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Nyheder2018oktober04

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4h

Fungus provides powerful medicine in fighting honey bee viruses

A mushroom extract fed to honey bees greatly reduces virus levels, according to a new paper from Washington State University scientists, the USDA and colleagues at Fungi Perfecti, a business based in Olympia, Washington.

9h

Professor kritiserer Klimarådet: »Bæredygtig diesel er mere miljøvenlig end el«

Diesel eller benzin fremstillet på biomasse kan sagtens konkurrere med elbiler på bæredygtighed. Derfor bør Danmark satse andet end blot elbiler, som Klimarådet har lagt sig fast på, mener professor.

12h

LATEST

Aggressive prostate and lung cancers are driven by common mechanisms, researchers find

Researchers have discovered a common process in the development of late-stage, small cell cancers of the prostate and lung. These shared molecular mechanisms could lead to the development of drugs to treat not just prostate and lung cancers, but small cell cancers of almost any organ.

6min

The ‘all-natural’ label on your LaCroix is meaningless, but that doesn’t mean it’s bad for you

Science Your LaCroix can’t kill cockroaches. Or you. A new lawsuit argues LaCroix is lying about what goes in its bubbly flavored water. It’s far from an airtight case.

19min

Promo | Master of Arms

Catch the All New Series MASTER OF ARMS Friday, November 2nd at 10p on Discovery. | https://www.discovery.com From: Discovery

35min

The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: The Vote Will Go On

Written by Elaine Godfrey ( @elainejgodfrey ) Today in 5 Lines Senate Judiciary Committee Chairman Chuck Grassley said the FBI’s supplemental investigation does not corroborate the sexual-assault allegations against Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh. Democrats widely criticized the report, which was released only to senators on Thursday. The Senate Judiciary Committee is expected to vote to a

47min

Trump’s Immigration Agenda Takes Another Hit in Court

The travel ban. The termination of the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program. A funding cut-off for “sanctuary cities.” Time and time again the federal courts have prevented the Trump administration from pushing through measures that radically overhaul the nation’s immigration protocols. And so it happened again late Wednesday, with about 300,000 immigrants from El Salvador, Haiti, Nicar

47min

Artificial enzymes convert solar energy into hydrogen gas

Researchers have synthesized an artificial enzyme that functions in the metabolism of living cells. These enzymes can utilize the cell's own energy, and thereby enable hydrogen gas to be produced from solar energy.

56min

Malaria parasites adapt to mosquito feeding times, study shows

Malaria parasites have evolved to be most infectious at the time of day when mosquitoes feed, to maximize their chances of being spread.

56min

Migraine can be treated without medicine, pilot study finds

Some migraine patients can cut down on medication or stop using it completely by using a newly developed inhaler which changes the composition of the air we breathe, according to results of a recent pilot study.

56min

Get ready for some llama and bagel emojis: Apple's adding 70 new icons in iOS 12.1 update

Upset Apple's recent iOS 12 updates for iPhones, iPads and the iPod touch didn't add any emoji? You can now turn that frown upside down. (There is an emoji for that.)

56min

Sequencing RNA in 20,000 Cardiac cells reveals insights into heart development and disease

Scientists using a powerful new technology that sequences RNA in 20,000 individual cell nuclei have uncovered new insights into biological events in heart disease. In animal studies, the researchers identified a broad variety of cell types in both healthy and diseased hearts, and investigated in rich detail the "transcriptional landscape," in which DNA transfers genetic information into RNA and pr

1h

This AI can help spot biased websites and false news

Technology We should take a lesson from it. MIT is working on an AI that can evaluate how biased websites are, and how factually accurate they are.

1h

Trump’s Unusual Strategy on Kavanaugh Worked

The White House’s expected victory in getting Brett Kavanaugh confirmed to the Supreme Court is in part a product of an unusual approach by President Trump: restraint . While the president has a tendency to lash out when he doesn’t get what he wants immediately, he approached allegations of sexual misconduct against his nominee with unusual calmness. Rather than go on the offensive, the White Hou

1h

Focusing on the Lasers from the Last Two Physics Nobel Prizes

Focusing on the Lasers from the Last Two Physics Nobel Prizes Innovations in laser methods and technology won Nobel Prizes in 2017 and 2018, but not all lasers are the same. nobel-lasers_final.jpg Abigail Malate, Staff Illustrator Image credits: Copyright American Institute of Physics Physics Thursday, October 4, 2018 – 16:30 Claire Cleveland, Contributor (Inside Science) — The Nobel Prizes in p

1h

MacArthur Fellow And Planetary Scientist Sarah Stewart Discusses How The Moon Was Formed

NPR's Ari Shapiro speaks with planetary scientist Sarah Stewart about her research into how the moon was formed, using a big cannon in her University of California Davis lab.

1h

Minnesota Residents Call Police On Rowdy Drunk Birds

Gilbert Police Chief Ty Techar says an early frost means the birds have been "getting a little more 'tipsy' than normal" on fermented berries. (Image credit: Kirill Kukhmar/Getty Images)

1h

Too Little, Too Much: How Poverty and Wealth Affect Our Minds

We all know the downsides of being poor. But what about the downsides of being rich? This week, we explore the psychology of scarcity…and excess. (Image credit: Andrea Cappelli/Picture Press/Getty Images/Picture Press RM)

1h

Why Supply Chain Hacks Are a Cybersecurity Worse Case ScenarioApple Bloomberg Chinese

A blockbuster report from Bloomberg says that China has compromised servers used by major US companies. It's a problem that experts have long feared, and still don't know how to resolve.

1h

Physician experts highlight research ahead of Otolaryngology's Annual Meeting

The latest research on ear health, head and neck cancer, sleep-disordered breathing, rhinology and allergy, facial plastics, laryngology and swallowing disorders, endocrine surgery, and other topics related to otolaryngology-head and neck surgery will be presented in Atlanta, Ga., October 7-10, during the 2018 Annual Meeting & OTO Experience of the American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck

1h

Interior Department Wants Stricter Data Standards in Conservation Decisions

A new rule would emphasize public, peer-reviewed reports in its decision-making, which has scientists concerned about the exclusion of sensitive, private data.

1h

Scientists: US military program could be seen as bioweapon

A research arm of the U.S. military is exploring the possibility of deploying insects to make plants more resilient by altering their genes. Some experts say the work may be seen as a potential biological weapon.

1h

500-Year-Old Scroll Reveals King Henry VII's Extraordinary Support of Travelers to New World

In 1500, just a year after England sent its first British-led expedition to "Terra Nova," the so-called New World, King Henry VII gave a hefty reward to one of the explorers, new research shows.

1h

Even the best AI for spotting fake news is still terrible

It should be possible to automatically identify dubious news sources—but we’ll need a lot more data.

1h

Successful mouse couples talk out infidelity in calm tones

California mice are relatively solitary animals, but put two in a room and they'll talk each other's ears off.

1h

In its final days, Cassini bathed in 'ring rain'

On its last orbits in 2017, the long-running Cassini spacecraft dove between Saturn's rings and its upper atmosphere and bathed in a downpour of dust that astronomers call "ring rain."

1h

Claire Cleveland

Contributor Claire Cleveland is a science writing intern for Inside Science News Service. She has degrees in journalism and biology & society from Arizona State University, where she worked for outlets such as the Arizona Republic, Arizona Center for Investigative Reporting, The Denver Post, and ASU’s independent student news service, The State Press. When she’s not at work, she’s reading, watchi

1h

Spacewatch: asteroid landing explores a missing link

In the weak gravity, it took the Mascot lander 20 minutes to fall 51 metres to the surface – taking photos and readings A German-French lander has arrived safely on the surface of the asteroid Ryugu, 300m kilometres from Earth. The Mobile Asteroid Surface Scout (Mascot) is about the size of a shoebox and weighs 9kg. It was developed by the German Aerospace Center (DLR) and built in cooperation wi

1h

The best new features in the Fall 2018 Windows Update

Technology Here's the new stuff your computer can do. Your computer will finally wait until you're not working to force a restart and update.

2h

‘We’re Still Under Attack’

This morning, the Justice Department indicted seven Russian intelligence officers for cyberattacks meant to interfere with a United States investigation into doping allegations. It’s the latest in a string of indictments and sanctions targeting Russian entities, which are meant to dissuade Russia from interfering in and undermining American democracy. Most of the counter-Russia actions taken by t

2h

Oculus Quest finally gives virtual reality true freedom

Virtual reality has always faced barriers that prevented it from going mainstream. Oculus is quite aware of that. The price of a VR machine paired with a powerful PC was a financial obstacle.

2h

Tales from 141,430 and one genomes

Non-invasive prenatal testing potentially provides a wealth of genetic information, but the quality of the DNA sequencing is poor — only about 10 percent coverage per genome. Nevertheless, scientists now show that with enough genomes — in this case, 141,431 — it is possible to find genetic variants linked with human traits, including birth outcomes and susceptibility to infectious disease. Such

2h

Successful mouse couples talk out infidelity in calm tones

The quality of conversations between California mice couples after one partner has been unfaithful can help predict which mouse pairs will successfully produce a litter of mouse pups and which males are good fathers, according to a study published recently by the journal Frontiers in Ecology and Evolution in a special issue on the evolution of monogamy.

2h

Using personal data to predict blood pressure

Engineers at UC San Diego used wearable off-the-shelf technology and machine learning to predict an individual's blood pressure and provide personalized recommendations to lower it based on this data.

2h

The FBI’s Kavanaugh Report Was Enough for Key Senate Republicans

Brett Kavanaugh has spent the past three weeks in Senate-confirmation limbo. By this weekend, he seems headed to the Supreme Court. An updated, but limited, FBI investigation into decades-old accusations of sexual misconduct against Kavanaugh appeared to satisfy the remaining Republican holdouts, likely giving the federal appellate judge the slim majority he’ll need to win confirmation. The repor

2h

A Brazilian Far-Right Populist and the Women Who Like Him

In Brazil, there’s a video that just won’t go away. It shows a young male congressman, dressed in a suit and tie, sparring with a female congresswoman, as photographers and journalists encircle them. The subject of the argument has been lost over the 15 years since the video was shot. What hasn’t been lost are the man’s words, or his actions. “I wouldn’t ever rape you because you don't deserve it

2h

Small business solutions for a more robust economy | Magatte Wade

Many African countries are poor for a simple reason, says entrepreneur Magatte Wade: governments have created far too many obstacles to starting and running a business. In this passionate talk, Wade breaks down the challenges of doing business on the continent and offers some solutions of her own — while calling on leaders to do their part, too.

2h

Model helps robots navigate more like humans do

Researchers have now devised a way to help robots navigate environments more like humans do. Their novel motion-planning model lets robots determine how to reach a goal by exploring the environment, observing other agents, and exploiting what they've learned before in similar situations.

2h

Ground shaking during devastating flood offers new insights

Scientists were able to record a sudden outburst of a glacial lake with seismometers deployed the year before in the wake of the catastrophic Ghorka earthquake in April 2015. The authors of a new study argue that such major flood events have a greater impact on erosion rates than the annual monsoon rainfalls. The reason is that the water masses mobilize large boulders and coarse sediment which usu

2h

Molecular guardians monitor chromosomes during cell division

One of the worst things that can happen to a cell is to end up with the wrong number of chromosomes. This can happen if something goes wrong during cell division, and it can lead to infertility, miscarriages, birth defects, or cancer.

2h

Solving a medical mystery: Cause of rare type of dwarfism discovered

For children born with Saul-Wilson syndrome, and their parents, much of their lives are spent searching for answers. First defined in 1990, only 14 cases are known worldwide. Today, these individuals have answers. A study has now uncovered the cause of Saul-Wilson syndrome.

2h

Viruses in blood lead to digestive problems

Some people suffer unpredictable bouts of abdominal pain and constipation. A new study in mice shows that viruses that target the nervous system can kill neurons in the gut that coordinate the process of moving waste along. Such viruses may be involved in causing people's digestive woes.

2h

Nanoparticles to treat snakebites

Venomous snakebites affect 2.5 million people, and annually cause more than 100,000 deaths and leave 400,000 individuals with permanent physical and psychological trauma each year. Researchers have now described a new approach to treating snake bites, using nanoparticles to bind to venom toxins and prevent the spread of venom through the body.

2h

Dr. Bernard J. Carroll, ‘Conscience of Psychiatry,’ Dies at 77

After early work on the biological basis of depression, Dr. Carroll became a relentless campaigner against corruption among academic researchers.

2h

The other shoe drops: Amazon cuts bonus, stock offerings

Previous to the announced increase in minimum wage to $15/hr., warehouse workers were eligible for production bonuses and stock awards Those terminate when the wage is increased Amazon claims it's a net gain for the workers; others disagree CEO Jeff Bezos still makes $30,000 a minute So … net positive or not so much? Following the announcement earlier this week of Amazon increasing wages to $15

2h

The 2018 Nobel Prize in Chemistry winners all work with ‘directed’ evolution

"Directed" evolution is a kind of coaxing, and speeding up of, evolution itself. The committee referred to the work of all three as "The foundation for a revolution in chemistry." Frances H. Arnold is the fifth woman to win the prize in chemistry in its 117-year history. How they did it The 2018 Nobel Prize in Chemistry winners are Frances H. Arnold at the California Institute of Technology, Sir

2h

Why Scientists Should Be Tracking a Catastrophic Pig Disease

African swine fever is eliminating entire herds in China and Europe. But few surveillance systems capture animal pathogens, even when humans are aiding their spread.

2h

The demise of Rethink Robotics shows how hard it is to make machines truly smart

The company’s easy-to-use robots helped kick-start a big trend. So what happened?

2h

Amazon rainforest conservation victories spill losses to neighbors

New research suggests that protecting the Amazon rainforest from deforestation may just be shifting the damage to a less renowned neighbor. The unintended consequences are profound.

2h

Enhancement of piezoelectric properties in organic polymers all in the molecules

The inability to alter intrinsic piezoelectric behavior in organic polymers hampers their application in flexible, wearable and biocompatible devices, according to researchers, but now a molecular approach can improve those piezoelectric properties.

2h

A new take on the 19th-century skull collection of Samuel Morton

After unearthing and analyzing handwritten documentation from scientist Samuel Morton, a doctoral candidate drew a new conclusion about the infamous 19th-century collection: though Morton accurately measured the brain size of hundreds of human skulls, racist bias still plagued his science.

2h

Why huskies have blue eyes

DNA testing of more than 6,000 dogs has revealed that a duplication on canine chromosome 18 is strongly associated with blue eyes in Siberian Huskies.

2h

Rewriting the textbook on how steroid hormones enter cells

A discovery may open up new ways to control steroid hormone-mediated processes, including growth and development in insects, and sexual maturation, immunity, and cancer progression in humans.

2h

Light makes catalyst more effective

Scientists have demonstrated a new catalyst for making clean-burning hydrogen from ammonia. They describe a plasmonic effect that lowers chemical activation barriers, improves efficiency and could be of general use in other catalysts.

2h

Species-rich forests store twice as much carbon as monocultures

Species-rich subtropical forests can take up on average twice as much carbon as monocultures. An international research team has evaluated data from forests grown specifically for this purpose in China with a total of over 150,000 trees. The results speak in favor of using many different tree species during reforestation.

2h

Big data method could speed up the hunt for new drugs

Researchers have discovered a new anti-epileptic drug target and a whole new approach that promises to speed up the discovery of future drugs to treat debilitating diseases, including epilepsy. The researchers developed an advanced computational approach to predict new drug targets. As a proof-of-concept, the investigators applied the computational approach to epilepsy and discovered a new drug t

2h

Why we can’t treat all ovarian cancer the same way

A new study that reveals differences within a group of women with ovarian cancer who received the same treatment could lead to more personalized medicine. Ovarian cancer is hard to detect and often goes without diagnosis until an advanced stage, leading to a five-year survival rate of just 43 percent. (By comparison the breast cancer rate is 90 percent). Like many other cancers, research shows it

2h

Why NASA needs to flip Curiosity’s ‘brain’ over

Space It's having memory issues. The past few months have been pretty rough on NASA’s Mars rovers. Opportunity is still not responding to NASA’s frequent missives.

2h

Immunophenotyping Extracellular Vesicles Using Amnis® Technology

Download this application note to learn how the Amnis® time delay integration (TDI) image capturing system facilitates high-throughput flow cytometry with high sensitivity to submicron particles!

2h

A Star is Born: Lady Gaga's Most Iconic Roles

Stefani Germanotta has portrayed more than just a global pop icon—she's popped up in a handful of genre projects too.

2h

Model helps robots navigate more like humans do

MIT researchers have now devised a way to help robots navigate environments more like humans do. Their novel motion-planning model lets robots determine how to reach a goal by exploring the environment, observing other agents, and exploiting what they've learned before in similar situations. A paper describing the model was presented at this week's IEEE/RSJ International Conference on Intelligent

2h

Apoptosis Signaling and Detection

Download this poster to learn about the mechanisms and pathways that mediate early-, mid-, and late-stage apoptosis, as well as the assays used to investigate this critical process!

2h

Hemorrhoids: Symptoms, Causes and Treatment

About 2 million Americans are treated for hemorrhoids each year.

2h

Prosecute Those Making ‘True Threats’ Against Ford and Kavanaugh

When Christine Blasey Ford appeared before the Senate last week, she testified that her greatest fears about going public with sexual-assault claims were realized upon receiving messages that shook her to her core. “My family and I have been the target of constant harassment and death threats,” she said. “People have posted my personal information and that of my parents online. This has resulted

3h

Trump’s Counterterrorism Strategy Is a Relief

Twenty-one months after being elected president, Donald Trump finally issued a “National Strategy for Counterterrorism” on Thursday. It’s the U.S. government’s first overarching public counterterrorism strategy since President Obama’s in 2011, which was preceded by George W. Bush’s in 2006. (I worked as the senior director for counterterrorism at the National Security Council from 2015 to 2017, i

3h

Police-Grade Surveillance Technology Comes to the Playground

As other elementary schools across the country were preparing for the new school year by cleaning classrooms and training teachers, Hermosa Elementary, in Artesia, New Mexico was also installing a network of wireless microphones that could pick up the specific concussive audio signature of gunfire. Placed high in classrooms and hallways, the golf-ball-sized devices can alert authorities to the so

3h

The Kavanaugh Pressure Campaign on Red-State Democrats

“You don’t vote him, I won’t vote for you.” A passerby shouted these words at Democratic Senator Joe Manchin at the West Virginia Pumpkin Festival on Monday, in a moment captured on video . “I gotcha—I’ve heard that a lot,” Manchin replied. He probably has. Ever since President Donald Trump nominated Judge Brett Kavanaugh to the Supreme Court, conservative activists and interest groups have put i

3h

Scientists call for microbial 'Noah's Ark' to protect global health

A team of researchers is calling for the creation of a global microbiota vault to protect the long-term health of humanity.

3h

Teaching wild birds to sing a new tune

Like toddlers learning to speak, young birds learn to sing by listening to the voices of adults. Now, researchers have shown for the first time that they could teach young sparrows in the wild how to sing a new tune. The wild birds then passed the new songs on to the next generation.

3h

Surprising chemical complexity of Saturn's rings changing planet's upper atmosphere

A new study based on data from the final orbits last year of NASA's Cassini spacecraft shows the rings of Saturn — some of the most visually stupendous objects in the universe — are far more chemically complicated than previously was understood.

3h

AI could predict cognitive decline leading to Alzheimer's disease in the next 5 years

A team of scientists has successfully trained a new artificial intelligence (AI) algorithm to make accurate predictions regarding cognitive decline leading to Alzheimer's disease.

3h

Efavirenz in HIV-positive pregnant women, risk of neurological condition in children

Antiretroviral therapy (ART) is a vital treatment that helps prevent a pregnant woman from passing HIV to her baby, but one type of ART medication may increase the risk the child will develop a neurological condition, according to new research being presented at IDWeek 2018.

3h

13 Hyperfast, Alien Stars Are Invading the Milky Way

Hyperfast stars that are flying through the Milky Way may have been flung out from a nearby galaxy.

3h

City size and structure may influence influenza epidemics

The size and structure of cities helps shape the progression of new influenza cases during a flu season, a new study finds.

3h

3h

Neanderthal Genes Likely Helped Homo sapiens Resist Illness

Modern humans retain DNA sequences from Neanderthals related to fighting off RNA-based viruses.

3h

Explore Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, the German Research Center Devoted to Measurement

The Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt in Braunschweig is committed to metrology.

3h

Experts develop guide for getting more LTC residents immunized

A summit convened by The Gerontological Society of America (GSA) National Adult Vaccination Program (NAVP) has resulted in a roadmap for advancing immunization efforts in long-term care (LTC) facilities. A dozen recommendations — including five priority actions — have been outlined in a new white paper, 'Charting a Path to Increase Immunization Rates in the Post-Acute and Long-Term Care Settings

3h

UCLA researchers discover aggressive prostate and lung cancers are driven by common mechanisms

UCLA researchers have discovered a common process in the development of late-stage, small cell cancers of the prostate and lung. These shared molecular mechanisms could lead to the development of drugs to treat not just prostate and lung cancers, but small cell cancers of almost any organ.

3h

Ghost objects in the sky

Gamma ray bursts are thought to accompany the explosion of a massive star, but astronomers probably detect a small percentage because the collimated burst must point directly at Earth. A UC Berkeley astronomer searched instead for the radio afterglow of such an explosion and discovered the first of what may be many 'orphan' bursts: an extremely bright source of radio emissions that blazed into exi

3h

New study evaluates efficacy of PET imaging to manage chronic liver diseases

While liver biopsies are powerful and reliable, they are also invasive, painful, limited and subject to complications. These effects may soon be a thing of the past for some patients thanks to new research showing PET imaging with the 18F-FAC radiotracer can be used as a non-invasive substitute.

3h

Broad genetic variation on the Pontic-Caspian Steppe

The genetic variation within the Scythian nomad group is so broad that it must be explained with the group assimilating people it came in contact with. This is shown in a new study on Bronze and Iron Age genetics of the Pontic-Caspian Steppe, situated in the Black Sea region.

3h

Boosting the efficiency of silicon solar cells

A solar cell's efficiency indicates what percentage of the solar energy radiated into the cell is converted into electrical energy. The theoretical limit for silicon solar cells is 29.3 percent due to physical material properties. In a new article, researchers describe how this limit can be abolished.

3h

The ethics of human brain surrogacy

“Creepy ‘brain in a bucket’ study spurs medical, ethical debates” … “Yale experiment to reanimate dead brains promises ‘living hell’ for humans” … “Scientists have managed to reanimate disembodied pigs’ brains – but for a human mind, it could be a living hell” … These are just a few of the sensational headlines that came […]

3h

A Controversial Virus Study Reveals a Critical Flaw in How Science Is Done

Last year, the world learned that researchers led by David Evans from the University of Alberta had resurrected a virus called horsepox. The virus hasn’t been seen in nature for decades, but Evans’s team assembled it using genetic material that they ordered from a company that synthesizes DNA. The work caused a huge stir. Horsepox is harmless to people, but its close cousin, smallpox, killed hund

3h

Scythe Complete: Lock at 1

Hi Scythes, We recently sent out a survey asking Scythes a variety of questions about the future of Scythe Complete . One of those questions was: “Do you think cubes should be locked at 1 SC vote?” Based on your responses we will implement lock at 1. 1 Scythe Complete Locks Cubes from Play Previously cubes would be “locked” aka made unplayable once 2 Scythes had completed them. Going forward it w

3h

In its final days, Cassini bathed in 'ring rain'

Nearly one year after Cassini burned up in Saturn's atmosphere, scientists report that the spacecraft successfully collected 2,700 bits of dust from the planet's rings.

3h

Post-treatment surveillance frequency not related to improved lung cancer patient survival

Study findings sourced by the National Cancer Database published in Annals of Surgery also do not show that more frequent surveillance improved survival following lung cancer recurrence.

3h

Artificial enzymes convert solar energy into hydrogen gas

In a new scientific article, researchers at Uppsala University describe how, using a completely new method, they have synthesised an artificial enzyme that functions in the metabolism of living cells. These enzymes can utilize the cell's own energy, and thereby enable hydrogen gas to be produced from solar energy.

3h

EU commissioner questions legality of new Ryanair terms

Consumer officials should examine budget airline Ryanair's new terms and conditions, as any move to force dissatisfied customers to seek redress in Ireland would be illegal, a top European official said Thursday.

3h

Men Fined $1 Million for Trafficking $17 Million Worth of Squishy Sea Cucumbers

Two men were charged with smuggling an astonishing $17 million worth of sea cucumbers through San Diego over a period of two years. Authorities have charged them with $1 million in fines and two years' probation.

3h

The Not-So-Trippy Reason Mushrooms Are Psychedelic

The Not-So-Trippy Reason Mushrooms Are Psychedelic They probably evolved to make mushroom-eating insects lose their appetites. The Not-So-Trippy Reason Mushrooms Are Psychedelic Video of The Not-So-Trippy Reason Mushrooms Are Psychedelic Earth Thursday, October 4, 2018 – 14:15 Karin Heineman, Executive Producer (Inside Science) — There are about 10,000 known species of mushrooms in the world, an

3h

Viruses Spread by Insects to Crops Sound Scary. The Military Calls It Food Security.

Critics warn that a Defense Department-funded food security project that is still in the lab could set off a “biological arms race.”

4h

The Gay Men Who Have Lived for Years With Someone Waiting on Their Death

Flipping through LGBTQ magazines from the 1980s and 1990s, you can map the trajectory of the AIDS crisis in the United States by looking at the advertisements. Early in the 1980s, as HIV swept through gay enclaves of metropolitan cities, publications like The Advocate collected advertising revenue from gay bars and bathhouses—institutions that New York City tried to shutter in response to the cri

4h

Make your home greener—and more resilient

Nexus Media News Storms cause flooding, but green infrastructure can help homeowners stay afloat. Green infrastructure protects public health and helps the environment in the face of extreme weather events.

4h

Tech giant Apple takes tiny Andrea Electronics to court over patent

Apple Inc., with a trillion-dollar market capitalization, is turning to a federal appeals court in its years-long patent fight with Andrea Electronics Corp., one of Long Island's smallest public companies.

4h

Amazon rainforest conservation victories spill losses to neighbors

New research suggests that protecting the Amazon rainforest from deforestation may just be shifting the damage to a less renowned neighbor. The unintended consequences are profound.

4h

NASA puts together a composite of Tropical Storm Kong-Rey

NASA's IMERG combines data from many satellites to provide a look at rainfall occurring around the world. Those rainfall data were combined with visible imagery from NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite to create a composite or fuller picture of Kong- Rey in the Northwestern Pacific Ocean as it weakened to a tropical storm.

4h

The FASEB Journal: Animal study suggests ketone supplement more effective for weight loss

A study published in The FASEB Journal found that ketone supplementation decreased body fat and body weight in mice placed on a high-fat diet. The findings could have implications for an alternative to low-carbohydrate, high-fat ketogenic diets to help lower body fat and weight.

4h

Species-rich forests store twice as much carbon as monocultures

Species-rich subtropical forests can take up on average twice as much carbon as monocultures. An international research team with the involvement of the University of Zurich has evaluated data from forests grown specifically for this purpose in China with a total of over 150,000 trees. The results speak in favor of using many different tree species during reforestation.

4h

Light makes Rice University catalyst more effective

Scientists at Rice's Laboratory for Nanophotonics have demonstrated a new catalyst for making clean-burning hydrogen from ammonia. Reporting this week in Science, they describe a plasmonic effect that lowers chemical activation barriers, improves efficiency and could be of general use in other catalysts.

4h

Common genetic toolkit shapes horns in scarab beetles

Horns have evolved independently multiple times in scarab beetles, but distantly related species have made use of the same genetic toolkit to grow these prominent structures, according to a study publishing Oct. 4, 2018 in the open-access journal PLOS Genetics by Teruyuki Niimi at the National Institute for Basic Biology in Okazaki, Japan, and colleagues.

4h

Why huskies have blue eyes

DNA testing of more than 6,000 dogs has revealed that a duplication on canine chromosome 18 is strongly associated with blue eyes in Siberian Huskies, according to a study published Oct. 4, 2018, in the open-access journal PLOS Genetics by Adam Boyko and Aaron Sams of Embark Veterinary, Inc., and colleagues.

4h

Nanoparticles to treat snakebites

Venomous snakebites affect 2.5 million people, and annually cause more than 100,000 deaths and leave 400,000 individuals with permanent physical and psychological trauma each year. Researchers reporting in PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases have now described a new approach to treating snake bites, using nanoparticles to bind to venom toxins and prevent the spread of venom through the body.

4h

Latest insights into Saturn's weird magnetic field only make things weirder

Some of the last data from the Cassini mission reveals more structure in Saturn's magnetic field, but still no answer as to how it formed.

4h

Immune cell variations contribute to malaria severity

An MIT study offers a possible explanation for why some people are more likely to experience a severe, potentially fatal, form of malaria. Researchers found that in some people, immune cells called natural killer cells (NK cells) fail to turn on the genes necessary to destroy malaria-infected red blood cells.

4h

Amazon rainforest conservation victories spill losses to neighbors

New research suggests that protecting the Amazon rainforest from deforestation may just be shifting the damage to a less renowned neighbor. The unintended consequences are profound.

4h

Newly detected microquasar gamma-rays 'call for new ideas'

The first-ever detection of highly energetic radiation from a microquasar has astrophysicists scrambling for new theories to explain the extreme particle acceleration. A microquasar is a black hole that gobbles up debris from a nearby companion star and blasts out powerful jets of material.

4h

Microsoft unveils new Surface devices, including headphones

Microsoft announced several new Surface devices at an event in Manhattan recently, saying the computers have faster speeds and longer battery lives.

4h

NASA puts together a composite of Tropical Storm Kong-Rey

NASA's IMERG combines data from many satellites to provide a look at rainfall occurring around the world. Those rainfall data were combined with visible imagery from NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite to create a composite or fuller picture of Kong- Rey in the Northwestern Pacific Ocean as it weakened to a tropical storm.

4h

Enhancement of piezoelectric properties in organic polymers all in the molecules

The inability to alter intrinsic piezoelectric behavior in organic polymers hampers their application in flexible, wearable and biocompatible devices, according to researchers at Penn State and North Carolina State University, but now a molecular approach can improve those piezoelectric properties.

4h

Red tide confirmed in Miami-Dade, and some beaches have been closed

Miami-Dade closed beaches north of the Haulover inlet before dawn on Thursday morning after lab tests confirmed the presence of red tide in ocean waters as the toxic algae traveled from Gulf waters to the Atlantic, spreading an environmental and tourism crisis to more of Florida.

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US plan to genetically alter crops via insects feared to be biological war plan

$27m program says it will use virus-carrying insects to engineer crops, but some worry it’s a way to develop biological agents Government-backed researchers in America are aiming to use virus-carrying insects to genetically engineer crops – raising fears the technology could be used for biological weapons. A new article in the journal Science explores the shadowy program funded by the US Defense

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Build 'Noah's ark' for beneficial gut microbes, scientists say

Repository would store ‘friendly’ germs from the intestines of people in remote communities for future medical treatments Scientists have put forward plans for a microbial “Noah’s ark” to preserve beneficial bugs found in the guts of people living in some of the most remote communities on Earth. The move to save the microbes is driven by concerns that modern lifestyles are wiping out organisms th

4h

Observations challenge cosmological theories

Since the big bang, fewer galaxy clusters have formed over time than was actually expected. Physicists from the have now confirmed this phenomenon. For the next years the researchers will analyze their data in even greater detail. This will put them in a position to confirm whether the theories considered valid today need to be reworked.

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Amputation injury is communicated to opposing limbs

In research that extends knowledge about the physiology of regeneration and wound repair, biologists have discovered that amputation of one limb is immediately reflected in the bioelectric properties of the contralateral, or opposing, un-damaged limb of developing frogs.

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Windier wind farms

Depending on how wind turbines are situated relative to each other and to the prevailing wind, those not directly in the path of the wind could be left to extract energy from significantly depleted airflow. However, according to researchers, there are ways to get around this issue of diminishing wind returns.

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Chemotherapy may lead to mitochondrial dysfunction in skeletal muscle

Chemotherapy drugs to treat breast cancer may promote muscle mitochondrial dysfunction, according to new research. Dysfunctional mitochondria, the energy centers of the cells, may contribute to fatigue and weakness that some people with breast cancer experience through the course of disease treatment.

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News at a glance

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Sky rivers

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Insulator or a metal?

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Gene for preeclampsia

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Glacial lake outburst floods as drivers of fluvial erosion in the Himalaya

Himalayan rivers are frequently hit by catastrophic floods that are caused by the failure of glacial lake and landslide dams; however, the dynamics and long-term impacts of such floods remain poorly understood. We present a comprehensive set of observations that capture the July 2016 glacial lake outburst flood (GLOF) in the Bhotekoshi/Sunkoshi River of Nepal. Seismic records of the flood provide

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Slab2, a comprehensive subduction zone geometry model

Subduction zones are home to the most seismically active faults on the planet. The shallow megathrust interfaces of subduction zones host Earth’s largest earthquakes and are likely the only faults capable of magnitude 9+ ruptures. Despite these facts, our knowledge of subduction zone geometry—which likely plays a key role in determining the spatial extent and ultimately the size of subduction zon

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Rapid change of superconductivity and electron-phonon coupling through critical doping in Bi-2212

Electron-boson coupling plays a key role in superconductivity for many systems. However, in copper-based high–critical temperature ( T c ) superconductors, its relation to superconductivity remains controversial despite strong spectroscopic fingerprints. In this study, we used angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy to find a pronounced correlation between the superconducting gap and the bosoni

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Quantum oscillations of electrical resistivity in an insulator

In metals, orbital motions of conduction electrons on the Fermi surface are quantized in magnetic fields, which is manifested by quantum oscillations in electrical resistivity. This Landau quantization is generally absent in insulators. Here, we report a notable exception in an insulator—ytterbium dodecaboride (YbB 12 ). The resistivity of YbB 12 , which is of a much larger magnitude than the res

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Quantifying hot carrier and thermal contributions in plasmonic photocatalysis

Photocatalysis based on optically active, "plasmonic" metal nanoparticles has emerged as a promising approach to facilitate light-driven chemical conversions under far milder conditions than thermal catalysis. However, an understanding of the relation between thermal and electronic excitations has been lacking. We report the substantial light-induced reduction of the thermal activation barrier fo

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Rapid Pliocene adaptive radiation of modern kangaroos

Differentiating between ancient and younger, more rapidly evolved clades is important for determining paleoenvironmental drivers of diversification. Australia possesses many aridity-adapted lineages, the origins of which have been closely linked to late Miocene continental aridification. Using dental macrowear and molar crown height measurements, spanning the past 25 million years, we show that t

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Urbanization and humidity shape the intensity of influenza epidemics in U.S. cities

Influenza epidemics vary in intensity from year to year, driven by climatic conditions and by viral antigenic evolution. However, important spatial variation remains unexplained. Here we show predictable differences in influenza incidence among cities, driven by population size and structure. Weekly incidence data from 603 cities in the United States reveal that epidemics in smaller cities are fo

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Impacts of species richness on productivity in a large-scale subtropical forest experiment

Biodiversity experiments have shown that species loss reduces ecosystem functioning in grassland. To test whether this result can be extrapolated to forests, the main contributors to terrestrial primary productivity, requires large-scale experiments. We manipulated tree species richness by planting more than 150,000 trees in plots with 1 to 16 species. Simulating multiple extinction scenarios, we

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The role of education interventions in improving economic rationality

Schooling rewards people with labor market returns and nonpecuniary benefits in other realms of life. However, there is no experimental evidence showing that education interventions improve individual economic rationality. We examine this hypothesis by studying a randomized 1-year financial support program for education in Malawi that reduced absence and dropout rates and increased scores on a qu

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Gene editing restores dystrophin expression in a canine model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy

Mutations in the gene encoding dystrophin, a protein that maintains muscle integrity and function, cause Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). The deltaE50-MD dog model of DMD harbors a mutation corresponding to a mutational "hotspot" in the human DMD gene. We used adeno-associated viruses to deliver CRISPR gene editing components to four dogs and examined dystrophin protein expression 6 weeks after

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Reprogramming normal human epithelial tissues to a common, lethal neuroendocrine cancer lineage

The use of potent therapies inhibiting critical oncogenic pathways active in epithelial cancers has led to multiple resistance mechanisms, including the development of highly aggressive, small cell neuroendocrine carcinoma (SCNC). SCNC patients have a dismal prognosis due in part to a limited understanding of the molecular mechanisms driving this malignancy and the lack of effective treatments. H

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A radiation belt of energetic protons located between Saturn and its rings

Saturn has a sufficiently strong dipole magnetic field to trap high-energy charged particles and form radiation belts, which have been observed outside its rings. Whether stable radiation belts exist near the planet and inward of the rings was previously unknown. The Cassini spacecraft’s Magnetosphere Imaging Instrument obtained measurements of a radiation belt that lies just above Saturn’s dense

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The low-frequency source of Saturns kilometric radiation

Understanding how auroral radio emissions are produced by magnetized bodies requires in situ measurements within their source region. Saturn’s kilometric radiation (SKR) has been widely used as a remote proxy of Saturn’s magnetosphere. We present wave and plasma measurements from the Cassini spacecraft during its ring-grazing high-inclination orbits, which passed three times through the high-alti

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Dust grains fall from Saturns D-ring into its equatorial upper atmosphere

The sizes of Saturn’s ring particles range from meters (boulders) to nanometers (dust). Determination of the rings’ ages depends on loss processes, including the transport of dust into Saturn’s atmosphere. During the Grand Finale orbits of the Cassini spacecraft, its instruments measured tiny dust grains that compose the innermost D-ring of Saturn. The nanometer-sized dust experiences collisions

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Chemical interactions between Saturns atmosphere and its rings

The Pioneer and Voyager spacecraft made close-up measurements of Saturn’s ionosphere and upper atmosphere in the 1970s and 1980s that suggested a chemical interaction between the rings and atmosphere. Exploring this interaction provides information on ring composition and the influence on Saturn’s atmosphere from infalling material. The Cassini Ion Neutral Mass Spectrometer sampled in situ the re

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In situ collection of dust grains falling from Saturns rings into its atmosphere

Saturn’s main rings are composed of >95% water ice, and the nature of the remaining few percent has remained unclear. The Cassini spacecraft’s traversals between Saturn and its innermost D ring allowed its cosmic dust analyzer (CDA) to collect material released from the main rings and to characterize the ring material infall into Saturn. We report the direct in situ detection of material from Sat

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Saturns magnetic field revealed by the Cassini Grand Finale

During 2017, the Cassini fluxgate magnetometer made in situ measurements of Saturn’s magnetic field at distances ~2550 ± 1290 kilometers above the 1-bar surface during 22 highly inclined Grand Finale orbits. These observations refine the extreme axisymmetry of Saturn’s internal magnetic field and show displacement of the magnetic equator northward from the planet’s physical equator. Persistent sm

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Two Patched molecules engage distinct sites on Hedgehog yielding a signaling-competent complex

Aberrant Hedgehog (HH) signaling leads to various types of cancer and birth defects. N-terminally palmitoylated HH initiates signaling by binding its receptor Patched-1 (PTCH1). A recent 1:1 PTCH1-HH complex structure visualized a palmitate-mediated binding site on HH, which was inconsistent with previous studies that implied a distinct, calcium-mediated binding site for PTCH1 and HH co-receptors

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Enhancement of piezoelectric properties in organic polymers all in the molecules

The inability to alter intrinsic piezoelectric behavior in organic polymers hampers their application in flexible, wearable and biocompatible devices, according to researchers at Penn State and North Carolina State University, but now a molecular approach can improve those piezoelectric properties.

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Every cell has a story to tell in brain injury

Traumatic head injury can have widespread effects in the brain, but now scientists can look in real time at how head injury affects thousands of individual cells and genes simultaneously in mice. This approach could lead to precise treatments for traumatic brain injury (TBI). The study, reported in Nature Communications, was supported by the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke

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Gastric banding as effective as metformin in slowing prediabetes, type two diabetes

People with prediabetes or new-onset type 2 diabetes who had gastric banding, a type of bariatric surgery for weight loss, had similar stabilization of their disease to those who took metformin alone, according to a study supported by the National Institutes of Health.

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‘God particle’ physicist and Nobel laureate Leon Lederman dies at 96

Lederman won the 1988 Nobel Prize in Physics for discovering a second type of neutrino. He coined the nickname 'God particle' for the Higgs boson in his 1993 bestseller The God Particle: If the Universe Is the Answer, What Is the Question? In 2015, Lederman and his family sold his Nobel Prize to pay for medical bills resulting from dementia. None Leon Lederman, a Nobel laureate and particle physi

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Saturn’s ‘ring rain’ is a surprising cocktail of chemicals

NASA’s Cassini probe got a closeup view of the material falling from Saturn’s rings into the planet. The data could help illuminate the belts’ origins.

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Tool uses DNA to predict your height and education

A new DNA tool can accurately predict a person’s height, and more importantly, could potentially assess risk for serious illnesses, such as heart disease and cancer. For the first time, the tool, or algorithm, builds predictors for human traits such as height, bone density, and even the level of education a person might achieve, purely based on one’s genome. But the applications may not stop ther

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Questions Raised About DARPA-Funded Crop Program

Critics of an agricultural research initiative cite concerns about possible weaponization of the resulting technology, which would use infected insects to deliver genetically modified viruses to plants.

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Why huskies have blue eyes

DNA testing of more than 6,000 dogs has revealed that a duplication on canine chromosome 18 is strongly associated with blue eyes in Siberian Huskies, according to a study published October 4, 2018, in the open-access journal PLOS Genetics by Adam Boyko and Aaron Sams of Embark Veterinary, Inc., and colleagues. Embark is a dog DNA startup company headquartered in Boston, MA, and Ithaca, NY, and re

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Nanoparticles to treat snakebites

Venomous snakebites affect 2.5 million people, and annually cause more than 100,000 deaths and leave 400,000 individuals with permanent physical and psychological trauma each year. Researchers reporting in PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases have now described a new approach to treating snake bites, using nanoparticles to bind to venom toxins and prevent the spread of venom through the body.

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Latest insights into Saturn's weird magnetic field only make things weirder

Some of the last data from the Cassini mission reveals more structure in Saturn's magnetic field, but still no answer as to how it formed.

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A new take on the 19th-century skull collection of Samuel Morton

In the 1830s and 1840s, American craniologist Samuel Morton collected and measured hundreds of human skulls in what he described as an attempt to compare the brain size of five human racial groups. At nearly the same time, across the world, German anatomist Friedrich Tiedemann was conducting similar research.

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Surprising chemical complexity of Saturn's rings changing planet's upper atmosphere

Political humorist Mark Russel once joked, "The scientific theory I like best is that the rings of Saturn are composed entirely of lost airline luggage."

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Common genetic toolkit shapes horns in scarab beetles

Horns have evolved independently multiple times in scarab beetles, but distantly related species have made use of the same genetic toolkit to grow these prominent structures, according to a study publishing October 4, 2018 in the open-access journal PLOS Genetics by Teruyuki Niimi at the National Institute for Basic Biology in Okazaki, Japan, and colleagues.

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Team details plasmonic effect that allows catalyst to work at lower energy

Rice University nanoscientists have demonstrated a new catalyst that can convert ammonia into hydrogen fuel at ambient pressure using only light energy, mainly due to a plasmonic effect that makes the catalyst more efficient.

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Ground shaking during devastating flood offers new insights

A devastating wall of water gushed down the Bhotekoshi/Sunkoshi River in Nepal on July 5, 2016. It came from a lake that had been dammed by a glacial moraine, but the dam broke and discharged more than 100,000 tons of water all at once. An international team of GFZ and Nepali scientists was able to record the sudden outburst with seismometers deployed the year before in the wake of the catastrophi

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'Double agent' in the immune system may make us vulnerable to bacterial infections

Scientists have discovered the role of an immune system double agent. This molecule, called USP18, can help curtail immune responses, but it can also open the door to bacterial infections, such as harmful listeria and staph infections.

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Evidence mounts linking aspirin to lower risk of ovarian cancer

A new study found that women who reported taking a low-dose aspirin every day had a 23 percent lower risk of ovarian cancer compared to nonaspirin users. The research also found that women who were heavy users of nonaspirin nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) over a long period of time had a higher risk of developing ovarian cancer.

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Astronomers discover sonic boom from powerful unseen explosion

A team of astronomers has detected the sonic boom from an immensely powerful cosmic explosion, even though the explosion itself was totally unseen. The titanic eruption, known as a Gamma Ray Burst (GRB), was generated by the collapse of a massive star in a galaxy nearly 300 million light-years from Earth.

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More wet and dry weather extremes projected with global warming

Global warming is projected to spawn more extreme wet and dry weather around the world, according to a new study. Those extremes include more frequent dry spells in the northwestern, central and southern United States and in Mexico, and more frequent heavy rainfall events in south Asia, the Indochinese Peninsula and southern China.

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GM tracked radio listening habits for 3 months: Here's why

Whether you're using your cellphone or listening to your car radio, it's likely that someone is paying attention.

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At-risk teens and young adults overlooked during opioid crisis

Teens and young adults who have injected drugs are at risk for contracting hepatitis C, but most aren't tested and therefore don't receive life-saving treatment, according to a national study being presented at IDWeek 2018. The study of more than 250,000 at-risk youth found only one-third of those with diagnosed opioid use disorder (OUD) were tested for hepatitis C.

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How Russian Spies Infiltrated Hotel Wi-Fi to Hack Their Victims Up CloseUK Russian GRU US Dutch

A new indictment details how Russian agents camped outside hotels when remote hacking efforts weren't enough.

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Personality missing from BBC sporting contest | Brief letters

Bath Festival of Blues and Progressive Music | Sports Personality of the Year | Inequality and lack of empathy | Nuclear threat | Tequila brand ambassador My abiding memory of the Bath Festival of Blues and Progressive Music of 1970 ( Letters , 3 October), to give it its full title, was Pink Floyd coming on stage in the early hours with a local women’s choir to perform Atom Heart Mother, not to me

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Matter: Deep in Human DNA, a Gift From the Neanderthals

Long ago, Neanderthals probably infected modern humans with viruses, perhaps even an ancient form of H.I.V. But our extinct relatives also gave us genetic defenses.

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Arizona dam at risk of failure will be checked by engineers

A damaged earthen dam holding back a lake swollen by runoff from the remnants of a tropical storm was still at risk of failing Thursday and inundating a small Native American village near the U.S.-Mexico border, officials said.

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Bronze swords, other items found in plundered Greek cemetery

Greece's culture ministry says archaeologists have found an undisturbed grave with pottery, weapons and jewelry at a heavily plundered cemetery that is more than 3,500-years old.

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GPM satellite examines upgraded Hurricane Leslie

When Tropical Storm Leslie strengthened into a hurricane, the Global Precipitation Measurement mission or GPM core satellite passed overhead and analyzed the rates in which rain was falling throughout the stronger storm.

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US Air Force: Don't Worry About Those Weird Lights and Booms Sunday, It's Just a Space Ship

SpaceX will attempt to launch and land a rocket on the West Coast Sunday, and the USAF wants Californians to know in advance so they won't worry.

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Blue plaques, female scientists, #MeToo and women on Wikipedia | Letters

Anna Eavis of English Heritage on efforts to get more blue plaques commemorating women; Hilary Caldicott on the suspended Cern professor Alessandro Strumia; Jean Rogers on men writing about feminism, and Sandy Balfour of Wikimedia on the gender bias of Wikipedia Anna Kessel makes some valuable points on the lack of blue plaques to women – not least that inaction will only lead to the worsening of

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Newly detected microquasar gamma-rays 'call for new ideas'

The first-ever detection of highly energetic radiation from a microquasar has astrophysicists scrambling for new theories to explain the extreme particle acceleration. A microquasar is a black hole that gobbles up debris from a nearby companion star and blasts out powerful jets of material.

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Mechanical engineers develop ways to improve windfarm productivity

You've probably seen them, perhaps on long roadtrips: wind turbines with enormous, hypnotic rolling blades, harnessing the clean power of wind for conversion into electric energy. What you may not know is that for the explosion in the number of wind turbines in use as we embrace cleaner sources of energy, these wind farms are quite possibly not as productive as they could be.

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NASA sees Hurricane Walaka battering Papahanaumokuakea Marine National Monument

NASA's Terra satellite analyzed Hurricane Walaka in infrared light as continued to lash the Papahanaumokuakea Marine National Monument in the Central Pacific Ocean.

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Climate changing faster than feared, but why are we surprised?

Nearly every day, peer-reviewed studies on global warming warn that deadly impacts will come sooner and hit harder than once thought.

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NASA takes powerful Hurricane Sergio's temperature

Infrared light provides scientists with temperature data and that's important when trying to understand the strength of storms. NASA's Aqua satellite provided those cloud top temperatures of Category 4 Hurricane Sergio in the Eastern Pacific Ocean.

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The Underestimated Value of Compassion

In his scholarship and in his personal philosophy, the professor Cornel West has arrived at a simple conclusion. “Justice is what love looks like in public,” he said during a 2011 speech at Howard University . “Just like tenderness is what love looks like in private.” Often decontextualized and shared as a stand-alone sentiment, the first half of the quote has taken on a life of its own. It’s pit

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Letters: Is Trump Tom Buchanan Incarnate?

How ‘The Great Gatsby’ Explains Trump Last week, Rosa Inocencio Smith wrote about the “superficial but telling ways” President Donald Trump resembles Tom Buchanan, a character in F. Scott Fitzgerald’s The Great Gatsby. As a high-school English teacher, I found your article informative, refreshing, and full of new takeaways to consider. While I agree with many of your points, I believe one conside

5h

How Do You Take a Picture of a Black Hole? With a Telescope as Big as the Earth

A planet-spanning virtual observatory, years in the making, could change how we think about space, time and the nature of reality. Will it work?

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Elefanten i rummet

Kunstig intelligens kan have svært ved at finde hoved og snabel i billeder med usædvanlige motiver, viser ny forskning.

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Researchers detect high-energy rays from powerful star system

An international collaboration of scientists at the High-Altitude Water Cherenkov Gamma Ray Observatory, including Segev BenZvi and Chang Rho at the University of Rochester, has, for the first time, detected extremely high-energy gamma rays from a powerful star system–a microquasar known as SS 433. The discovery marks the most energetic radiation ever detected from a microquasar in our galaxy and

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Mayo researchers ID potential new treatment for one type of triple-negative breast cancer

Mayo Clinic researchers have identified the drug estradiol as a potential new treatment for a subset of women with triple-negative breast cancer. Their findings are published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America.

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Genome of Japanese insect delicacy sheds light on history of Earth

Scientists have shed light on the evolutionary biology and distribution of Stenopsyche caddisflies, a common insect in Japanese rivers and a local delicacy. The discovery also identified new genetic lineages among previously recognized species.

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New wristband provides personalised and real-time tracking of UV exposure

Researchers have developed personalized and low-cost wearable ultraviolet (UV) sensors that warn users when their exposure to the sun has become dangerous.

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China implanted tiny spy chips in servers used by Amazon, AppleApple Bloomberg Chinese

A 2015 security test of a server sold by an American company found that someone in the supply chain had successfully embedded a tiny microchip on a motherboard. The company that manufactured the compromised motherboard provides servers to hundreds of international clients, including NASA and the Department of Homeland Security. U.S. officials linked the hardware attack to a People's Liberation Ar

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Can creativity be taught?

Divergent thinking is a fundamental aspect of creative teaching. Studies have found that there are a number of valid teaching methods that inspire creativity in their students, regardless of what field they're in. Ordinary modes of education are not conducive towards developing creativity if they do not employ methods like divergent thinking and also allow mistakes to be made while learning. None

5h

Traveling’s great. Jet lag, uunnhh…

Jet lag has affected 98% of respondents in new survey. It's an annoying modern malady that can ruin a trip and make coming home harder. This infographic lists things you can do to try to get over it more quickly. Maybe you're reading this on a plane. Maybe you just wish you were. On any given day, in the U.S. alone , there's an average of over 2.5 million people in the air. Depending on how far t

5h

Lindsey Graham to Trump: Make North Korea Choose Between ‘Death or Condos’

On Wednesday—just after Donald Trump gushed about falling “in love” with North Korea’s dictator and ahead of another trip by Secretary of State Mike Pompeo to Pyongyang to prepare for a second summit between Trump and Kim Jong Un—Lindsey Graham delivered a stark message to the U.S. president: End the lovefest. “I’m telling President Trump, ‘Enough with I love you,’” said the Republican senator, a

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New study evaluates efficacy of PET imaging to manage chronic liver diseases

While liver biopsies are powerful and reliable, they are also invasive, painful, limited and subject to complications. These effects may soon be a thing of the past for some patients thanks to new research showing PET imaging with the 18F-FAC radiotracer can be used as a non-invasive substitute. The study is featured in the October issue of The Journal of Nuclear Medicine.

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In comments on Medicare fee schedule proposal, AGS calls for putting older people first

In a letter sent to the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) and described today in an extensive editorial published in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society, the American Geriatrics Society (AGS) voiced strong opposition to a proposal that would significantly change the way physicians and other qualified health care professionals are paid for Evaluation and Management (E/M) ser

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Cracking the (reimbursement) code: Hard work, big changes covering care we need with age

A new editorial from the American Geriatrics Society (AGS) outlines how several key health services–from those for managing chronic care to those for assessing cognitive health — came to be recognized as part of Medicare through an important but oft unsung facet of geriatrics expertise: its leaders' engagement in building a better public policy environment to support the care we all need as we a

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Here's China’s massive plan to retool the web

Eastern Arsenal The most ambitious project of mass control is the country's “social credit” system. All Chinese citizens will receive a numerical score reflecting their “trustworthiness." The following is an adapted essay from the book LikeWar: The Weaponization of Social Media, by P.W. Singer and Emerson Brooking, HMH Oct. 2, 2018. More at…

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Windier wind farms

You've probably seen them, perhaps on long roadtrips: wind turbines with enormous, hypnotic rolling blades, harnessing the clean power of wind for conversion into electric energy. What you may not know is that for the explosion in the number of wind turbines in use as we embrace cleaner sources of energy, these wind farms are quite possibly not as productive as they could be.

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NASA sees Hurricane Walaka battering Papahanaumokuakea Marine National Monument

NASA's Terra satellite analyzed Hurricane Walaka in infrared light as continued to lash the Papahanaumokuakea Marine National Monument in the Central Pacific Ocean.

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NASA/JAXA's GPM satellite examines upgraded Hurricane Leslie

When Tropical Storm Leslie strengthened into a hurricane, the Global Precipitation Measurement mission or GPM core satellite passed overhead and analyzed the rates in which rain was falling throughout the stronger storm.

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'Double agent' in the immune system may make us vulnerable to bacterial infections

Scientists at Scripps Research have discovered the role of an immune system double agent. This molecule, called USP18, can help curtail immune responses, but it can also open the door to bacterial infections, such as harmful listeria and staph infections.

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NASA takes powerful Hurricane Sergio's temperature

Infrared light provides scientists with temperature data and that's important when trying to understand the strength of storms. NASA's Aqua satellite provided those cloud top temperatures of Category 4 Hurricane Sergio in the Eastern Pacific Ocean.

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Wind farms do affect climate – but they don’t cause global warming

A study has claimed that large-scale wind power in the US would cause significant warming, but this is misleading and could harm take-up of renewables

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Have asthma and a pet? Re-homing your cat or dog may not be necessary

A study analyzed environmental exposures, like pet and secondhand smoke, to determine if they have a role in asthma control among children whose asthma is managed per NAEPP (EPR-3) guidelines. Researchers found that once asthma guidelines are followed, environmental exposures to pets or secondhand smoke were not significant factors in overall asthma improvement over time.

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Large-scale US wind power would cause warming that would take roughly a century to offset

Extracting energy from the wind causes climatic impacts that are small compared to current projections of 21st century warming, but large compared to the effect of reducing US electricity emissions to zero with solar. Researchers report the most accurate modelling yet of how increasing wind power would affect climate, finding that large-scale wind power generation would warm the Continental United

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Here Are The Winners Of The 2018 MacArthur 'Genius' Grants

From engineering to economics, from painting to planetary science, the range of this year's class is vast. But the MacArthur Foundation expects them all to do big things with their newfound $625,000. (Image credit: John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation)

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Every day spent in the hospital, readmission likelihood increases by 2.9 percent in rural cities

Hospital readmissions cost hospitals about $26 billion annually. Systems like the Hospital Readmission Reduction Program (HRRP) within the Affordable Care Act penalize hospitals with higher readmission rates for targeted diagnoses. Health care data reveal that health care facilities located in rural Southern Appalachia show readmission rates that are above the national average, which results in pe

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Genetic mutation may increase risk of pancreatic cancer in females

In a new study from Lawson Health Research Institute and Western University's Schulich School of Medicine & Dentistry, researchers have found that mutation of a gene called ATRX may lead to increased risk of developing pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer in females. The study marks the first time a sex-specific genetic risk factor for pancreatic cancer has been identified.

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New DNA tool predicts height, shows promise for serious illness assessment

A new DNA tool created by Michigan State University can accurately predict people's height, and more importantly, could potentially assess their risk for serious illnesses, such as heart disease and cancer.

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Disruption in combination inhaled corticosteroid therapy may lead to an increased rate of costly exacerbations and hospitalizations for Medicare patients

Disruption of the refill of patients' regular combination inhaled corticosteroid therapy brand may have impacted symptoms and disease control and potentially lead to an increased rate of costly exacerbations and hospitalizations.

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Chemotherapy may lead to mitochondrial dysfunction in skeletal muscle

Chemotherapy drugs to treat breast cancer may promote muscle mitochondrial dysfunction, according to new research. Dysfunctional mitochondria, the energy centers of the cells, may contribute to fatigue and weakness that some people with breast cancer experience through the course of disease treatment. The study is published ahead of print in the American Journal of Physiology–Cell Physiology.

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Amputation injury is communicated to opposing limbs

In research that extends knowledge about the physiology of regeneration and wound repair, Tufts University biologists have discovered that amputation of one limb is immediately reflected in the bioelectric properties of the contralateral, or opposing, un-damaged limb of developing frogs.

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Conflict management improves ICU team knowledge, mindfulness and awareness

The intensive care unit is a stressful place, and conflicts invariably arise. To better understand the relationships between physicians, nurses, respiratory therapists and advanced practitioners, researchers created a conflict management education intervention. The study paid close attention to diagnosing the conflict type and cause, recognizing the internal dialogue, introducing conflict manageme

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Mortality in septic shock has improved since the Surviving Sepsis Campaign guidelines in 2004

A study from Mount Sinai West concludes that the overall mortality in septic shock has improved in the decade following the introduction of the Surviving Sepsis Campaign (SSC) guidelines.

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The homing instinct of relocated snakes

A pioneering study by the University of Kent on the effects of relocating adders due to development has found that males will disperse from their release site—with one even going so far as to return to his original home.

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Liderlige mænd og kræsne kvinder: Dating-apps skubber os tilbage i gamle kønsroller

Mænd tager stadig mere initiativ og kvinder bliver mere afventende, når vi dater på nettet, viser britisk forskning.

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Ibuprofen: Dosage, Side Effects & Other Facts

The anti-inflammatory painkilling drug ibuprofen is effective against fever, menstrual cramps, headaches, toothaches, joint pain and backaches.

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Huh? Carbon Dioxide Emissions Raise Risk of Satellite Collisions

European agency might actively remove space junk to reduce costly crashes — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Gas stations vent far more toxic fumes than previously thought

A study led by environmental health scientists at Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health examined the release of vapors from gas station vent pipes, finding emissions were 10 times higher than estimates used in setback regulations used to determine how close schools, playgrounds, and parks can be situated to the facilities. Findings appear in the journal Science of the Total Environme

6h

Sky survey reveals first 'orphan' gamma ray burst

Object in distant galaxy most likely is a gamma ray burst whose beams of gamma rays were pointed away from Earth and thus not detected. Radio afterglow's behavior over time, however, is what's expected from a gamma ray burst.

6h

Viruses influenced gene sharing between Neanderthals and humans

Human evolution used to be depicted as a straight line, gradually progressing from an ape-like ancestor to modern Homo sapiens. But thanks to next-generation sequencing, findings in recent years have shown that it wasn't quite so orderly. Now, a new study is reporting new details about the role of viruses in shaping evolution, in particular viral interactions between modern humans and Neanderthals

6h

Rethinking lethality in youth suicide attempts

First suicide attempts are more lethal than previously realized, reports a study of children and adolescents.

6h

Flexible piezoelectric acoustic sensors for speaker recognition

A research team has developed a machine learning-based acoustic sensor for speaker recognition. The team fabricated a flexible piezoelectric membrane by mimicking the basilar membrane in the human cochlear. Resonant frequencies vibrate corresponding regions of the trapezoidal piezoelectric membrane, which converts voice to electrical signal with a highly sensitive self-powered acoustic sensor.

6h

The Incredible Staying Power of Theresa May

BIRMINGHAM—U.K. Prime Minister Theresa May began her speech at the Conservative Party conference on Wednesday by dancing on to the stage to ABBA’s “Dancing Queen,” though the Destiny’s Child hit “Survivor” would have been more fitting. In the weeks and months leading up to the party’s annual gathering this week, May had seen it all: party infighting, not-so-subtle challenges to her leadership, an

6h

Stephen Breyer Is Reading Aeschylus While the Supreme Court Burns Around Him

Stephen Breyer, the liberal justice who is rounding out two and a half decades on the Supreme Court, doggedly avoided saying anything remotely relevant to the scandal surrounding Brett Kavanaugh in an interview on Thursday. Breyer’s potential future colleague has been publicly accused of sexual assault or misconduct by three women. Kavanaugh’s nomination hearings were long and contentious and con

6h

VLA sky survey reveals first 'orphan' gamma ray burst

Astronomers comparing data from an ongoing major survey of the sky using the National Science Foundation's Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) to data from earlier surveys likely have made the first discovery of the afterglow of a powerful gamma ray burst that produced no gamma rays detectable at Earth. The unprecedented discovery of this "orphan" gamma ray burst (GRB) offers key clues to unders

6h

Adherence to annual lung cancer screening needs improvement

A study from the Thoracic Oncology Research Group (TORG), Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care, Medical University of South Carolina, aimed to examine the adherence to annual low-dose computed tomography (LDCT) screening after baseline LDCT within the Veteran Health Administration Lung Cancer Screening Demonstration Project (LCDSDP). The study will be presented at the CHEST Annual Meeting 2018

6h

Mechanical ventilation 'no increased risk' of mortality in pregnant patients

Researchers in Columbia, South America, conducted a retrospective observational study within six hospitals to identify risk factors of maternal mortality in mechanically ventilated pregnant patients.

6h

Observations challenge cosmological theories

Since the big bang, less galaxy clusters have formed over time than was actually expected. Physicists from the University of Bonn have now confirmed this phenomenon. For the next years the researchers will analyze their data in even greater detail. This will put them in a position to confirm whether the theories considered valid today need to be reworked. The study is part of a series of publicati

6h

Have asthma and a pet? Re-homing your cat or dog may not be necessary

A study from the Nationwide Children's Hospital analyzed environmental exposures, like pet and secondhand smoke, to determine if they have a role in asthma control among children whose asthma is managed per NAEPP (EPR-3) guidelines. Researchers found that once asthma guidelines are followed, environmental exposures to pets or secondhand smoke were not significant factors in overall asthma improvem

6h

Gram-negative bacteria increase mortality, vasopressor use and ICU admission

Alterations to the respiratory microbiome have been identified as a predisposing factor of interstitial lung diseases (ILD). In a study at CHEST 2018, researchers at Beaumont Health Systems studied the influence of bacterial virulence on clinical outcomes patients hospitalized with ILD patients. The authors found that the use of immunosuppressive medications or antifibrotics had no influence on th

6h

UMN researchers use 3D technology to identify optimal stem cells for transplantation

Muscular dystrophy is a condition which causes muscle weakness and decreased mobility, caused by defects in a person's genes. There is no cure. University of Minnesota Medical School researchers have combined technology with science to discover a stem cell population that could hold promising answers for patients in the future.

6h

Video: What would it take to turn Boston harbor into tea?

On December 16, 1773, the Boston tea party protestors threw more than 340 chests full of tea—the equivalent of about 18 and a half million teabags—into the harbor.

6h

The Seismic Power of Women’s Rage

In America today, women are angry. But this isn’t a modern phenomenon, argues the author Rebecca Traister. In her new book, Good and Mad: The Revolutionary Power of Women's Anger, Traister details how female rage has long been the country’s political fuel. She expounded on this idea at Aspen Ideas Festival in June, where, in a video interview, she discussed how the fury of American women—from the

7h

The Teens Who Rack Up Thousands of Followers by Posting the Same Photo Every Day

Every day for more than a year, Joey, a 15-year-old high-school student, has logged on to Instagram and posted the exact same photo of Otis, a cartoon cow from the children’s TV show Back at the Barnyard , to an account that now has almost 30,000 followers. “For the first couple weeks, the account was only followed by my friends mostly, and a few other people I didn’t know,” said Joey, who, like

7h

Older adults want DNA info, but worry about results

Only a small percentage of people in their 50s and early 60s have had their DNA tested—for medical reasons, to learn their ancestry, or out of curiosity—but far more have an interest in getting such tests done, according to a new poll. Of 993 adults between the ages of 50 and 64 the poll surveyed, one in 10 have taken genetic tests companies offer directly to consumers, and one in 20 have taken g

7h

More than Just H2O – Water Quality in the Laboratory

Water isn't just something that comes out of a tap or a machine, it's an important lab reagent that's subject to the same stringency when it comes to quality. Download this eBook to discover how water contamination affects data quality and how to obtain the right water quality for your experimental needs!

7h

How wind power could contribute to a warming climate

If the United States had enough wind turbines to generate all of its power, they would warm the country by 0.24 degrees Celsius on average.

7h

Significant barriers facing homeless adults in accessing quality end-of-life care

Terminally-ill homeless adults and their care providers must surmount many obstacles in the receipt and provision of palliative care, according to a University of Toronto scoping review of the available grey and peer-reviewed literature on this topic, published online this week in OMEGA – Journal of Death and Dying.

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Female representation in the CHEST Fellowship on the rise

Achieving fellow status in medical societies is an important benchmark for academic success. A study presented at the CHEST Annual Meeting 2018 shows that women are underrepresented as Fellows in CHEST but that the numbers of women applying for CHEST Fellow are increasing.

7h

Facebook 'viable method' for implementing critical care ultrasound curriculum

Critical care ultrasound (CCUS) is an important skill for all critical care physicians to understand. However, currently there is no standard approach to how to teach CCUS. Researchers aimed to investigate the feasibility of implementing a CCUS curriculum via a social platform in order to evaluate the impact it has on fellow's self-perceived competency. Results found that utilizing a social media

7h

Synthetic training models provide equivalent physiologic stress response in learners

A study from the University of Minnesota Combat Casualty Training Consortium shows no significant differences between the use of live tissue models and synthetic training models in the learners' stress level. The study being presented at the CHEST Annual Meeting 2018 in San Antonio shows that similar stress levels can be reached in the learner while learning critical medical procedures with synthe

7h

Evidence mounts linking aspirin to lower risk of ovarian cancer

A new study found that women who reported taking a low-dose aspirin every day had a 23 percent lower risk of ovarian cancer compared to nonaspirin users. The research also found that women who were heavy users of nonaspirin nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), such as ibuprofen (Advil) or naproxen (Aleve), over a long period of time had a higher risk of developing ovarian cancer.

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Triple dual therapy significantly improves lung function, quality of life in COPD patients

The InforMing the PAthway of COPD Treatment (IMPACT) study was conducted to assess the benefits of triple versus dual therapy in patients with COPD. In a study at CHEST, researchers found that regardless of baseline reversibility, the usage of triple dual therapies significantly reduced the annual rate and moderate-to-severe and severe exacerbations, improved lung function and overall quality of l

7h

The homing instinct of relocated snakes

A pioneering study by the University of Kent on the effects of relocating adders due to development has found that males will disperse from their release site — with one even going so far as to return to his original home.All native reptiles are protected by law, which means that animals found to be present on sites scheduled for development are often moved to alternative habitats.

7h

Synthetic DNA-encoded checkpoint inhibitor antibodies advance cancer immunotherapy

Wistar scientists and collaborators demonstrate for the first time that through engineering constructs, they can express DNA-encoded monoclonal antibodies (DMAbs) targeting CTLA-4, an important cancer checkpoint molecule that blocks anti-cancer immunity.

7h

Astronomers discover sonic boom from powerful unseen explosion

A team of astronomers has detected the sonic boom from an immensely powerful cosmic explosion, even though the explosion itself was totally unseen. The titanic eruption, known as a Gamma Ray Burst (GRB), was generated by the collapse of a massive star in a galaxy nearly 300 million light-years from Earth.

7h

Clemson researcher warns of spread of homemade steroids

A Clemson University researcher recently published insights into homemade steroids and steroid trafficking through a study of federal court cases. The research details why homemade steroids became popular and how online tools and cryptocurrency have allowed for their rapid spread.

7h

VLA sky survey reveals first 'orphan' gamma ray burst

Object in distant galaxy most likely is a gamma ray burst whose beams of gamma rays were pointed away from Earth and thus not detected. Radio afterglow's behavior over time, however, is what's expected from a gamma ray burst.

7h

HZB researchers are used to boost the efficiency of silicon solar cells

The efficiency of a solar cell is one of its most important parameters. It indicates what percentage of the solar energy radiated into the cell is converted into electrical energy. The theoretical limit for silicon solar cells is 29.3 percent due to physical material properties. In the journal Materials Horizons, researchers from Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin (HZB) and international colleagues describe

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Women are less likely to receive lung protective tidal volumes when being considered as a lung donor

A study presented at the CHEST Annual Meeting 2018 in San Antonio examined the adherence to lung protective ventilation and whether there were sex specific differences in mechanical ventilation strategies. The authors found that potential organ donors frequently did not receive appropriate low tidal volumes (VT) in the transplant evaluation period.

7h

Rewriting the textbook on how steroid hormones enter cells

A discovery by scientists at UC Riverside may open up new ways to control steroid hormone-mediated processes, including growth and development in insects, and sexual maturation, immunity, and cancer progression in humans.

7h

Mass. General-led study supports aspirin's ability to reduce liver cancer risk

The results of a study led by Massachusetts General Hospital investigators support evidence from previous studies suggesting the regular use of aspirin can reduce the risk of developing primary liver cancer — also called hepatocellular carcinoma.

7h

Tales from 141,430 and one genomes

Non-invasive prenatal testing potentially provides a wealth of genetic information, but the quality of the DNA sequencing is poor — only about 10 percent coverage per genome. Nevertheless, scientists led by Rasmus Nielsen at UC Berkeley now show that with enough genomes — in this case, 141,431 — it is possible to find genetic variants linked with human traits, including birth outcomes and susce

7h

Dynamin-binding protein linked to congenital cataracts

A new study has found compelling evidence that links dynamin-binding protein (DNMBP) to congenital bilateral cataracts and severe vision loss.

7h

Viruses in blood lead to digestive problems

Some people suffer unpredictable bouts of abdominal pain and constipation. A new study in mice, from Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, shows that viruses that target the nervous system can kill neurons in the gut that coordinate the process of moving waste along. Such viruses may be involved in causing people's digestive woes.

7h

Solving a medical mystery: Cause of rare type of dwarfism discovered

For children born with Saul-Wilson syndrome, and their parents, much of their lives are spent searching for answers. First defined in 1990, only 14 cases are known worldwide. Today, these individuals have answers. A study published today in the American Journal of Human Genetics, has uncovered the cause of Saul-Wilson syndrome.

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Analysis reveals genomic effects of a new cancer treatment now in clinical trials

A twist on the molecular mechanism of how a new cancer drug works could aid in better identifying the best treatments for patients for an array of cancers. The team identified over 500 sites in DNA that require an enzyme called ATR checkpoint kinase to not break when they are replicated.

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Smoking cessation: a genetic mutation involved in relapse

Why is it so difficult to stop smoking? Why do some people relapse months after giving up? Scientists from the Institut Pasteur and the CNRS, in collaboration with Sorbonne University and Inserm, have demonstrated that a genetic mutation already known to be involved in sensitivity to nicotine also plays a role in relapse behavior after cessation in rats. The findings will be published in the journ

7h

Large-scale wind power needs more land, causes more climatic impact than previously thought

In two papers, Harvard University researchers find that the transition to wind or solar power in the United States would require five to 20 times more land area than previously thought, and if such large-scale wind farms were built, would warm average surface temperatures over the continental United States by 0.24 degrees Celsius.

7h

Uncovering the exquisite choreography of the developing human heart

How do you mend an injured heart? We don't yet know — but the answer is likely to lie in how the heart builds itself in the developing embryo, one cell at a time. In a study published today in Cell Stem Cell, Australian researchers report on the most in-depth study to date of exactly how human stem cells can be turned into heart cells. The researchers measured changes in gene activity in tens of

7h

Scientists find old antibiotic may selectively kill dangerous skin cancer cells

An old antibiotic, called nifuroxazide, could selectively kill dangerous cells within melanomas — the deadliest type of skin cancer — scientists from the MRC Institute of Genetics and Molecular Medicine at the University of Edinburgh have found. The study, published in the journal Cell Chemical Biology, found the drug showed promise for complementing existing melanoma therapies.

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Low-dose aspirin may lower ovarian cancer risk

Women who reported recent, regular use of low-dose aspirin (100 milligrams or less) had a 23 percent lower risk of developing ovarian cancer when compared with women who did not regularly take aspirin, according to new research led by Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. The study also found that long-term heavy use of non-aspirin non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) may be associa

7h

Molecular guardians monitor chromosomes during cell division

One of the worst things that can happen to a cell is to end up with the wrong number of chromosomes. This can happen if something goes wrong during cell division, and it can lead to infertility, miscarriages, birth defects, or cancer. Cell biologist Needhi Bhalla studies how chromosomes monitor themselves throughout the complex choreography of cell division to prevent such errors.

7h

Modern humans inherited viral defenses from Neanderthals

Neanderthals passed along genetic defenses against viral diseases to modern humans when the two species interbred 50,000 years ago.

7h

Large-scale US wind power would cause warming that would take roughly a century to offset

Extracting energy from the wind causes climatic impacts that are small compared to current projections of 21st century warming, but large compared to the effect of reducing US electricity emissions to zero with solar. Research publishing in Joule reports the most accurate modelling yet of how increasing wind power would affect climate, finding that large-scale wind power generation would warm the

7h

Viruses influenced gene sharing between Neanderthals and humans

Human evolution used to be depicted as a straight line, gradually progressing from an ape-like ancestor to modern Homo sapiens. But thanks to next-generation sequencing, findings in recent years have shown that it wasn't quite so orderly. Now, a study published in the journal Cell is reporting new details about the role of viruses in shaping evolution, in particular viral interactions between mode

7h

Teaching wild birds to sing a new tune

Like toddlers learning to speak, young birds learn to sing by listening to the voices of adults. Now, researchers reporting in Current Biology on Oct. 4 have shown for the first time that they could teach young sparrows in the wild how to sing a new tune. The wild birds then passed the new songs on to the next generation.

7h

Scientists use prenatal testing samples to complete the largest genetic study yet in China

Researchers have sequenced the genomes of over 140,000 women in China, the largest-scale genetic analysis of Chinese people to date, using data from non-invasive prenatal testing (NIPT) to assemble a representative sample of the whole population. The proof-of-concept analysis, still underway, could reveal new information about migration patterns, traits under selective pressure, and disease risk i

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Planets Found to Be Larger Than the Disks They Come From

A long time ago, a star we now call the sun ignited. It did not consume all the material available in its gestational cloud; the leftover gas and dust swirled around it like a ballroom dancer’s skirt. The dusty leftovers started to coalesce in some spots, forming larger rocky objects. After millions of years, the leftovers became the eight known planets, with a few crumbs remaining in the asteroi

7h

A century ago the Spanish flu killed 50 million—and then we forgot about it

Health Here's what we can learn. The 1918 Spanish influenza is often billed as the “forgotten flu.” But really, what flu isn’t forgotten?

7h

The Viruses That Neanderthals Spread to Humans

When modern humans left Africa for Europe tens of thousands of years ago, they met Neanderthals and had sex with them . The evidence of those encounters remains inside most of us today; 2 to 3 percent of the DNA of non-African humans comes from Neanderthals. The bits of Neanderthal DNA that have persisted are not entirely random. Scientists have wondered whether they offered some advantage in the

7h

Kavanaugh on the Brink

Brett Kavanaugh’s nomination to the Supreme Court moved toward a dramatic culmination Wednesday night and Thursday morning, as senators received a supplemental FBI report on President Donald Trump’s nominee and Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell scheduled a key vote for Friday morning. The White House says the report found no wrongdoing on Kavanaugh’s part, according to The Wall Street Journa

7h

Spørg Fagfolket: Er æggehvider ernæringsmæssigt ligegyldige?

Er æggehvider andet end luft og ligegyldig smag? Det svarer ernæringsforsker fra KU på.

7h

Wide-scale US wind power could cause significant warming

A Harvard study raises questions about just how much wind should be part of a climate solution.

7h

Tre minutters træning kan hjælpe prædiabetikere

Selv mikroskopiske mængder højintens intervaltræning om ugen kan gøre en forskel for personer med prædiabetes.

7h

Forskere: Drop tidlig screening for diabetisk øjensygdom

Det kan ikke svare sig at screene samtlige børn med diabetes allerede fra 12-års-alderen, konkluderer forskere på baggrund af nyt studie.

7h

Rewriting the textbook on how steroid hormones enter cells

A discovery by scientists at UC Riverside may open up new ways to control steroid hormone-mediated processes, including growth and development in insects, and sexual maturation, immunity, and cancer progression in humans.

7h

Scientists find old antibiotic may selectively kill dangerous skin cancer cells

An old antibiotic, called nifuroxazide, could selectively kill dangerous cells within melanomas, the deadliest type of skin cancer, scientists from the Medical Research Council (MRC) Institute of Genetics and Molecular Medicine at the University of Edinburgh have found.

7h

Molecular guardians monitor chromosomes during cell division

One of the worst things that can happen to a cell is to end up with the wrong number of chromosomes. This can happen if something goes wrong during cell division, and it can lead to infertility, miscarriages, birth defects, or cancer. An estimated 30 percent of miscarriages are due to an incorrect number of chromosomes in the cells of the embryo.

7h

Modern humans inherited viral defenses from Neanderthals

Neanderthals mysteriously disappeared about 40,000 years ago, but before vanishing they interbred with another human species that was just beginning its global spread. As a result of these ancient trysts, many modern Europeans and Asians today harbor about 2 percent of Neanderthal DNA in their genomes.

7h

Teaching wild birds to sing a new tune

Like toddlers learning to speak, young birds learn to sing by listening to the voices of adults. Now, researchers reporting in Current Biology on October 4 have shown for the first time that they could teach young sparrows in the wild how to sing a new tune. The wild birds then passed the new songs on to the next generation.

7h

CREDO's first light: The global particle detector begins its collection of scientific data

Now everyone can become co-creator and co-user of the largest detector of cosmic ray particles in history – as well as a potential co-discoverer. All you need is a smartphone and the CREDO Detector application turned on overnight. Under development for over two years, the CREDO project is entering the era of its maturity. Today, at IFJ PAN in Cracow, the first light of the detector was presented c

7h

What would it take to turn Boston harbor into tea? (video)

On Dec. 16, 1773, the Boston tea party protestors threw more than 340 chests full of tea — the equivalent of about 18 and a half million teabags — into the harbor. Would that be enough to turn the harbor into a giant cup of tea? In this video, Reactions considers the math.

7h

Rethinking lethality in youth suicide attempts

First suicide attempts are more lethal than previously realized, reports a study of children and adolescents published in the Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry (JAACAP).

7h

Gas stations vent far more toxic fumes than previously thought

A study led by environmental health scientists at Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health examined the release of vapors from gas station vent pipes, finding emissions were 10 times higher than estimates used in setback regulations used to determine how close schools, playgrounds, and parks can be situated to the facilities. Findings appear in the journal Science of the Total Environme

7h

Tarragon supplements may make healthy women gain weight

Russian tarragon and bitter melon supplements may be less helpful for women than men when it comes to combating metabolic syndrome, whose symptoms include high blood sugar, high blood pressure and excess fat around the waist.A study published in the journal Biology of Sex Differences found that female mice on a high-fat diet given supplements of Russian tarragon gained more weight and body fat tha

7h

The Strange Case of the Dissident Saudi Journalist Who Disappeared

Jamal Khashoggi was under no illusion about what would happen to him if he returned to Saudi Arabia. In a piece last year in The Washington Post about a wave of detentions in the country, the self-exiled Saudi dissident said he too “could face arrest” if he returned home. Yet that’s essentially what he did when he visited the Saudi consulate in Istanbul, Turkey, with his fiancée; they were report

7h

Rare, Blue Jellyfish-Like Creatures Wash Ashore in NJ, Puzzling Beachgoers

A weird, brilliant blue creature with feathery-like strands is washing ashore onto the beaches of New Jersey.

7h

These Frogs Are Evolving to Survive a Murderous Fungus That Tries to Stop Their Hearts

Decades after chrytrid fungus began its deadly rampage through the world's frog populations, a community of tropical frogs has managed to adapt.

7h

Neutrons scan magnetic fields inside samples

With a newly developed neutron tomography technique, an HZB team has been able to map for the first time magnetic field lines inside materials at the BER II research reactor. Tensorial neutron tomography promises new insights into superconductors, battery electrodes, and other energy-related materials.

7h

Potential treatment could stop knee and spine osteoarthritis, Krembil scientists say

Scientists at the Krembil Research Institute have developed a novel therapeutic treatment that has the potential to stop knee and spine osteoarthritis in its tracks.

7h

Genome of Japanese insect delicacy sheds light on history of the Earth

Japanese scientists have shed light on the evolutionary biology and distribution of Stenopsyche caddisflies a common insect in Japanese rivers and a local delicacy. The new discovery also identified new genetic lineages among previously recognized species. the results of the study suggest that these caddisflies originated in the south of Asia, and furthermore originated from the Gondwana continent

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Researchers develop combined data model to better evaluate for mild cognitive impairment

A new study has shown that by combining imaging and neuropsychological testing, one can more accurately assess the cognitive status of individuals.

7h

Pilot study: Migraine can be treated without medicine

By slightly changing the body's own molecules using a small inhaler, certain migraine patients can either cut down on medication or do without it completely. This is shown by a pilot study which has been published in the scientific journal Cephalalgia. Patients who suffer from migraine with aura, which is where they experience either sensory or visual disturbances before the painful headaches begi

7h

New wristband provides personalized and real-time tracking of UV exposure

Researchers from the University of Granada and RMIT University in Melbourne have developed personalized and low-cost wearable ultraviolet (UV) sensors that warn users when their exposure to the sun has become dangerous.

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HKBU study: Sunscreen chemicals harm fish embryos and could pose risk to humans

A HKBU has detected an extensive amount of sunscreen chemicals in seawater that could pose a risk to human health.

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Neanderthal healthcare practices crucial to survival

Researchers investigated the skeletal remains of more than 30 individuals where minor and serious injuries were evident, but did not lead to loss of life. The samples displayed several episodes of injury and recovery, suggesting that Neanderthals must have had a well-developed system of care in order to survive.

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Decoding the regulation of cell survival — A major step towards preventing neurons from dying

An interdisciplinary and international research group led by Dr. Volker Busskamp from the Center for Regenerative Therapies Dresden at the TU Dresden (CRTD) has decoded the regulatory impact on neuronal survival of a small non-coding RNA molecule, so-called miRNA, at the highest resolution to date.

7h

Broad genetic variation on the Pontic-Caspian Steppe

The genetic variation within the Scythian nomad group is so broad that it must be explained with the group assimilating people it came in contact with. This is shown in a new study on Bronze and Iron Age genetics of the Pontic-Caspian Steppe, situated in the Black Sea region. The article is published in the scientific journal Science Advances.

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Køleskabe kan ødelægge kvaliteten af insulin

Diabetespatenter opbevarer deres medicin i køleskabe, men mange køleskabe rammer ofte ved siden af de anbefalede temperaturer for opbevaring af insulin.

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Forskere kortlægger udbredelse af diabetes og overvægt

Nyt studie har estimeret, hvor i verden antallet af svært overvægtige og mennesker med diabetes kommer til at være højest og lavest i fremtiden.

8h

3 ways to be a better ally in the workplace | Melinda Epler

We're taught to believe that hard work and dedication will lead to success, but that's not always the case. Gender, race, ethnicity, religion, disability, sexual orientation are among the many factors that affect our chances, says writer and advocate Melinda Epler, and it's up to each of us to be allies for those who face discrimination. In this actionable talk, Epler shares three ways to support

8h

Latin may help students bridge their native language with English

Lessons in the Latin roots of words may help Spanish-speaking students who are learning English bridge the gap between the two languages.

8h

Flexible piezoelectric acoustic sensors for speaker recognition

A KAIST research team has developed a machine learning-based acoustic sensor for speaker recognition. The team fabricated a flexible piezoelectric membrane by mimicking the basilar membrane in the human cochlear. Resonant frequencies vibrate corresponding regions of the trapezoidal piezoelectric membrane, which converts voice to electrical signal with a highly sensitive self-powered acoustic senso

8h

The constructive role of noise

Noise can induce spatial and temporal order in non-linear systems, which helps to detect and amplify weak external signals that are difficult to detect by conventional amplifiers, according to an international team composed of researchers from Germany, China and Spain in which the Universidad Carlos III de Madrid (UC3M) is a participant.

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Latin may help students bridge their native language with English

Researchers found that teaching English learners — students who aren't fluent in English and often come from homes where a language other than English is spoken — the Latin roots of words helped them problem solve the meaning of unfamiliar words.

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ESMO 2018 Congress curtain raiser

Reporters are invited to follow the ESMO 2018 Congress, the leading international oncology event in Europe, Oct. 19-23 at the Messe München in Munich, Germany. Journalists will have access to the latest research in oncology and to leading cancer experts from around the world.

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Duvelisib has marked response, survival benefit in difficult-to-treat leukemia and lymphoma

For some patients with difficult-to-treat leukemia and lymphoma, the investigational oral medicine duvelisib may significantly improve disease outcomes, according to phase III trial data published today in the journal Blood. The DUO trial studied duvelisib versus ofatumumab, an approved standard-of-care chemotherapy for relapsed or treatment-resistant chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) and small l

8h

Report outlines cancer risk among Hispanics/Latinos in the United States

The cancer burden in Puerto Rico, a US territory with a 99 percent Hispanic population, is substantially different from that of Hispanics in the continental US, according to a new American Cancer Society report.

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New display design could make lightweight, compact smart glasses a reality

Researchers have developed a fundamentally new approach to a see-through display for augmented reality, or smart glasses. By projecting images from the glass directly onto the eye, the new design could one day make it possible for a user to see information such as directions or restaurant ratings while wearing a device almost indistinguishable from traditional glasses.

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‘Cross talk’ in kid brains predicts their reading abilities

A new study shows that reading is a team effort, with different parts of the brain working together as a network. The changing connections in this network can predict children’s reading proficiency, according to the study. Here’s a sentence. Got it? You just involuntarily transformed symbols on a screen into sounds in your head. Or to put it another way, you read it. That seems simple enough, but

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Can a Mood-Predicting Smartphone App Work?

Evidence behind a digital tech intervention remains scant — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Angry Women Are Taken More Seriously When They’re Moms

At the heart of Rebecca Traister’s Good and Mad —a history of women’s anger and how it has shaped society and politics in the United States—is a deep, righteous indignation over the right to get deeply, righteously indignant. Women fed up with their lack of opportunity or unequal treatment have, throughout history, been known to ignite movements for progress and social change, but women’s anger h

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European badgers' gut bacteria may be a powerful ally in the fight against tuberculosis

What do cattle, European badgers, and gut bacteria have in common? They are all central players in a complex web surrounding a disease that affects multiple species, often with devastating results—tuberculosis. Now, new research funded by Morris Animal Foundation is shedding light on how one player, gut bacteria, may help protect both badgers and cattle from this common, pervasive and deadly illne

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Malaria parasites adapt to mosquito feeding times, study shows

Malaria parasites have evolved to be most infectious at the time of day when mosquitoes feed, to maximise the chance of being spread, research shows.

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Teachers' views on LGBQ students are changing

Over the past decade, the American school environment has become slightly more receptive towards students who identify as being either lesbian, gay, bisexual or queer (LGBQ). This is, in part, thanks to the changing attitudes of teachers, who have a substantial influence on school culture. In a new study published in Springer's journal Social Psychology of Education, William Hall and Grayson Rodge

8h

High-risk HPV linked to improved survival in cervical cancer

The presence of the human high-risk papillomavirus (HPV) in the diagnosis of invasive cervical cancer is linked to a greatly improved prognosis compared with if high-risk HPV cannot be identified in the tumour, researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden report in the scientific journal PLOS Medicine. The researchers believe that high-risk HPV can be another important prognostic marker that can

8h

First evidence of fatal infection of white-tailed sea eagles with avian influenza

The most common unnatural causes of death in white-tailed sea eagles are lead poisoning and collisions with trains. During the winter of 2016/2017, however, many white-tailed eagles died in Northern Germany in circumstances unrelated to either cause. Instead, at least 17 white-tailed sea eagles were killed by avian influenza of the highly pathogenic virus subtype H5N8. Avian influenza may become a

8h

Daytime naps help us acquire information not consciously perceived, study finds

The age-old adage 'I'll sleep on it' has proven to be scientifically sound advice, according to a new study which measured changes in people's brain activity and responses before and after a nap. The findings, published in the Journal of Sleep Research, support the advice which suggests that a period of sleep may help weighing up pros and cons or gain insight before making a challenging decision.

8h

Teachers' views on LGBQ students are changing

Over the past decade, the American school environment has become slightly more receptive towards students who identify as being either lesbian, gay, bisexual or queer (LGBQ). This is, in part, thanks to the changing attitudes of teachers, who have a substantial influence on school culture. In a new study published in Springer's journal Social Psychology of Education, William Hall and Grayson Rodge

8h

New display design could make lightweight, compact smart glasses a reality

Researchers have developed a fundamentally new approach to a see-through display for augmented reality, or smart glasses. By projecting images from the glass directly onto the eye, the new design could one day make it possible for a user to see information such as directions or restaurant ratings while wearing a device almost indistinguishable from traditional glasses.

8h

University isn't everything when it comes to employment outcomes

There is increasing pressure being placed on universities to deliver better "value for money". Universities minister Sam Gyimah wants school leavers to have greater access to the labour market outcomes for each individual course. This would mean that prospective students could see which ones provide a good return on their investment.

8h

How capitalism ruined our relationship with bacteria

There are many rational reasons that motivate consumers to spend US$65 billion annually on household cleaning products. But non-rational mechanisms are nevertheless still at work in the cleaning products market, as in all others.

8h

Live your best post-Zuckerberg life with these replacements for Instagram, WhatsApp, and Facebook

DIY Alternative apps to help you ditch the Facebook ecosystem. If you delete your Facebook account, you might also want to ditch the other apps, including Instagram and WhatsApp, that the tech giant owns. Here's how to replace…

8h

ISS astronauts return to Earth amid US-Russia tensions

Two American astronauts and a Russian cosmonaut returned to Earth on Thursday wrapping up a six-month mission at the International Space Station as tensions between Washington and Moscow threaten a rare area of cooperation.

8h

Indonesia battles fake news after quake-tsunami disaster

Indonesia has cracked down on "fake news" about its deadly quake-tsunami disaster, with police arresting nine people for spreading hoaxes in a bid to prevent further panic spreading among survivors.

8h

Smartphone with a finger crawls across the table to stroke your wrist

MobiLimb is a fake finger that plugs into a phone's USB port. It can provide extra interaction, including stroking your wrist and dragging itself across a table

8h

Stephen Hawking's 1st Wife Blasts Biopic 'The Theory of Everything'

Jane Hawking says the film got a lot of things wrong about her life with the renowned physicist.

8h

Hong Kong research warns of sunscreen health risks

New research in Hong Kong has found that UV filters commonly used in sunscreen are polluting surrounding waters and could endanger human health, one of the city's leading universities said Thursday.

8h

India plans facial recognition technology at airports

Indian flyers will soon be able to leave their identification cards and boarding passes at home after the government announced plans Thursday to introduce facial recognition technology at airports.

8h

Sexism, racism drive black women to run for office in both Brazil and US

Motivated in part by President Donald Trump's disparaging remarks about women and the numerous claims that he committed sexual assault, American women are running for state and national office in historic numbers. At least 255 women are on the ballot as major party congressional candidates in the November general election.

8h

Researchers reveal ancient thyroid disease using science and art

Art often imitates life, but when University of Cincinnati anthropologist and geologist Kenneth Tankersley investigated a 2000-year-old carved statue on a tobacco pipe, he exposed a truth he says will rewrite art history.

8h

Malaria parasites adapt to mosquito feeding times, study shows

Malaria parasites have evolved to be most infectious at the time of day when mosquitoes feed, to maximise their chances of being spread.

8h

Even small gifts boost business

If a sales agent brings their customer a small gift, the customer is much more likely to make a purchase, a study by the university of Zurich has shown. This works particularly well when the person receiving the gift is the boss. The fact that even small gifts can result in conflicts of interest has implications for the debate about where the line should be drawn between tokens of appreciation and

8h

Scientists develop a new way to remotely measure Earth's magnetic field

By zapping a layer of meteor residue in the atmosphere with ground-based lasers, scientists in the US, Canada and Europe get a new view of Earth's magnetic field.

8h

European badgers' gut bacteria may be a powerful ally in the fight against tuberculosis

What do cattle, European badgers, and gut bacteria have in common? They are all central players in a complex web surrounding a disease that affects multiple species, often with devastating results — tuberculosis. Now, new research funded by Morris Animal Foundation is shedding light on how one player, gut bacteria, may help protect both badgers and cattle from this common, pervasive and deadly il

8h

Common herbicide compound may save millions of lives

A chemical compound found in common herbicides could help fight hospital-acquired human fungal pathogenic infections, which claim an estimated two million lives per year. A team of international researchers led by The University of Queensland has discovered that the chemical chlorimuron ethyl also targets a range of fungal infections that are potentially fatal to humans, particularly people underg

8h

A copper bullet for tuberculosis

Tuberculosis is a sneaky disease, and the number one cause of death from infectious disease worldwide. The bacteria shelter from antibiotics inside the very immune cells that are supposed to kill them, making treatment long and difficult. But in the November issue of ACS Infectious Diseases, UConn chemists report a new antibiotic that can find and kill tuberculosis bacteria where they hide.

8h

Building Strength And Resilience After A Sexual Assault: What Works

Sexual assault is still a highly stigmatized form of trauma, and that can complicate recovery for years, psychologists find. PTSD, depression and anxiety aren't unusual, but treatment can help. (Image credit: Hero Images/Getty Images)

9h

New analysis shows seagrass meadows in Guam have decreased by 22 percent

As the oceans warm and humans migrate to or grow in numbers in coastal areas of the world, scientists are increasingly keeping an eye on ocean seagrasses and their decline. A new analysis shows that seagrass meadows in Guam have decreased by 22 percent.

9h

More wet and dry weather extremes projected with global warming

Global warming is projected to spawn more extreme wet and dry weather around the world, according to a Rutgers-led study.

9h

Using aircraft as weather stations

To fly safely, aircraft need accurate updates on wind and temperature. But together, aircraft can also act as a sensor network that provides information to make weather models and predictions better, researchers at Delft University of Technology (TU Delft, The Netherlands) have found. This week, they published their findings in PLOS One.

9h

Quantum technologies can be applied on a standard telecommunications network

Spanish researchers have developed a quantum cryptography network integrated in a commercial optical network through technologies based on software defined networking (SDN), allowing for the implementation of quantum and classical network services in a flexible, dynamic and scalable manner.

9h

Københavnske fodboldspillere skal spille på miljøvenlig kork

På kunstgræsbanen hos Tingbjerg Idrætspark har man erstattet det sædvanlige gummigranulat fra gamle bildæk med kork.

9h

The Remarkable Rise of the Feminist Dystopia

“Ever since last week,” Cedar explains on the first page of Louise Erdrich’s 2017 book, Future Home of the Living God , “things have changed. Apparently—I mean, nobody knows—our world is running backward. Or forward. Or maybe sideways, in a way as yet ungrasped.” This passage has returned to me again and again in recent weeks. It’s never felt more obvious that something is very wrong with the sha

9h

Studie støtter tese om anti-inflammatorisk effekt af faste

Læge Nikolaj Rittig fik et overraskende resultat, da han undersøgte, hvordan en bestemt markør reagerer ved faste.

9h

Regionerne er klar til at næste bølge af udfordringer i sundhedsvæsenet

Danske Regioner præsenterer ny strategi, der skal sikre, at regionerne skaber nye løsninger, der kan imødekomme sundhedsvæsenets udfordringer.

9h

Tegn på diabetes kan spores 20 før diagnose

De første spæde tegn på type 2-diabetes indfinder sig op til 20 år, inden diagnosen bliver stillet. Forebyggelse skal måske gå i gang meget tidligere, mener læge bag ny forskning.

9h

Sundhedsminister: Ledelsen skal tage ansvar for lægefejl

Nyt lovforslag skal sikre, at ansvaret for lægefejl, der opstår som følge af arbejdsforhold på landets sygehuse, ligger hos ledelsen. Lægelig direktør og regionsdirektør bakker op.

9h

Praktiserende læger i Danmark skrider hurtigere til anden linje

I Danmark skrider de praktiserende læger tidligere til andenlinjebehandling for patienter med type 2-diabetes end de gør i vores nordiske nabolande.

9h

Sundhedsreform: Gode svar kræver klare spørgsmål

En sundhedsreform vil måske betyde farvel til folkevalgte regionspolitikere og goddag til klynger på akutområdet. Men det er usikkert, om det vil løse sundhedsvæsenets udfordringer, vurderer Jakob Kjellberg, professor i sundhedsøkonomi fra Vive.

9h

Tracing the Universe: X-ray survey supports standard cosmological model

Scanning the sky for X-ray sources, ESA's XMM-Newton X-ray observatory has been busy with the XXL Survey, its largest observational programme to date. The second batch of data from the survey has just been released, including information on 365 galaxy clusters, which trace the large-scale structure of the Universe and its evolution through time, and on 26 000 active galactic nuclei (AGN).

9h

Does a man's social class have anything to do with the likelihood he'll commit sexual assault?

Defending his reputation against Dr. Christine Blasey Ford's allegations of sexual assault, Judge Brett Kavanaugh worked hard, and angrily, to present himself as a respectable man in his statement to the Senate Judiciary Committee.

9h

Artificial enzymes convert solar energy into hydrogen gas

In a new scientific article, researchers at Uppsala University describe how, using a completely new method, they have synthesised an artificial enzyme that functions in the metabolism of living cells. These enzymes can utilize the cell's own energy, and thereby enable hydrogen gas to be produced from solar energy.

9h

Poll: Young Americans say online bullying a serious problem

Teens and young adults say cyberbullying is a serious problem for people their age, but most don't think they'll be the ones targeted for digital abuse.

9h

New analysis shows seagrass meadows in Guam have decreased by 22 percent

As the oceans warm and humans migrate to or grow in numbers in coastal areas of the world, scientists are increasingly keeping an eye on ocean seagrasses and their decline. A new analysis shows that seagrass meadows in Guam have decreased by 22 percent.

9h

Fungus provides powerful medicine in fighting honey bee viruses

A mushroom extract fed to honey bees greatly reduces virus levels, according to a new paper.In field trials, colonies fed mycelium extract showed a 79-fold reduction in deformed wing virus and a 45,000-fold reduction in Lake Sinai virus compared to control colonies.The hope is that the results of this research will help dwindling honey bee colonies fight viruses that are known to play a role in co

9h

Researchers link gut bacteria to heart transplant success or failure

In a new study, researchers have found that the gut microbiome appears to play a key role in how well the body accepts a transplanted heart. The scientists found a causal relationship between the presence of certain microbes and transplant outcome. The results have the potential to significantly change how researchers and doctors deal with the problem of rejection and transplantation.

9h

Genomic study finds a new role for microRNAs as predictors of Crohn's disease progression

A new study led by UNC School of Medicine researchers and has found that a set of biomolecules known as microRNAs, specifically microRNA-31 (miR-31), can help predict which patients with Crohn's disease are at higher risk for the development of severe problems that may require surgical removal of the large intestine.

9h

UC anthropologist rewrites history using science, art

University of Cincinnati anthropology and University of Bordeaux medical science reveal ancient thyroid disease using science and art

9h

Periodontal disease bacteria may kick-start Alzheimer's

Long-term exposure to periodontal disease bacteria causes inflammation and degeneration of brain neurons in mice that is similar to the effects of Alzheimer's disease in humans. Periodontal disease may be an initiator of Alzheimer's.

9h

Interpersonal psychotherapy helps depressed women with histories of sexual trauma

Women sexually abused in childhood and adolescence who suffer from depression and post-traumatic stress disorder benefit significantly from Interpersonal Psychotherapy-Trauma, according to a Rutgers researcher.

9h

Decoding the regulation of cell survival—a major step towards preventing neurons from dying

An interdisciplinary and international research group led by Dr. Volker Busskamp from the Center for Regenerative Therapies Dresden at the TU Dresden (CRTD) has decoded the regulatory impact on neuronal survival of a small non-coding RNA molecule, so-called miRNA, at the highest resolution to date. This deciphering of gene regulation primes applications for strengthening neurons in order to protec

9h

Rainforest-friendly livelihoods can be more lucrative than gold mining

There is a widespread myth that small-scale and informal gold mining is the most lucrative livelihood for local and migrant communities in the Peruvian Amazon, and illegal mining is increasing every day. While many people are trying to make a living from mining, those "informal mining" operations are destroying large swaths of the region's rainforest, polluting rivers, and threatening the region's

9h

Scientists develop a new way to remotely measure Earth's magnetic field

Researchers in Canada, the United States and Europe have developed a new way to remotely measure Earth's magnetic field—by zapping a layer of sodium atoms floating 100 kilometres above the planet with lasers on the ground.

9h

Chan Zuckerberg Biohub launches Tabula Muris, an open-source database of mouse cells

A very large team of researchers from Stanford University, Chan Zuckerberg Biohub, VA Palo Alto Healthcare System and the University of California has put together an open-source database of mouse cell information it is calling Tabula Muris. In their paper published in the journal Nature, the group describes how information in the database was obtained and the ways in which it might be used.

9h

The promise of deep grooves

A manufacturing technique that could help the semiconductor industry make more powerful computer chips began in the humblest of places—at a lunch table at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Argonne National Laboratory.

9h

Screening technique detects special messenger RNA molecules that sense and respond to environmental signals

A*STAR researchers have developed a rapid, high-throughput screening procedure that can detect RNA aptamers—special messenger RNA molecules (mRNAs) able to sense and respond to particular cellular chemicals—in a sea of normal mRNA extracted from cells.

9h

Fluorescent molecule could shed light on the inner workings of the cellular environment

A fluorescent molecule whose luminosity depends upon how fast it can rotate is helping researchers measure how viscous the fluid is inside different parts of a cell.

9h

‘Phantom’ breasts open the door to better cancer detection

Researchers have simulated how over 20 different breast tissue ratios respond to heat that magnetic resonance imaging (MRIs) give off at higher field strengths than available in hospitals today. No woman’s breast tissue is the same, so MRIs detecting and monitoring cancer shouldn’t treat them all the same. Without a way to prove that a new MRI technique is safe for all women, clinical MRIs haven’

9h

Faecal swaps could help stop heart transplants from being rejected

Giving mice a faecal transplant made them more tolerant of a subsequent heart transplant, hinting the gut may be key to avoiding organ rejection

9h

A Mushroom Extract Might Save Bees From a Killer Virus

Two types of mushroom seem to help bees fight a major virus contributing to colony collapse disorder.

9h

Sådan kan tuberkulose-vaccinen være gavnlig for diabetespatienter

Ny forskning peger på den mekanisme, der formentlig er årsagen til, at BCG-vaccinen kan have en langvarig gavnlig effekt på folk med type 1-diabetes.

9h

Ny ledende overlæge for Lungemedicinsk Afdeling i Odense

Uddannelse og høj faglighed er vigtige områder for Goran Nadir Salih, der tiltræder som ledende overlæge for Lungemedicinsk Afdeling J Odense Universitetshospital.

9h

An insurance discount for your fitness data is a bad deal in the long run

John Hancock Insurance, the US division of Canadian insurance company Manulife, came under scrutiny last month for offering lower premiums to individuals who agreed to share their fitness tracking data with the company.

9h

What's Wrong with Science–and How to Fix It

— Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

9h

These Panamanian frogs coexist with a deadly fungus

Within a decade of a massive die off due to a fungus commonly known as chytrid, the frog species left in El Copé, Panama developed the ability to coexist with the deadly fungus. In a later field study, the researchers found that frogs infected with the fungus survived at a nearly identical rate compared with uninfected frogs. In 2004, the frogs of El Copé, Panama, began dying by the thousands. Th

9h

Better food labels could cut severe allergic reactions

Scientists are calling for more stringent food labeling regulations following a new study that found packaged food ingredient lists did not include suspected allergens. The survey of 864 Allergy & Anaphylaxis Australia members found that over nine months, 58 (6.7 percent) reported anaphylactic reactions. Australian food labels must declare potential allergens when they are present as ingredients

9h

Researcher developing new industrial uses for wax made from soybean oil

Petroleum-based paraffin wax commonly coats cardboard and all sorts of other products to improve durability and water resistance, but it can't be recycled and may adversely affect human health. So researchers at Iowa State University are developing wax from soybean oil that would share many properties of paraffin wax but would also be biodegradable.

9h

Making a movie of nanocrystal structural evolution

When you rapidly turn the pages of a flipbook, the series of static images look like they are moving. Scientists recently applied a similar principle to capture how the structure of a material changes over extremely short time scales—mere trillionths of a second or faster. To record this atomic-scale motion, they needed a special instrument housed at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Brookhave

9h

Adding nanoparticles to a polymer matrix enhances the thermo-mechanical properties of the materials

A*STAR researchers have toughened up polylactic acid while maintaining its elasticity by adding core-shell nanoparticles as a filler1.

9h

Study details how business districts target homeless people

The first major study of California's Business Improvement Districts shows that they are increasingly targeting homeless people and excluding them from public spaces.

9h

Researchers report evidence that fruit plants evolved to offer seed dispersers an attractive scent

A team of researchers from Germany, Madagascar and the U.S. has found evidence that suggests fruit-bearing plants have evolved to produce fruit that communicates ripeness with a particular smell that attracts the animals that will disperse its seeds. In their paper published in the journal Science Advances, the group describes their study of fruit eaten by lemurs in Madagascar.

9h

Japan to revise northern Pacific sei whaling program

Japanese fisheries officials said Thursday they will revise one of the country's two main research whaling programs after an international organization said selling meat from killed sei whales violates a convention protecting endangered species, in a possible setback for Japan's ambition to resume commercial whaling.

10h

Motoriserede trafikkegler skal mindske kø ved vejarbejder

Britiske ingeniører vil gøre det nemmere at flytte rundt på kegler i forbindelse med vejarbejde – uden at gå på kompromis med de ansattes sikkerhed.

10h

Sexual Selection shaping Human Behavior (Introductory Video)

submitted by /u/Darkroe [link] [comments]

10h

What happened to the Lyme vaccine?

You can vaccinate your dog against Lyme disease, but there's no vaccine for humans. Why?

10h

Small donations to presidential primaries are on rise, study finds

Political science researchers have found that the number and amount of small individual campaign contributions during presidential primaries has increased substantially since 2000, while medium and large contributions declined.

10h

The first step to choosing the 'right' college? Ignore the rankings

New research review finds scant evidence for the widespread belief that attending a "top tier" college leads to success in school and in life.

10h

Glow-in-the-dark paper as a rapid test for infectious diseases

Researchers from Eindhoven University of Technology (The Netherlands) and Keio University (Japan) have presented a practicable and reliable way to test for infectious diseases in Angewandte Chemie. The simple technique uses a special glowing paper strip, a drop of blood and a digital camera. The technology is inexpensive and fast—after 20 minutes, it is clear whether there is an infection; it also

10h

Proposed simple chemical reaction network of existing biological E. coli signaling data

Bacteria have been found to exhibit a behaviour characterized by statistics and can be described by power-law distributions. For example, E. coli bacteria have an appendage called a flagellum, an appendage that works as a screw-propeller of the cell, which rotates at intrinsically random time intervals distributed according to a power law. What is so special in the power-law distributions and the

10h

Common herbicide compound may save millions of lives

A chemical compound found in common herbicides could help fight hospital-acquired human fungal pathogenic infections, which claim an estimated two million lives per year.

10h

Curiosity Rover to temporarily switch 'brains'

Engineers at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California, this week commanded the agency's Curiosity rover to switch to its second computer. The switch will enable engineers to do a detailed diagnosis of a technical issue that has prevented the rover's active computer from storing science and some key engineering data since Sept. 15.

10h

Pyramid-shaped brain cells provide algorithm for us to recognize, categorize food

Brain regions best known for recognizing the potential horror of a hurricane also help us recognize, appreciate and categorize our food, scientists report.

10h

Tree rings reveal plague hit medieval Europe’s construction industry

Dating timber used to build European houses between AD 1250 and 1699 reveals that building activity fell during the Black Death and the Thirty Years’ War

10h

The colour blind octopus that mastered the art of disguise

The fact that the animals can copy vivid patterns that they can't even see is perplexing, but it turns out they might not be using their eyes at all

10h

These cities are the hubs of Africa’s economic boom

The wealth of Africans is projected to grow by a third over the next decade The continent's wealth is agglomerating in a number of urban clusters, in the south, east and west Wealth is collected in a few other places – isolated capitals and mini-clusters stretching from Morocco down to Angola Over the past decade, 19,000 Africans have become dollar millionaires. Africa's combined wealth has grown

10h

Opinion: The end of scientific, rational thinking: Donald Trump, Doug Ford and Jordan Peterson

This has been a terrible year for science and evidence-based decision making, which are the newest casualties of the growing wave of populism in North America where "postmodern thought … is being used to undermine scientific truths."

10h

A recording device for cell history

ETH researchers are using the CRISPR-Cas system to develop a novel recording mechanism: The snippets of DNA it produces can provide information about certain cellular processes. In the future, this cellular memory might even be used in diagnostics.

10h

The physics of throwing a perfect baseball pitch

Science Physicists and Trevor Bauer on how to invent a whole new slider. Standing on the mound, a major league baseball pitcher has 60 feet and 6 inches of air to get each pitch to sizzle before it crosses the plate. But it’s their arsenal of…

10h

New approach on the use of big data in clinical decision support

A new computational approach that allows the identification of molecular alterations associated with prognosis and resistance to therapy of different types of cancer was developed by the research group led by Nuno Barbosa Morais at Instituto de Medicina Molecular João Lobo Antunes (iMM; Portugal). It has been published in Nucleic Acids Research.

10h

The Republican Party Needs to Embrace Liberalism

Edmon De Haro The word liberal was one of the many casualties of the Vietnam era. A generation before, Americans competed to own the term. Anti–New Deal Republicans like Senator Robert Taft claimed that they, not their opponents, were the “true liberals.” Former President Herbert Hoover preferred the term historical liberal . The social turmoil of the 1960s and ’70s ripped away liberal ’s positiv

10h

Nobel-winning physics key to ultra-fast laser research

The technique for generating high-intensity, ultra-short optical pulses developed by the 2018 Nobel Prize for Physics winners, Professor Gérard Mourou and Dr. Donna Strickland, provides the basis for important scientific approaches used in Swinburne's research.

10h

First evidence of fatal infection of white-tailed sea eagles with avian influenza

The most common unnatural causes of death in white-tailed sea eagles are lead poisoning and collisions with trains. During the winter of 2016/2017, however, many white-tailed eagles died in Northern Germany in circumstances unrelated to either cause. Instead, at least 17 white-tailed sea eagles were killed by avian influenza of the highly pathogenic virus subtype H5N8, as a team of scientists from

10h

The Best Sony PlayStation 4 Games (2018)

Crawl dungeons, experience the rapture, and learn to be a dad with our favorite PlayStation 4 games.

10h

California Is Fighting the Trump Administration on Car Emissions

The state’s Air Resources Board passes new measures that reinforce its vehicle emissions rules—and maintain its collision course with the federal government.

10h

11 vil være Sygehus Lillebælts nye sygehusdirektør

Region Syddanmark har modtaget 11 ansøgninger til stillingen som Sygehus Lillebælt nye sygehusdirektør.

10h

Image of The Day: Open-and-Shut Case

A special hinge joint allows some turtle species to close and open their shells.

10h

The Man Who Thinks He Can Save Brexit

Theresa May managed to survive. Boris Johnson delivered his usual bombast. But at Britain’s Conservative Party conference this week, both Tory giants came across as almost doomed figures: Neither looked like they had a real long-term future in ruling the United Kingdom. Beyond the prime minister’s loyalists and the hardest of Brexiteers, talk of tomorrow was elsewhere. Among members of parliament

10h

5G Devices Are about to Change Your Life

It will make 4G phones seem positively quaint — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

11h

Would you rather die of liver failure or live with HIV?

In 2017, doctors from the Transplant Unit at the Wits Donald Gordon Medical Centre performed what is believed to be the world's first intentional liver transplant from a mother living with HIV to her critically ill HIV negative child, who had end-stage liver disease. Now, more than a year later, the mother and child have fully recovered, however, doctors are unsure the HIV-status of the child.

11h

Appetite-suppressant lorcaserin decreases risk of developing diabetes and induces remission of high blood sugar in obese and overweight patients

New research presented at this year's annual meeting of the European Association for the Study of Diabetes (EASD) in Berlin, Germany, and published in The Lancet, shows that the appetite-suppressant drug lorcaserin decreases risk of developing diabetes and increases the rates of remission of high blood sugar.

11h

Weight loss drug shows positive effect on diabetes

'Now we report that, when added to lifestyle interventions, lorcaserin significantly reduced incidence of diabetes, increased rates of diabetes remission, and reduced the risk of diabetic microvascular complications.'

11h

Physicist Who Coined 'God Particle' Dies. And a Great Voice for Science Is Stilled.

It is a sad "day" in science. Dr. Leon Lederman has passed away at the age of 96.

11h

It Turns Out Most Cobras Are Cannibals

It turns out, cobras get a disturbingly large percentage of their calories by eating others of their own kind.

11h

Donald Trump’s Real Endgame With China

Is the United States looking for a fight or a deal? That’s the fundamental question that a mystified Chinese scholar and former government official posed to me when we met recently in Washington, D.C., as the scholar wrapped up a fact-finding mission to the U.S. capital in the heat of an escalating trade war between the world’s largest economies. On Tuesday—fresh off signing a revised trade agree

11h

Democrats’ Burgeoning Chances in the Rust Belt

For Democrats looking ahead to 2020, the most encouraging trend in 2018 may be the party’s renewed competitiveness in key races across all five Rust Belt states that keyed Donald Trump’s unexpected victory two years ago. Yet even that potential recovery can’t erase the magnitude of the challenge Democrats will face reclaiming those states from Trump in 2020—a trial that likely became even tougher

11h

Politi: Biltyve scanner koder fra elektroniske nøgler

En international bande har stjålet danske biler via en avanceret scanner, mener efterforskningsafdeling i Aarhus.

11h

Zunum Aero’s Hybrid Plane Uses a Helicopter Engine Cut Fuel Use in Half

The Washington-based startup is using a modified helicopter engine to generate power, supplementing the batteries packed in its fuselage.

11h

When Tech Knows You Better Than You Know Yourself

Historian Yuval Noah Harari and ethicist Tristan Harris discuss the future of artificial intelligence with WIRED editor in chief Nicholas Thompson.

11h

Swarms of Supersize Mosquitoes Besiege North Carolina

These mosquitoes are monstrous in size, hyperaggressive, and hatching by the millions in the wake of Hurricane Florence.

11h

There’s no Google Maps for self-driving cars, so this startup is building it

In as little as 24 hours, Mapper will deliver a machine-readable map of any place on earth with public roads.

11h

11h

Why Do Computers Use So Much Energy?

It’s possible they could be vastly more efficient, but for that to happen, we need to better understand the thermodynamics of computing — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

11h

Er du helt sikker? Blot et enkelt ord kan manipulere din hukommelse

Vidner kan blive påvirket til at huske forkert. I nogle tilfælde kan et enkelt ord i et spørgsmål gøre forskellen, siger forskere.

11h

Are the Nobels Finally Rewarding More Female Scientists' Achievements?

“Maybe we're on a roll,” a veteran women-in-science advocate says — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

11h

Computer Science for Everyone

On the second floor of a brick building on Branch Avenue in Washington, D.C., green and white signs celebrating innovation and professionalism decorate the classrooms of Digital Pioneers Academy, the first computer-science–focused middle school in the nation’s capital. One early afternoon, students at DPA worked on Scratch, an animation-based coding platform, to make a virtual cat move around in

12h

How Lindsey Graham Tries to Keep Trump Hawkish

Donald Trump rose to power denigrating the Iraq War and promising an “America First” foreign policy. He rarely shows any concern for human rights and is unapologetically transactional in his rhetoric. Senator Lindsey Graham of South Carolina is among the most hawkish, interventionist members of the Republican Party, believes that protecting human rights can be a good reason for going to war, and

12h

‘This Is the Red Cross. Do You Have Food?’

NEW BERN, N.C. — Just two weeks after Hurricane Florence inundated this historic town with floodwaters and raging winds, many of its downtown streets have been swept clean of debris and brought back to life. Businesses have reopened, shop fronts are sparkling, and young couples are out for lunch after church on Sunday, peeking in shop windows and making plans for the week ahead. The annual MumFes

12h

Netflix’s Private Life Is Brutal, Honest, and Brilliant

Comedies about Manhattan intellectuals are often of a type: breezy, short, full of clever repartee and fraught romantic pairings. Private Life , Tamara Jenkins’s first movie in 11 years, certainly presents as such. Debuting Friday on Netflix, the film follows Rachel (Kathryn Hahn) and Richard (Paul Giamatti); both are writers, although Rachel is getting ready to publish a new book and Richard is

12h

Capitalism 2.0: How natural laws can create a more equal economy

The modern economy is an example of an unhealthy hierarchy, says John Fullerton, founder and president of Capital Institute. Unlike all other living systems, its design is not sustainable. The laws of nature show how hierarchies can be healthy: "The lion is at the top of the food chain, but the lion sits around sleeping most the day rather than eating and killing all day," says Fullerton. All nat

12h

Facebook fordobler den tid det tager helt at lukke en brugerkonto

Vil du slette din Facebook-konto går der nu op til én måned – en såkaldt 'grace period', hvor beslutningen kan fortrydes, og hvor kontoen stadig eksisterer.

12h

På jagt med sneglebor og spunsede kasser

Arkæologerne måtte ty til helt nye metoder under udgravningerne ved Femern Bælt. Metoder, som allerede anvendes ved anlægs­arbejde i kystnære områder.

13h

More wet and dry weather extremes projected with global warming

Global warming is projected to spawn more extreme wet and dry weather around the world, according to a Rutgers-led study. Those extremes include more frequent dry spells in the northwestern, central and southern United States and in Mexico, and more frequent heavy rainfall events in south Asia, the Indochinese Peninsula and southern China.

13h

Thirteen ocean solutions for climate change

Over a dozen international researchers from the Ocean Solutions Initiative — including scientists from the CNRS, IDDRI, and Sorbonne University — have evaluated the potential of 13 ocean-based measures to counter climate change. Their findings are published in Frontiers in Marine Science. They hope their analysis will inform decision-makers gathering in Katowice, Poland, for the COP24 conference

13h

Climate change efforts should focus on ocean-based solutions

The first broad-scale assessment of ocean-based measures to reduce atmospheric CO2, counteract ocean warming and/or reduce ocean acidification and sea-level rise shows their high potential to mitigate climate change and its impacts. The study identifies ocean-based renewable energy as the most promising, and several local marine conservation and restoration options as 'no-regret measures', that sh

13h

Climate change efforts should focus on ocean-based solutions

Ambitious and rapid action is needed to reduce climate change and its impacts—and the first broad-scale assessment of ocean-based solutions shows the focus should be on the oceans. The study looks at the feasibility of 13 ocean-based measures to reduce atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2), counteract ocean warming and/or reduce impacts like ocean acidification and sea-level rise. It identifies ocean-b

13h

Storbritannien anklager Rusland for cyberangreb

Rusland har i en længere årrække stået bag omfattende cyberangreb i flere andre lande, lyder anklagen fra den britiske udenrigsminister.

13h

Primary tropical forests are best but regrowing forests are also vital to biodiversity

Even after 40 years of recovery, secondary forests remain species and carbon-poor compared to undisturbed primary forests, a new study reveals.However these secondary forests — forests regrowing in previously deforested areas — are still vitally important to biodiversity conservation and carbon storage, argue scientists.

13h

Højere plantearters fremmarch i Arktis kan forværre global opvarmning

Verdens hidtil største videnskabelige undersøgelse af klimaændringernes påvirkning af plantelivet på den arktiske tundra viser, at plantehøjden stiger overalt.

14h

Primary tropical forests are best but regrowing forests are also vital to biodiversity

Even after 40 years of recovery, secondary forests remain species and carbon-poor compared to undisturbed primary forests, a new study reveals.

14h

Myanmar torches $1.3m of illegal wildlife parts

Elephant skins, clouded leopard remains and tiger bones were among a $1.3 million haul of illegal wildlife incinerated Thursday in Myanmar's first ever public event of its kind against the illicit trade.

14h

Chemistry Nobel for using evolution to create new proteins

Three scientists won the Nobel Prize in chemistry Wednesday for using a sped-up version of evolution to create new proteins that have led to a best-selling drug and other products.

14h

2 millioner sommerfugle skal fra nål til net

Med hjælp fra frivillige vil Statens Naturhistoriske Museum ved Københavns Universitet…

15h

Font of all knowledge? Researchers develop typeface they say can boost memory

Researchers say font, which slants to the left and has gaps in each letter, can aid recall • Click here to read this article in Sans Forgetica Australian researchers say they have developed a new tool that could help students cramming for exams – a font that helps the reader remember information. Melbourne-based RMIT University’s behavioural business lab and design school teamed up to create “San

15h

El-nettet er klar til millioner af elbiler

Vi skal bruge el mere intelligent. Så kan el-nettet sagtens sikre strøm til den million elbiler, politikerne drømmer om.

16h

Bangladesh kids turn the tide on climate change aboard floating schools

Mosammat Rekha's older cousins grew up unable to read and write, their tiny village so frequently cut off from the nearest school by floods that would rise suddenly in their remote corner of disaster-prone Bangladesh.

16h

Lockheed Martin unveils its lunar lander concept vehicle

US aerospace giant Lockheed Martin, responding to NASA's plans to renew the exploration of the moon and Mars in the next decade, unveiled Wednesday a concept spacecraft able to land on the lunar surface.

16h

Engineers discover that visualizing how bad air quality is in your home can help mitigate pollution

You can't see nasty microscopic air pollutants in your home, but what if you could?

16h

ICESat-2 laser fires for first time, measures Antarctic height

The laser instrument that launched into orbit last month aboard NASA's Ice, Cloud and land Elevation Satellite-2 (ICESat-2) fired for the first time Sept. 30. With each of its 10,000 pulses per second, the instrument is sending 300 trillion green photons of light to the ground and measuring the travel time of the few that return: the method behind ICESat-2's mission to monitor Earth's changing ice

16h

Seven researchers evacuated from Pacific atoll as storm nears

Seven researchers have been evacuated from a remote atoll in the Northwestern Hawaiian Islands as a powerful hurricane headed their way, officials said Wednesday.

16h

Another rare fish pulled back from extinction

Another rare Colorado River fish has been pulled back from the brink of extinction, the second comeback this year for a species unique to the Southwestern U.S.

16h

Toyota, SoftBank setting up mobility services joint venture

Japan's No. 1 automaker Toyota Motor and technology giant SoftBank Group are setting up a joint venture to create mobility services in what they called a "united Japan" effort to face global competition.

16h

Rigshospitalet: DNA-data fra syge beskyttes med kryptering under overførsel til Risø

Genom-data fra blandt andet kræftpatienter sendes fra Rigshospitalet til DTU Risøs supercomputer med hardwarebokse baseret på AES256-kryptering

16h

Viewpoint: Joel Sartore, the wildlife photographer who is all for zoos

Zoos can help save animals not just cage them, says veteran wildlife photographer Joel Sartore.

17h

Mouse study mirrors human findings that link chemotherapy and APOE4 to cognitive issues

A chemotherapy drug commonly used to treat breast cancer alters brain structure and function in mice that express the human APOE4 gene, known to significantly increase risk of developing Alzheimer's disease, according to a study led by Georgetown investigators.

17h

På forkant med fremtiden: Femern skal designes til selvkørende biler

Infrastruktur som Femern-tunnelen skal holde i over 100 år, derfor er det vigtigt at kunne tilpasse den fremtidens teknologi.

17h

Sir David Attenborough: 'Population growth has to come to an end'

Sir David Attenborough on Love Island, Global Warming, population growth and meat eating.

17h

What you can't see can hurt you

Engineers from the University of Utah's School of Computing conducted a study to determine if homeowners change the way they live if they could visualize the air quality in their house.

18h

Detecting fake news, at its source

A machine learning system aims to determine if a news outlet is accurate or biased.

18h

Viking Link: 11 mia. kr. dyrt kabel giver stort set ingen CO2-reduktion

Notat fra Energistyrelsen viser, at CO2-reduktionen ved at trække et søkabel til England er 0,026 procent om 12 år. Tillige er analysen meget usikker, og energiprofessor kalder det »en efterrationalisering«.

18h

First 'exomoon' may have been found

Astronomers have announced the possible discovery of the first known moon outside our Solar System.

22h

First large study details cognitive outcomes among older breast cancer patients

The first large US study of cognition in older breast cancer patients found that within the first two years after diagnosis and treatment, most women do not experience cancer-related cognitive problems.

22h

Couples showing off: Songbirds are more passionate in front of an audience

Both sexes of a songbird called the blue-capped cordon-bleu intensify courtship performances that involve singing and dancing in the presence of an audience, especially if it is a member of the opposite sex, researchers have discovered.

22h

25 UK species' genomes sequenced for first time

The newly sequenced genomes will enable research into why some brown trout migrate to the open ocean, whilst others don't, or investigations into the magneto receptors in robins' eyes that allow them to 'see' the magnetic fields of the Earth. The genomes could also help to shed light on why red squirrels are vulnerable to the squirrel pox virus, yet grey squirrels can carry and spread the virus wi

23h

25 UK species' genomes sequenced for first time

The genomes of 25 UK species have been read for the first time by scientists at the Wellcome Sanger Institute and their collaborators. The 25 completed genome sequences, announced today (4 October) on the Sanger Institute's 25th anniversary, will lead to future studies to understand the biodiversity of the UK and aid the conservation and understanding of our species.

23h

James Winnefeld Jr.’s Vow to Combat the Opioid Crisis

On Wednesday, retired Admiral James A. Winnefeld Jr. discussed with the senior Atlantic editor Ross Andersen one of the most painful experiences a parent can go through: losing a child. Winnefeld spoke about his son Jonathan’s overdose and death from fentanyl-laced heroin, which he wrote about in his article “No Family Is Safe From This Epidemic” in The Atlantic a year ago. The talk covered Jonat

23h

The Atlantic Daily: ‘You Can’t Say We Didn’t Warn You!’

What We’re Following No Deal: The U.S. is tearing up a six-decade-old treaty with Iran , with U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo calling the decision “39 years overdue.” Iran had used the little-known treaty to take the U.S. to the International Court of Justice over its withdrawal from the Obama-era Iran nuclear deal back in May. Meanwhile on Wednesday, a former U.S. secretary of state defended

23h

Give up to $60,000 to every American kid at birth, says inequality expert

An economist has proposed giving every child born in America up to $60,000 in a trust fund. Inequality is locked-in with the current system in which wealth is largely inherited. A "reverse social security" to promote Americans' security and well-being. Education is considered the great equalizer, but what happens when access to it is anything but equal, as is the case in the U.S. these days? With

23h

On factory farms, the death rate of pig sows is soaring

A rise in mortality for factory farm pig sows has growers worried. There are some obvious possible reasons, but studies are underway. Rise in deaths points toward a need for more humane treatment of pigs. While relatively little is known about the psychology of domestic pigs, what is known suggests that pigs are cognitively complex and share many traits with animals whom we consider intelligent.

23h

Speeding up evolution to create useful proteins wins the chemistry Nobel

The three winners, which include the fifth woman to win the chemistry prize, pioneered techniques used to fashion customized proteins for new biofuels and drugs.

23h

Funder involved in all aspects of most industry-funded clinical trials

In most industry funded trials reported in high impact medical journals, all aspects of the trial involved the industry funder, finds a study published by The BMJ today.

23h

Study reveals large regional variations on future trends of diabetes dependent on if obesity rates are tackled

New research presented at this year's annual meeting of the European Association for the Study of Diabetes (EASD) in Berlin looks into the rising prevalence of both obesity and type 2 diabetes (T2D) around the world and estimates the population that will likely be affected by both conditions over the coming decades.

1d

Domestic refrigerators may pose risk to insulin quality

New research being presented at this year's European Association for the Study of Diabetes (EASD) Annual Meeting in Berlin, Germany (Oct. 1-5), suggests that insulin is often stored at the wrong temperature in patients' fridges at home, which could affect its potency.

1d

Potential mechanism by which BCG vaccine lowers blood sugar levels to near normal in type 1 diabetes discovered

New research being presented at this year's European Association for the Study of Diabetes (EASD) Annual Meeting in Berlin, Germany (Oct. 1-5) reveals the mechanism through which the BCG vaccine for tuberculosis can make durable, beneficial changes to the immune system and lower blood sugars.

1d

Cardiovascular admissions more common among most deprived

People with diabetes from deprived backgrounds in England are twice as likely to end up in hospital with a major cardiovascular event such as a heart attack or stroke as those from more affluent communities, according to new research being presented at this year's European Association for the Study of Diabetes (EASD) Annual Meeting in Berlin, Germany (Oct. 1-5).

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Elementary school student support leads to lower high school dropout, study finds

Elementary-school students who participated in a comprehensive support intervention in the Boston public school district had about half the odds of dropping out of high school as students not in the intervention, according to a new study.

1d

New Accuracy-Triggered Notifications

A new set of notifications is now live to welcome new Eyewirers and congratulate accuracy achievements in the game. Notifications will congratulate players on things like unlocking the ability to trailblaze and alert them to opportunities for advancement in the game. There are also now new sets of helper notifications for when players are promoted to ranks like Scout and Scythe. Gotta play to fin

1d

The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: This Is Not a Test

Written by Olivia Paschal ( @oliviacpaschal ), Elaine Godfrey ( @elainejgodfrey ), and Madeleine Carlisle ( @maddiecarlisle2 ) Today in 5 Lines Republican Senators Jeff Flake, Susan Collins, and Lisa Murkowski criticized President Trump for mocking Christine Blasey Ford at a rally in Mississippi on Tuesday. Speaking at The Atlantic Festival, Senator Lindsey Graham also said he “didn’t particularl

1d

There's a goblin lurking on the outskirts of our solar system

Space And it could help prove the existence of Planet Nine. There’s a lot more going on in our solar system than just the eight (or maybe nine) planets you learned about in school.

1d

Why Didn’t I Get an Emergency Presidential Alert Text?

If you didn't get a message from the president on your phone Wednesday, don't freak out.

1d

The Federal Reserve Chair Is Ignoring President Trump

This summer, President Donald Trump twice overstepped traditional norms by criticizing the Federal Reserve for raising interest rates. That drew disapproval from observers who worried that the White House would erode the central bank’s independence. But Federal Reserve Chair Jerome Powell remains stoic about the controversy—and a little bit wry. “My focus is on controlling the controllable,” he s

1d

Physicist Leon Lederman, renowned for his subatomic particle work, has died

The Nobel Prize–winning particle physicist discovered multiple particles and wrote popular science books.

1d

Kidney care conflicts of interest: Experts call for transparency on joint-venture dialysis clinics

Penn Medicine experts in nephrology and health policy call for more transparency about joint-venture ownership of dialysis clinics to better understand what impact these arrangements may have on patient referrals and clinical outcomes. The lack of transparency poses a major barrier for evidence-based health care policy research and deprives patients of critical information, the researchers write i

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Mouser Electronics

Technology Generation Robot: Friend Request Robotics expert Grant Imahara visits San Francisco to meet with a company that is breaking the stereotypes of robots, and using AI to do it.

1d

Traces of opiates found in ancient Cypriot vessel

Researchers have discovered traces of opiates preserved inside a distinctive vessel dating back to the Late Bronze Age.

1d

Cuisine of early farmers revealed by analysis of proteins in pottery from Çatalhöyük

Knowledge of the diet of people living in the prehistoric settlement of Çatalhöyük almost 8000 years ago has been completed in astonishing scope and detail by analyzing proteins from their ceramic bowls and jars. Using this new approach, an international team of researchers has determined that vessels from this early farming site in central Anatolia, in what is now Turkey, contained cereals, legum

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Diet rich in fried and processed foods linked to increased hypertension in black Americans

New findings suggest that diet is a major contributor for the increased risk of hypertension in black compared to white Americans. The results, published in the Journal of the American Medical Association, are part of the Reasons for Geographic and Racial Differences in Stroke (REGARDS) study, which looks at the incidence of stroke in approximately 30,000 individuals. The study is funded by the Na

1d

Kamala Harris Might Have Just Previewed Her 2020 Message to Trump

Senator Kamala Harris offered a preview Wednesday afternoon of how she might respond to attacks from President Donald Trump if she runs against him in 2020: by appealing to Americans’ sense of compassion. “What would you have said to President Trump about his—his mocking of [Christine Blasey Ford’s] memory at his campaign rally last night?” asked Laurene Powell Jobs, who was interviewing Harris a

1d

The Cruelty Is the Point

The Museum of African-American History and Culture is in part a catalogue of cruelty. Amid all the stories of perseverance, tragedy, and unlikely triumph, there are the artifacts of inhumanity and barbarism: the child-size slave shackles, the bright red robes of the wizards of the Ku Klux Klan, the recordings of civil rights protesters being brutalized by police. The artifacts that persist in my

1d

A novel molecule could spur new class of drugs for breast cancer

Researchers have designed and developed a new class of molecules that use a never-before-known mechanism that may halt or destroy breast cancer tumors, particularly for patients with drug-resistant or dangerously metastatic stages of the disease.

1d

A new brain-inspired architecture could improve how computers handle data and advance AI

Researchers are developing a new computer architecture, better equipped to handle increased data loads from artificial intelligence. Their designs draw on concepts from the human brain and significantly outperform conventional computers in comparative studies.

1d

New 3D-printed cement paste gets stronger when it cracks — just like structures in nature

Researchers have 3D-printed cement paste, a key ingredient of the concrete and mortar used to build various elements of infrastructure, that gets tougher under pressure like the shells of arthropods such as lobsters and beetles. The technique could eventually contribute to more resilient structures during natural disasters.

1d

Opioid overdoses, depression linked

A 1 percent increase in statewide depression diagnoses was associated with a 26 percent increase in opioid-related deaths. Rates of opioid-related deaths rose substantially in 2014 and 2015, and states with the highest rates of opioid-related deaths often have a shortage of mental health care professionals.

1d

Fathers' postnatal hormone levels predict later caregiving

Dads whose cortisol levels were elevated while they held their newborns on the day of their birth — either skin-to-skin or clothed — were more likely to be involved with indirect care and play with their infants in the first months of their lives.

1d

New fuel cell concept brings biological design to better electricity generation

Fuel cells have long been viewed as a promising power source. But most fuel cells are too expensive, inefficient, or both. In a new approach, inspired by biology, a team has designed a fuel cell using cheaper materials and an organic compound that shuttles electrons and protons.

1d

Paradigm shift in tuberculosis treatment: Genome sequencing replaces standard resistance testing

An international research team has shown that genome sequencing can improve tuberculosis treatment.

1d

Exercise reduces stress, improves cellular health in family caregivers

Exercising at least three times a week for six months reduced stress in a group of family caregivers and even appeared to lengthen a small section of their chromosomes that is believed to slow cellular aging.

1d

Mama Giraffes' Spot Patterns Are Passed Down to Their Babies

Young giraffes inherit much of the detail in their spots from their mamas.

1d

Malware Has a New Way to Hide on Your Mac

By only checking a file's code signature when you install it—and never again—macOS gives malware a chance to evade detection indefinitely.

1d

Did the Democrats Mishandle the Allegations Against Brett Kavanaugh?

Immediately after President Donald Trump nominated Brett Kavanaugh to the Supreme Court, there was concern among progressives that Senate Democrats had no plan for stopping his confirmation. Democrats had barely laid a glove on Neil Gorsuch in 2017, and it wasn’t clear they were better prepared for a new Supreme Court fight. Adding to the impression of disorder was a shifting public line: First,

1d

People Around The Country Are Pushing For More Information About Drinking Water

Communities around the country are grappling with a new kind of chemical pollution in their drinking water. The science and regulation around it aren't settled, leaving some people frustrated and in limbo.

1d

First known exomoon could be a baffling monster the size of Neptune

Last year, New Scientist reported the possible discovery of the first ever exomoon. Now new evidence suggests that if it does exist, it is very strange

1d

Fathers' postnatal hormone levels predict later caregiving, study shows

Dads whose cortisol levels were elevated while they held their newborns on the day of their birth — either skin-to-skin or clothed — were more likely to be involved with indirect care and play with their infants in the first months of their lives.

1d

Sleeping too much or too little may affect stroke risk differently based on race

How many hours people sleep at night may affect their risk of stroke differently based on race, according to a study published in the Oct. 3, 2018, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

1d

Green algae, white noise: Gas bubbles produced during photosynthesis 'ring' upon release

Gas bubbles released by marine algae during photosynthesis produce sound whose intensity correlates with the degree of algal cover on coral reefs, according to a new study.

1d

Evolution: Genetics doesn't matter much in forming society

Genetics isn't as important as once thought for the evolution of altruistic social behavior in some organisms, a new insight into a decade-long debate.

1d

Bone knife from Morocco is oldest specialized tool associated with Aterian culture

A single bone artifact found in a Moroccan cave is the oldest well-dated specialized bone tool associated with the Aterian culture of the Middle Stone Age, according to a new study.

1d

Hugs may help protect against conflict-related distress

Receiving hugs may buffer against deleterious changes in mood associated with interpersonal conflict, according to a new study.

1d

Family of rodents may explain how some groups of animals become so diverse

Scientists have developed a new model that shows how geography can play a major role in how families of animals evolve and result in many species.

1d

Fly protein has protective effect on dopaminergic neurons

A team recently identified the fruit fly protein known as Scarlet as a target gene whose function is required to prevent age-dependent loss of dopaminergic neurons in fruit flies. They found that loss of Scarlet activity causes a progressive loss of dopaminergic neurons and that Scarlet has a neuroprotective role in a model of Parkinson's disease.

1d

Cooling effect of preindustrial fires on climate underestimated

The Industrial Revolution brought about many things: the steam engine, the factory system, mass production. But not, apparently, more wildfires. Actually, the opposite. A new study finds that emissions from fire activity were significantly greater in the preindustrial era, which began around 1750, than previously thought. As a result, scientists have underestimated the cooling effect the aerosol p

1d

Emissions-free energy system saves heat from the summer sun for winter

Researchers have made strides towards the development of a specially designed molecule which can store solar energy for later use.

1d

How has the gluten-free industry affected individuals with celiac disease?

A new study looks at how the recent proliferation of the gluten-free industry has affected individuals living with celiac disease.

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Wheat that pumps iron, naturally

Crop breeders are developing a biofortified wheat that could make proper nutrition easier.

1d

Better Living through Evolution: Nobel Prize in Chemistry

Frances Arnold, George Smith and Gregory Winter shared the 2018 Nobel Prize in Chemistry for using evolutionary principles to create highly efficient enzymes and antibodies, with numerous practical… — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

1d

Teeth of Homo antecessor shed light on trends in Pleistocene hominin dental evolution

Some of the dental features characteristic of Neanderthals were already present in Early Pleistocene Homo antecessor, according to a new study.

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Hormone therapy for 'low T' may not be safe for all men

Boosting testosterone levels with hormone supplements may not be safe or appropriate for all men with low testosterone (low T), according to new research.

1d

T cell bispecific antibody for the immune-mediated killing of HER2+ breast cancer cells

Researchers show that the p95HER2-T cell bispecific antibody (TCB) can successfully guide immune cells, known as lymphocytes, directly to cancerous ones for their targeted killing. This direct delivery is achieved thanks to the p95HER2 protein, which is only located in tumor cells.

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Neanderthal-like features in 450,000-year-old fossil teeth from the Italian Peninsula

Fossil teeth from Italy, among the oldest human remains on the Italian Peninsula, show that Neanderthal dental features had evolved by around 450,000 years ago, according to a new study.

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Neuromorphic computing: New research could lead to more energy-efficient computing

Scientists have developed 'neuristor' circuits that behave similarly to biological neurons in the human brain, which can perform complex computations using an incredibly small amount of power.

1d

For better multiple-choice tests, avoid tricky questions, study finds

Although people often think about multiple-choice tests as tools for assessment, they can also be used to facilitate learning. A new study offers straightforward tips for constructing multiple-choice questions that are effective at both assessing current knowledge and strengthening ongoing learning.

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Liquid crystals and the origin of life

Liquid crystals are common in modern electronic device screens, but they may have played a far more ancient role: helping to assemble Earth's first biomolecules. Researchers have found that short RNA molecules can form liquid crystals that encourage growth into longer chains.

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Lemurs Provide Clues About How Fruit Scents Evolved

Researchers tested what kind of information the animals are able to discern from scent about whether a fruit is ripe. There's evidence that some fruits evolved to better signal ripeness to lemurs. (Image credit: N. Rowe & Centre ValBio)

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Nobel Prize in Chemistry Goes to a Woman for the Fifth Time in History

Frances H. Arnold was awarded this year’s Nobel Prize in Chemistry for her work conducting the directed evolution of enzymes.

1d

Opioid overdoses, depression linked

A 1 percent increase in statewide depression diagnoses was associated with a 26 percent increase in opioid-related deaths.Rates of opioid-related deaths rose substantially in 2014 and 2015, and states with the highest rates of opioid-related deaths often have a shortage of mental health care professionals.

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Nobel-winning women follow in Marie Curie's footsteps

The two women to win Nobels in physics and chemistry this week follow in the footsteps of the towering genius that was Marie Curie, the first woman to win both prizes.

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'No-one should be told they can’t'

Professor Donna Strickland has become the first woman in 55 years to win the Nobel Prize in Physics.

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Irish data authority probing Facebook over breach of 50 mn accounts

Ireland's data protection authority launched an investigation into Facebook Wednesday, bringing stringent new European privacy laws to bear on the tech titan after a security breach exposed 50 million accounts.

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Astronomers find first compelling evidence for a moon outside our solar system

On the hunt for distant worlds, researchers have identified an exomoon candidate around the transiting exoplanet Kepler-1625b that indicates the presence of a previously unknown gas-giant moon.

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Mountaintop observatory sees gamma rays from exotic Milky Way object

The High-Altitude Water Cherenkov Gamma-Ray Observatory (HAWC) collaboration has detected highly energetic light coming from a microquasar — a black hole that gobbles up stuff from a companion star and blasts out powerful jets of material. Data analysis indicates that electron acceleration and collisions at the ends of the microquasar's jets produced powerful gamma rays. Multi-wavelength messenge

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Fresh insights help unlock mysteries of the first stages of life

Key insights into how sperm and egg cells are formed have been discovered by scientists, shedding light on the earliest stages of their development.

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Twins, Separated at Birth, Reunite as Adults

Three Identical Strangers is a shocking watch. Tim Wardle’s documentary, released earlier this year, tells the story of three 19-year-old boys who discover they are identical triplets, separated at birth and adopted by different families. But the revelations don’t end there. As it turns out, the boys were unwittingly part of an unethical scientific study conducted by their adoption agency, Louise

1d

John Kerry Is Pushing Back Against Trump

Whether it’s speaking out against President Donald Trump, working to keep the Iran nuclear deal alive, or encouraging voters to participate in a “course correction” this November, former Secretary of State John Kerry says he’s still in the game. “I don’t consider myself gone,” Kerry replied when The Atlantic ’s Steve Clemons asked him at The Atlantic Festival whether he was mulling a return to po

1d

A Chiropractor Adjusted Her Neck. Then This Woman's Vision Problems Began

A woman experienced eye damage after a chiropractor manipulated her neck.

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A new brain-inspired architecture could improve how computers handle data and advance AI

IBM researchers are developing a new computer architecture, better equipped to handle increased data loads from artificial intelligence. Their designs draw on concepts from the human brain and significantly outperform conventional computers in comparative studies. They report on their recent findings in the Journal of Applied Physics.

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The weirdest things we learned this week: Sheep on meth, hopping space robots, and the economy of “Frozen”

Science Our editors scrounged up some truly bizarre facts. What’s the weirdest thing you learned this week? Well, whatever it is, we promise you’ll have an even weirder answer if you listen to PopSci’s newest podcast.

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Notre Dame study shows fathers' postnatal hormone levels predict later caregiving

Dads whose cortisol levels were elevated while they held their newborns on the day of their birth — either skin to skin or clothed — were more likely to be involved with indirect care and play with their infants in the first months of their lives.

1d

A novel molecule could spur new class of drugs for breast cancer

Researchers at Stevens Institute of Technology and colleagues have designed and developed a new class of molecules that use a never-before-known mechanism that may halt or destroy breast cancer tumors, particularly for patients with drug-resistant or dangerously metastatic stages of the disease.

1d

Hubble finds compelling evidence for a moon outside the solar system

Using the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope and older data from the Kepler Space Telescope two astronomers have found the first compelling evidence for a moon outside our own solar system. The data indicate an exomoon the size of Neptune, in a stellar system 8,000 light-years from Earth. The new results are presented in the journal Science Advances.

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Trump’s ‘Maximum-Pressure’ Strategy Is Destined to Fail

Last week at the United Nations, President Donald Trum p claimed his administration had made progress in contending with North Korea, and promised to repeat the same feat with Iran. Heaping praise on North Korea and scorn on Iran, he told reporters, “It doesn’t matter what world leaders think of Iran. Iran’s going to come back to me and they’re going to make a good deal.” Clearly, Trump believes

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