – især i almen praksis, men ser også en risiko for øget efterspørgsel af sundhedsydelser.

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Study shows proximity to industrial facilities does not translate to better jobs for minorities

A pair of researchers at the University of Massachusetts has found that minorities living close to industrial facilities do not necessarily gain an employment advantage. In their paper published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Michael Ash and James Boyce describe their study and comparison of environmental and job data from government agencies and what they found.

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Meet the farmers of the future: robotsIron Ox Angus Autonomous

Brandon Alexander would like to introduce you to Angus, the farmer of the future. He's heavyset, weighing in at nearly 1,000 pounds, not to mention a bit slow. But he's strong enough to hoist 800-pound pallets of maturing vegetables and can move them from place to place on his own.

6h

T. rex evolved into a monster predator by dumbing down its brain

The very first tyrannosaurs were relatively small dinosaurs – and the skull of one of them seems to have contained a brain with a more complex shape than that of the enormous T. rex

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GM, Honda team up to produce self-driving vehicles

General Motors and Honda will team up on self-driving vehicle technology as big automakers and tech giants race to develop the next generation of personal transportation.

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How Nobel-winning chemists used and directed evolutionNobel Prize Chemistry

Three scientists shared the 2018 Nobel Chemistry Prize on Wednesday for their work in harnessing the power of evolution, which led to a range of breakthroughs including better biofuels and more targeted drugs.

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Elite N.Korean hacker group tied to bank attacks: researchers

An elite group of North Korean hackers has been identified as the source of a wave of cyberattacks on global banks that has netted "hundreds of millions" of dollars, security researchers said Wednesday.

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New evidence discovered regarding first English voyage to America

Historians from the University of Bristol have uncovered compelling new evidence concerning the first English-led expedition to North America in 1499 hidden deep within huge parchment rolls and only legible by using ultra-violet light.

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New method predicts risk of TB relapse

Testing the Mycobacterium tuberculosis bacteria that causes tuberculosis (TB) can identify most people at high risk for disease relapse before treatment begins, according to new research. “The most important signal of a successful treatment for TB is the relapse rate,” says David Alland, professor and chief of infectious disease in the medicine department at Rutgers University. “Approximately fiv

6h

Strain versus Sprain: What's the Difference?

They share similar signs and symptoms, but the difference comes down to ligaments versus tendons — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Protoplanetary disk material found to be too sparse to form planet populations

A trio of researchers with the European Southern Observatory and Université Côte d'Azur has found evidence showing that the gas and dust disks that form around early stars systems do not contain enough material to form the planets that develop. In their paper published in the journal Astronomy Astrophysics, Carlo Manara, A. Morbidelli and T. Guillot describe their study of data from the Atacama La

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California sued by DOJ after governor signs 'model' net neutrality bill

California now has the strongest net neutrality rules in the nation, after Gov. Jerry Brown signed the bill during a last-minute flurry of bill signings and vetoes Sunday. A little over an hour after the announcement, the Department of Justice sued the state.

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Energiselskaber poster knap 5 mia. i fibernet på Sjælland og Østjylland

Seas-NVE og NRGI investerer 4,6 milliarder kroner i nye fiberkabler, der skal give andelshavere på Sjælland, Lolland, Falster og Østjylland 1Gbit/s internetadgang inden udgangen af 2023.

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Forsker i fedtomsætning bliver ny professor ved Steno Diabetes Center Aarhus

Fedt- og sukkeromsætning hos mennesker med diabetes bliver hovedemnet for overlæge Søren Nielsen, der er tiltrådt som ny klinisk professor.

7h

Three Biochemists Win Chemistry Nobel for Directing Evolution

The Nobel Prize in Chemistry went to three scientists who harnessed the power of evolution and accelerated it in the laboratory to produce novel, beneficial enzymes used in pharmaceuticals, renewable energy, industrial chemistry and many other fields. Frances H. Arnold , a professor of chemical engineering at the California Institute of Technology, received half of this year’s prize for being the

7h

Liquid crystals and the origin of life

The display screens of modern televisions, cell phones and computer monitors rely on liquid crystals – materials that flow like liquids but have molecules oriented in crystal-like structures. However, liquid crystals may have played a far more ancient role: helping to assemble Earth's first biomolecules. Researchers reporting in ACS Nano have found that short RNA molecules can form liquid crystals

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World Health Organization Endorses Quackery

The World Health Organization fails its primary function by promoting traditional quackery.

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Russian scientists develop high-precision laser for satellite navigation

Scientists from ITMO University developed a laser for precise measurement of the distance between the moon and Earth. The short pulse duration and high power of this laser help to reduce errors in determining the distance to the moon to just a few millimeters. This data can be used to specify the coordinates of artificial satellites in accordance with the lunar mass influence to make navigation sy

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Tsunami in Indonesia shows blind spots in global warning systemsIndonesia Palu Tsunami

Across the world, dozens of deep-sea ocean sensors are a first line of defense that warns officials when a devastating tsunami is coming.

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Tales From The Bering Sea: Sleepwalking Into a Storm | Deadliest Catch

Captain Keith Colburn's first season on the Bering Sea was ROUGH. Stream Full Episodes of Deadliest Catch: https://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/deadliest-catch/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/DeadliestCatch https://www.facebook.com/Discovery Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/DeadliestCatch https://twitter.com/Discovery

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The Game-Changing Technique Behind an Amazing New Archaeological Discovery

In 2014, two archaeologists, Katerina Douka and Tom Higham , paid a visit to Denisova Cave—a site high up in Siberia’s Altai Mountains that has become something of a magnet for scientists interested in humanity’s past. A decade ago, researchers found a pinky bone in the cave. After analyzing its DNA, they realized it represented a previously unknown group of ancient humans, distinct from either N

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Trump Is Not Texting You

A t 2:18 p.m. ET today , your smartphone probably buzzed and shriek before displaying a notice that resembles a text message. This was the Federal Emergency Management Agency and Federal Communications Commission’s test of the Wireless Emergency Alerts system (WEA). A test of the Emergency Alert System (EAS), which sends emergency messages to radio and television, will follow two minutes later. B

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Raised by YouTube

ChuChu TV, the company responsible for some of the most widely viewed toddler content on YouTube, has a suitably cute origin story. Vinoth Chandar, the CEO, had always played around on YouTube, making Hindu devotionals and little videos of his father, a well-known Indian music producer. But after he and his wife had a baby daughter, whom they nicknamed “Chu Chu,” he realized he had a new audience

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Podcast: Meet Rachel Fort

Rachel Fort explains how her love of chemistry led to a career developing more efficient lubrication technologies at Nexcel

7h

Look beyond 42 for the answer to life, the universe and everything

One mysterious number determines how physics, chemistry and biology work. But controversial experimental hints suggest it's not one number at all

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Mark Zuckerberg and team take heat for massive data breach, Facebook 'not well managed'

Mark Zuckerberg is facing a major public reckoning following the massive Facebook data breach as a cascade of crises catch up with the social media giant.

7h

Lilly pilly fossils reveal snowless Snowy Mountains

Leaf fossils discovered high in Australia's Snowy Mountains have revealed a past history of warmer rainforest vegetation and a lack of snow, in contrast with the alpine vegetation and winter snow-covered slopes of today.

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Gene editing could turn this wild orphan fruit into your new favorite berry

Science But don't go looking for it in a supermarket just yet. Quick, name an orange fruit that tastes like a tomato crossed with a tropical treat like pineapple or mango, plus hints of vanilla and a tinge of sourness. Stumped?

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Image of the Day: Transgenic Axolotl

Lineage tracing reveals how cells help the salamanders regrow chopped-off limbs.

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It’s Time to Talk About Robot Gender Stereotypes

How gender biases manifest in the design of voice assistants is well-worn territory. But scientists are just beginning to consider how these gender biases materialize in physical robots.

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Mammals Shrink When Humans Migrate In

Where humans migrate, mammals become smaller — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Nobel in Chemistry for New and Useful Chemical Entities via Evolutionary Principles

Frances H. Arnold, George P. Smith and Gregory P. Winter share the 2018 chemistry Nobel for developing evolutionary-based techniques that lead to the creation of new chemical entities with useful… — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

7h

Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder Can Be Contagious

PTSD sometimes spreads from trauma victims to the people who care for them, including rescue workers, spouses and even therapists — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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New autonomous farm wants to produce food without human workersIron Ox Angus Autonomous

Down on a new robot farm, machines tend rows of leafy greens under the watch of software called “The Brain.”

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Scientists develop smart technology for synchronized 3-D printing of concrete

Scientists from Nanyang Technological University, Singapore (NTU Singapore) have developed a technology whereby two robots can work in unison to 3-D-print a concrete structure. This method of concurrent 3-D printing, known as swarm printing, paves the way for a team of mobile robots to print even bigger structures in the future. Developed by Assistant Professor Pham Quang Cuong and his team at NTU

7h

Liquid crystals and the origin of life

The display screens of modern televisions, cell phones and computer monitors rely on liquid crystals—materials that flow like liquids but have molecules oriented in crystal-like structures. However, liquid crystals may have played a far more ancient role: helping to assemble Earth's first biomolecules. Researchers reporting in ACS Nano have found that short RNA molecules can form liquid crystals t

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Behandling med testosteron kan hjælpe mænd med diabetes

Nyt studie viser, at testosteronbehandling over 10 år kan forbedre eller kurere type 2-diabetes blandt mænd med lavt testosterontal og desuden lede til signifikant vægttab.

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Researchers report proteins that escort a key enzyme to DNA for cell differentiation

The development of an adult organism starts with a fertilized egg that differentiates into hundreds of specialized cell types comprising tissues and organs. How these cell fate changes happen is a subject of research interest. All cells contain the same genetic information, and development therefore involves the selective regulation of genes contained in the DNA. The proteins that turn these genes

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Speeding up the evolution of proteins wins the chemistry Nobel

Work on evolving new proteins from old ones takes the Nobel Prize in chemistry.

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Three Share Chemistry Nobel Prize for a Revolution in Evolution

Three Share Chemistry Nobel Prize for a Revolution in Evolution The 2018 Nobel Prize in chemistry will go to Frances H. Arnold, George P. Smith and Sir Gregory P. Winter for research on enzymes, peptides and antibodies. nobel2018_chem_winner.jpg Abigail Malate, Staff Illustrator Image credits: Copyright American Institute of Physics Technology Wednesday, October 3, 2018 – 07:00 Benjamin Plackett,

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"Bar Codes" Could Trace Errant Brain Wiring in Autism and Schizophrenia

A new, speedy technique affords scientists the ability to visualize the brain’s myriad connections at an unprecedented level of complexity — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Patienter med diabetes oftere ramt af infektioner

Antallet af indlæggelser som følge af infektioner stiger i USA, og det ser specielt slemt ud blandt voksne med diabetes, viser nyt studie.

8h

Flere faktorer afgør hvor hurtigt diabetes udvikler sig

En række faktorer kan forklare forskellen på, hvor hurtigt type 2-diabetes skrider frem hos forskellige personer. Det viser nyt studie.

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#49 Der var engang

Stetoskopet går på opdagelse i fortidens administration og kigger på journaler i centralarkivet ved Sjællands Universitetshospital, Roskilde, samt taler med 70'ernes eneste IT-medarbejder ved Viborg Sygehus.

8h

Pimples Could Be Good for Your Grades

One of the few good things about acne is that it hardly discriminates: With some variation, it afflicts people of all races and income levels, from all regions and countries. Acne is the eighth-most-common disease globally, affecting roughly two out of three people ages 15 to 19. Another one of the good things? Acne may contribute to better grades and longer-term academic success, according to a

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National Reporters Are Transfixed by the Kavanaugh Story. How About Their Readers?

“A Nation Transfixed ,” headlines blared as Thursday’s Senate Judiciary Committee hearing wound down, and both Christine Blasey Ford and Brett Kavanaugh had given their testimony. The dispatches arrived from discrete swatches of the country. At a senior center in Palm Beach County, Florida, some retirees, gathered around a TV, cried for Ford. A man at a Houston cigar bar professed his sympathies

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New tool helps scientists better target the search for alien life

Could there be another planet in the universe with a society at the same stage of technological advancement as ours? To find out, EPFL scientist Claudio Grimaldi, working in association with the University of California, Berkeley, has developed a statistical model that gives researchers a new tool in the search for the kind of signals that an extraterrestrial society might emit. His method, descri

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Cuisine of early farmers revealed by analysis of proteins in pottery from Çatalhöyük

An international team led by researchers from the Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History, the Freie Universität Berlin and the University of York has uncovered details about the diet of early farmers in the central Anatolian settlement of Çatalhöyük. By analyzing proteins from residues in ancient pots and jars excavated from the site, the researchers found evidence of foods that wer

8h

The Presidential Text Alert Has a Long, Strange History

While the presidential text that hits your phone Wednesday will be the first of its kind, it's part of a decades-long lineage of official government Doomsday alerts.

8h

Judge Kavanaugh and the Information Terrorists Trying to Reshape America

The network architecture built in Gamergate helped propel Trump to the presidency and fuel conspiracies like Pizzagate and QAnon. Now it’s backing Brett Kavanaugh.

8h

Intra Gives Older Versions of Android Important DNS Protections

Alphabet subsidiary Jigsaw is using a new app to give DNS encryption protections to any Android smartphone from the last seven years.

8h

BitTorrent's Creator Wants to Build a Better Bitcoin

Bram Cohen is the founder of Chia, a cryptocurrency, and ledger protocol designed to attract banks.

8h

Hand-drawn maps imitated the printed maps in the first days of Hispano-American cartography

Researchers from the Higher Technical School of Engineering (ETSI) of the University of Seville have published a study of a series of hand-drawn maps that copied the maps printed in the first days of Hispano-American cartography.

8h

Health Problems in Women Can Persist Years After Sexual Assault

Women can experience lingering health problems years after workplace sexual harassment or a sexual assault happen, a new study finds.

8h

Malware spredt til fire millioner computere: Udbyttet blev hvidvasket i danske banker

Et udbytte på 80 millioner kroner fra et stort malware-angreb begået af estiske cyberkriminelle blev hvidvasket fra Nordea til Danske Bank i Estland.

8h

Why Has America Been Such a Magnet for Immigrant Scientists?

The answer lies in a culture that rewards excellence and has not historically imposed restrictions based on prior connections, social status, ethnicity or national origin — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Ancient Mediterranean 'Juglet' Contained Traces of Opium

A curious-looking container, discovered in the Mediterranean and dating back to more than 3,000 years ago, has been found to contain traces of opium.

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A Nerve Pathway Links the Gut to the Brain's Pleasure Centers

A newly discovered neural circuit in mice may one day help modify food preferences and eating behavior — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Global warming increases potential wildfire damage in Mediterranean Europe

A study published in Nature Communications, led by researchers at the University of Barcelona in collaboration with other research institutions, shows that anthropogenic warming will increase the burned areas due to fires in Mediterranean Europe, and that this increase could be reduced by limiting global warming to 1.5 ºC. The higher the warming level, the larger the increase of the burned area is

8h

The faint glow of cosmic hydrogen

A study published recently in Nature has revealed the presence of a hitherto undetected component of the universe—large masses of gas surrounding distant galaxies. An international team from some 10 scientific institutions has shown that almost the whole of the early universe shows a faint glow in the Lyman-alpha line. This line is one of the key "fingerprints" of hydrogen. This detection reveals

8h

Microbes Were Just Found in 'Dark Biosphere' Where They Shouldn't Exist

Cyanobacteria were recently (and unexpectedly) found living in "the dark biosphere," thousands of feet underground.

8h

Airtight Iron Coffin Found in Queens Held a Mysterious 19th-Century Mummy

How did a 19th-century mummy in an iron coffin end up in a Queens construction site?

8h

Vouching for Vonnegut: Engineers study polymer that freezes at room temperature

In Kurt Vonnegut's sci-fi classic Cat's Cradle, ice-nine is a substance capable of raising water's melting point from 32 to 114.4 degrees Fahrenheit. Once in contact with water, it spreads instantly and indefinitely, leaving frozen oceans and chilling consequences in its wake. Luckily, as Vonnegut explains in the epigraph, 'Nothing in this book is true.' When he wrote the novel in 1963, he may hav

8h

Icebreaker tests out oil spill recovery system

A Finnish icebreaker has conducted an oil spill response exercise in the Baltic Sea, testing a new, inbuilt oil recovery system—a first for an icebreaker.

8h

Amazon bets big on Europe as it takes on Netflix

Amazon is firing a new salvo in its global battle with Netflix for the booming online streaming market—and it features Julia Roberts and descendants of Russia's tsars.

8h

Genome of sea lettuce that spawns massive 'green tides' decoded

Sea lettuce, a fast-growing seaweed that spawns massive "green tides," is a prolific thief, according to research that for the first time sequenced the genome of a green seaweed.

8h

Nobelpris i kemi gives for genetik og evolution

Amerikaneren Frances H. Arnold deler årets Nobelpris i kemi med briten Sir Gregory P. Winter og amerikaneren George P. Smith II.

8h

Analyse: Hybridbilerne bliver første slagmark for Løkkes grønne løfter

Med statsministerens løfte om en million grønne biler på vejene bliver det altafgørende, hvordan regeringen har tænkt sig at definere, om en hybridbil er grøn.

8h

Trio win Nobel Chemistry Prize for research harnessing evolutionNobel Prize Chemistry

US scientists Frances Arnold and George Smith and British researcher Gregory Winter won the Nobel Chemistry Prize on Wednesday for applying the principles of evolution to develop enzymes used to make everything from biofuels to medicine.

9h

Trio modtager Nobelpris i kemi for arbejdet med proteiner

Årets prismodtagere har taget kontrollen over evolutionen oplyser The Nobel Prize på Twitter.

9h

Piccoline-syndromet: Da en sær dansk computer (næsten) blev enden på EDB i folkeskolen

For 40 år siden skulle folkeskolens elever lære at programmere. Det blev begyndelsen på enden for Danmarks første IT-virksomhed.

9h

Chemistry Nobel Prize awarded for harnessing evolution to help humans

The chemistry Nobel Prize goes to Frances Arnold, George Smith, and Gregory Winter for controlling evolution to create proteins that solve chemical problems.

9h

What Bonobos Can Teach Us About Sexual Assault

If you’ve read National Geographic or seen a documentary about chimps, you’ve heard that we can learn a great deal about ourselves from our very close primate relatives Pan troglodytes . Observing a troop in Gombe, Tanzania, Jane Goodall discovered that chimps have personalities, intimate relationships, and agendas. Her work and that of scientists who followed in her footsteps also taught us that

9h

How Easy Is It to Make Ricin?

Once again, someone appears to have sent envelopes stuffed with ricin to the government. The tests need to be confirmed, but two suspicious letters to the Pentagon were caught in an off-site mail screening. No one was exposed. The same person is also reported to have sent letters to Senator Ted Cruz and to the White House, though the contents of those have not been confirmed to contain ricin. Ric

9h

What’s the Loneliest You’ve Ever Felt?

It’s perhaps not much of a statement to say that movie audiences have been conditioned to expect lonely heroes on the big screen. Westerns have long touted the virtues of the lone cowboy while simultaneously fetishizing the isolation of a dame waiting for rescue. Meg Ryan and Sandra Bullock reigned in the ’90s with their portrayals of sad, clumsy dream girls. Superhero films have issued unfailing

9h

Nobel Prize in Chemistry Is Awarded to 3 Scientists for Using Evolution in Design of MoleculesNobel Prize Chemistry

Frances H. Arnold of the U.S. received half the prize, while her compatriot George P. Smith and Gregory P. Winter of Britain shared the other half.

9h

In Australia, Cervical Cancer Could Soon Be Eliminated

The government started a program to distribute the HPV vaccine for free to girls more than a decade ago.

9h

Stone Engravings of Famous Warrior Pharaoh Found in Ancient Egyptian Temple

The inscription show Seti I, a pharaoh who launched military campaigns in North Africa and the Middle East.

9h

Nobel Prize In Chemistry Honors Work That Demonstrates 'The Power Of Evolution'Nobel Prize Chemistry

An American woman, Frances H. Arnold, has won half of the 2018 Nobel Prize in Chemistry, and George Smith of the U.S. and Sir Gregory Winter of the U.K. will share the other half. (Image credit: Heikki Saukkomaa/Lehtikuva via AP)

9h

Protein research takes Chemistry Nobel

The 2018 Nobel Prize in Chemistry has been awarded to three scientists for their discoveries in enzyme research.

9h

Mindst 500 patienters journaler solgt med arkivskabe

En auktion over effekter fra det nu lukkede Give Sygehus er endt i en skandale.

9h

Frances H Arnold, George P Smith and Gregory P Winter win Nobel prize in chemistry

Briton and two Americans honoured for using evolutionary principles to develop proteins that have been used in new drugs and medical treatments Nobel prize in chemistry awarded for pioneering work on proteins – as it happened Three scientists have won the Nobel prize in chemistry for their work in harnessing evolution to produce new enzymes and antibodies. British scientist Sir Gregory P Winter a

9h

Third lander arrives on asteroid Ryugu with only 16 hours to live

Japan has just dropped off its third lander on the surface of the asteroid Ryugu. It has less than a day to complete its mission before its batteries run out

9h

WHO-chef langer ud efter forskere og medier: »Håndsprit er stadig effektivt«

Håndsprit er ikke ved at blive ineffektivt, selv om en undersøgelse for nylig blev udlagt, som om den havde netop det resultat, mener WHO-chef, der samtidig kritiserer forskere og medier for at have spredt historien.

9h

Nobel prize in chemistry awarded for pioneering work on proteins – live

Americans Frances H Arnold and George P Smith and Briton Gregory P Winter will share the prize of 9m Swedish kronor (£770,000) 11.18am BST Some graphics might help. Here are some, courtesy of the Nobel assembly. First up, how Frances Arnold’s directed evolution works: Frances Arnold, awarded the 2018 #NobelPrize , conducted the first directed evolution of enzymes, which are proteins that catalyse

10h

No more Iron Man: submarines now have soft, robotic arms

The human arm can perform a wide range of extremely delicate and coordinated movements. The robotic 'arms' on underwater research submarines, however, lack the finesse to reach and interact with soft-bodied sea creatures. A new system from the Wyss Institute and collaborators lets biologists intuitively control a modular, highly flexible soft robotic arm by wearing a glove equipped with wireless s

10h

Revolutionary ultra-thin 'meta-lens' enables full-color imaging

Columbia Engineers have created the first flat lens capable of correctly focusing a large range of colors of any polarization to the same focal spot without the need for any additional elements. Only a micron thick, their revolutionary 'flat' lens is much thinner than a sheet of paper and offers performance comparable to top-of-the-line compound lens systems. UPenn nanophotonics expert Nader Enghe

10h

Cuisine of early farmers revealed by analysis of proteins in pottery from Çatalhöyük

Knowledge of the diet of people living in the prehistoric settlement of Çatalhöyük almost 8000 years ago has been complemented in astonishing scope and detail by analyzing proteins from their ceramic bowls and jars. Using this new approach, an international team of researchers has determined that vessels from this early farming site in central Anatolia, in what is now Turkey, contained cereals, le

10h

Smokers with peripheral artery disease need more help to kick the habit

Study Highlight: While many people with peripheral artery disease smoke, few receive proven smoking cessation strategies from their doctor.

10h

Winners Of Nobel Prize In Chemistry Announced In Stockholm

Frances H. Arnold, an American chemist, has won half of the 2018 Nobel Prize in Chemistry, and George Smith of the U.S. and Sir Gregory Winter of the U.K will share the other half.

10h

No more Iron Man—submarines now have soft, robotic arms

The human arm can perform a wide range of extremely delicate and coordinated movements, from turning a key in a lock to gently stroking a puppy's fur. The robotic "arms" on underwater research submarines, however, are hard, jerky, and lack the finesse to be able to reach and interact with creatures like jellyfish or octopuses without damaging them. Previously, the Wyss Institute for Biologically I

10h

Revolutionary ultra-thin 'meta-lens' enables full-color imaging

Light of different colors travels at different speeds in different materials and structures. This is why we see white light split into its constituent colors after refracting through a prism, a phenomenon called dispersion. An ordinary lens cannot focus light of different colors to a single spot due to dispersion. This means different colors are never in focus at the same time, and so an image for

10h

The removal of Darwin and evolution from schools is a backwards step | Michael Dixon

It’s the only evidence-based explanation of life on Earth, yet some countries are turning their backs on it • Michael Dixon is director of the Natural History Museum In recent weeks there have been alarming reports from both Israel and Turkey of Charles Darwin’s theory of evolution being erased from school curriculums. In Turkey, this has been blamed on the concept of evolution – which is taught i

10h

Instagram har store tekniske problemer

Appen til det sociale medie Instagram har været nede i flere storbyer -herunder London, San Francisco og Singapore.

11h

Genome of sea lettuce that spawns massive 'green tides' decoded

Sea lettuce, a fast-growing seaweed that spawns massive 'green tides,' is a prolific thief, according to research that for the first time sequenced the genome of a green seaweed.

11h

Study shows how lixisenatide slows or prevents damage to the kidneys in patients with type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease

New research presented at the annual meeting of the European Association for the Study of Diabetes (EASD) and published simultaneously in The Lancet Diabetes & Endocrinology shows how the glucose-lowering drug lixisenatide can slow or prevent damage to the kidneys in macro-albuminuric patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and cardiovascular disease.

11h

Closed-loop 'artificial pancreas' insulin delivery system offers better glucose control and reduced risk of hypoglycaemia

New research presented at this year's annual meeting of the European Association for the Study of Diabetes (EASD) in Berlin, Germany, and published in The Lancet, shows that use of a hybrid day-night closed-loop insulin delivery system is better than sensor-augmented pump therapy for blood sugar control in poorly controlled type 1 diabetes.

11h

Video: Håndværkerrobot genkender værktøj og gipsplader

Japansk menneskelignende robot skal udføre byggeopgaver.

11h

California law on company boards spotlights deep challenges

California's new law requiring companies to include women on their boards of directors may not survive widely expected legal challenges but it has already spotlighted the entrenched practices and barriers that have helped keep women out of boardrooms.

11h

007 carmaker Aston Martin stalls in glitzy £4.3bn London IPO (Update)

James Bond's favourite carmaker Aston Martin stalled Wednesday after making a glitzy £4.3-billion ($5.6-billion, 4.9-billion-euro) debut on the London stock market.

11h

'Are the US and Australia declaring climate war on all of Earth? You make it sound so final' | First Dog on the Moon

After Australia cynically releases its catastrophic climate data the day before grand final weekend, Ian the Climate Denialist Potato holds a press conference Sign up here to get an email whenever First Dog cartoons are published Get all your needs met at the First Dog shop if what you need is First Dog merchandise and prints Continue reading…

12h

'Reasons to be hopeful' on 1.5C global temperature target

IPCC scientist says there are some positive signs about our ability to keep the global temperature rise to 1.5C

12h

Thai bay made famous in 'The Beach' shut indefinitely

The glittering Thai bay immortalised in the movie "The Beach" will be closed indefinitely to allow it to recover from the impact of hordes of tourists, an official said Wednesday, as a temporary ban on visitors expired.

12h

Gaia spacecraft prepares to weather an incoming meteoroid storm

A spacecraft currently mapping the Milky Way could be pelted by space dust next week, so the European Space Agency is putting up its shields

12h

Facebook says no sign recent hack spread to other apps

Facebook on Tuesday said hackers who stole digital keys to tens of millions of accounts appear not to have tampered with third-party applications linked to the social network.

12h

Canadian Nobel physics laureate hails womens' progress

Canada's Donna Strickland, the first female Nobel Prize winner in physics since 1963, said Tuesday that women have "come a long way" since the previous laureate, Maria Goeppert Mayer.

12h

Proposed rule change worries some about radiation regulation

The EPA is pursuing rule changes that experts say would weaken the way radiation exposure is regulated, turning to scientific outliers who argue that a bit of radiation damage is actually good for you—like a little bit of sunlight.

12h

Apple chief says firm guards data privacy in China

Apple chief executive Tim Cook on Tuesday said the company is devoted to protecting people's privacy, with data encrypted and locked away on servers even in China.

12h

Touchdown! Japan space probe lands new robot on asteroid

A Japanese probe landed a new observation robot on an asteroid on Wednesday as it pursues a mission to shed light on the origins of the solar system.

12h

Winner of year's final scientific Nobel Prize to be named

The Nobel Prize in chemistry, which honors researchers for advances in studying how molecules combine and interact, is being announced Wednesday by the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences.

12h

Volcano erupts on same Indonesian island as earlier quake

A volcano erupted Wednesday on the same central Indonesian island struck last week by a powerful earthquake and tsunami, and authorities warned planes about volcanic ash in the air.

12h

Hopis have made their mark in the world of running, author says

To be Hopi is to run. "That's who we are and that's what we do," says Matthew Sakiestewa Gilbert.

12h

Demand for sexual services in Britain: does sex education matter?

By analysing survey data from 1999-2001 and 2010-2012, researchers have estimated the demand for commercial sex among British men.

13h

Wheat that pumps iron, naturally

Is biofortification the best thing since sliced bread? Well, biofortified wheat could certainly make it easier to help some humans get proper nutrition.

13h

At 80, I’m on the last lap of life’s circuit and I don’t want to get off | Stewart Dakers

Working with older people, I know what’s in store for me as I enter another decade. I just hope I’ll know when I need to let go Eighty, eh, so how does it feel?” It’s a question to which I have had to reply too often since “that” birthday. I have now lived two years longer than my father, eight years longer than my mother, a full decade longer than the good book anticipated and if the demographic

13h

Molecule studies reveal potential treatment for stroke patients

In an extension of research published a month ago in Nature Methods, a novel hybrid approach performed by researchers from Clemson University's department of physics and astronomy and Stony Brook University has revealed a 3-D structure of a protein fragment that could serve as a drug target in treating stroke patients.

13h

Staten skal kradse ejendomsskat ind: Usikkert om spritnyt skattesystem kan bruges

Kombit har fået udviklet et nyt system til inddrivelse af ejendomsskat i kommunerne. Men midt i udviklingen overgik området til staten, og nu er systemets fremtid usikker.

13h

To understand modern Europe, look at its natural history | Tim Flannery

Defining this continent is a slippery undertaking, but it is revealing to look at its evolution over the last 100 million years How was Europe formed? How was its extraordinary history discovered? And why did Europe come to be so important in the world? For those, such as me, seeking answers, it is fortunate that Europe has a great abundance of bones – layer upon layer of them, buried in rocks an

14h

High stakes: cannabis capitalists seek funds to drive drug trade

London conference pushes uses ranging from reducing pain to increasing orgasms • Cannabis capitalism: who is making all the money? In a Mayfair hotel ballroom some of the UK’s biggest banks and pension funds have gathered to consider an investment in a new wonder ingredient that promises to revolutionise products ranging from pharmaceuticals, face creams and diet supplements to yoghurt and beer.

14h

Mink mæsker sig i rekordmeget antibiotika

Vi skal tilbage til 2004, før antibiotikaforbruget til mink var lige så højt som nu. En løsning er på vej, fortæller minkavlernes brancheforening.

14h

Emissions-free energy system saves heat from the summer sun for winter

A research group from Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden, has made great, rapid strides towards the development of a specially designed molecule which can store solar energy for later use. These advances have been presented in four scientific articles this year, with the most recent being published in the highly ranked journal Energy & Environmental Science.

15h

Exercise reduces stress, improves cellular health in family caregivers

Exercising at least three times a week for six months reduced stress in a group of family caregivers and even appeared to lengthen a small section of their chromosomes that is believed to slow cellular aging, new UBC research has found

15h

Wheat that pumps iron, naturally

Crop breeders are developing a biofortified wheat that could make proper nutrition easier.

15h

Demand for sexual services in Britain: does sex education matter?

By analysing survey data from 1999-2001 and 2010-2012, researchers have estimated the demand for commercial sex among British men.

15h

Crossing new frontiers in melanoma research

In a Pigment Cell & Melanoma Research article, world-leading experts identify emerging frontiers in skin cancer and pigment diseases.Melanoma is a deadly type of skin cancer that arises from pigment-forming cells. The article challenges the field by addressing provoking questions in melanoma immunotherapy, cancer systems biology, medical and surgical oncology, pigment biophysics, and precision pre

15h

Novel inhibitor of vascular calcification tested in trial of haemodialysis patients

Cardiovascular calcification is a major health concern in patients with kidney failure undergoing haemodialysis. A first-time-in-human clinical trial of an investigational calcification inhibitor has generated promising results in terms of safety, tolerability, and pharmacokinetics. The findings are published in the British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology.

15h

ALS drug may help treat prostate cancer

Researchers have discovered a new use for an old drug as a potential treatment for prostate cancer. The findings are published in the journal The Prostate.

15h

Non-VA healthcare providers are uncertain how to care for veterans

A study published in Family Practice indicates that healthcare providers outside of the Veterans Affairs Department are uncertain how to address veterans' needs. The study says that this is due to limited knowledge of resources and coordination problems.

15h

Study sheds light on atypical periprosthetic femoral fractures

Following surgery, some patients experience a broken bone around the implants of a total hip replacement–called a periprosthetic femoral fracture.

15h

Low vitamin D linked to earlier death in Thai men

Previous studies on the association between blood levels of vitamin D and survival have come from high-income countries. A new Geriatrics & Gerontology International study has now found that vitamin D insufficiency is linked with earlier death in community-dwelling Thai older men.

15h

Study examines care for knee replacement patients at physical therapy facilities

In an analysis of 112 records from 30 physical therapy (PT) sites regarding care for patients who had undergone total knee replacement (TKR) surgery, investigators found that the content and amount of specific exercises varied widely.

15h

How has the gluten-free industry affected individuals with celiac disease?

new Journal of Human Nutrition and Dietetics study has investigated how the recent proliferation of the gluten-free industry has affected individuals living with celiac disease.

15h

New information for women faced with infertility

A new Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology Research study offers infertile women new information regarding their expected probabilities of becoming pregnant and may help them select the optimal treatment based on their various risk factors.

15h

Cataracts linked to higher risks of osteoporosis and fracture

A new Journal of the American Geriatrics Society study has evaluated the potential impacts of cataracts and cataract surgery on the risks of osteoporosis and bone fractures.

15h

Teen cannabis use is not without risk to cognitive development

A study led by researchers at CHU Sainte-Justine in Montreal confirms that cannabis use is related to impaired and lasting effects on adolescent cognitive development.

15h

Interferential current offers solution to painful sex

Insufficient estrogen creates an array of physical changes in women, some of which limit the ability to enjoy sex. A new study offers hope, however, by demonstrating the effectiveness of interferential current in improving lubrication, pain, orgasm, and overall satisfaction for women with premature ovarian insufficiency who are taking hormones. Study results will be presented during The North Amer

15h

Sexual harassment and assault take long-term toll on women's health

The #MeToo Movement, in addition to raising awareness, has provided people with a voice to speak out when they've been wronged, harassed, or assaulted. A new study shows that not only are sexual harassment and assault highly prevalent today, but they may also have negative health consequences. Study results will be presented during The North American Menopause Society (NAMS) Annual Meeting in San

15h

Getting women in the mood for sex

Even before ancient Egyptians, the search was on for aphrodisiacs that stimulated sexual desire and pleasure. Today, although we better understand the science behind desire, there is still much to be learned. The Presidential Symposium at The North American Menopause Society (NAMS) Annual Meeting in San Diego, Oct. 3-6, will provide a historical world-wide tour of the search for aphrodisiacs, endi

15h

Pregnancy disorders may lead to more hot flashes

What occurs during pregnancy could have longer-term health effects than originally thought. A new study suggests that women with a history of hypertensive disorders of pregnancy and gestational diabetes may experience a greater burden of hot flashes during the menopause transition. Study results will be presented during The North American Menopause Society (NAMS) Annual Meeting in San Diego, Oct.

15h

Who needs genetic testing for breast cancer?

Advances are regularly being made in cancer genetics. But, if patients aren't screened and diagnosed early enough, the advances can't save lives. A presentation at The North American Menopause Society (NAMS) Annual Meeting in San Diego, Oct. 3-6, will review the various genetic testing options for breast cancer, as well as profile those who should be tested.

15h

Taking control of stress and menopause symptoms

It's another one of those chicken-or-the-egg dilemmas … do bothersome menopause symptoms create stress or does stress bring on menopause symptoms? The correct answer might not matter since a new study suggests that higher mindfulness may lower stress and the impact of menopause-related symptoms such as hot flashes. Study results will be presented during The North American Menopause Society (NAMS

15h

Options for making sex more enjoyable at any age

Women at any age should be able to enjoy sex. Unfortunately, sexual function and comfort often decreases for women during the menopause transition. A presentation at The North American Menopause Society (NAMS) Annual Meeting in San Diego, Oct. 3-6, will highlight the many nonhormone and also hormone therapy options currently available to help women stay sexually active, even if they suffer from ge

15h

Time to rethink how we diagnose Alzheimer's disease

With all the focus on Alzheimer's disease in recent years as a result of the aging population, what have we learned? A symposium at The North American Menopause Society (NAMS) Annual Meeting in San Diego, Oct. 3-6, will not only review conflicting evidence regarding the best way to diagnose the disease, but also the latest thinking on the neurodegeneration that often begins during the menopause tr

15h

Understanding why women may age slower than men

Why do women typically live longer than men? The Keynote Address at The North American Menopause Society (NAMS) Annual Meeting in San Diego, Oct. 3-6, reviews some old and provides some new answers, highlighting the latest studies on the protective effects of sex hormones and estrogen, as well as other tips for slowing the aging process by improving telomere health.

15h

Shedding light on new treatment options for perimenopausal depression and sleep problems

Light therapy has long been a recognized treatment option for depression. But can it help perimenopausal women struggling with depression and sleep problems as the result of hormone changes? A new study from the University of California suggests that it can by altering a woman's natural sleep/wake cycle. Preliminary study results will be presented during The North American Menopause Society (NAMS)

15h

Midterm Time Capsule, 35 Days to Go: ‘Outright Fraud’

The huge New York Times report today by David Barstow, Susanne Craig, and Russ Buettner, five weeks before the midterm elections of 2018, is a counterpart to the Access Hollywood tape that came out four weeks before the presidential election of 2016. Why? Each of them involved allegations that, in any previous election cycle, would have ended a campaign or triggered major investigations. In 2016:

16h

A Goblin World That Points Toward Hidden Planet Nine in the Solar System

What astronomers have found about the curious orbit of a small ice world far away reinforces the idea that a large world is hidden out in the solar system.

17h

For Just the Third Time in 117 Years, a Woman Wins the Nobel Prize in Physics

Donna Strickland did pioneering work with lasers and shared the award with two men on Tuesday. She is the first woman to receive the award in 55 years.

18h

First Woman in 55 Years Wins the Nobel Prize in Physics

Prof. Donna Strickland won the Nobel Prize in Physics for her work with lasers. She is the first woman to receive the award in 55 years and the third woman to receive it in over a century.

18h

The Norwegian teen fighting the government over Arctic oil

Elina Berg is a member of a campaign group which is suing the Norwegian government over oil exploration in the Arctic.

19h

City-dwelling blue tits may lay bigger eggs because of what they eat

Blue tit eggs that were laid in urban parkland were 5% larger than eggs laid in a nearby forest, which could be due to differences in the amount of calcium available to birds in urban and forest environments, a study published in Frontiers in Zoology has found.

19h

The Atlantic Daily: She Didn’t ‘Qualify’ for Her Own Wikipedia Page. Then She Won a Nobel Prize

What We’re Following Women on Wikipedia: Donna Strickland became the third woman in history—and the first in 55 years—to win a Nobel Prize in physics, an award she shared with her fellow physicists Gérard Mourou and Arthur Ashkin. A tug-of-war played out in a surprising place: on Wikipedia, where, before her win, the Canadian professor didn’t meet the threshold for getting her own page. On Tuesda

19h

City-dwelling blue tits may lay bigger eggs because of what they eat

Blue tit eggs that were laid in urban parkland were 5% larger than eggs laid in a nearby forest, which could be due to differences in the amount of calcium available to birds in urban and forest environments, a study published in Frontiers in Zoology has found.

19h

How should we deal with a large-scale chemical attack?

Scientists are developing technology to help.

19h

The first drywood termite known to use snapping stick-like mandibles to defend its colony

First-of-a-kind new species and genus of drywood termite was collected from two localities in Cameroon. With its soldier caste sporting a unique set of long, slender, stick-like 'jaws', the previously unknown insect is the first drywood termite known to rely on the so-called snapping mandibles as a defense strategy. The discovery poses a whole set of questions about the origin of the termite and i

19h

Commandeering microbes pave way for synthetic biology in military environments

Scientists have developed and demonstrated a pioneering synthetic biology tool to deliver DNA programming into a broad range of bacteria.

19h

New concept to cool boiling surface may help prevent nuclear power plant accidents

Scientists have demonstrated a novel concept that overcomes the tolerable heat limit or what's known as the critical heat flux (CHF). They have come up with a new method that increased the CHF by 10 percent compared to approaches used in the past.

19h

Animal study suggests deep space travel may significantly damage GI function in astronauts

Deep space bombardment by galactic cosmic radiation (GCR) could significantly damage gastrointestinal (GI) tissue leading to long-term functional alterations, according to a new study, which also raises concern about high risk of tumor development in stomach and colon.

19h

How people judge good from bad

New research sheds light on how people decide whether behavior is moral or immoral. The findings could serve as a framework for informing the development of artificial intelligence and other technologies.

19h

Traces of opiates found in ancient Cypriot vessel

Researchers at the University of York and the British Museum have discovered traces of opiates preserved inside a distinctive vessel dating back to the Late Bronze Age

20h

Southern Diet Blamed For High Rates Of Hypertension Among Black Americans

Fried chicken, mac and cheese and sweet drinks: A study suggests Southern cuisine may be at the center of a tangled web of reasons why black people are more prone to hypertension than white people. (Image credit: Robert Manella/Getty Images)

20h

Biofilm reactor promises to cut production costs on vitamin K

In an innovative study that promises to reduce production costs for the most potent form of vitamin K, Menaquinone-7, researchers have developed a novel method to enhance the fermentation process that creates the supplement by agitated liquid fermentation in a biofilm reactor.

20h

Major step toward printed anisotropic magnets

Researchers have taken a major step toward printed, aligned anisotropic magnets via additive manufacturing processes.

20h

To make SNAP healthier and save costs: Offer food incentives and disincentives

A new cost-effectiveness study estimates that nearly one million cardiovascular and diabetes events could be prevented and $42 billion could be saved in healthcare costs by including food incentives and disincentives for participants on SNAP. Of three models, two were cost-effective but the third, SNAP-plus, was not only cost-effective but actually cost-saving — i.e., the government gained more d

20h

Why vitamin E effect is often a matter of luck until now

Vitamin E's positive effects often fail to manifest themselves as strongly as expected, but sometimes administering vitamin E actually has detrimental effects. An international team has now found a possible cause for this. It has shown that the effect of vitamin E, which is taken as a tablet or capsule, is not based on the vitamin itself, but rather on the effect of a metabolite. This socalled alp

20h

Smart technology for synchronized 3D printing of concrete

Scientists have developed a technology where two robots can work in unison to 3D-print a concrete structure.

20h

Idly tapping your fingers can make you think time has slowed down

Moving a body part in time to a rhythm alters your perception of time, causing it to either stretch or contract – providing new clues about which parts of the brain control our body clocks

20h

F.D.A. Seizes Documents From Juul Headquarters

The latest move by the agency to increase pressure on e-cigarette makers to curtail marketing their products to teenagers.

20h

Traces of opiates found in ancient Cypriot vessel

Researchers at the University of York and the British Museum have discovered traces of opiates preserved inside a distinctive vessel dating back to the Late Bronze Age.

20h

This Is No ‘Standard’ FBI Background Investigation

President Donald Trump, who has attacked the FBI and the Justice Department relentlessly over the ongoing Russia investigation, announced last week that he is essentially putting his full faith in the bureau to probe the sexual-assault allegations that have been made against the Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh . “I want them to do a very comprehensive investigation,” Trump reiterated on Mon

20h

Read Hillary Clinton’s Remarks on Brett Kavanaugh

In Senate testimony last week, President Trump’s Supreme Court nominee, Brett Kavanaugh, denounced the sexual-assault and misconduct allegations against him as a “political hit” and part of a left-wing conspiracy orchestrated “on behalf of the Clintons.” On Tuesday, in an interview with The Atlantic editor in chief Jeffrey Goldberg at The Atlantic Festival in Washington, D.C., Hillary Clinton off

20h

New technique uses umbilical cord stem cells for early repair of cleft palate

A technique using umbilical cord blood stem cells could be a promising new approach for repair of cleft palate in infants, researcher report.

20h

Reading is a team-lift as different brain parts work together to predict proficiency

The extent to which sensory-specific parts of the brain are able to connect as a network, not necessarily anatomically, but functionally, during a child's development predicts their reading proficiency, according to a new neuroimaging study.

20h

Biologists find new genetic interdependence between mothers and their offspring

A team of biologists has discovered that the distinctive genetic processes of early development help explain patterns of animal development in nature and across the evolutionary tree.

20h

Wildfire aerosols remain longer in atmosphere than expected

Light-absorbing brown carbon aerosols, emitted by wildfires, remain longer in the atmosphere than expected, which could have implications for climate predictions.

20h

One more year of high school may shape waistlines later in life

Together, genetics and years of education can influence whether or not someone becomes obese, a new study finds.

20h

Weekday mornings are no longer peak times for sudden cardiac arrest

Heart experts have long believed that weekday mornings — and especially Mondays — were the danger zones for unexpected deaths from sudden cardiac arrests. But a new study shows those peak times have disappeared and now, sudden cardiac arrests are more likely to happen on any day at any time.

20h

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BioNyt Videnskabens Verden (www.bionyt.dk) er Danmarks ældste populærvidenskabelige tidsskrift for naturvidenskab. Det er det eneste blad af sin art i Danmark, som er helliget international forskning inden for livsvidenskaberne.

Bladet bringer aktuelle, spændende forskningsnyheder inden for biologi, medicin og andre naturvidenskabelige områder som f.eks. klimaændringer, nanoteknologi, partikelfysik, astronomi, seksualitet, biologiske våben, ecstasy, evolutionsbiologi, kloning, fedme, søvnforskning, muligheden for liv på mars, influenzaepidemier, livets opståen osv.

Artiklerne roses for at gøre vanskeligt stof forståeligt, uden at den videnskabelige holdbarhed tabes.

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