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Nyheder2018oktober05

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Susan Collins Gambles With the Future of Roe v. Wade

In a long speech on the Senate floor Friday afternoon, Senator Susan Collins said she believes that Brett Kavanaugh would not vote to overturn Roe v. Wade and subsequent cases that have reaffirmed it, if such an opportunity were to come before him on the Supreme Court. The Maine Republican has been closely watched as a potential swing voter, largely because she supports abortion rights: In July,

35min

Drunk birds are wreaking havoc in Minnesota

Science Here's why experts call our desire to drink an ‘evolutionary hangover.’ Birds are on a bender in Minnesota, and we're probably enjoying it more than they are.

57min

Earth's climate monsters could be unleashed as temperatures rise | Graham Readfearn

As a UN panel prepares a report on 1.5C global warming, researchers warn of the risks of ignoring ‘feedback’ effects This week, hundreds of scientists and government officials from more than 190 countries have been buzzing around a convention centre in the South Korean city of Incheon. They are trying to agree on the first official release of a report – the bit called the Summary for Policymakers

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Study finds standard treatment for common STD doesn't eliminate parasite in some women

A new study led by an infectious disease epidemiologist at Tulane University School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine could change the way doctors treat a common sexually transmitted disease.

25min

The Powerful, Pained Raps of Sacramento’s Mozzy

Mozzy isn’t afraid to cry in his music. The Sacramento-bred street rapper, who’s gained acclaim over the last several years for his colorful, melodic depictions of gang life and gun violence in the northern California city, doesn’t shun emotions. Mozzy’s music slaps, but the gruff lyricist is a bard. His latest release, Gangland Landlord , finds Mozzy once again wrestling with indelible pain. It

57min

The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: The Maine Event

Written by Elaine Godfrey ( @elainejgodfrey ), Madeleine Carlisle (@maddiecarlisle2) , Olivia Paschal (@oliviacpaschal) Today in 5 Lines The Senate voted 51 to 49 to advance Brett Kavanaugh’s Supreme Court nomination to a final vote. In a speech on the Senate floor, Republican Senator Susan Collins of Maine announced that she would vote to confirm Kavanaugh. Read the speech here . Democratic Sena

1h

Novel use of NMR sheds light on easy-to-make electropolymerized catalysts

In the world of catalytic reactions, polymers created through electropolymerization are attracting renewed attention. A group of researchers recently provided the first detailed characterization of the electrochemical properties of polyaniline and polyaspartic acid (PASP) thin films. The team used a wide range of tests to characterize the polymers, especially their capacity for catalyzing the oxid

1h

Lunar craters named in honor of Apollo 8

The Working Group for Planetary System Nomenclature of the International Astronomical Union has today officially approved the naming of two craters on the Moon to commemorate the 50th anniversary of the Apollo 8 mission. The names are Anders's Earthrise and 8 Homeward.

1h

How fatal biofilms form

By severely curtailing the effects of antibiotics, the formation of organized communities of bacterial cells known as biofilms can be deadly during surgeries and in urinary tract infections. Researchers have just come a lot closer to understanding how these biofilms develop, and potentially how to stop them.

1h

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The coolest concept cars from the 2018 Paris Motor Show

Cars The list includes an all-electric muscle car. The entries range from sleek to adorable.

1h

Physicists Condemn Sexism Through ‘Particles for Justice’

At least 1,600 signatures have been submitted to a letter protesting a sexist talk given by physicist Alessandro Strumia at CERN last week.

1h

Susan Collins Says She Believes Survivors—Just Not Ford

Susan Collins’s late announcement to vote to confirm Brett Kavanaugh to the Supreme Court on Friday placed the Maine senator squarely in the center of the debate. And in her remarks, Collins sought the middle on another question, too: how to assess allegations of sexual assault such as those brought against Kavanaugh. Republicans have for the most part insisted that Kavanaugh is innocent until pr

1h

A Man Took Too Much Erectile Dysfunction Drug. Then His Vision Turned Red

A high dose of an online-bought erectile dysfunction drug caused a man's vision to turn red

1h

ASU research graces cover of ACS journal

Gary Moore, an assistant professor in the School of Molecular Sciences and a researcher with the Biodesign Center for Applied Structural Discovery, and his team won the coveted honor when their research article, "Electrocatalytic Properties of Binuclear Cu(II) Fused Porphyrins for Hydrogen Evolution," was selected for the cover of the October edition of ACS Catalysis.

2h

New Horizons sets up for New Year's flyby of Ultima Thule

NASA's New Horizons spacecraft carried out a short engine burn on Oct. 3 to home in on the location and timing of its New Year's flyby of the Kuiper Belt object nicknamed Ultima Thule.

2h

Heavy rain on Costa Rica's Pacific coast forces evacuations

Nearly 1,000 people were evacuated from their homes on Costa Rica's northern and central Pacific coast due to flooding caused by heavy rain, officials said Friday.

2h

The universe’s continued existence implies extra dimensions are tiny

The strictest limits yet on the size of extra dimensions come from the fact that black holes haven't destroyed the universe.

2h

Read Susan Collins’s Historic Floor Speech on Brett Kavanaugh

Capping several days of uncertainty over where her vote would fall, Senator Susan Collins said in a speech on the Senate floor on Friday that she would vote to confirm Brett Kavanaugh to the Supreme Court. Her remarks touched on the MeToo movement, the political theater of the confirmation process, and the state of American democracy. Below, the full text of her speech: Mr. President, the five pr

2h

Doorstop turns out to be meteorite worth $100K

A Michigan man recently learned that a rock he's been using as a doorstop is a meteorite worth $100,000.

2h

Study looks at San Francisco quake vulnerability

As two of San Francisco's most vaunted buildings sink or crack, an earthquake study recommended re-inspecting dozens of high-rises and beefing up construction codes for the growing crop of skyscrapers in the booming city.

2h

Larger cities have smaller water footprint than less populated counterparts

Global sustainability is important now more than ever due to increasing urban populations and the resulting stress it can have on natural resources. But increased populations in cities may lead to greater efficiency, as a team of Penn State researchers discovered when they analyzed the water footprint of 65 mid- to large-sized U.S. cities.

2h

'Turbidity currents' are not just currents, but involve movement of the seafloor itself

Turbidity currents have historically been described as fast-moving currents that sweep down submarine canyons, carrying sand and mud into the deep sea. But a new paper in Nature Communications shows that, rather than just consisting of sediment-laden seawater flowing over the seafloor, turbidity currents also involve large-scale movements of the seafloor itself. This dramatic discovery, the result

2h

Science and the Supreme Court: Cases to Watch in 2018

The death penalty, uranium mining and the endangered dusky gopher frog are among the topics that justices will consider this year — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

2h

Acetaminophen: Dosage, Side Effects & Overdose

Acetaminophen is an over-the-counter pain reliever works by elevating the pain threshold so that only more intense pain is felt.

2h

The Devolution of Kanye West and the Case for Cancel Culture

Cancellation is an act of catharsis, of rebellion—even as it's come under fire for being little more than a purity test.

2h

Tumor necrosis associate with atherosclerotic lipid accumulation

Atherosclerosis is regarded as a chronic inflammatory disease associated with changes in the innate immune system functioning and cytokine disturbances. In this study, we explored localization of a pro-inflammatory cytokine, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNFα), and anti-inflammatory chemokine, C-C motif chemokine ligand 18 (CCL18), in the arterial wall of human aorta.

2h

It All Came Down to Susan Collins

In a much-anticipated speech from the Senate floor, Senator Susan Collins of Maine announced Friday her intention to vote to confirm Brett Kavanaugh to the Supreme Court of the United States. Moments after Collins yielded the floor, Democratic Senator Joe Manchin pushed out a statement confirming that he too would support Kavanaugh’s nomination. “I have found Judge Kavanaugh to be a qualified jur

2h

A big tech company is working to free the internet from big tech companies

Cloudflare’s “gateway” system opens the door to the decentralized web

3h

Eyewire Release Report 10/5/2018

Happy Friday! To give you a comprehensive picture of everything new on Eyewire, here are all changes since the last report a few weeks ago. New notification type: cell completion ! At last, you can find out how you did on a particular cell, whenever it finishes. Cell completion notifs are currently only sent for e2198 cells, not for zebrafish. New notification type: your accumulated retro trailbl

3h

Tony Makes Moves on Dredge Number Two | Gold Rush

60 miles south of Dawson City, Tony Beets starts transporting his second dredge. Catch the Season Premiere of GOLD RUSH Friday October 12th at 9p on Discovery. Stream Full Episodes of Gold Rush: https://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/gold-rush/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/GoldRush/ https://www.facebook.com/Discovery Follow us

3h

Meteorite used as doorstop for decades worth $100,000

It landed on a farm near Grand Rapids, Michigan in 1930, and is estimated to be 4 billion years old When the house was sold, it was included in the sale by the farmer who had no idea of its value, but had quite a story about finding it If you see a meteorite fall to Earth and remain at least partially intact, it would be in your best interest to run (or drive, quickly) to find it! It's not often

3h

Astronomers discover dwarf planet beyond Pluto. Its nicknamed 'The Goblin.'

The solar system's starting to look very different than we thought. A third object beyond Pluto has just been announced. The newly discovered dwarf, dubbed "The Goblin," never comes closer than 65 astronomical units, or AU, to the sun. Beyond the fringes of our known solar system orbits a newly discovered object, 2015 TG387. Its nickname? The Goblin. It has an extremely elongated orbit, never com

3h

Being gay in Scientology: How Michelle LeClair got out

Michelle LeClair survived rape, violence, and surveillance, and is now speaking out against the Church of Scientology. In her new memoir, Perfectly Clear , she details her harrowing story. The church promotes a culture of submission and fear, she says, and is seeking new avenues to retain members. None When did it all start to fall apart? Humans are terrible prophets, though we're exceptionally s

3h

Therapy Dogs Can Spread MRSA to Young Cancer Patients. Here's How to Prevent It.

Petting a therapy dog can help reduce stress and anxiety in kids with cancer, but a visit from one of these furry friends can also spread dangerous germs to these vulnerable children.

3h

Man Captures Stunning, Rare Video of a Fight Between Two Huge Moose

A New Brunswick man named Denis Levesque came upon the astonishing scene and captured it on video.

3h

In the hunt for aliens, satellites may light the way

Space If aliens love satellites as much as we do, we might be able to spot them Researchers have long searched for signs of alien civilizations among the stars. Now, better telescopes are letting them take a look at planets.

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Gadget Lab Podcast: Hacking Humans

On this episode, WIRED's editor in chief Nick Thompson talks to best-selling author Yuval Noah Harari and Center for Humane Technology co-founder Tristan Harris about how social platforms expertly manipulate our thinking.

3h

Why Can't Christine Blasey Ford Remember How She Got Home?

Time-dependent effects of stress on the hippocampus and memory—and why they matter — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

3h

Trilobites: Taming the Groundcherry: With Crispr, a Fussy Fruit Inches Toward the Supermarket

You may have never eaten a groundcherry, but with common gene-editing techniques it and other fruits may be more easily domesticated.

3h

Participants in dementia prevention research motivated by altruism

Researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine, with collaborators across the country, report that people who participate in dementia prevention trials are primarily motivated by altruism and pleased to help.

3h

We’ve spotted the shock wave from an invisible explosion in space

For the first time, astronomers have spotted the shock wave from a powerful space explosion called a gamma ray burst without being able to see the burst itself

3h

What Are X-Rays?

X-rays are a form of electromagnetic radiation. One of the most common uses of X-rays is for medical imaging. X-rays are also used in treating cancer and in exploring the cosmos.

3h

Article from 1912 warns the world about climate change

An article from 1912 is making headlines for its mention of climate change by means of putting carbon into the atmosphere. It is but one of many articles and papers that mentioned human-driven climate change during the early 20th century. It reminds us that just because we can see a problem coming doesn't mean we fully understand how quickly it will arrive or how dangerous it will be. Somehow, th

3h

Woman Recalls Being Trapped Underwater for 30 Minutes

Josh Gates speaks with a woman who recounts a kayaking trip where she was underwater for 30 minutes. Catch an All New EXPEDITION UNKNOWN: SEARCH FOR THE AFTERLIFE Sunday 10p on Discovery. Stream Full Episodes of Expedition Unknown: https://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/expedition-unknown/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Discovery

4h

Industry Partners Extensively Involved in Trials They Fund

A new study suggests that sponsors downplay their influence when reporting trials carried out in collaboration with academic researchers.

4h

The Divide Over Kavanaugh Isn’t as Big as It First Appears

Brett Kavanaugh’s confirmation battle and the sexual-assault allegations against him have cleaved many Americans into enemy camps. Many critics feel certain that he sexually assaulted Christine Blasey Ford and that he would threaten women and discredit the Supreme Court if confirmed; many defenders feel as certain that he is innocent and that his defeat would encourage future character assassinat

4h

'Turbidity currents' are not just currents, but involve movement of the seafloor itself

Turbidity currents in submarine canyons often involve large-scale movement of the seafloor. This discovery could help ocean engineers avoid damage to pipelines, communications cables, and other seafloor structures.

4h

Consumers willing to pay more for sustainably brewed beer

More and more breweries are investing in practices to save energy and reduce greenhouse gases. Will it pay off? A new study suggests it may.

4h

Chemists advance ability to control chemical reactions

Chemists have found a way to select the outcome of chemical reaction by employing an elusive and long-sought factor known as the 'impact parameter' — the miss-distance by which a reagent molecule misses a target molecule, thereby altering the products of chemical reaction. Termed the 'forbidden fruit of reaction dynamics', the impact parameter has previously defied direct control.

4h

This toaster-sized asteroid rover accomplished more in 17 hours than you will in your life

Space MASCOT had one job, and it did great! MASCOT, a decidedly not-alive asteroid-landing robot, got 17 hours of existence—longer than planned, but still incredibly brief.

4h

Columbia University Postdocs Vote to Unionize

More than 2,000 individuals favor the bargaining unit—the first at a private university in the US.

4h

Pigs, Hogs & Boars: Facts About Swine

Pigs are mammals with stocky bodies, flat snouts, small eyes and large ears. They are highly intelligent, social animals, and are found all over the world.

4h

Cancer's Spread May Depend on Weird, Newfound Fluid Physics

Tumors are controlled by a previously unknown type of physics specific to living tissue.

4h

Larger cities have smaller water footprint than less populated counterparts

Global sustainability is important now more than ever due to increasing urban populations and the resulting stress it can have on natural resources. But increased populations in cities may lead to greater efficiency, as a team of Penn State researchers discovered when they analyzed the water footprint of 65 mid- to large-sized US cities.

4h

How a Seafloor Blob Became Mexico’s ‘Black Gold’

A frenzy for sea cucumbers, driven by demand in Asia, has brought their populations near collapse in the waters off the Yucatán Peninsula.

4h

Civics Education Helps Create Young Voters and Activists

It’s widely known that young adults in the United States tend to vote at lower rates than older Americans, but it’s easy to gloss over just how stunning the numbers really are—especially at a time of such intense political polarization and divisiveness. Only half of eligible adults between the ages of 18 and 29 voted in the 2016 presidential election that sent Donald Trump to the White House. Dur

4h

In a spin

Water shortages mean the laundry industry is adopting various technologies to reduce consumption.

4h

Outpatient antibiotic overprescribing rampant

Clinicians prescribed antibiotics without an infection-related diagnosis nearly half of the time and one in five prescriptions were provided without an in-person visit, according to new research.

4h

Scientists condemn professor's 'morally reprehensible' talk

Italian researcher Alessandro Strumia is heavily criticised for claiming physics was "built by men".

4h

Swedish girl discovers ancient sword in lake

An eight-year-old girl found a pre-Viking era sword while swimming in a lake in Sweden during the summer.

4h

Atoms and Brexit

The government says it has a clear plan, but many in the nuclear sector are concerned for the future.

4h

A 'Scarily Simple' Bug Put Millions of Cox Communications Customers at Risk

The most straightforward insecurities can sometimes be the riskiest.

4h

Consumers willing to pay more for sustainably brewed beer, study finds

More and more breweries are investing in practices to save energy and reduce greenhouse gases. Will it pay off? A study by Indiana University researchers suggests it may.

4h

University of Toronto chemists advance ability to control chemical reactions

University of Toronto chemists led by Nobel Prize-winning researcher John Polanyi have found a way to select the outcome of chemical reaction by employing an elusive and long-sought factor known as the 'impact parameter' — the miss-distance by which a reagent molecule misses a target molecule, thereby altering the products of chemical reaction. Termed the 'forbidden fruit of reaction dynamics', t

4h

Education improves decision-making ability, study finds

A new study found that education can be leveraged to help enhance an individual's economic decision-making quality or economic rationality.

4h

'Not right away': Electric cars still have long road ahead

Under dazzling autumn sunshine in the heart of Paris, Marc Fiot steps out of a new Zoe, Renault's flagship all-electric hatchback, and readily declares it "the future".

4h

NASA Voyager 2 could be nearing interstellar space

NASA's Voyager 2 probe, currently on a journey toward interstellar space, has detected an increase in cosmic rays that originate outside our solar system. Launched in 1977, Voyager 2 is a little less than 11 billion miles (about 17.7 billion kilometers) from Earth, or more than 118 times the distance from Earth to the Sun.

4h

Consumers willing to pay more for sustainably brewed beer, study finds

More and more breweries are investing in practices to save energy and reduce greenhouse gases. Will it pay off? A study by Indiana University researchers suggests it may.

5h

Chemists advance ability to control chemical reactions

Scientists at the University of Toronto have found a way to select the outcome of chemical reaction by employing an elusive and long-sought factor known as the 'impact parameter'.

5h

Trilobites: Hidden Stories of Chinese Migration and Culture Found in Giant Genetic Study

Scientists reported an assortment of findings resulting from a sweeping and novel analysis of data from the prenatal tests of 141,431 participants.

5h

Q&A: A Tube of DNA? Not Pretty, but That’s Life

Extracting and purifying DNA is routine now, but the results are not particularly aesthetic.

5h

Addiction Treatment Gap Is Driving A Black Market For Suboxone

This medicine to treat opioid addiction is hard to come by — only a fraction of doctors can prescribe it. So some people trying to quit a heroin habit are turning to the black market for help. (Image credit: Craig F. Walker/The Boston Globe/Getty Images)

5h

First SpaceX mission with astronauts set for June 2019: NASA

NASA has announced the first crewed flight by a SpaceX rocket to the International Space Station (ISS) is expected to take place in June 2019.

5h

NASA investigates Tropical Storm Kong-Rey's rainfall rates

The Global Precipitation Measurement mission or GPM core satellite passed over Tropical Storm Kong-Rey and analyzed the rates in which rain was falling throughout the storm.

5h

NASA looks at large Leslie lingering in Atlantic

NASA's Aqua satellite passed over the Central Atlantic Ocean and obtained infrared data on Leslie, now weakened to a large tropical storm.

5h

Alaskan carbon assessment has implications for national climate policy

Alaska's land mass is equal to the size of one-fifth of the continental United States, yet stores about half of the country's terrestrial—both upland and wetland – carbon stores and fluxes. The carbon is not only stored in vegetation and soil, but also in vital freshwater ecosystems even though lakes and ponds, rivers, streams, and springs only cover a small amount of landmass in Alaska.

5h

Is your brain ready for YouTube's new mini-player?

Technology On multi-tasking and the possible death of tabs. YouTube's new mini-player is likely to be a huge hit with viewers. But it could have surprising consequences.

5h

Novel use of NMR sheds light on easy-to-make electropolymerized catalysts

In the world of catalytic reactions, polymers created through electropolymerization are attracting renewed attention. A group of Chinese researchers recently provided the first detailed characterization of the electrochemical properties of polyaniline and polyaspartic acid (PASP) thin films. In AIP Advances, the team used a wide range of tests to characterize the polymers, especially their capacit

5h

'Turbidity currents' are not just currents, but involve movement of the seafloor itself

A new paper shows that turbidity currents in submarine canyons often involve large-scale movement of the seafloor. This discovery could help ocean engineers avoid damage to pipelines, communications cables, and other seafloor structures.

5h

Outpatient antibiotic overprescribing rampant

Clinicians prescribed antibiotics without an infection-related diagnosis nearly half of the time and one in five prescriptions were provided without an in-person visit, according to research being presented at IDWeek 2018. The study, which is the first to look at overall outpatient antibiotic prescribing, analyzed more than half a million prescriptions from 514 outpatient clinics.

5h

Musik på formel: Her er opskriften på et pophit

Bestemte elementer går igen i mange radiohits. Men ofte er god musik mere kompliceret end popnumre, siger forskere.

5h

Photos of the Week: Dairy Show, Beached Giant, Jet Suit

Yacht racing in Saint Tropez, the friendship of a dog and a goose in Turkey, Catalan independence protests in Spain, Comic Con in Manhattan, a black bear in Juneau, tsunami damage in Indonesia, Supreme Court confirmation drama in Washington, D.C., a volcanic eruption in Indonesia, and much more.

5h

New spheres trick, trap and terminate water contaminant

Scientists have enhanced micron-sized titanium dioxide particles to trap and destroy BPA, a contaminant in water with health implications. The robust particles can be recharged for reuse in water remediation.

5h

Gene signature predicts outcome after spinal cord injury

Scientists have determined a gene signature that is linked to the severity of spinal cord injury in animals and humans.

5h

Bag a job, bag your prey

How many jobs should an applicant consider before accepting the next job offer? Turns out the same decision-making process that goes into searching for a job also applies to hunters searching for prey, and the knowledge can be used in conservation.

5h

Intense nursing home rehab might do more harm than good

New research reveals a growing trend of potentially unnecessary—and harmful—high-intensity rehabilitation services for residents of nursing homes. This trend, which may be due to a desire to maximize reimbursement rates, is on the rise for patients in the last 30 days of life, indicating that these services may be interfering with appropriate end-of-life care. The findings appear in the Journal o

5h

Can a ‘Noah’s Ark’ save beneficial bacteria?

Researchers are calling for the creation of a global microbiota vault to protect the long-term health of humanity. Such a Noah’s Ark of beneficial germs would be gathered from human populations whose microbiomes antibiotics, processed diets, and other ill effects of modern society have not compromised. These factors have contributed to a massive loss of microbial diversity and an accompanying ris

5h

To celebrate NASA’s 60th birthday, 21 vintage photos from space

Space One small step for a man and his camera, one giant leap for photography. Beautiful frames from the Project Apollo Archive.

5h

The Pentagon Wants to Make an Army of Virus-Spreading Insects. Scientists Are Concerned.

The Pentagon wants to make an army of virus-spreading insects, theoretically to help with food security. But scientists are worried.

5h

‘Einstein’s Shadow’ explores what it takes to snap a black hole’s picture

The new book offers a behind-the-scenes look at the Event Horizon Telescope’s attempt to image a black hole.

5h

Take a Number: Amputations and Lacerations: Your Front Lawn Is a Jungle

As lawn-mowing season ends, scientists are toting up the injuries from recent years.

6h

UTMB develops a universal vaccine platform that's cheaper and shelf stable

Researchers at The University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston have developed less expensive way to produce vaccines that cuts the costs of vaccine production and storage by up to 80 percent without decreasing safety or effectiveness. The findings are currently available in EBioMedicine.

6h

Software may reveal new info on brain diseases and treatment

New software could help neuroscience researchers and clinicians understand more about the brain and find biomarkers for disease. The human brain contains about 90 billion neurons, but Stephanie Jones, an associate professor of neuroscience at Brown University, doesn’t let that staggering number faze her. She just released a user-friendly version of her new software tool to the public. The softwar

6h

The Apollo Breach Included Billions of Data Points

Sales intelligence firm Apollo left a "staggering amount" of exposed online, including 125 million email addresses and nine billion data points.

6h

Flu Season Length May Differ by City Size

Work suggests preparedness strategy should differ by location — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

6h

Denis Mukwege and Nadia Murad win Nobel Peace Prize for combating wartime sexual violence

Dr. Mukwege is a Congolese gynecologist who has helped to treat thousands of survivors of sexual violence. Murad is a 25-year-old Yazidi woman who was taken captive by ISIS militants in 2014. Both have sacrificed their own personal safety to speak out against wartime sexual violence, the Nobel committee said. The 2018 Nobel Peace Prize has been awarded to Dr. Denis Mukwege, a Congolese gynecologi

6h

New spheres trick, trap and terminate water contaminant

Rice University scientists enhance micron-sized titanium dioxide particles to trap and destroy BPA, a contaminant in water with health implications. The robust particles can be recharged for reuse in water remediation.

6h

An Unmistakable Sign Kamala Harris Is Running in 2020

The presidential-primary dam is bursting. Getting more serious about a 2020 run by the day, Kamala Harris has been reaching out to Democrats in Iowa to plan a trip there at the end of the month, according to people who know about the calls. The California senator is likely to spend the final weekend before the midterms in the home of the first caucuses, crossing a symbolic but unmistakably signif

6h

Raging Against the Rock-and-Roll Suicide

Amid rising suicide rates and a series of public figures killing themselves , what is the best way to talk about self-destruction? Experts counsel understanding for the victims of suicide and those they’ve left behind, more open conversations about mental health, and a resistance to glorifying or fixating on the act itself. But pop culture hasn’t followed those rules strictly: Netflix’s 13 Reason

6h

NASA investigates Tropical Storm Kong-Rey's rainfall rates

The Global Precipitation Measurement mission or GPM core satellite passed over Tropical Storm Kong-Rey and analyzed the rates in which rain was falling throughout the storm.

7h

Novel use of NMR sheds light on easy-to-make electropolymerized catalysts

In the world of catalytic reactions, polymers created through electropolymerization are attracting renewed attention. A group of Chinese researchers recently provided the first detailed characterization of the electrochemical properties of polyaniline and polyaspartic acid (PASP) thin films. In AIP Advances, the team used a wide range of tests to characterize the polymers, especially their capacit

7h

Keeping Women Safe Is a Radical Act

Confronting rampant misogyny and abuse is crucial in science and beyond — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

7h

Diverse Forests Capture More Carbon

Replanting forests with a mix of trees, rather than one species, will sequester more carbon dioxide — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

7h

Living organisms find a critical balance

Biologists know a lot about how life works, but they are still figuring out the big questions of why life exists, why it takes various shapes and sizes, and how life is able to amazingly adapt to fill every nook and cranny on Earth. An interdisciplinary team of researchers has discovered that the answers to these questions may lie in the ability of life to find a middle ground, balancing between r

7h

Part-organic invention can be used in bendable mobile phones

Engineers have invented a semiconductor with organic and inorganic materials that can convert electricity into light very efficiently, and it is thin and flexible enough to help make devices such as mobile phones bendable.

7h

Research affirms the power of 'we'

New research has greatly magnified the body of evidence asserting that the pronouns we use foretell good relationship outcomes.

7h

New details of HIV life cycle

The discovery of a small molecule that plays an important part of the HIV life cycle may lead to the development of new treatments for the virus.

7h

New cancer vaccine platform a potential tool for efficacious targeted cancer therapy

Researchers have discovered a solution in the form of a cancer vaccine platform for improving the efficacy of oncolytic viruses used in cancer treatment.

7h

Typical mutations in children of radar soldiers

The offspring of radar soldiers exposed to high doses of radiation during their service experience more genetic alterations than families without radiation exposure.

7h

Protein dynamics: Molecular machines at work

Researchers have used a special fluorescence-based imaging technique to track the shape changes that occur when pore proteins in the cell membrane export molecules into the extracellular medium.

7h

An 8-Year-Old Girl Pulled This 1,500-Year-Old Sword Out of a Swedish Lake

While spending the day near their summer home, Saga the reached into a lake and felt something hard and metallic greet her fingers.

7h

NASA looks at large Leslie lingering in Atlantic

NASA's Aqua satellite passed over the Central Atlantic Ocean and obtained infrared data on Leslie, now weakened to a large tropical storm.

7h

Cleaning procedure prevents therapy dogs from spreading MRSA to children with cancer

Therapy dogs help ease stress in young patients with cancer, but can spread methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), putting vulnerable kids at risk for a serious infection. Cleaning the dogs with special antibacterial shampoo and wipes reduces MRSA carriage and helps keep the kids safe, suggests a first-of-its-kind study presented at IDWeek 2018.

7h

New function of a key component in the immune system discovered

The complement proteins that circulate in our blood are an important part of our immune system. They help identify bacteria, viruses and other harmful organisms, making it easier for our white blood cells to find and neutralize dangerous microbes. Researchers have now discovered a previously unknown function of the central complement protein, C3, which describes how C3 regulates autophagy.

7h

Analytiker: Danmark også sårbar for teknologisk spionage

Spionchips kan være på størrelse med riskorn og nærmest umulige at finde i computerudstyr.

7h

Naloxone Retail Dispensing Is Up 70 Percent

Thirty years ago during the height of the United States’ HIV/ AIDS epidemic, the U.S. Surgeon General, C. Everett Koop, sent informational brochures on the disease to every American household. The campaign was effective in helping shift the debate from the moral politics of intravenous drug use to the importance of prevention, such as condom use, and medical care. “No one will require more suppor

7h

Senators Vote to Move Kavanaugh’s Nomination Forward

The Senate voted Friday morning to move Brett Kavanaugh’s nomination to the Supreme Court forward, but it’s still unclear whether Republicans have the votes to confirm President Trump’s nominee. Friday morning’s vote, which commenced around 10:35, is on cloture—that is, whether to close debate and move to the next stage of voting. While a senator can vote for cloture but still oppose the nominati

7h

7h

Energy-insecure New Yorkers face multiple health risks

Nearly one-third of Washington Heights residents surveyed report problems with lack of heat in the winter and/or paying their electric bills. The study by researchers at Columbia Mailman School of Public Health found these energy insecure New Yorkers were more likely to have breathing problems, mental health issues, and poor sleep.

7h

Alaskan carbon assessment has implications for national climate policy

A collection of articles in Ecological Applications provides a synthesis of the Alaska terrestrial and aquatic carbon cycle. These papers stem from efforts by the USGS, U.S. Forest Service, and university scientists to assess past and future carbon fluxes as mandated by congress.

7h

Cancer death disparities linked to poverty, lifestyle factors nationwide

Yale researchers have identified factors that may contribute to widening cancer death disparities among counties across the United States. These factors, which include both socioeconomic and behavioral traits, may provide public health experts with specific targets for potentially reducing cancer disparities, the researchers said.

7h

Health insurer policies may discourage use of non-opioid alternatives for lower back pain

Public and private health insurance policies in the US are missing important opportunities to encourage the use of physical therapy, psychological counseling and other non-drug alternatives to opioid medication for treating lower back pain, a study led by researchers at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health has found.

7h

Could treating psoriasis in the future be as easy as going online?

New research from the Keck School of Medicine of USC finds that an online care delivery model is equivalent to in-person care for improving psoriasis symptoms.

7h

American hospitals make it too hard for patients to access medical records

Many top hospitals in the United States are making it unduly confusing or expensive for patients to gain access to their own medical records, say researchers at Yale. Their study appeared on Oct. 5 in JAMA Network Open.

7h

Study examines processes to request patient medical records in US Hospitals

Patients can face barriers when trying to obtain their medical records and a study of top-ranked US hospitals suggests noncompliance with federal and state regulations regarding certain aspects of medical records request processes and discrepancies in information provided to patients may contribute.

7h

Scientists get the drop on the cell's nucleus

A team of physicists has devised a novel strategy that uses naturally occurring motions inside the human cell nucleus to measure the physical properties of the nucleus and its components. The method offers a potential new means for illuminating the physical properties of unhealthy cells, such as those linked to Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease.

7h

Depression strongly linked to opioid-related deaths

A new study finds a strong link between the depression and opioid-related deaths. Nearly one in 12 adults in the US is depressed and opioid-related deaths are skyrocketing. “For every additional 1 percent of the population that has a depression diagnosis, we see between a 25 and 35 percent increase in the number of opioid overdose deaths,” says Laura Schwab Reese, an assistant professor of health

7h

Hundreds of physicists condemn sexist talk at CERN on women in physics

Following a talk by Alessandro Strumia at particle physics lab CERN that sparked outrage about sexism, hundreds of researchers have rallied together to push back against his claims

7h

How should we control the power to genetically eliminate a species?

The power to re-engineer or eliminate wild species using a “gene drive” needs to be brought under international governance, say Simon Terry and Stephanie Howard

7h

IVF success boosted by drug that helps embryos implant in the womb

Women given a drug that increases blood flow to the womb have a significantly higher chance of giving birth through IVF

7h

Conquer your fear of public speaking by practising in virtual reality

Practising public speaking in virtual reality lets people confront their fears in a safe environment and become more confident in front of real-life audiences

7h

Sticker Design Contest: Entries Due October 15

With just about two weeks left to enter our second annual Sticker Design Contest, there’s still plenty of time to submit your design (if you haven’t already)! The Dana Foundation is calling on artists, graphic designers, illustrators, and brain enthusiasts alike to come up with their own version of an image that captures the essence of our global Brain Awareness Week initiative to promote the pro

8h

Nanoscale pillars as a building block for future information technology

Researchers propose a new device concept that can efficiently transfer the information carried by electron spin to light at room temperature — a stepping stone towards future information technology.

8h

Sink traps are surprising source of antibiotic-resistant bacteria in ICU

During a nationwide outbreak of healthcare-associated infections of an antibiotic-resistant bacteria, a hospital traced repeated infections of patients in its intensive care unit (ICU) to an unexpected source — sink traps.

8h

Neil deGrasse Tyson has an unexpected reaction to Trump's Space Force

The astrophysicist and author Neil deGrasse Tyson discusses why he wanted a Space Force for decades. He doesn't think just because Trump proposed it that the Space Force is "a crazy idea". Tyson sees important non-military functions for the branch. Showing a willingness to put his love and respect for space above politics, Neil deGrasse Tyson came out in support of the Space Force. This sixth bra

8h

The toxins of our past still threaten the future of killer whales

Animals The EPA banned PCBs 40 years ago, but they're not going anywhere. A family of chemicals banned more than 30 years ago is still making it difficult for killer whales around the world to have babies.

8h

Scientists get the drop on the cell's nucleus

A team of physicists has devised a novel strategy that uses naturally occurring motions inside the human cell nucleus to measure the physical properties of the nucleus and its components. The method, which reveals that human nucleoli behave as liquid droplets, offers a potential new means for illuminating the physical properties of unhealthy cells, such as those linked to Alzheimer's and Parkinson

8h

Neural Cell Culturing Guide

Download this guide from R&D Systems to learn the fundamental techniques and protocols for successfully isolating, culturing, and expanding specific cell types from the rodent central and peripheral nervous systems!

8h

Researchers discover how fatal biofilms form

By severely curtailing the effects of antibiotics, the formation of organized communities of bacterial cells known as biofilms can be deadly during surgeries and in urinary tract infections. Yale researchers have just come a lot closer to understanding how these biofilms develop, and potentially how to stop them.

8h

Researchers discover how fatal biofilms form

By severely curtailing the effects of antibiotics, the formation of organized communities of bacterial cells known as biofilms can be deadly during surgeries and in urinary tract infections. Yale researchers have just come a lot closer to understanding how these biofilms develop, and potentially how to stop them.

8h

Lunar craters named in honor of Apollo 8

The newly named craters are visible in the foreground of the iconic Earthrise colour photograph taken by astronaut William Anders. It depicts the moment that our shiny blue Earth came back into view as the spacecraft emerged out of the dark from behind the grey and barren Moon. This is arguably the most famous picture taken by Apollo 8. It became iconic and has been credited with starting the envi

8h

The secrets of spider venom | Michel Dugon

Spider venom can stop your heart within minutes, cause unimaginable pain — and potentially save your life, says zoologist Michel Dugon. As a tarantula crawls up and down his arm, Dugon explains the medical properties of this potent toxin and how it might be used to produce the next generation of antibiotics.

8h

Lunar craters named in honor of Apollo 8

The Working Group for Planetary System Nomenclature of the International Astronomical Union has today officially approved the naming of two craters on the Moon to commemorate the 50th anniversary of the Apollo 8 mission. The names are Anders's Earthrise and 8 Homeward.

8h

Bag a job, bag your prey

How many jobs should an applicant consider before accepting the next job offer? Turns out the same decision-making process that goes into searching for a job also applies to hunters searching for prey, and the knowledge can be used in conservation.

8h

Flertal for ny københavnsk ø – men havnetunnelen vækker kritik

Et flertal i Københavns borgerrepræsentation støtter plan om at etablere en ny ø og lade grundsalg finansiere ny metro. Men idéen om at bygge en havnetunnel som led i projektet møder bekymring og kritik.

8h

Bag a job, bag your prey

How many jobs should an applicant consider before accepting the next job offer? Turns out the same decision-making process that goes into searching for a job also applies to hunters searching for prey, and the knowledge can be used in conservation.

8h

The Atlantic Hires Amanda Mull as Staff Writer Covering Health

Amanda Mull is joining The Atlantic as a staff writer and will cover health across a range of topics, including the beauty and nutrition industries. She begins with The Atlantic later this month and joins at a time when The Atlantic is expanding its editorial team. As The Atlantic’s editor in chief Jeffrey Goldberg and editor of TheAtlantic.com Adrienne LaFrance wrote to staff today when announci

8h

Studies needed on impact of cannabis use on puberty

Samaan and his research team at McMaster set out to find studies on boys and girls under age 18 with exposure to recreational or medicinal cannabis. The use of cannabis included smoked, ingested and other modes of exposure to cannabis products.

8h

Gene signature predicts outcome after spinal cord injury

Scientists have determined a gene signature that is linked to the severity of spinal cord injury in animals and humans, according to a study in the open-access journal eLife.

8h

Education improves decision-making ability, study finds

A new study led by Hyuncheol Bryant Kim, assistant professor of policy analysis and management at Cornell University, found that education can be leveraged to help enhance an individual's economic decision-making quality or economic rationality.

8h

New details of HIV life cycle

The discovery of a small molecule that plays an important part of the HIV life cycle may lead to the development of new treatments for the virus.

8h

New measuring technique can save pulp mills millions

New research at Karlstad University shows that pulp mills can save millions by using a new measuring technique. This new technique enables control of the pulping process, thus reducing the demand of chemicals, water and energy. This may yield positive environmental effects as well as improved pulp quality and increased production.

8h

This therapy works for women with past sexual trauma

Women who faced sexual abuse in childhood or adolescence benefit significantly from a kind of therapy that focuses on reducing psychological distress through resolving interpersonal conflicts and strengthening social relationships, according to a new study. These women constitute more than 20 percent of female patients in publicly funded community mental health centers. Researchers compared the r

8h

Chernobyl begins new life as solar power park

Ukraine launched Friday a park of photovoltaic panels at the former Chernobyl power plant as the country seeks to use solar power to give the scene of the world's worst nuclear disaster a new lease on life.

8h

Increasing the speed limit won't get the traffic moving faster

The UK should raise its motorway speed limit for cars and vans to 80mph as a way of increasing national productivity, a government minister recently suggested. It's a perennial political idea that has already been proposed and then ruled out by the government at least once in the past decade. Despite claims that the current 70mph limit is embedded in the national psyche, 48% of car drivers choose

8h

Explosive lies: How volcanoes can lie about their age, and what it means for us

Just like a teenager wanting to be older, volcanoes can lie about their age, or at least about their activities. For kids, it might be little white lies, but volcanoes can tell big lies with big consequences.

8h

New method measures single molecules from nanoliter of blood in real time

Scientists have designed a nanopore system that is capable of measuring different metabolites simultaneously in a variety of biological fluids, all in a matter of seconds. The electrical output signal is easily integrated into electronic devices for home diagnostics.

8h

Radio Atlantic: Remembering Ferguson with DeRay Mckesson

Four years ago, after a police officer shot and killed Michael Brown, protestors took to the streets of Ferguson, Missouri. Among them was a school administrator, always clad in a trademark blue vest. DeRay Mckesson, now a face of what became the Black Lives Matter movement, spoke in Washington this week at The Atlantic Festival. Mckesson recently authored a memoir: On the Other Side of Freedom:

8h

Why Flu Epidemics Work Differently in Big American Cities

A new paper highlights new and unique problems with how influenza moves through dense urban centers in the US.

9h

Nye transatlantiske guidelines for type 2-diabetes er klar

Arbejdsgruppe med dansk deltagelse er klar med nye fælles europæiske-amerikanske anbefalinger til behandling af type 2-diabetes.

9h

EASD vælger ny præsident

Oxford-professor David R. Matthews skal fra nytår kommer til at stå i spidsen for den internationale sammenslutning for forskning i diabetes.

9h

Forsker forbinder gener bag type 1- og type-2-diabetes

Steno-forsker har som den første vist, at der er en forbindelse mellem gener, der kan være med til at give type 1-diabetes, og gener, der kan være med til at give type 2.

9h

Genvariant er forbundet med betacellers overlevelse

Der er en sammenhæng mellen de insulinproducende betacellers overlevelsesevne og tilstedeværelsen af en bestemt variant af genet SKAP2.

9h

Glukosemønster er ikke styret af fedme-gener

Selv om overvægt er associeret med ens glukosemønster, er der ikke en sammenhæng mellem mønstret, som det tager sig ud ved en glukosetolerancetest, og ens genetiske prædisponering for fedme.

9h

Tesla's autopilot is better than you, statistically

When it's machine versus man, it's more likely you'll be exchanging insurance information with man, according to data released by the electric-car maker Tesla.

9h

Nobel Peace laureates demand end to sexual violence in war

Raped after being forced into sexual slavery by the Islamic State group, Iraqi Nadia Murad did not succumb to shame or despair—she spoke out. Surgeon Denis Mukwege treated countless victims of sexual violence in war-torn Congo and told the world of their suffering. Together, they were awarded the Nobel Peace Prize on Friday for drawing attention to how rape and sexual abuse are used as weapons of

9h

Interdisciplinary study finds cell networks seek optimal point between stability and adaptiveness

Biologists know a lot about how life works, but they are still figuring out the big questions of why life exists, why it takes various shapes and sizes, and how life is able to amazingly adapt to fill every nook and cranny on Earth.

9h

How to make a lab-on-a-chip clear and biocompatible (with less blood splatter)

Microfluidic devices can take standard medical lab procedures and condenses each down to a microchip that can balance on top of a water bottle lid. A team from Michigan Technological University, studying chemical engineering, electrical engineering and materials science, streamline the design of microfluidic devices to be see-through to observe their inner workings. Using hair-thin tunnels and equ

9h

Protein dynamics: Molecular machines at work

Researchers from Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) in Munich have used a special fluorescence-based imaging technique to track the shape changes that occur when pore proteins in the cell membrane export molecules into the extracellular medium.

9h

Nanopore technology with DNA computing easily detects microRNA patterns of lung cancer

Researchers at Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology (TUAT) have developed a simple technique that allows detection of two independent microRNAs as an early diagnosis marker of Small Cell Lung Cancer (SCLC) , which is very aggressive. In this technique, they combined nanopore and DNA computing technologies as rapid and label-free detection. This method, therefore, could help to identify S

9h

New cancer vaccine platform a potential tool for efficacious targeted cancer therapy

Researchers at the University of Helsinki have discovered a solution in the form of a cancer vaccine platform for improving the efficacy of oncolytic viruses used in cancer treatment.

9h

How the brain learns during sleep

Researchers from Ruhr-Universität Bochum and the University of Bonn have investigated which activity patterns occur in the brain when people remember or forget things. They were interested in how the brain replays and stores during sleep what it had learned before. The team recorded the brain activity of epilepsy patients who had electrodes implanted into their brain for the purpose of surgical pl

9h

Sink traps are surprising source of antibiotic-resistant bacteria in ICU

During a nationwide outbreak of healthcare-associated infections of an antibiotic-resistant bacteria, an Israeli hospital traced repeated infections of patients in its intensive care unit (ICU) to an unexpected source — sink traps, according to a study published today in Infection Control & Hospital Epidemiology, the journal of the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America.

9h

Typical mutations in children of radar soldiers

The offspring of radar soldiers exposed to high doses of radiation during their service experience more genetic alterations than families without radiation exposure. This has been demonstrated in a pilot study by the research team involving Charité-Universitätsmedizin Berlin, the Berlin Institute of Health (BIH), the Max Delbrück Centre for Molecular Medicine, Radboud University Nijmegen (Netherla

9h

The Insane Physics of Airbags

In a collision, a car's airbag has a tiny fraction of a second in which to inflate—which is why airbags use explosives.

9h

Cassini's Death Dive into Saturn Reveals Weird Ring "Rain" and More

The spacecraft’s final observations are turning up a wealth of bizarre, unexpected phenomena — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

9h

Could an artificial intelligence be considered a person under the law?

Humans aren't the only people in society – at least according to the law. In the U.S., corporations have been given rights of free speech and religion. Some natural features also have person-like rights. But both of those required changes to the legal system. A new argument has laid a path for artificial intelligence systems to be recognized as people too – without any legislation, court rulings o

9h

Improving poplar biomass production under stress conditions

Inside the phytotron, rows of white industrial cabinets hide the life expected in a greenhouse. A peek through a square viewing port, however, reveals the green energy growing inside the bright chamber. These specific poplar saplings may not survive the hardships of prolonged droughts and heat waves, but they are helping a team of researchers make ones that can.

9h

Research affirms the power of 'we'

A healthy relationship starts with the word "we."

9h

Budgeting is tedious. These tricks make it easier.

DIY Clever ways to take control of your spending. Sticking to a budget is hard…because it’s just so boring . To help curb your spending, we collected a few offbeat tricks to keep you on track.

9h

Learning is a complex and active process that occurs throughout the life span, new report says

A new report from the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine highlights the dynamic process of learning throughout the life span and identifies frontiers in which more research is needed to pursue an even deeper understanding of human learning.

9h

Reusable water-treatment particles effectively eliminate BPA

Rice University scientists have developed something akin to the Venus' flytrap of particles for water remediation.

9h

New function of a key component in the immune system discovered

The complement proteins that circulate in our blood are an important part of our immune system. They help identify bacteria, viruses and other harmful organisms, making it easier for our white blood cells to find and neutralise dangerous microbes. Researchers at Lund University in Sweden have now discovered a previously unknown function of the central complement protein, C3, which describes how C3

9h

The urban training intervention increases physical activity in COPD patients

Increasing physical activity in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a key strategy — and a major challenge — in the fight against this respiratory disorder. According to a study published in European Respiratory Journal, the Urban Training intervention for COPD patients designed by the Barcelona Institute for Global Health (ISGlobal) — an institution supported by 'la C

9h

How has children's body image changed over time?

Results from a Chinese nationwide survey indicate that the prevalence of childhood overweight/obesity nearly tripled from 6.5 percent to 16.8 percent from 2000-2011, but children's perception of being fat remained at 2 percent. The findings are published in Obesity.

9h

Domesticated dogs weren't man's only best friend

For centuries dogs and humans have developed close relationships, that in many cases, have solidified each other as family. The close bond between humans and domesticated dogs can be traced back to some of New Mexico's earliest settlers. But what interests anthropologists at The University of New Mexico is whether or not these dog were in fact what we consider dogs.

9h

Painting a clearer picture of the heart with machine learning

Coronary artery disease (CAD) is a condition in which plaque forms on the walls of coronary arteries, causing them to narrow. Eventually, this could lead to a heart attack, or death. This condition is now the single largest health problem in the world, with over one million people in the US undergoing cardiac catheterization – where a stent is placed in the artery to prevent blockage – each year.

9h

Elephants and ivory – protecting the world's largest land mammal

In the run-up to the forthcoming illegal wildlife trade conference in London, Fauna & Flora international (FFI) has made a point of shining the spotlight on some of the neglected casualties of wildlife crime, from lizards and lansan trees to seahorses and sturgeon. But this passion for pangolins and other less well-publicised victims of large-scale poaching and trafficking doesn't preclude us from

9h

Even drinking a little each day ups your risk of early death

Drinking a daily glass of wine for health reasons may not be so healthy after all, a new study suggests. Analyzing data from more than 400,000 people ages 18 to 85, the researchers found that consuming one to two drinks four or more times per week—an amount current guidelines deem healthy—increases the risk of premature death by 20 percent, compared with drinking three times a week or less. The i

9h

Forsyningsselskab: Beboere er selv skyld i kloakoversvømmelser

Interview: Dispensationer til at udlede regnvand i spildevandsledningen er ikke skyld i Esbjerg-oversvømmelser, siger det ansvarlige forsyningsselskab. Skylden ser ud til at ligge hos grundejere, der uden tilladelser leder regnvand ud med spildevandet.

9h

Skal psykologi og terapi spille en større rolle i psykiatrien?

I stedet for at tale fagpolitik, burde vi tale om hvad vi vil med psykiatrien. I Norge har man god erfaring med, at psykologspecialister og psykiatere deler behandlingsansvaret. Det er trygt for patienterne, og det sikrer, at man får hele mennesket med.

9h

A copper bullet for tuberculosis

In a new study, chemists report a new antibiotic that can find and kill tuberculosis bacteria where they hide.

9h

Anil Seth: How Does Your Brain Construct Your Conscious Reality?

When we look around, it feels like we're seeing an objective reality. But neuroscientist Anil Seth says everything we perceive, from objects to emotions, is an act of informed guesswork by the brain. (Image credit: Bret Hartman / TED)

9h

Research shows there are benefits from getting more three-year-olds into preschool

On Thursday, the Labor party pledged an additional A$1.75 billion for early education if elected the next government of Australia. This is the largest investment in early childhood education in Australian history.

9h

On-chip excitation of nanodiamonds embedded in plasmonic waveguides

Quantum emitters can be integrated in monolithic nanoscale plasmonic circuitry via low-loss plasmonic configurations to confine light well below the diffraction limit. In integrated quantum plasmonics, waveguides based on surface plasmon polariton (SPP) modes that propagate electromagnetic waves along metal-dielectric or metal-air interfaces are superior to dielectric-based (and therefore diffract

9h

Venom Is the Strangest Romantic Comedy of the Year

It takes a frustratingly long time for the title character of Venom to speak. The first 45 minutes of Ruben Fleischer’s film tell a straightforward superhero origin story (despite the poster’s angry proclamation that “ the world has enough superheroes ”). Eddie Brock (Tom Hardy) is an investigative journalist in San Francisco asking probing questions about the preening space-tech CEO Carlton Drak

9h

Chemo may be the new weapon malaria drugs need

Researchers have uncovered how the frontline antimalarial drug, artemisinin, works and are now working on a promising chemotherapy-based compound to treat patients. Scientists derived artemisinin from wormwood and developed the drug in China during Mao Zedong’s rule. It has saved millions of lives, but scientists are engaged in a constant game of cat-and-mouse with malaria, searching for ways to

9h

Medieval Germans Riddled with Tapeworms

Archaeologists peek into the past by prodding preserved human poo.

9h

Species-rich forests store twice as much carbon as monocultures

Species-rich subtropical forests can take up twice as much carbon as monocultures. This has been reported by an international research team in Science. The study was carried out as part of a unique field experiment with forests grown specifically for this purpose in China. Data from plots with a total of over 150,000 trees were analyzed. The results speak in favor of using many different tree spec

9h

Nanoplatform developed with three molecular imaging modalities for tumor diagnosis

Nanotechnology and biotechnology are bringing us increasingly closer to personalised cancer treatment. With proven effectiveness in mice, the JANUS hybrid nanoplatform developed by a team of researchers from the Complutense University of Madrid (UCM) incorporates three types of molecular medical imaging to locate and diagnose solid tumours, thereby increasing the sensitivity, resolution and specif

9h

Part-organic invention can be used in bendable mobile phones

Engineers at The Australian National University (ANU) have invented a semiconductor with organic and inorganic materials that can convert electricity into light very efficiently, and it is thin and flexible enough to help make devices such as mobile phones bendable.

9h

Research affirms the power of 'we'

New research at UC Riverside has greatly magnified the body of evidence asserting that the pronouns we use foretell good relationship outcomes.

9h

Living organisms find a critical balance

Biologists know a lot about how life works, but they are still figuring out the big questions of why life exists, why it takes various shapes and sizes, and how life is able to amazingly adapt to fill every nook and cranny on Earth. An interdisciplinary team of researchers at ASU has discovered that the answers to these questions may lie in the ability of life to find a middle ground, balancing be

9h

Genome of Japanese insect delicacy sheds light on history of the earth

Japanese scientists have shed light on the evolutionary biology and distribution of Stenopsyche caddisflies, also known as sedge flies, a common insect in Japanese rivers, and a local delicacy. The discovery also identified new genetic lineages among previously recognized species. Their findings were published online in Freshwater Science on July 18th.

9h

Harassing females lowers reproduction rates and reduces population size

Males and females mate to produce offspring, but their relationships are not always cooperative. The conflict between the sexes when they behave selfishly can be negative for the whole group. A group of Japanese researchers found that when males of a species compete, the burden this places on females can cause a drop in reproductive ability and a decrease in population size. These findings were pu

9h

Construction of Europe's exoplanet hunter PLATO begins

The construction of ESA's PLATO mission to find and study planets beyond our solar system will be led by Germany's OHB System AG as prime contractor, marking the start of the full industrial phase of the project.

9h

Are joint custody and shared parenting a child's right?

Many families with children separate all around the world. In France, for instance, nearly 200,000 children per year are affected by the divorce of their parents. After divorce, just over seven out of ten children (73%) live only with their mother and visit their father on alternate weekends. This phenomenon begs the question of the short- and long-term fate of these children, particularly in ligh

9h

Social media's impact in an English language classroom

Somali refugees from the civil war had access to very few functioning schools during wartime, followed by long waits in refugee camps before resettlement in the United States. This has resulted in a high incidence of low print literacy among many Somali adolescents in Minnesota.

9h

Danskudviklet flydende havmøllefundament skal demonstreres i Norge

Shell, tyske Innogy SE samt Siemens Gamesa investerer nu millioner i en fuldskala-demonstration af Henrik Stiesdals flydende havmølle-koncept ud for den norske kyst ved Stavanger.

9h

Sjællands Universitetshospital nedlægger 350 stillinger

Som led i et omfattende sparerunde nedlægger Sjællands Universitetshospital 350 stillinger, herunder 100 vakante. Det vides endnu ikke, hvor mange der bliver fyret, siger hospitalsdirektør.

10h

Personer med type 1-diabetes bliver ofte fejldiagnosticeret med type 2-diabetes

Hvis personer bliver diagnosticeret med type 2-diabetes efter 30-årsalderen, kan der ofte være tale om, at de i stedet har type 1-diabetes, viser ny forskning.

10h

Using personal data to predict blood pressure

Engineers used wearable off-the-shelf technology and machine learning to predict an individual's blood pressure and provide personalized recommendations to lower it based on this data.

10h

Researchers develop combined data model to better evaluate for mild cognitive impairment

A new study has shown that by combining imaging and neuropsychological testing, one can more accurately assess the cognitive status of individuals.

10h

Potential treatment could stop knee and spine osteoarthritis, scientists say

Researchers have developed a novel therapeutic treatment that has the potential to stop knee and spine osteoarthritis in its tracks.

10h

European badgers' gut bacteria may be a powerful ally in the fight against tuberculosis

Researchers look at novel ways to reduce TB spillover from European badgers to cattle in the midst of an outbreak.

10h

Anthropologist rewrites history using science, art

Art often imitates life, but when an anthropologist and a geologist investigated a 2000-year-old carved statue on a tobacco pipe, he exposed a truth he says will rewrite art history.

10h

Specialized Men's Turbo Levo Comp Review: A Pedal-Assist Mountain Bike That Dominates the Trails

An off-road e-bike that's as beastly on the single-track as it is on paper.

10h

SpaceX Plans to Land Its First Rocket on California Soil

This Sunday, SpaceX intends to launch a Falcon 9, with a souped-up block 5 booster, from Vandenberg Air Force Base.

10h

Study links individual HPV types to HIV infection

An international research team led by a UC Riverside scientist has for the first time identified individual types of the human papillomavirus, or HPV, that are specifically linked to HIV infection. The study concludes that a person with any HPV type, more than one HPV type, or high-risk HPV is more likely to acquire HIV. The study found the following HPV types are linked to HIV: HPV16, 18, 31, 33,

10h

How to make a lab-on-a-chip clear and biocompatible (with less blood splatter)

Lab-on-a-chip devices harness electrical signals to measure glucose, tell apart blood type and detect viruses or cancer. But biological samples need hafnium oxide for protection from the electric fields.

10h

Nanoscale pillars as a building block for future information technology

Researchers from Linköping University and the Royal Institute of Technology in Sweden propose a new device concept that can efficiently transfer the information carried by electron spin to light at room temperature — a stepping stone towards future information technology. They present their approach in an article in Nature Communications.

10h

The Inner Life of Cats

If you have ever wondered why your cat behaves the way it does, wonder no more — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

10h

Part-organic invention can be used in bendable mobile phones

Engineers at ANU have invented a semiconductor with organic and inorganic materials that can convert electricity into light very efficiently, and it is thin and flexible enough to help make devices such as mobile phones bendable.

10h

Education improves economic rationality, study finds

There has been sustained interest across behavioral and social sciences – including psychology, economics and education – in whether people are born to be rational decision-makers or if rationality can be enhanced through education.

10h

Building sea walls is a small Band-aid on a gaping wound

The Kingscliff seawall, in the Tweed Shire in northern New South Wales, is an engineering marvel. It is 300 metres long and 6 metres deep, with a projected cost of between A$3 million and A$5 million. Its depth enables it to be covered in sand. When beach erosion occurs, the wall's large concrete steps should, in theory, allow the public to carry on using and enjoying the waterfront.

10h

Why I'm not surprised Nobel Laureate Donna Strickland isn't a full professor

Donna Strickland, an associate professor at the University of Waterloo in Canada, was awarded the 2018 Nobel Prize in physics. The third woman to have ever been awarded this prize in 117 years, she shares it with Arthur Ashkin and Gérard Mourou.

10h

Seawater breakthrough in production of climate-friendly fuel bioethanol cuts demands on freshwater

In the fight against global warming, bioethanol fuel is seen as a climate-friendly alternative to petrol and its adoption has been encouraged by many governments. But producing it requires huge amounts of freshwater – a precious resource in many parts of the world. Now, scientists at the University of Huddersfield have shown how it is possible to use a seawater-based system instead.

10h

Why does concrete swell and crack?

Unfortunately, concrete does not last forever. The ravages of time also take their toll on concrete structures in Switzerland. Not only are reinforced structures like bridges affected, but also concrete buildings without any reinforcement, such as dam walls. One cause is referred to as the alkali-aggregate reaction (AAR). It can affect all concrete structures in open air.

10h

Stop teaching kids how to be happy, says education expert

A leading educational psychologist is urging schools to stop thinking of wellbeing as another subject to be taught. Instead she is urging them to create healthier schools where students naturally develop wellbeing and a love of learning.

10h

Thicker plant leaves may make climate change worse

Plants with thicker leaves may exacerbate the effects of climate change, according to a new study. That’s because they would be less efficient in sequestering atmospheric carbon. Plant scientists have observed that when levels of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere rise, most plants do something unusual: They thicken their leaves. And since human activity is raising atmospheric carbon dioxide levels

10h

"New Second Line" | Camille A. Brown

Inspired by the events of Hurricane Katrina in 2005, Camille A. Brown choreographed "New Second Line," a celebration of the culture of New Orleans and the perseverance of Black people in the midst of devastation. The performance borrows its name from the energetic, spirited people who follow the traditional brass band parades for weddings, social events and, most notably, funerals in New Orleans.

10h

Flexible piezoelectric acoustic sensors for speaker recognition

A KAIST research team led by Professor Keon Jae Lee from the Department of Material Science and Engineering has developed a machine learning-based acoustic sensor for speaker recognition.

10h

Even small gifts boost business

If a sales agent brings their customer a small gift, the customer is much more likely to make a purchase, a study by the university of Zurich has shown. This works particularly well when the person receiving the gift is the boss. The fact that even small gifts can result in conflicts of interest has implications for the debate about where the line should be drawn between tokens of appreciation and

10h

A new era in the quest for dark matter

Since the 1970s, astronomers and physicists have been gathering evidence for the presence in the universe of dark matter: a mysterious substance that manifests itself through its gravitational pull. However, despite much effort, none of the new particles proposed to explain dark matter have been discovered. In a review that was published in Nature this week, physicists Gianfranco Bertone (UvA) and

10h

Dust is far from the least of our worries as we plan to colonize Mars, book says

The stuff we call "dirt" or "soil" or "earth" on Earth is known as "regolith" on the moon and Mars, but dust is dust wherever you go.

10h

How to stop workers from being exploited in the gig economy

Hot on the heels of the gig economy company Foodora shutting up shop in Australia amid accusations about its labour abuses, a Senate Committee report has recommended more robust laws to protect gig economy workers. But this doesn't go far enough.

10h

First results from Cassini's final mission phase show protons of extreme energies between the planet and its dense rings

Approximately one year ago, a spectacular dive into Saturn ended NASA's Cassini mission—and with it a unique, 13-year research expedition to the Saturnian system. In the mission's last five months, the probe entered uncharted territory again: Twenty-two times, it plunged into the almost unexplored region between the planet Saturn and its innermost ring, the D ring. On Friday, 5 October 2018, the j

10h

Test determines individuals likeliest to shed DNA at crime scenes

Modern DNA forensic science is capable of analysing microscopic genetic traces inadvertently left at crime scenes.

10h

A new take on kangaroo evolution

A pair of researchers at Flinders University has found evidence that suggests modern kangaroos diversified due to grassland expansion, not drying during the Miocene, as previous studies have shown. In their paper published in the journal Science, Aidan Couzens and Gavin Prideaux describe their study of marsupial tooth specimens that date back 25 million years and what they found. P. David Polly wi

10h

Groundbreaking science emerges from ultra-close orbits of Saturn

New research emerging from the final orbits of NASA's Cassini spacecraft represents a huge leap forward in our understanding of the Saturn system—especially the mysterious, never-before-explored region between the planet and its rings. Some preconceived ideas are turning out to be wrong while new questions are being raised.

10h

The early universe was a fluid quark-gluon plasma

Scientists from the Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, and their colleagues from the international ALICE collaboration recently collided xenon nuclei, in order to gain new insights into the properties of the Quark-Gluon Plasma (the QGP) – the matter that the universe consisted of up to a microsecond after the Big Bang. The QGP, as the name suggests, is a special state consisting of th

10h

Genome sequencing of two Red Sea bacteria highlights their potential as industrial workhorses

Analyses of two bacterial strains in the Red Sea show they are enriched with gene clusters with potential to activate the synthesis of a wide range of industrially useful compounds, from novel antibiotics, anticancer agents and pigments to those useful for crop protection and the food industry.

10h

Bizarre video of Nobel physics laureate Gérard Mourou surfaces

Mourou and a colleague shown dancing in a lab surrounded by female students, some of whom do a striptease When Donna Strickland was announced this week as physics’ first female Nobel laureate in 55 years, it appeared progress was afoot in the field. But a bizarre video that has resurfaced on YouTube featuring another of this year’s physics laureates, Gérard Mourou, suggests enlightenment may be y

10h

Study focused on improving radiation treatment for cancers in pet dogs

Can scientists improve cancer treatment for man's best friend?

10h

Do I have a cold or the flu?

Ask Us Anything One infectious illness comes on slow, the other hits you like a truck. Cooler air also signals the start of the inevitable cold and flu seasons that run rampant through close-packed classrooms, and circulate back out to parents and…

10h

What you need to know about the big UN climate report out next week

A special report on limiting global warming to 1.5°C will be published on Monday, but draft versions have already been leaked. Get caught up on why it matters

10h

Why Men Sexually Harass Women

I can’t imagine my teenage self—or any girl I knew—doing anything like what Christine Blasey Ford described teenage boys doing to her. Watching the Senate Judiciary Committee’s hearing last week, I was struck by the feeling that the Brett Kavanaugh she described and I both went to something called “high school,” but they were about as similar as a convent is to Space Camp. Ford has alleged that w

10h

The Strange Allure of Pioneer Living

Andy Friedman Running late after several wrong turns, I made a final, desperate attempt to locate Shaye Elliott’s home by driving into what appeared to be an apple orchard. Down a dirt path, past a gaggle of squawking geese, in the shadow of the town’s 10-story cross, there it was: the two-acre property outside Wenatchee, Washington, on which Elliott cultivates nearly all the food she feeds herse

10h

Datacenter på vej ved Esbjerg: Ingen planer for overskudsvarmen

Et erhvervsareal uden for Esbjerg skal huse et stort datacenter – angiveligt for Facebook. Men kommunen og Esbjergs Fjernvarme har ingen planer for at genanvende overskudsvarmen.

10h

Ulighed afgørende for indlæggelser med hjertesygdom

Dårligt stillede patienter med diabetes ender oftere på hospitalet med hjerte-kar-problemer, og fald i tilfælde af hjerte-kar-sygdomme over det seneste årti, har det ikke ændret på den socioøkonomiske uligevægt for diabetespatienter.

11h

Gender diversity is linked to research diversity

Women and girls are increasingly encouraged to pursue STEM careers, potentially leading to greater gender diversity within research organizations. While Stanford historian Londa Schiebinger sees that as a positive step, she wants those organizations to go further by also supporting the changes to research itself brought on by the greater diversity.

11h

Onewheel+ XR Review: Dangerously Fun

Onewheel's latest board is more for action sports enthusiasts than casual commuters.

11h

Online Conspiracy Theories: The WIRED Guide

Everything you need to know about George Soros, Pizzagate, and the Berenstain Bears.

11h

The NHS is revolutionising cancer treatment. Let’s back its mission | Iain Foulkes

Biotherapeutics are a great leap forward. Now proper funding is needed to fulfil their potential Theresa May’s announcement this week of a renewed NHS focus on diagnosing cancers earlier was warmly welcomed here at Cancer Research UK. Early detection and diagnosis is a key priority for us. A clear government ambition that within a decade 75% of cancer patients should be diagnosed at an early stage

11h

Image of the Day: “Ringing” Coral Reefs

Algae on the reefs make a sound when they produce gas bubbles.

11h

Image: Eastern U.S.

The Copernicus Sentinel-3 satellite takes us over eastern US. Spanning a huge area, including the states of Ohio, Maryland, West Virginia and Delaware, a number of major cities can be seen in this true-colour image. The megacity of New York is visible in the top right. A megacity is defined by the United Nations as a city with a population of over ten million. According to the latest estimates the

11h

Orbital Forensics Hint at Sun's Long-Lost Planet

Clues hidden in today’s orbits reveal the violent origins of the solar system—and, just maybe, a rogue giant kicked out long ago — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

11h

New bio-inspired dynamic materials transform themselves

Scientists have been searching for ways to develop materials that are as dynamic as living things, with the ability to change shape, move and change properties reversibly.

11h

New method measures single molecules from nanoliter of blood in real time

University of Groningen scientists, led by Associate Professor of Chemical Biology Giovanni Maglia, have designed a nanopore system that is capable of measuring different metabolites simultaneously in a variety of biological fluids, all in a matter of seconds. The electrical output signal is easily integrated into electronic devices for home diagnostics. The results were published in Nature Commun

11h

The weight is over: will kilograms get an upgrade? – Science Weekly podcast

On 16 November, scientists vote on whether to update the way we measure the kilogram. This week, Ian Sample investigates the history of the metric system, and finds out how universal constants might now make it more robust On 16 November, scientists will vote on whether or not to update the way we measure the kilogram and three other base units. Currently the kilogram is defined by a cylinder of

11h

Species-rich forests store twice as much carbon as monocultures

Species-rich subtropical forests can take up, on average, twice as much carbon as monocultures. An international research team with the involvement of the University of Zurich has evaluated data from forests grown specifically for this purpose in China with a total of over 150,000 trees. The results speak in favor of using many tree species during reforestation.

11h

Observations challenge cosmological theories

Recent observations have created a puzzle for astrophysicists: Since the Big Bang, fewer galaxy clusters have formed over time than were actually expected. Physicists from the university of Bonn have now confirmed this phenomenon. For the next three years, the researchers will analyze their data in even greater detail. This will put them in a position to confirm whether the theories considered val

11h

Broad genetic variation on the Pontic-Caspian Steppe

The genetic variation within the Scythian nomad group is so broad that it can only be explained by the group assimilating people it came in contact with. This is shown in a new study on Bronze and Iron Age genetics of the Pontic-Caspian Steppe, situated in the Black Sea region. The article is published in the scientific journal Science Advances.

11h

Neutrons scan magnetic fields inside samples

With a newly developed neutron tomography technique, an HZB team has mapped for the first time magnetic field lines inside materials at the BER II research reactor. Tensorial neutron tomography promises new insights into superconductors, battery electrodes and other energy-related materials.

11h

Cryptography techniques to screen synthetic DNA could help prevent the creation of dangerous pathogens

In 2016, synthetic biologists reconstructed a possibly extinct disease, known as horsepox, using mail-order DNA for around $100,000. The experiment was strictly for research purposes, and the disease itself is harmless to humans. But the published results, including the methodology, raised concerns that a nefarious agent, given appropriate resources, could engineer a pandemic. In an op-ed publishe

11h

Kalorielette sødemidler forstyrrer tarmbakterierne

Nyt studie viser, at kalorielette sødemidler forstyrrer tarmbakterierne og leder til dårligere blodsukkerkontrol blandt raske mennesker.

11h

Eksperter advarer mod tobaksindustriens alternativ til cigaretter

Tobaksindustrien har lanceret ’varm tobak’ som et mindre skadeligt alternativ til almindelig cigaretter. Lungelæger og sundhedseksperter tror ikke på, at produktet er mindre skadeligt end cigaretter og advarer om, at det kan forhindre rygere i at droppe tobakken helt.

11h

Unødvendige indlæggelser koster sygehuse otte mia. hvert år

Hvert år bruger hospitalerne otte mia. kr. på indlæggelser, der kunne være undgået. »Penge lige ud af vinduet,« lyder det fra sundhedsministeren.

11h

Philip Morris: Varm tobak er sandsynligvis mindre skadelige end cigaretter

Forskningschef for Philip Morris forstår skepsis over for tobaksindustriens forskningsresultater, men fastholder at ’varm tobak’ er bedre end almindelige cigaretter.

11h

Sundhedsordførere er uenige om ’varm tobak’

Liselotte Blixt fra Dansk Folkeparti mener, at ’varm tobak’ har fordele, mens Flemming Møller Mortensen fra Socialdemokratiet »meget skeptisk«.

11h

The weight is over: will kilograms get an upgrade? – Science Weekly podcast

On 16 November, scientists vote on whether to update the way we measure the kilogram. This week, Ian Sample investigates the history of the metric system, and finds out how universal constants might now make it more robust

11h

The Business of Slavery and Sugar in Cuba, 1868

Innovation and discovery as chronicled in Scientific American — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

11h

Why Cases of UTIs Increase During Summer: It May Really Be the Weather

Cases of urinary tract infections (UTIs) spike every summer, and now a new study suggests why: It may really be the weather.

11h

Find out how outrageously weird octopuses are – take our quiz

They have multiple brains, amazing camouflage abilities and are surprisingly intelligent. But there’s plenty more you might not know about these alien creatures

11h

People in Chile are currently evolving the ability to digest goat milk

Most Europeans have a genetic mutation that allows adults to digest milk, but it is less common elsewhere. Now it is spreading through Chile, and we don't know why

11h

Seaweed-powered trucks—hope or hype?

Seaweed has long been touted for its potential as a sustainable ingredient for biofuels, green chemicals and biodegradable materials, but scaling up production to industrial levels in a way that maintains its environmental credentials is proving a real challenge for scientists.

11h

Adults Can Get Homesick, Too

Travis Wannemuehler hasn’t lived in his home—well, his parents’ home—in seven years. At 24, he’s checked all the boxes of an independent, successful young adulthood: He has a social life, an apartment, and a job that pays the bills. And, like other adults his age, he has pangs of wanting to go home before realizing he’s in his home. He’s homesick. A swirl of emotions such as nostalgia, anxiety ,

11h

'Venom' Review: A Bad Movie With Great Cult-Movie Potential

Ultimately, it fails because it doesn't know which one it wants to be.

11h

We're Destroying the Sea—But It Could Save Us From Ourselves

A new review looks at more than 1,000 studies of potential oceanic solutions to climate change. A good idea? Wind energy. Maybe not so good? Loading the sea with iron.

11h

A new ultrafast laser emits pulses of light 30 billion times a second

A new technique allows lasers to pulsate at a higher rate than ever before.

12h

What It Means When Scientists Disagree

Often, there’s an underlying divergence about what aspect of a theory matters most — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

12h

Vigorous Chiropractic Adjustment Associated with Potentially Serious Eye Injury

Can vigorous adjustment of the neck cause direct injury to your eye? Probably, but I don't know. This is based on a single case report. Still, I wouldn't take the chance. And why do I keep mentioning dugongs?

12h

Why Are There So Few Female Leaders?

A gender gap persists across fields, but women are more likely to be perceived as leaders after longer interactions — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

12h

Macbooks går i sort efter reperation uden særlig service-software

Hvis man ikke bruger den rigtige diagnose-software til reparationer af nye MacBook Pro computere, vil computeren lukke ned. Det viser dokumenter som Apples autoriserede service-leverandører har modtaget.

12h

Ny ø skal klimasikre København og betale ny havnetunnel og metro

Regeringen og Københavns Kommune vil indvinde 2 mio. m2 land til en ny bydel ud for Refshaleøen. Grundsalg og indskud fra private grundejere skal finansiere havnetunnel og metro og sikre byen mod oversvømmelser

12h

Sweden's 'true queen', 8, pulls ancient sword from lake

Saga Nevecek discovers 1,500-year-old sword while skimming stones An eight-year-old girl has pulled a 1,500-year-old sword from a lake in southern Sweden. “I felt something with my hand and at first I thought it was a stick,” Saga Nevecek told the local Värnamo Nyheter newspaper . “Then it had a handle that looked like it was a sword, and then I lifted it up and shouted: ‘Daddy, I found a sword!’

12h

Hundreds of tonnes of UK hospital waste piles up including human limbs

A huge backlog of NHS hospital waste has been revealed in a leaked report. It is believed to include pharmaceutical waste and a small number of amputated limbs

12h

How to be a better leader: Offer guidance, not instruction

Good leadership means making your team or students feel that anything is possible, says Robert Langer, head of Langer Lab at MIT Department of Chemical Engineering. Langer speaks from his life experience, which has shown him that positive reinforcement is the best way to get people to work smarter and harder. Knowing the answers isn't everything; good leaders also know how to ask important questi

12h

Amazon dumps "stealth tax" on unsuspecting warehouse workers

Previous to the announced increase in minimum wage to $15/hr., warehouse workers were eligible for production bonuses and stock awards. Those will be terminated when the wage is increased. Amazon claims it's a net gain for the workers, but others disagree. CEO Jeff Bezos still makes $30,000 a minute. Net positive, or not so much? Following the announcement earlier this week of Amazon increasing w

12h

New 'animative' backpack can play games, signal cyclist turns

The Pix backpack features a built-in screen that displays customizable messages and animations. Pix is currently available for pre-order on Kickstarter for $199 and is expected to deliver in January 2019. Pix raises questions about the future of wearable technology, especially in terms of advertising potential. A California-based company called PIX will soon release a backpack that can display an

12h

6 ways to be good: What's behind moral behavior?

Lawrence Kohlberg, a famous psychologist, developed this framework to categorize how people think about morality. These six stages progress from the simplistic to the complex. Generally, as people age, they progress through the stages, although some unpleasant individuals get stuck. Although quantifying morality is challenging and the framework isn't perfect, spending more time to think about wha

12h

Women are more productive than men at work these days

Women complete 10 percent more office work than men. Gender divisions persist between women and men at work. New study reveals some habits we need to break. There are certainly measures by which we've barely made any progress on gender equality in the workplace. There remains a "pink tax" that has women still making 81.8 percent of what mean earn for the same work performed by men. And there's st

12h

Judge blocks first planned hunt of Yellowstone grizzly bears in over 40 years

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service exceeded its authority in taking the grizzly bear off the endangered species list. At the end of September, a judge restored federal protections of grizzly bears. Watch: Live webcams stationed in the wild let you see bears moving through their natural habitat. None At the end of September, U.S. District Judge Dana Christensen ordered the restoration of federal p

12h

Airport security trays are dirtier than airport toilets, new study finds

Airport security trays carry pathogens that can cause respiratory illnesses. A recent study in Helsinki confirms that TSA security check points are the most-likely place to "catch something." In light of the research, airport trays might eventually be replaced with self-cleaning ones. None This isn't exactly a case of scrolling through TSA's Instagram account to see what sort of things someone tr

12h

USA ranked 27th in the world in education and healthcare—down from 6th in 1990

The American healthcare and education systems are known to need some work, but a new study suggests we've fallen far in comparison to the rest of the world. The findings show what progress, if any, 195 countries have made over the last twenty years The study suggests that economic growth is tied to human capital, which gives a dire view of America's economic prospects. The concept of human capita

12h

Ineffective leaders too often repeat their past.

Ineffective leaders mistakenly expect past victories to translate into new situations. By forcing their previous culture into new environments, they create ineffective cultures. Canadian researchers suggest that leaders need to treat their current role as it is, not as it's been previously. None What makes a leader great? There is no shortage of explanations. One recent example can be found in Ra

12h

Mitch McConnell’s Legacy Is Riding on Kavanaugh’s Confirmation

Picture this: Massachusetts Avenue in Washington, D.C. Early July 2017, a punishing 86 degrees. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell walking alongside his wife, Elaine Chao. His casual comment to her, overheard by a reporter : “I’d really like to get that Kennedy slot.” Now picture this, one year and three months later. It is Friday morning, and McConnell is up early to prepare for the vote to

12h

Trump Chose to Be Silent on Kavanaugh

Forty minutes into Thursday night’s “Make America Great Again” rally in Minnesota, after all the claims of historic greatness, the ritual chanting (“Drain the swamp”), the harping about “fake news,” and the gratuitous insults hurled at Congresswoman Maxine Waters , it was pretty clear President Trump simply wasn’t going there. He wended his oratorical way several times to the “radical Democrats”

12h

The Guardrails Have Failed

The Republican-controlled Senate appears poised to confirm a Supreme Court justice who believes in presidential immunity to criminal investigation . He was hand-picked by a president whose wealth was inherited through tax fraud , whose former personal attorney has implicated him in a federal crime , and who is the focus of an ongoing investigation into a foreign attack on American democracy . For

12h

The FBI Investigation Didn’t Go Very Far By Design

The FBI found itself at the center of another political firestorm on Thursday as the findings from its supplemental background investigation of the Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh were made available to all 100 senators. By late morning, top Republicans and Democrats had already reached vastly different conclusions about the FBI report, which the bureau concluded after four days without int

12h

What an Audacious Hoax Reveals About Academia

Over the past 12 months, three scholars—James Lindsay, Helen Pluckrose, and Peter Boghossian—wrote 20 fake papers using fashionable jargon to argue for ridiculous conclusions, and tried to get them placed in high-profile journals in fields including gender studies, queer studies, and fat studies. Their success rate was remarkable: By the time they took their experiment public late on Tuesday, sev

12h

M.I.A.’s Critique of Wokeness

M.I.A. wants to talk foreign policy. I called up the 43-year-old pop star Maya Arulpragasam last Friday to talk about Matangi/Maya/M.I.A. , Stephen Loveridge’s fascinating documentary about her life. But she immediately brought up the latest news about her birth nation, Sri Lanka, which her family of ethnic Tamils fled amid civil war when she was 10. “I am in New York City, down the road from the

12h

Regeringen lover parkeringsgaranti til el-biler

Væk med begrænsningerne på rabat til elbiler og ind med krav om, at alle med en elbil er sikret en parkeringsplads med opladning. Sådan lyder det nu fra regeringen.

13h

Læge modtager Nobels Fredspris

Læge Denis Mukwege deler Nobels Fredspris med Nadia Murad for deres kamp mod seksuel vold.

13h

Forskere vil spotte tidlige tegn på blodprop i hjertet og hjertestop

Et nyt projekt mellem Region Nordjylland og Hovedstaden skal sikre, at patienter med tegn på blodprop i hjertet og hjertestop hurtigere bliver behandlet.

13h

Medie: Kina har installeret spionchips i Apples og CIAs computere

Ekspert kalder det sort magi, men de ramte virksomheder nægter kategorisk, at kineserne har placeret spionudstyr i over 7.000 computere.

13h

Hør ugens podcast om minedrift på havets bund og SpaceX’ Mars-raket

Råstofselskaber er klar til at høste guld, kobber og andre mineraler på bunden af klodens oceaner. SpaceX afslører en række opsigtsvækkende designændringer for Big Falcon Rocket og dens Mars-færd.

13h

Nej, man skal ikke politianmelde læger per automatik

Det afgørende er, om der er grundlag for at gå til politiet med en sag – ikke om Styrelsen for Patientsikkerhed gør, som den har fået besked på af en minister. Ellen Trane Nørbys løfter endte som en tynd kop the.

13h

Why the Wilder Storms? It’s a ‘Loaded Dice’ Problem

Global warming is bringing an era of wilder, more dangerous rains. The good news is that we’re getting better at evacuating flood zones. The bad news is everything else.

13h

New method measures single molecules from nanoliter of blood in real time

University of Groningen scientists, led by Associate Professor of Chemical Biology Giovanni Maglia, have designed a nanopore system that is capable of measuring different metabolites simultaneously in a variety of biological fluids, all in a matter of seconds. The electrical output signal is easily integrated into electronic devices for home diagnostics. The results were published in Nature Commun

13h

Forsvarsminister: Vi skal sætte navn og adresse på cyberangribere

Forsvarets Efterretningstjeneste skal fortælle mere åbent, hvem der angriber danske virksomheder, offentlige myndigheder og ministerier i cyberspace. Sådan lyder det fra forsvarsminister Claus Hjort Frederiksen(V)

14h

Saltvandsfyldt ballon ved hjertekirurgi mindsker risiko for blodpropper i hjernen

Aalborg Universitetshospital er det første i Danmark til at indføre en teknik, som kan reducere risikoen for blodpropper i hjernen i forbindelse med hjerteoperationer.

14h

Vietnam makes fresh ivory, pangolin haul from Nigeria

Vietnam has seized eight tonnes of pangolin scales and elephant ivory shipped from Nigeria, police said Friday, the second such haul in a week in a country which both consumes and trafficks huge volumes of endangered African wildlife.

14h

More than 100 baby turtles reported stolen on Galapagos islands

A total of 123 baby giant turtles have been stolen from a breeding facility in the Galapagos islands, a lawmaker from Ecuador's prized archipelago in the Pacific told AFP.

14h

China tech stocks Lenovo, ZTE tumble after chip hack report

Chinese tech stocks Lenovo Group and ZTE Corp. tumbled in Hong Kong on Friday following a news report Chinese spies might have used chips supplied by another company to hack into U.S. computer systems.

14h

Alge-produktion på land skal erstatte soja

Forskere og industri vil inden for tre år være klar med et dyrkningskoncept, der kan erstatte dele af den problematiske sojaimport. Ifølge forskerne er der tale om et ’Keep It Simple Stupid'-projekt.

15h

Charity urges aid for sinking cities

Governments must provide "major" investment in flood risk reduction to save coastal cities around the world, a charity said Friday, as rising seas and sinking urban areas pose unprecedented threats to millions of homes.

15h

Australia farmers welcome rain relief amid severe drought

Farmers in drought-stricken parts of Australia are celebrating after the heavens opened up this week, inundating parched lands with more than a month's rain in one day following the country's driest September on record.

16h

Lenovo shares pummelled in Hong Kong after microchip report

China's Lenovo led a sharp tech sell-off in Asia on Friday after a report said Beijing had used microchips inserted in US computer goods as part of a drive to steal technology secrets.

16h

Toyota announces new recall of 2.4 million hybrid cars

Japanese car giant Toyota said Friday it is recalling more than 2.4 million hybrid cars over a fault that could cause crashes, just a month after an another recall affecting hybrids.

16h

Spanish cities grapple with invasion of electric scooters

Cities across Spain are grappling with electric scooters that have popped up on sidewalks across the country, helping riders zip around but exasperating drivers and pedestrians.

16h

Publisher drops Tronc name, reverts to Tribune Publishing

The US newspaper group known as Tronc announced Thursday it was reverting back to its old name Tribune Publishing, two years after a rebranding effort that drew widespread derision.

16h

'Real' fake research hoodwinks US journals

Three US researchers have pulled off a sophisticated hoax by publishing fake research with ridiculous conclusions in sociology journals to expose what they see as ideological bias and a lack of rigorous vetting at these publications.

16h

Tesla's Musk mocks US agency just days after settling with it

Less than a week after settling fraud charges with the US Securities and Exchange Commission, Tesla Chief Executive Elon Musk on Thursday derided the agency on Twitter.

16h

Columbia postdoctoral researchers vote to unionize

Some 2,000 postdoctoral researchers and associate research scientists at Columbia University have voted for representation by the United Auto Workers.

16h

New effort will analyze genes of endangered Northwest orcas

A new scientific effort will sequence the genomes of critically endangered Pacific Northwest orcas to better understand their genetics and potentially find ways to save them from extinction.

16h

Samsung Electronics flags record Q3 operating profit

Samsung Electronics Friday forecast a record operating profit of 17.5 trillion won ($15.4 billion) in the third quarter led by solid demand for its memory chips.

16h

New EASD-ADA consensus guidelines on managing hyperglycaemia in type 2 diabetes launched at EASD meeting

Following a review of the latest evidence –including a range of recent trials of drug and lifestyle interventions — the European Association for the Study of Diabetes (EASD) and the American Diabetes Association (ADA) have produced an updated consensus statement on how to manage hyperglycaemia (high blood sugar) in patients with type 2 diabetes.

16h

Vietnam's children and the fear of climate change

Children's drawings of nightmarish scenarios illustrate climate change's impact in the Mekong Delta.

16h

Nye dataprincipper om børn gør ingen forskel: For nemt at fortsætte 'uhæmmet' indsamling

Undervisningsministeriet: Dataetiske principper berører ikke trivlselsmålinger.

17h

Flere danskere smittes med MRSA og andre multiresistente bakterier

Antallet af alvorlige bakterieinfektioner er steget med næsten en tredjedel siden 2009. Det er især bekymrende, at flere smittes med multiresistente bakterier, mener overlæge.

17h

18h

Climate change apathy, not denial, is the biggest threat to our planet | Leo Barasi

The easy way to cut emissions – closing coal power stations – is exhausted. Now the public has to be convinced to make sacrifices Three years after world leaders signed the Paris climate agreement , we’re about to better understand what that deal means for how we live our lives. On Monday, a major report from the UN’s climate science panel will set out what it will take to limit global warming to

18h

Nu skal husdyrene fodres med dansk-dyrkede mikroalger

Et testforsøg skal vise, om bæredygtige mikroalger kan erstatte importeret sojaprotein, der i dag er landbrugtes foretrukne foder.

18h

Primary tropical forests are best but regrowing forests are also vital to biodiversity

Even after 40 years of recovery, secondary forests remain species and carbon-poor compared to undisturbed primary forests, a new study reveals. However these secondary forests — forests regrowing in previously deforested areas — are still vitally important to biodiversity conservation and carbon storage, argue scientists.

18h

Digital marketing exposure increases energy drink usage among young adults

Energy drinks represent a new category of nonalcoholic beverage with global sales of over $50 billion. Containing caffeine as a main ingredient, energy drinks are a central part of partying and sporting culture. A new study published in the Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior found that digital marketing of energy drinks was more persuasive with young adults than other marketing methods.

18h

Detecting fake news, at its source

A machine learning system aims to determine if a news outlet is accurate or biased.

18h

What you can't see can hurt you

Engineers conducted a study to determine if homeowners change the way they live if they could visualize the air quality in their house.

18h

Weight loss drug shows positive effect on diabetes

A new study has found that lorcaserin decreased risk for diabetes, induced diabetes remission and reduced risk of diabetes complications in obese and overweight patients.

18h

Diet rich in fried and processed foods linked to increased hypertension in black Americans

New findings suggest that diet is a major contributor for the increased risk of hypertension in black compared to white Americans.

18h

25 UK species' genomes sequenced for first time

The newly sequenced genomes will enable research into why some brown trout migrate to the open ocean, whilst others don't, or investigations into the magneto receptors in robins' eyes that allow them to 'see' the magnetic fields of the Earth. The genomes could also help to shed light on why red squirrels are vulnerable to the squirrel pox virus, yet grey squirrels can carry and spread the virus wi

18h

Mineindustrien jagter metaller og mineraler på havets bund

Under klodens oceaner gemmer sig store rigdomme, og råstofselskaber står klar til at udvinde dem. Men miljøorganisationer advarer.

20h

Beer Fermentation Hops Along

The bittering agents called hops have enzymes that chew up starch and unleash more fermentable sugar—which can boost alcohol and CO2 in the finished brew. Christopher Intagliata reports. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

21h

Caution urged over use of 'carbon unicorns' to limit warming

Using technologies to keep global temperature rise below 1.5C is "crazy" but may be the only way.

21h

Fast fashion is harming the planet, MPs say

The industry is blamed for damaging the environment, fuelling climate change and polluting water.

22h

How malaria infection activates natural killer cells

Malaria-infected red blood cells trigger the immune system's first line of defense by releasing small vesicles that activate a pathogen recognition receptor called MDA5, according to a new study.

22h

Common genetic toolkit shapes horns in scarab beetles

Horns have evolved independently multiple times in scarab beetles, but distantly related species have made use of the same genetic toolkit to grow these prominent structures, according to a new study.

22h

New DNA tool predicts height, shows promise for serious illness assessment

A new DNA tool can accurately predict people's height, and more importantly, could potentially assess their risk for serious illnesses, such as heart disease and cancer.

22h

Every cell has a story to tell in brain injury

Traumatic head injury can have widespread effects in the brain, but now scientists can look in real time at how head injury affects thousands of individual cells and genes simultaneously in mice. This approach could lead to precise treatments for traumatic brain injury (TBI).

22h

Elon Musk Isn’t Done Tweeting Yet

Over the weekend, Elon Musk and Tesla settled a lawsuit with the Securities and Exchange Commission over a tweet that federal regulators said misled the electric-car company’s investors and agitated financial markets. The agreement compels Musk to step down from his role as chairman of Tesla’s board for three years, but allows him to remain as CEO. It instructs Musk and Tesla to each pay $20 mill

22h

Our 25 Favorite Features From the Past 25 Years

From an epic account of the online drug market Silk Road, to a poignant tale about a man seeking intimacy with his robot clone, these stories will blow your mind. Again.

22h

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23h

Latin may help students bridge their native language with English

Researchers found that in teaching English learners — students who aren't fluent in English and often come from homes where a language other than English is spoken — the Latin roots of words helped them problem solve the meaning of unfamiliar words.

23h

Neutrons scan magnetic fields inside samples

With a newly developed neutron tomography technique, researchers have been able to map for the first time magnetic field lines inside materials at the BER II research reactor. Tensorial neutron tomography promises new insights into superconductors, battery electrodes, and other energy-related materials.

23h

Tarragon supplements may make healthy women gain weight

Russian tarragon and bitter melon supplements may be less helpful for women than men when it comes to combating metabolic syndrome, whose symptoms include high blood sugar, high blood pressure and excess fat around the waist, a new study suggests.

23h

Gas stations vent far more toxic fumes than previously thought

A study examined the release of vapors from gas station vent pipes, finding emissions were 10 times higher than estimates used in setback regulations used to determine how close schools, playgrounds, and parks can be situated to the facilities.

23h

Fungus provides powerful medicine in fighting honey bee viruses

A mushroom extract fed to honey bees greatly reduces virus levels, according to a new paper. In field trials, colonies fed mycelium extract showed a 79-fold reduction in deformed wing virus and a 45,000-fold reduction in Lake Sinai virus compared to control colonies. The hope is that the results of this research will help dwindling honey bee colonies fight viruses that are known to play a role in

23h

Cassini revealed three big surprises before diving into Saturn

Before the Cassini spacecraft melted away in Saturn’s atmosphere, it hurtled between the planet and its rings 22 times – and made some strange discoveries

23h

The Atlantic Daily: Still Alive

What We’re Following Does He Have the Votes?: As of Thursday evening, Brett Kavanaugh looks to be on the brink of a seat on the Supreme Court. Whatever the outcome, both parties make a case for how the bad result for their party might invigorate their midterms support. An ugly confirmation process has radiating consequences. Christine Blasey Ford, Kavanaugh, and their families have reportedly fac

23h

Synthetic DNA-encoded checkpoint inhibitor antibodies advance cancer immunotherapy

Scientists demonstrate for the first time that through engineering constructs, they can express DNA-encoded monoclonal antibodies (DMAbs) targeting CTLA-4, an important cancer checkpoint molecule that blocks anti-cancer immunity.

23h

Gram-negative bacteria increase mortality, vasopressor use and ICU admission

Alterations to the respiratory microbiome have been identified as a predisposing factor of interstitial lung diseases (ILD). In a new study, researchers studied the influence of bacterial virulence on clinical outcomes patients hospitalized with ILD patients. The authors found that the use of immunosuppressive medications or antifibrotics had no influence on the outcomes including development of r

23h

Neanderthal healthcare practices crucial to survival

Researchers investigated the skeletal remains of more than 30 individuals where minor and serious injuries were evident, but did not lead to loss of life. The samples displayed several episodes of injury and recovery, suggesting that Neanderthals must have had a well-developed system of care in order to survive.

23h

Decoding the regulation of cell survival: A major step towards preventing neurons from dying

Researchers have decoded the regulatory impact on neuronal survival of a small non-coding RNA molecule, so-called miRNA, at the highest resolution to date.

23h

Greenhouse Gas Emissions From Plastics Are Predicted to Rise

A predicted rise in emissions from the petrochemical industry, led by plastics producers, threatens to erode climate benefits from reductions in other sectors, according to a report.

1d

Tesla's Autopilot Report Makes Big Safety Claims With Little Context

Tesla's report finds drivers using Autopilot crash nearly seven times less often than the general population, but safety experts aren't convinced.

1d

When it Comes to Autonomous Cars, the Department of Transportation Says ‘Drivers’ Don’t Have to Be Human

And that’s really great news for the humans developing self-driving trucks.

1d

AI could predict cognitive decline leading to Alzheimer's disease in the next five years

A team of scientists has successfully trained a new artificial intelligence (AI) algorithm to make accurate predictions regarding cognitive decline leading to Alzheimer's disease.

1d

The homing instinct of relocated snakes

A new study on the effects of relocating adders due to development has found that males will disperse from their release site — with one even going so far as to return to his original home.

1d

Vitamin D supplements don't help bone health, major study concludes

Biggest ever review of evidence recommends the government ditch its advice to take them throughout winter Vitamin D supplements do nothing for bone health and the government should ditch its advice that everyone should take them throughout the winter months, according to the authors of the biggest review of the evidence ever carried out. The findings challenge the established view of vitamin D an

1d

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