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Nyheder2018oktober08

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Final call to save the world from 'climate catastrophe'UN Climate Change Report

Top scientists from around the world urge changes "in all aspects of society" to limit climate warming.

15h

FN udgiver vigtig klima-rapport: Her er fire vigtige punkter

Det er den vigtigste rapport i flere år. Og der er håb, siger Jesper Theilgaard, men vi gør slet ikke nok

12h

FN's klimapanel: Der skal handles hurtigt nu

Ny rapport fra FN’s klimapanel, IPCC, peger på de ændringer, vi allerede mærker. Drastiske samfundsforandringer er nødvendige for at nå målet.

10h

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How your brain is like a film editor

A brain structure called the hippocampus may slice our continuous existence into discrete chunks that can be stored as memories.

4min

Rumspejl og kunstige vulkaner: Her er 6 bud på ekstreme klimaløsninger

Desperate omstændigheder kræver desperate løsninger. Her er nogle af de teknologiske vidundere som måske kan gøre en forskel i kampen mod klimaforandringerne.

10min

Imagining Space Colonization, From Mars, Pennsylvania to the Red Planet

People around the world are itching to colonize Mars—should they be?

13min

For more energy, wind turbines should go with the airflow

Researchers have developed new ways to improve the productivity of wind farms. You’ve probably seen them, perhaps on long road trips: wind turbines with enormous, hypnotic rolling blades, harnessing the clean power of wind for conversion into electric energy. What you may not know is that for the explosion in the number of wind turbines in use as we embrace cleaner sources of energy, these wind f

20min

Mystery of Saturn's moon Titan's atmospheric haze

Experiments have helped scientists to zero in on a low-temperature chemical mechanism that may help to explain the complex molecular compounds that make up the nitrogen-rich haze layer surrounding Titan, Saturn's largest moon.

37min

When yesterday's agriculture feeds today's water pollution

Water quality is threatened by a long history of fertilizer use on land, scientists find.

37min

There's a better way to decipher DNA's epigenetic code to identify disease

A new method for sequencing the chemical groups attached to the surface of DNA is paving the way for better detection of cancer and other diseases in the blood. These chemical groups mark one of the four DNA 'letters' in the genome, and it is differences in these marks along DNA that control which genes are expressed or silenced.

37min

Route to flexible electronics made from exotic materials

Engineers have developed a technique to fabricate ultrathin semiconducting films made from a host of exotic materials other than silicon. To demonstrate their technique, the researchers fabricated flexible films made from gallium arsenide, gallium nitride, and lithium fluoride — materials that exhibit better performance than silicon but until now have been prohibitively expensive to produce in fu

37min

Small-brained female guppies aren't drawn to attractive males

Female guppies with smaller brains can distinguish attractive males, but they don't recognize them as being more appealing or choose to mate with them, according to a new study. The study adds weight to the link between mate preference and cognitive ability.

37min

Jupiter’s moon Europa may have a belt of 15-metre-tall ice spikes

Landing on Jupiter’s moon Europa will be even harder than we thought due to a forbidding belt of huge ice spikes that could trap or incapacitate a spacecraft

37min

Naysayers rise to the top because we naturally treat them as leaders

Openly negative and critical people are often elected leaders, perhaps because we perceive their disregard for social niceties as a sign of power and independence

37min

Three people had their brains wired together so they could play Tetris

Three people played a game of Tetris using brain-reading caps. This is the first time several people have collaborated through brain-to-brain communication

37min

Study discovers how daytime naps help your brain

Researchers find that daytime naps help your brain deal with unconscious information. A short sleep can improve brain processing speed. Scientists looked at how subjects performed on tasks they were not consciously aware of. Maybe you knew this already, but daytime naps are good for you. But why exactly? A new study that measured changes in people's brains before and after naps found that there a

46min

Observing stroke recovery in mice may provide guide for humans

Scientists have observed genes responsible for helping mice recover from strokes. This could provide guidance for humans. Drugs could be developed to target these specific genes. None Scientists at Stanford Medicine recently observed that some mice recovered from strokes better than others, leading them to wonder whether or not they could find evidence that specific genes played a role in recover

46min

The economics of climate change and tech innovation win U.S. pair a Nobel

Climate change and tech innovations inspired the new Nobel Memorial Prize winners in Economic Sciences.

47min

Algorithm may tag perfect spot to split proteins

A computer-guided algorithm may help scientists find just the right spot to split a protein and then reassemble it, according to new research. Splitting a protein is a little like splitting an apple. But finding just the right spot—and being able to reassemble it to functionality—is a matter of trial and error. The new algorithm may change that. Scientists say it could bring them a step closer to

48min

Did you solve it? I've got a little (logical) list

The solutions to today’s puzzles In my puzzle column earlier today I set you the following two self-referential logic list problems ONE Continue reading…

49min

Let’s bring back the Sabbath as a radical act against ‘total work’

As a boy in late-1940s Memphis, my dad got a nickel every Friday evening to come by the home of a Russian Jewish immigrant named Harry Levenson and turn on his lights, since the Torah forbids lighting a fire in your home on the Sabbath. My father would wonder, however, if he were somehow sinning. The fourth commandment says that on the Sabbath 'you shall not do any work – you, your son or your da

55min

Sleep: how much do we really need?

The optimum amount of sleep is supposed to be eight hours a night. Why is shuteye so important – and what happens if we don’t get enough? “The only known function of sleep is to cure sleepiness,” the Harvard sleep scientist Dr J Allan Hobson once joked. This isn’t quite true, but the questions of why we spend about a third of our lives asleep and what goes on in our head during this time are far

1h

Intel's 2018 Core i9 CPU Offers High-End Performance for the MassesIntel Gen Core 9GC

The 9th generation of Intel's Core series helps firm up the foundation of the PC resurgence.

1h

Pottery gunk offers earliest sign of humans eating nutmeg

Researchers have discovered the earliest-known use of nutmeg in food. At an archaeological site on Pulau Ay, a small island in the Banda Islands, central Maluku, Indonesia, researchers found nutmeg residue on ceramic potsherds and estimate that it’s 3,500 years old—about 2,000 years older than the previously known use of the spice. People occupied the Pulau Ay archaeological site from 2,300 to 3,

1h

Can this money ethos help you obtain early retirement in your 30s?

An online culture of millennials is looking to min-max their finances to achieve financial independence and retire early. Called the FIRE movement, members aim to live lean and control their spending, an ethos catalyzed by Vicki Robin's work in the early '90s. Some are doubtful of the movement, arguing their strategies aren't exacting enough to be future proof or are a means for wealthy individua

1h

Golden blood: the rarest blood in the world

Fewer than 50 people worldwide have 'golden blood' — or Rh-null. Blood is considered Rh-null if it lacks all of the 61 possible antigens in the Rh system. It's also very dangerous to live with this blood type, as so few people have it. None Golden blood sounds like the latest in medical quackery. As in, get a golden blood transfusion to balance your tantric midichlorians and receive a free charco

1h

Gene editing in human embryos takes step closer to reality

Successful correction of genetic problems in mice before birth raises hopes of similar treatments for humans Gene editing to correct faulty DNA in human embryos has taken a step closer to becoming a reality, with scientists showing it is possible to correct genetic problems in mice before they are born. Researchers used a form of the gene-editing tool Crispr-Cas9 to introduce a mutation into a ge

1h

Regioner har sat prop i overlæge-ansættelser

Efter en årrække med solid vækst i antallet af overlæger, har Danske Regioner gjort en indsats for at begrænse antallet af de bekostelige overlæger. Overlægeforeningen bekymrer sig ikke over antal, men formand Lisbeth Lintz er ikke vild med metoden.

1h

Scientists present new clues to cut through the mystery of Titan's atmospheric haze

Experiments at Berkeley Lab have helped scientists to zero in on a low-temperature chemical mechanism that may help to explain the complex molecular compounds that make up the nitrogen-rich haze layer surrounding Titan, Saturn's largest moon.

1h

Neoadjuvant combination checkpoint blockade trial yields high response rates for patients with high-risk stage three melanoma

Combination checkpoint blockade before surgery (neoadjuvant therapy) produced a high response rate among patients with high-risk stage three melanoma, with nearly half having no sign of disease at surgery, but a high incidence of side effects caused the trial to be closed early.

1h

When yesterday's agriculture feeds today's water pollution

Water quality is threatened by a long history of fertilizer use on land, Canadian scientists find.

1h

There's a better way to decipher DNA's epigenetic code to identify disease

A new method for sequencing the chemical groups attached to the surface of DNA is paving the way for better detection of cancer and other diseases in the blood. These chemical groups mark one of the four DNA 'letters' in the genome, and it is differences in these marks along DNA that control which genes are expressed or silenced.

1h

Copper ions flow like liquid through crystalline structures

Materials scientists have sussed out the physical phenomenon underlying the promising electrical properties of a class of materials called superionic crystals through the investigation of CuCrSe2. A better understanding of such materials could lead to safer and more efficient rechargeable batteries than the current standard-bearer of lithium ion.

1h

Guided by CRISPR, prenatal gene editing used in treating congenital disease before birth

For the first time, scientists have performed prenatal gene editing to prevent a lethal metabolic disorder in laboratory animals, offering the potential to treat human congenital diseases before birth.

1h

Guided by CRISPR, prenatal gene editing shows proof-of-concept in treating disease before birth

For the first time, scientists have performed prenatal gene editing to prevent a lethal metabolic disorder in laboratory animals, offering the potential to treat human congenital diseases before birth. Published today in Nature Medicine, research from Children's Hospital of Philadelphia and the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania offers proof-of-concept for prenatal use o

1h

Genetic disease healed using genome editing

A team of researchers from ETH Zurich and the University Children's Hospital Zurich applied a newly developed editing tool to target and correct genetic mutations. By doing so, the researchers healed mice suffering from a genetic metabolic disorder that also affects humans.

1h

Getting a grip on the slow but unique evolution of sharks

Scientists at the RIKEN Center for Biosystems Dynamics Research (BDR) in Japan, in collaboration with other Japanese institutes and aquariums, have decoded the whole genomes of two shark species for the first time and improved the whale shark genome sequences released previously. By analyzing the genomes and comparing them with those of other vertebrate species, they have constructed an overview o

1h

Study opens route to flexible electronics made from exotic materials

MIT engineers have developed a technique to fabricate ultrathin semiconducting films made from a host of exotic materials other than silicon. To demonstrate their technique, the researchers fabricated flexible films made from gallium arsenide, gallium nitride, and lithium fluoride — materials that exhibit better performance than silicon but until now have been prohibitively expensive to produce i

1h

Study examines changes made at home after unintentional injuries to children

A research letter looked at how parents made changes at home after unintentional injuries sent children to emergency departments. In the study of 104 children (6 months to 7 years old) who experienced 123 injuries, falls at home were most common with most injuries to the head/neck/face area.

1h

Expanding fungal diversity, one cell at a time

Reported Oct. 8, 2018, in Nature Microbiology, a team led by researchers at the US Department of Energy (DOE) Joint Genome Institute (JGI), a DOE Office of Science User Facility, has developed a pipeline to generate genomes from single cells of uncultivated fungi. The approach was tested on several uncultivated fungal species representing early diverging fungi, the earliest evolutionary branches i

1h

Risk of attempted suicide among sexual minority adolescents

Adolescents who don't identify as heterosexual appear to have a greater risk of attempted suicide.

1h

USC scientists create new map of brain region linked to Alzheimer's disease

USC scientists complete exceptionally detailed map of the brain's memory bank, the hippocampus. Intricate insight into hippocampus' structure and function opens new opportunities to treat diseases such as Alzheimer's.

1h

Hispanic individuals benefit from skills-based stroke prevention intervention

A culturally tailored program used when discharging stroke patients from the hospital helped to lower blood pressure among Hispanic individuals one year later, finds a new study led by researchers at NYU College of Global Public Health. The almost 10 mm Hg reduction in systolic blood pressure measured in this study has been linked to a nearly 40-percent reduction in the risk of having another stro

1h

Columbia engineers build smallest integrated Kerr frequency comb generator

Optical frequency combs can enable ultrafast processes in physics, biology, and chemistry, as well as improve communication and navigation, medical testing, and security. Columbia Engineers have built a Kerr frequency comb generator that, for the first time, integrates the laser with the microresonator, significantly shrinking the system's size and power requirements. They no longer need to connec

1h

A new method to pinpoint genetic differences between species could benefit human health

There are mouse species with stark differences in longevity, immunity and susceptibility to cancer. But understanding the genetic basis of trait differences between species has been essentially impossible. Researchers detail a new method to do that work, with the goal of finding the genetic basis of those advantages and then to compare them with human genetics. Ultimately scientists want to design

1h

Implantable, biodegradable devices speed nerve regeneration in rats

Peripheral nerve injuries leave people with tingling, numbness and weakness in their arms, hands and legs. Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis and Northwestern have developed an implantable, bioabsorbable device that speeds recovery in rats by stimulating injured nerves with electricity.

1h

Researchers demonstrate first example of a bioelectronic medicine

Northwestern University and Washington University School of Medicine researchers have developed the first example of a bioelectronic medicine: an implantable, biodegradable wireless device that speeds nerve regeneration and improves healing of a damaged nerve. Their device delivered pulses of electricity to damaged nerves in rats after a surgical repair process, accelerating the regrowth of nerves

1h

Small-brained female guppies aren't drawn to attractive males

Female guppies with smaller brains can distinguish attractive males, but they don't recognize them as being more appealing or choose to mate with them, according to a new study by UCL and Stockholm University researchers.The study, published in Nature Ecology & Evolution, adds weight to the link between mate preference and cognitive ability.

1h

Previously unknown genetic aberrations found to be associated with Alzheimer's progression

Researchers from the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai and Columbia University conducted a large-scale analysis of RNA from postmortem brain tissue, identifying specific RNA splicing events associated with the progression of Alzheimer's disease that will serve as a new resource for Alzheimer's research.

1h

Gout drug may protect against chronic kidney disease

The drug allopurinol used to manage gout may offer protection against the development of kidney disease, according to a new study.

1h

Hurricane categories consider windspeed but ignore one of the deadliest effects

Environment The Saffir-Simpson Scale isn't working, but we can't abandon it. One of the scariest things you can hear before a hurricane hits is that someone won’t evacuate because the storm hasn’t hit a certain category yet.

1h

Buy, borrow or lease: Can we rethink how and when we access household products to tackle climate change?

The public is supportive of emissions reduction strategies that are likely to bring significant changes to the way we own and use everyday items such as clothing, cars, appliances and furniture, finds a new study led by Cardiff University.

1h

Cory Booker’s Four Standing Ovations in Des Moines

DES MOINES, Iowa—Cory Booker was supposed to get here on Thursday. Then it was moved to Friday. Then Saturday. He ended up on the ground about an hour before he was due onstage, straight from the Kavanaugh vote to the Iowa Democratic Party dinner, courtesy of a fast flight on a private plane that his aides were exhausted from working out logistics for and not at all eager to give details about. W

1h

Spiky ice spires may stud the equator of Jupiter’s moon Europa

Fields of jagged ice spires, if they exist, could affect where future spacecraft land on the Jovian moon.

1h

When yesterday's agriculture feeds today's water pollution

A study led by researchers at Université de Montréal quantifies for the first time the maximum amount of nutrients—specifically, phosphorus—that can accumulate in a watershed before additional pollution is discharged into downriver ecosystems.

1h

Scientists present new clues to cut through the mystery of Titan's atmospheric haze

Saturn's largest moon, Titan, is unique among all moons in our solar system for its dense and nitrogen-rich atmosphere that also contains hydrocarbons and other compounds, and the story behind the formation of this rich chemical mix has been the source of some scientific debate.

1h

Copper ions flow like liquid through crystalline structures

Materials scientists have sussed out the physical phenomenon underlying the promising electrical properties of a class of materials called superionic crystals. A better understanding of such materials could lead to safer and more efficient rechargeable batteries than the current standard-bearer of lithium ion.

1h

Expanding fungal diversity, one cell at a time

They can be found on forest floors, swamps and in houses, ranging in size from smaller than the period on your smartphone's keyboard to stretching over several city blocks. More than a million species of fungi are estimated to live on this planet, but most of that diversity remains unknown because the fungi have avoided detection and have not been cultured for study in laboratories.

1h

Cost-effective method produces semiconducting films from materials that outperform silicon

The vast majority of computing devices today are made from silicon, the second most abundant element on Earth, after oxygen. Silicon can be found in various forms in rocks, clay, sand, and soil. And while it is not the best semiconducting material that exists on the planet, it is by far the most readily available. As such, silicon is the dominant material used in most electronic devices, including

1h

A new method to pinpoint genetic differences between species could benefit human health

Why do naked mole rats live up to 31 years, when distantly related lab mice are lucky to make it to four? How is the aquatic axolotl capable of regenerating limbs, jaws, spines and even brains when frogs can only regrow tails as tadpoles? How can these difference be exploited for the benefit of human health?

1h

Engineers build smallest integrated Kerr frequency comb generator

Optical frequency combs can enable ultrafast processes in physics, biology, and chemistry, as well as improve communication and navigation, medical testing, and security. The Nobel Prize in Physics 2005 was awarded to the developers of laser-based precision spectroscopy, including the optical frequency comb technique, and microresonator combs have become an intense focus of research over the past

1h

Getting a grip on the slow but unique evolution of sharks

Scientists at the RIKEN Center for Biosystems Dynamics Research (BDR) in Japan, in collaboration with other Japanese institutes and aquariums, have decoded the whole genomes of two shark species for the first time and improved the whale shark genome sequences released previously. By analyzing the genomes and comparing them with those of other vertebrate species, they have constructed an overview o

1h

Small-brained female guppies aren't drawn to attractive males

Female guppies with smaller brains can distinguish attractive males, but they don't recognise them as being more appealing or choose to mate with them, according to a new study by UCL and Stockholm University researchers.

1h

A mysterious insulating phenomenon in a superconductor

Leiden physicist Milan Allan and his group have discovered an apparent paradox within a material that has zero electrical resistance. They report trapped charges, although charges should, in theory, keep flowing in the absence of resistance. The discovery could provide a missing piece of one of the big puzzles in physics today—high-temperature superconductivity. The results are published in Nature

1h

To make sense of A.I. decisions, ‘peek under the hood’

Now that humans have programmed computers to learn, we want to know exactly what they’ve learned and how they make decisions after their learning process is complete. The answers to such questions could shed light on our own decision-making processes. Kate Saenko, an associate professor of computer science at Boston University, asked humans to look at dozens of pictures depicting steps that the c

1h

I reported harassment and was silenced – and I’m a senior academic | Athene Donald

Universities must end the culture of tolerating bad behaviour and of valuing perpetrators more than their victims How many of us have contemplated the cost of speaking out against bad behaviour and thought, “no, it’s not worth it”? And how often as a result do perpetrators – great and small – get away with it? A Guardian investigation revealed that nearly 300 academics had been accused of bullying

2h

Facebook launches AI video-calling device 'Portal'Facebook Portal Amazon

Facebook on Monday launched a range of AI-powered video-calling devices, a strategic revolution for the social network giant which is aiming for a slice of the smart speaker market that is currently dominated by Amazon and Google.

2h

Economists Who Changed Thinking on Climate Change Win Nobel Prize

The ideas of William Nordhaus and Paul Romer have shaped today's policies on greenhouse gas emissions — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

2h

To Win a Nobel Prize in Science … Make Art?

To Win a Nobel Prize in Science … Make Art? For top scientists like James P. Allison, music and other artistic endeavors may be key to success. CheckPoints_cropped1.jpg James P. Allison plays the harmonica with his band, The CheckPoints. Image credits: Society for Immunotherapy of Cancer (SITC) Culture Friday, October 5, 2018 – 17:00 Nala Rogers, Staff Writer (Inside Science) — Nobel-prize-winni

2h

Novozymes-direktør om nobelpris i kemi: En teknologi, vi bare måtte have

Frances H. Arnold vandt i sidste uge nobelprisen i kemi for sit bidrag til 'directed evolution' af enzymer. Metoden har i dag vundet frem over alt – ikke mindst hos verdens største enzymproducent, Novozymes, der fulgte Frances Arnolds arbejde tæt, da hun gjorde sit gennembrud.

2h

Brazil Turns Its Back on Democracy

Jair Bolsonaro , the former army captain who dominated the first round of Brazil’s presidential election on Sunday, talks a lot about killing people— common criminals , political opponents , the organizers of queer-art shows . Promising to cleanse the nation of corruption, he holds up the 1964-1985 military dictatorship, when torture was state policy, as “a period of glory for Brazil.” Since Braz

2h

How I climbed a 3,000-foot vertical cliff — without ropes | Alex Honnold

Imagine being by yourself in the dead center of a 3,000-foot vertical cliff — without a rope to catch you if you fall. For professional rock climber Alex Honnold, this dizzying scene marked the culmination of a decade-long dream. In a hair-raising talk, he tells the story of how he summited Yosemite's El Capitan, completing one of the most dangerous free-solo climbs ever.

2h

Research shows club drug GHB associated with brain and cognitive changes

Scientists have discovered that regular use of the party drug GHB, and especially unconsciousness following GHB use, is associated with brain changes including negative effects on long-term memory, working memory, IQ, and higher levels of stress and anxiety. This work is presented at the ECNP conference in Barcelona, following partial peer-review publication.

2h

Reaching international climate change goals can halve rising sea levels by the end of the centuryUN Global Climate Change

Research by scientists at the University of Southampton has revealed the extent by which achieving the ambitions the 2015 Paris Climate Change agreement could protect coastal communities from rising sea levels.

2h

Production of renewable gas from waste wood

KIT's researchers succeeded in producing renewable methane from a biomass-based synthesis gas mixture in their pilot plant for honeycomb methanation. The quality of this synthetic natural gas (SNG) is comparable to that of fossil natural gas and can be used as fuel in co-generation and heating plants as well as in cars or trucks. The pilot plant was designed and tested by researchers of Karlsruhe

2h

Big discoveries about tiny particles

Understanding the mechanical properties of nanoparticles are essential to realizing their promise in being used to create exciting new products. This new research has taken a significant step toward gaining the knowledge that can lead to better performance with products using polymer nanoparticles.

2h

Assessing how Florence affected the very ground we stand on

A week after Hurricane Florence finally moved out of North Carolina, a small group of researchers moved into areas that were still reeling from the devastation. They were engineers, and their goal was to see how the wind, rain and flooding had affected the earth underlying the affected area.

2h

Grenfell-overlevende risikerer asbest-sygdomme

Beboere og brandmænd, der inhalerede røg under den tragiske brand i højhuset Grenfell i London, kan have fået asbest ned i lungerne, advarer retsmediciner, der har undersøgt de omkomne.

2h

Rapport giver ikke ny tillid til styrelse

Kammeradvokatens rapport til Styrelsen for Patientsikkerheds politianmeldelser understreger et behov for en ankeinstans og en forbedring af selve systemet af sagkyndige og lægefaglig rådgivning. Ellers kan man godt begynde at forberede sig på det næste stormvejr af dimensioner.

2h

Overlæge bliver ny projektchef på BørneRiget

Overlæge Thomas Leth Frandsen stopper som overlæge i BørnUngeKlinikken i Juliane Marie Centret for i stedet at blive ny projektchef på BørneRiget.

2h

Big discoveries about tiny particles

Understanding the mechanical properties of nanoparticles are essential to realizing their promise in being used to create exciting new products. This new research has taken a significant step toward gaining the knowledge that can lead to better performance with products using polymer nanoparticles.

2h

Graduate Student Solves Quantum Verification Problem

In the spring of 2017, Urmila Mahadev found herself in what most graduate students would consider a pretty sweet position. She had just solved a major problem in quantum computation, the study of computers that derive their power from the strange laws of quantum physics. Combined with her earlier papers, Mahadev’s new result, on what is called blind computation, made it “clear she was a rising st

2h

UN report on global warming carries life-or-death warning

Preventing an extra single degree of heat could make a life-or-death difference in the next few decades for multitudes of people and ecosystems on this fast-warming planet, an international panel of scientists reported Sunday. But they provide little hope the world will rise to the challenge.

2h

New laser technology can identify unknown white powders from safe distance

White powders found at known or potential crime scenes present investigators and first responders with a dilemma. Touching the powders could be dangerous or compromise the evidence, and sending samples to a lab to be identified could take too long.

2h

Approach paves way for new generation of antimicrobial materials

Researchers at North Carolina State University have successfully incorporated "photosensitizers" into a range of polymers, giving those materials the ability to render bacteria and viruses inactive using only ambient oxygen and visible-wavelength light. The new approach opens the door to a range of new products aimed at reducing the transmission of drug-resistant pathogens.

2h

Americans win economics Nobel for work on climate and growth

Two Americans won the Nobel Prize in economics on Monday, one for studying the economics of climate change and the other for showing how to help foster the innovation needed to solve such a problem.

2h

Oil cleanup begins after cargo ships collide off Corsica

French and Italian ships raced Monday to contain a spreading oil spill after two cargo ships collided off the Mediterranean island of Corsica, as French authorities launched an investigation for "maritime pollution".

2h

Germany probes Audi over S. Korea 'fraud': Report

German prosecutors are investigating whether Audi fraudulently obtained authorisations for some cars in South Korea by falsifying chassis numbers and test records, local media reported Monday.

2h

Economists win Nobel for work on climate and growth

William Nordhaus and Paul Romer win prize for research on how climate and technology affect the economy.

3h

The 8-dimensional space that must be searched for alien life

A new mathematical model suggests that signs of extraterrestrial intelligence could be common, for all we know—we’ve barely begun investigating the vastness where they might lie.

3h

The Navy’s Terrible Accident Record Is Now Hidden From Public View

Websites appear and disappear every day. The internet is an amorphous beast, constantly being edited and updated. We accept these changes as simple fact, but crucial information is frequently removed from government websites—and small changes over time can have major downstream consequences. I made the disturbing discovery recently that, amid a dramatic five-year spike in aviation accidents, the

3h

Throwing knives is growing more popular—here's how to get started

DIY Toss around some steel. When you picture a sporty hobby, your mind probably doesn’t jump to knife throwing. Let's change that perception.

3h

Could villains clone themselves to take over the world?

If asked about clones, most people think of evil sci-fi characters. However, in real life, the word "clone" often has broader, far more positive applications. Just as office workers replicate documents by using copy machines, scientists like us who study plant disease use the biological equivalent of a copier to clone genes, cells, and tissues, as well as entire organisms.

3h

3h

Profiles in Science: How Do You Find an Alien Ocean? Margaret Kivelson Figured It Out.

For forty years, the physicist at U.C.L.A. has been uncovering the outer solar system’s secrets. Few scientists know more about the mysteries of Jupiter and its icy moons.

3h

Sound software for fault detection in machinery

Experienced operators claim they can tell if their machine is functioning properly merely by listening to the sounds it makes. EU-funded researchers have gone one better by developing technology based on the human auditory system that can, through sound analysis, 'hear' if industrial machinery is due for maintenance.

3h

‘Venus flytrap’ spheres catch and destroy BPA

Scientists have created micron-sized spheres built to catch and destroy bisphenol A (BPA), a synthetic chemical used to make plastics. BPA is commonly used to coat the insides of food cans, bottle tops, and water supply lines, and was once a component of baby bottles. While BPA that seeps into food and drink is considered safe in low doses, scientists suspect prolonged exposure affects the health

3h

Hubble telescope hit by mechanical failureHubble Space Telescope

The Hubble Space Telescope is operating with only essential functions after it lost one of the gyroscopes needed to point the spacecraft.

3h

New security scanners safely detect threats from people on the move

With increased threats to soft targets, security personnel need tools to detect menaces in fast moving, crowded environments. The EU-funded SPIDERS project introduces 'MM-Imager', a safe approach working in real-time which can scan bodies at short distances for hidden objects.

3h

Lys giver topatleter et forspring

DTU Fotonik arbejder tæt sammen med Team Danmark om at optimere de danske elitesvømmeres forberedelser til og præstationer ved OL.

3h

OUH genindkalder patienter til ultralydsskanning af halspulsårerne

OUH har konstateret, at kvaliteten af mindst tre patienters ultralydsskanninger for forsnævring af halspulsåren desværre ikke har levet op til sædvanlig kvalitet.

3h

Backpacking builds character, confidence and problem solving skills, study finds

Heads up all seasoned backpackers. Here's the scientific evidence you need to convince yourself and others that backpacking is about so much more than a whole lotta fun.

3h

Planetary nebulae reveal kinematics of Messier 87 galaxy's outer halo

Astronomers have carried out a study of almost 300 hundred planetary nebulae in the supergiant elliptical galaxy Messier 87. The new research, published September 27 on the arXiv pre-print repository, reveals essential information about the galaxy's outer halo and its subcomponents.

3h

Annual price tag for nonfatal injuries in the US tops $1.8 trillion

Almost one in 10 people in the US visited the hospital for nonfatal injuries in 2013 for a total cost of $1.8 trillion. Falls and being hit by objects were the most prevalent causes of injury.

3h

Pregnant women recognize baby expressions differently depending on mental health history

A pilot study has found that pregnant women who have suffered from depression or bipolar disorder (i.e. both mania and depression) recognize babies' faces and how babies laugh or cry, differently to healthy controls. This happens even if they are not currently experiencing depressive or manic symptoms and may represent an early risk-factor for children of these women, although the authors stress t

3h

Novel technology enables detection of early-stage lung cancer when surgical cure still is possible

To improve outcomes for patients with non-small-cell lung carcinoma researchers are developing a blood test to detect lung cancer earlier in the disease. A report describes a new technology, electric field-induced release and measurement (EFIRM) that is both highly sensitive and specific in detecting two epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutations associated with lung cancer in the blood of

3h

When is a nova not a nova? When a white dwarf and a brown dwarf collide

Astronomers have found for the first time that a white dwarf and a brown dwarf collided in a 'blaze of glory' that was witnessed on Earth in 1670.

3h

Your Dog May Be Smart, but She’s Not Exceptional

In a new study, scientists say that dogs do not stand out compared to other animals when it comes to intelligence.

3h

Scientists want to use dirty nappies as a source of raw materials

Thousands of soiled nappies that were destined to clog Italian landfill sites or incinerators are being redirected to a recycling plant that is turning them into streams of high quality raw materials, in a new process that it is hoped will be replicated around Europe.

3h

Fingerprint drug screen test works on the living and deceased

A revolutionary drug test developed from research carried out at the University of East Anglia can detect four classes of drugs in traces of sweat found in a fingerprint. And the technology works on both the living and deceased.

3h

Scientists question whether prescription practices can help the environment

A huge rise in the number of people taking antidepressant drugs is potentially posing a threat to the environment, according to new research.

3h

Global sea level could rise 15 meters by 2300, study says

Global average sea-level could rise by nearly 8 feet (2.5 meters) by 2100 and 50 feet (15 meters) by 2300 if greenhouse gas emissions remain high and humanity proves unlucky, according to a review of sea-level change and projections by Rutgers and other scientists.

3h

Statistician's new book explores the meaning of luck in everyday life

When Joe Parker offered to take a photo of a vacationing family at a beach in Waikiki, he had no idea at first that he'd just met his half-brother. Rick Hill, the man he'd just photographed, had a noticeable Massachusetts accent, and Parker commented on it. They soon discovered that they grew up in neighbouring towns. Parker started throwing out some names, including his dad's, Dickie Halligan. To

3h

We got viral defenses from our Neanderthal ancestors

Interbreeding between Neanderthals and modern humans 50,000 years ago gave us the genetic tools to combat viral infections, according to a new study. Neanderthals mysteriously disappeared about 40,000 years ago, but before vanishing they interbred with another human species that was just beginning its global spread. As a result of these ancient trysts, many modern Europeans and Asians today harbo

4h

With Project xCloud, Xbox Wants to Bring Gaming Anywhere You AreMicrosoft Project xCloud

Cloud gaming is a long-held dream, but Xbox is harnessing the power of Microsoft to make it happen—for real this time.

4h

Facebook Portal: Price, Specs, Release DateFacebook Portal Amazon

Facebook made you a device for your home that has a camera on it. Neat!

4h

How JUMP Designed a Global Electric Bike

The secret to building a bike that can serve all kinds of riders across the country—and soon, the world.

4h

Star Wars News: Kathleen Kennedy Isn't Going Anywhere

The Lucasfilm president just extended her contract for three more years.

4h

Study details link between social media and sex trafficking

Social media is increasingly being exploited to contact, recruit and sell children for sex, according to a study by The University of Toledo Human Trafficking and Social Justice Institute.

4h

A novel approach for the study of integral membrane proteins

The membranes that surround our cells contain a large number of proteins. Membrane proteins are therefore a crucial class of macromolecules in living systems. They play key roles, such as providing transport gateways into and out of the cell, facilitating signalling between cells, as well as being involved in enzyme catalysis. These functional roles make them particularly important as drug targets

4h

Science under Scrutiny: The Problem of Reproducibility

Better incentives could reduce the alarming number of studies that turn out to be wrong when repeated — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

4h

Druggists Shouldn't Be Morality Police

Some states let them deny care for nonmedical reasons — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

4h

Out like a light: Researchers ID brain's 'sleep switch'

Scientists demonstrate in mice that that specific brain cells — located in a region of the hypothalamus called the ventrolateral preoptic nucleus (VLPO) — are in fact essential to normal sleep.

4h

Lessons from the 1918 flu pandemic, 100 years on

With flu season nearly upon us, a new study looks at the factors behind the extremely high mortality of the 1918 flu pandemic and how to prepare for future outbreaks. The authors warn that while the world is better prepared than 100 years ago, new challenges will affect the impact of the next influenza virus pandemic — including changing population demographics, antibiotic resistance and climate

4h

Global sea level could rise 50 feet by 2300, study says

Global average sea-level could rise by nearly 8 feet by 2100 and 50 feet by 2300 if greenhouse gas emissions remain high and humanity proves unlucky, according to a review of sea-level change and projections.

4h

Better winter weather forecasts for airports

EU-funded researchers have developed up to the minute probabilistic forecasts for winter weather that enable air traffic and airport operators to make their operations more efficient and to mitigate risks.

4h

Is dark energy even allowed in string theory?

A new conjecture is the cause of excitement in the string theory community. Timm Wrase of the Vienna University of Technology has now published his much-discussed results on recent new developments.

4h

Peer mentoring program shows promise for preventing African youth violence

Recent episodes of violence among Australian youth of African descent have been a topic of mounting concern for politicians, the police and African communities alike.

4h

Image: Hot X-ray glow from massive cluster of galaxies

Astronomers using ESA's XMM-Newton space observatory have captured the X-ray glow (shown here in purple) emitted by the hot gas that pervades the galaxy cluster XLSSC006.

4h

How protein complexes form in the cell

The formation of protein complexes is a highly organised process that does not begin with the "finished" proteins. Studies conducted by researchers at the Center for Molecular Biology of Heidelberg University (ZMBH) and the German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ) demonstrate that they form in a coordinated way when the protein subunits are synthesised. "Our findings fundamentally alter our understand

4h

Permanent, wireless self-charging system using NIR band

As wearable devices are emerging, there are numerous studies on wireless charging systems. Here, a KAIST research team has developed a permanent, wireless self-charging platform for low-power wearable electronics by converting near-infrared (NIR) band irradiation to electrical energy. This novel technology can be applied to flexible, wearable charging systems without needing any attachments.

4h

Small carnivores might be the most destructive

A recent study published in the journal Archaeological and Anthropological Sciences featuring Ruth Blasco, a taphonomy specialist from the Centro Nacional de Investigación sobre la Evolución Humana (CENIEH), and member of the URV-IPHES, attempts to simulate the actions of small carnivores at an experimental level and find diagnostic features that make them different from other agents, both in term

4h

Forcing a metal to be a superconductor via rapid chilling

A team of researchers with the RIKEN Center for Emergent Matter Science and The University of Tokyo, both in Japan, has found a way to force a metal to be a superconductor by cooling it very quickly. In their paper published on the open access site, Science Advances, the group describes their process and how well it worked.

4h

Does it really matter if one animal goes extinct?

Imagine what it must have been like for those early ocean explorers setting foot on new islands full of interesting animals that they had never seen before.

4h

Graphene controls surface magnetism at room temperature

In a refreshing change of perspective, theoretical physicist Dr. Zeila Zanolli has looked at the proximity effects of graphene on a magnetic semiconducting substrate, finding it to affect the substrate's magnetism down to several layers below the surface. Her paper was published on 5 October in Physical Review B. She was also one of three recipients of the first MaX Prize for frontier research in

4h

Understanding of the evolution of Earth's ecology as oxygen levels changed

A new study has produced a detailed estimation for when there was enough oxygen in the Earth's atmosphere to support large land-based life, such as dinosaurs and eventually humans.

4h

NASA's ARIA maps Indonesia quake, tsunami damage

A 7.5-magnitude earthquake on Sept. 28 in northern Indonesia and the devastating tsunami that followed it killed more than 1,400 people and left a large trail of destruction.

4h

Collins, Heitkamp and the Essence of Credibility

Susan Collins says her vote isn’t likely to play well with Maine voters, whom the fourth-term Republican must face again in two years if she seeks re-election from a state that last backed a Republican presidential candidate in 1988. She says personal friends told her their own years-old stories of sexual assault. A progressive crowdfunding campaign quickly raised more than $3 million for a futur

4h

A robust material for the uptake and storage of ammonia at densities that come close to that of the liquefied gas

Handling, storing, and shipping of ammonia requires costly equipment and special precautions because of its inherent corrosiveness and toxicity. Scientists in Manchester, UK, have found that a metal–organic framework, MFM-300(Al), a porous solid, not only effectively filters harmful nitrogen dioxide gas, but it also has outstanding capabilities for ammonia storage. As detailed in the journal Angew

4h

A rare star opens a window on the beginning of time

EPFL astrophysicists actively participated in the discovery of a very rare star, which is particularly old and metal-poor. As a messenger from the distant past, it will allow the scientists to learn more about the young universe, right after the Big Bang.

4h

Sentinel-2 maps Indonesia earthquake

A 7.5-magnitude earthquake and tsunami hit Indonesia on 28 September, destroying homes and hundreds of lives. As the death toll continues to rise, the effects of this natural disaster are far-reaching, with hundreds of thousands of people seeking access food, water and shelter in the aftermath of this tragedy.

4h

UToledo study details link between social media and sex trafficking

Social media is increasingly being exploited to contact, recruit and sell children for sex, according to a study by The University of Toledo Human Trafficking and Social Justice Institute.

4h

One in five Australian honey samples adulterated

Following the recent high-profile fake honey scandal, new and independent research from Macquarie University in collaboration with the National Measurement Institute has unveiled, for the first time, the scale of the adulteration problem—almost one in five Australian honey samples were found to be adulterated with cheaper sugar products such as corn syrup or sugar cane.

4h

Is it possible to be too flexible?

Health Yoga might make you too bendy without making you strong enough to handle it. Yoga class is all about poses, from the basics, like bridge, chair, and cow pose, up to complicated headstands and one-armed, twisting backbends. Expert practitioners…

4h

Protein dynamics: Molecular machines at work

Researchers from Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) in Munich have used a special fluorescence-based imaging technique to track the shape changes that occur when pore proteins in the cell membrane export molecules into the extracellular medium.

4h

Rapid response needed to limit global warmingUN Climate Change Report

Limiting global warming to 1.5°C would require rapid, far-reaching and unprecedented changes in all aspects of society, according to the latest report from the world's leading body of climate change experts.

4h

Understanding natural fungicide synthesis—the pathway to strobilurins revealed at last

Scientists from the Universities of Bristol and Hannover studying a naturally-produced compound that inspired the biggest selling family of commercial agricultural fungicides have, for the first time, discovered how this important class of compound is synthesised in nature. The findings could potentially be used in the future to enable a pick and mix approach with combinations of enzymes to make d

4h

Remarkable flares from the galactic center

Sagittarius A* (Sgr A*), the supermassive black hole at the center of our Milky Way Galaxy, is 100 times closer to us than any other SMBH and therefore a prime candidate for studies of how matter radiates as it accretes onto black holes. SgrA* has been observed for decades and rapid fluctuations reported from X-ray to the near infrared wavelengths (intervening dust reduces optical light signals by

4h

Nanopore technology with DNA computing easily detects microRNA patterns of lung cancer

Small cell lung cancer (SCLC) is very aggressive, as the cancer cells quickly grow and easily spread throughout the body. Often, SCLC can be diagnosed using several common tests, but has poor survival following metastasis.

4h

Vesta reveals the childhood of the Solar System

Investigating the earliest and least-known phases of the history of the solar system, when the young sun was still enveloped by a disk of gas and dust in which the planets began to form, is probably one of the most complex challenges in modern planetary science. The existing celestial bodies that formed at the time are few, and in the majority of cases, evidence of the ancient processes that marke

4h

Image of the Day: All in a Day's Work

A bee researcher finds that his subjects are protected from viral infections when they dine on fungus.

5h

French doctors fail to solve mystery of babies with missing limbs

Officials say they cannot find any link between cases and will not investigate further French doctors have admitted they do not know why clusters of babies have been born with limbs missing, saying they cannot find any link between the cases and will not be investigating further. Thirteen children have been born missing hands, forearms or arms in three rural areas of France between 2007 and 2017.

5h

A Long Goodbye to Baxter, a Gentle Giant Among Robots

Baxter is a legend in these early days of advanced robotics. But now its maker, Rethink Robotics, is folding.

5h

iRobot Roomba i7+ Review: This Bot Can Empty Its Own BinAmazon Echo Show Alexa

iRobot’s new high-end Roomba comes one step closer to automated cleaning perfection.

5h

Swallowing a vibrating capsule could help relieve constipation

Capsules that are programmed to vibrate when they reach the large intestine have been shown to stimulate bowel contractions and relieve chronic constipation

5h

When is a nova not a nova? When a white dwarf and a brown dwarf collide

Researchers from Keele University and an international team of astronomers have reported for the first time that a white dwarf and a brown dwarf collided in a 'blaze of glory' that was witnessed on Earth in 1670.

5h

Nuclear technique helps validate theoretical model for optimised laser material deposition in additive manufacturing

Neutron diffraction strain scanning measurements at ANSTO have validated a new theoretical model that successfully predicts the residual stresses and critical deposition heights for laser additive manufacturing.

5h

Nanoscale pillars as a building block for future information technology

Researchers from Linköping University and the Royal Institute of Technology in Sweden have proposed a new device concept that can efficiently transfer the information carried by electron spin to light at room temperature—a stepping stone toward future information technology. They present their approach in an article in Nature Communications.

5h

Nanoplatform developed with three molecular imaging modalities for tumor diagnosis

Researchers at the Complutense University of Madrid (UCM) have developed a hybrid nanoplatform that locates tumours using three different types of contrast simultaneously to facilitate multimodal molecular medical imaging: magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), computed tomography (CT) and fluorescence optical imaging (OI).

5h

A Geyser Erupted in Yellowstone and 80 Years of Human Trash Poured Out

The geyser spewed up an old cinderblock and a pacifier from the 1930s, among other things.

5h

Rare 'Polio-Like' Illness Diagnosed in 6 Minnesota Kids

Six children in Minnesota have been diagnosed with a rare illness that resembles polio, according to news reports.

5h

Regeringen vil skærpe miljøzoner: Udledningen af partikler skal sænkes med en fjerdedel

Nye krav til dieseldrevne varebiler og tunge dieselkøretøjer skal reducere transportens partikelforurening med 25 procent. Men hvis alle dieselkøretøjer var omfattet, havde reduktionen været på omkring 64 procent.

5h

Columbus Discovered the New World … So Why Isn't America Named After Him?

Christopher Columbus famously sailed the ocean blue in 1492, so why isn't the New World named after him?

5h

Indonesia’s Tsunami and the Problem of Human Empathy

When a 7.5-magnitude earthquake rocked the sea floor off the coast of Indonesia last week, the resulting tsunami devastated much of the city of Palu. The confirmed death count has soared to more than 1,700 and will almost certainly continue to rise. As of this writing, an estimated 70,000 people are displaced, with dwindling water supplies, in desperate need of help that might not arrive in time.

5h

Dear Therapist: My Granddaughter Has Autism and Her Cousins Exclude Her

Editor’s Note: Every Monday, Lori Gottlieb answers questions from readers about their problems, big and small. Have a question? Email her at dear.therapist@theatlantic.com . Dear Therapist, I have 10 grandchildren who live in the same city as me—all are under the age of 10, and they are together a lot. One of our granddaughters, a 7-year-old I'll call Poppy, has a pretty high-functioning form of

5h

Why the quest for ethical AI is doomed to failure

You wouldn't buy a self-driving car that would kill you to save pedestrians – and that's why we must rethink how we make AI behave, says researcher Iyad Rahwan

5h

Front-runner in Brazil’s election wants to pull out of climate treaty

The far-right winner of the first round of Brazil's presidential election wants to withdraw from the Paris climate agreement and cut down the Amazon rainforest

5h

How to minimize stress, astronaut style

Feeling stressed? Ask: 'What would an astronaut do?' Stress is a clue that can make you stronger. The best way to beat stress? Understand what scares you

5h

Can the FCC Really Block California's Net Neutrality Law?

A lawsuit raises novel questions about the relationship between the federal government and the states.

6h

Addressing Mental Health Effects, a Year After the Tubbs Fire in Sonoma

As the anniversary of the massive wildfires in Northern California arrives, researchers are trying to pinpoint the best ways to treat the anxiety, depression, and PTSD left in the disaster’s wake.

6h

STEM Candidates Try to Ride a Pro-Science Wave to Congress

At the March for Science, protesters spoke about the importance of getting more scientists in office. Actually winning elections takes a lot more.

6h

Community Support for Recycling Pays Off

A recent study points to three key strategies for getting people to participate — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

6h

Microsoft stopper Windows 10-opdatering efter meldinger om slettede dokumenter

Windows 10-brugere klager over slettede dokumenter efter oktober-opdatering. Nu har Microsoft sat udrulningen på pause.

6h

Climate takeawaysUN Climate Change Report

The most important messages from the landmark report on global warming.

6h

What Linguistics Can Tell Us about Talking to Aliens

Linguist Sheri Wells-Jensen explains the pitfalls in our assumptions about extraterrestrials — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

6h

Economics Nobel prize given for putting a price tag on climate change

The 2018 Sveriges Riksbank prize in economic sciences has gone to Paul Romer and William Nordhaus for integrating climate change and technology into macroeconomics

6h

Techtopia #73: 3D-print forandrer dansk industri

3D-print af brillestel og skibsdele; dansk industri har sine pionerer, som Techtopia besøger.

6h

Formand for Yngre Læger stopper

Formand for Yngre Læger Camilla Rathcke rejser sig fra formandsstolen til november. Hendes afløser ser ud til at blive 43-årige Helga Schultz.

6h

Everyone Wants the Supreme Court to Thwart Democratic Majorities

After Senate Republicans confirmed Brett Kavanaugh, a conservative jurist, to the Supreme Court, the progressive feminist writer Rebecca Traister argued in New York that they are “shoring up the power of the minority in this country over its majority population, and in doing so, acting to subvert the founding promises—of democracy and representation—which have always been hollow, yet have been th

6h

Civility Has Its Limits

When it comes to Brett Kavanaugh, there are three camps. The first believes it’s a travesty that he was confirmed. The second believes it’s a travesty that he was smeared. The third believes it’s a travesty that the process was so divisive. David Brooks is in the third camp. The Kavanaugh hearings, he wrote on Friday, constituted an “ American nadir .” You often hear such phrases from people who

6h

What Sarah Palin Saw Clearly

Ten years ago, we first met Sarah Palin, then the governor of Alaska, for a series of TV interviews. At the time, Palin might not have been able to name a single newspaper or magazine—but she did read where the electorate, at least a significant part of it, was moving. Her candidacy revealed that long-standing political norms were being pushed aside by a new style of divisive, personality-driven

6h

A High-Stakes Immigration Case Hits the Supreme Court

“What is chicken?” asked the great Judge Henry Friendly in Frigaliment Importing Co. v. B.N.S. International Sales Corp., a case read by every first-year law student. Is it “a young chicken, suitable for broiling and frying” or rather “any bird of that genus that meets contract specifications on weight and quality”? And do you care? Law students do not, but the clients did—at stake was a tidy sum

6h

The Sexual-Harassment Victims Who Can’t Get to Court

One year into the #MeToo movement, there’s an underreported barrier to supporting victims: Many workers are still not legally protected from sexual harassment. Federal law—specifically, Title VII of the 1964 Civil Rights Act —recognizes two categories of workplace harassment. There’s quid pro quo sexual harassment, when a boss, supervisor, or anyone in a position of authority with hiring or firin

6h

A Star Is Born Asks: What Constitutes a Sellout?

This article contains some spoilers for A Star Is Born . Lady Gaga does some great acting in A Star Is Born , but her performance extends beyond film. She’s been wearing outfits that evoke classic Hollywood when promoting Bradley Cooper’s remake of a Hollywood classic, and one particularly fascinating look came in the form of a black veil on the Toronto International Film Festival red carpet. Bot

6h

Hubble Space Telescope taken out of action by faulty gyroscopes

NASA's Hubble Space Telescope has been temporarily shut down as technical faults have hampered its ability to point in the right direction

6h

Climate Report Warns Of Extreme Weather, Displacement of Millions Without ActionUN Climate Change Report

A scientific panel, convened by the U.N., lays out a challenging path to keep the global climate from warming more than 1.5 degrees Celsius — the red line for dangerous consequences.

7h

Australia’s Other Great (and Threatened) Coral Reefs

Every one of Australia’s coral reefs is threatened by climate change, potentially devastating not just the country’s ecosystems but its economy as well.

7h

Global sea level could rise 50 feet by 2300, study says

Global average sea-level could rise by nearly 8 feet by 2100 and 50 feet by 2300 if greenhouse gas emissions remain high and humanity proves unlucky, according to a review of sea-level change and projections by Rutgers and other scientists.

7h

Out like a light: Researchers id brain's 'sleep switch'

Clifford B. Saper, M.D., Ph.D., Chairman of the Department of Neurology at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (BIDMC), and colleagues demonstrate in mice that that specific brain cells — located in a region of the hypothalamus called the ventrolateral preoptic nucleus (VLPO) — are in fact essential to normal sleep.

7h

Lessons from the 1918 flu pandemic, 100 years on

With flu season nearly upon us, a new study looks at the factors behind the extremely high mortality of the 1918 flu pandemic and how to prepare for future outbreaks. The authors warn that while the world is better prepared than 100 years ago, new challenges will affect the impact of the next influenza virus pandemic — including changing population demographics, antibiotic resistance and climate

7h

Superraketten BFR skal sprænge alle rammer

Brændstofproduktion på en fjern planet og et helt nyt kompositmateriale. SpaceX styrer mod både interplanetariske destinationer og teknologiens grænseland.

7h

Andreas Mogensen skal efterforske mystisk hul på rumfartøj

Andreas Mogensen skal som astronauternes repræsentant deltage i Nasas undersøgelseskomité, der skal forsøge at afgøre, hvordan mystisk hul opstod på rumfartøj.

7h

Some Apps May Help Curb Insomnia, Others Just Put You To Sleep

People struggling with insomnia often turn to apps to help them fall asleep. But scientists say only some apps use proven methods that can help address the underlying causes of sleeplessness. (Image credit: Mary Mathis/NPR)

7h

Novel functional insight in protein complex, possible new target for antibiotics

Researchers at Utrecht University have gained new insights into the structure and function of a protein complex that maintains the outer membrane of a bacteria. Shutting down this protein complex makes it impossible for the membrane to maintain itself, causing the bacteria to die. This protein could present a promising target for novel antibiotics. The researchers will publish their findings in Na

8h

Antallet af infektioner med MRSA fortsætter med at stige

Årets Danmap-rapport viser en fortsat stigende tendens i antallet af infektioner forårsaget af den multiresistente bakterie MRSA.

8h

The IPCC global warming report spares politicians the worst details | Bob Ward

The dangers if governments ignore efforts to limit warming to 1.5C are more grave than the summary makes out A report by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change confirms the enormous wisdom that governments showed in Paris in December 2015, when they agreed to the goal of “pursuing efforts” to limit global warming to 1.5C. The report’s summary for policymakers paints a sobering picture of t

8h

As Storms Keep Coming, FEMA Spends Billions in ‘Cycle’ of Damage and Repair

FEMA has paid out billions for disaster recovery efforts. But many projects seem to be undertaken in defiance of climate change, leaving structures nearly as vulnerable as before.

8h

Cancer disparities: It’s money that matters (along with a lot of other things)

Cancer is a complex set of diseases. I commonly discuss complexities in its biology and treatment. However, there's another layer of complexity that leads to marked disparities in cancer incidence and death rates. One major factor associated with such disparities is socioeconomic status.

9h

Crisis management: Seven ways to engineer climate

Dismissed a decade ago as far-fetched and dangerous, schemes to tame global warming by engineering the climate have migrated from the margins of policy debates towards centre stage.

9h

UN warns paradigm shift needed to avert global climate chaosUN Climate Change Report

Avoiding global climate chaos will require a major transformation of society and the world economy that is "unprecedented in scale," the UN said Monday in a landmark report that warns time is running out to avert disaster.

9h

Climate, development tipped for Nobel economics prize

The 2018 Nobel season, marked by the lack of a literature award for the first time in 70 years, winds up Monday with the economics prize which experts say could go to research on the climate or development.

10h

Rocket carrying Argentinian satellite takes off successfullySpaceX California WC

A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket carried an Argentinian Earth-observation satellite into space Sunday and for the first time landed a first-stage booster back at its California launch site.

10h

California wildfire victims say cleanup crews add to woes

One year after a devastating series of wildfires ripped through Northern California wine country, destroying thousands of homes, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers' first experience cleaning up after a wildfire has turned into an expensive bureaucratic mess and California's top emergency official suspects fraud played a role.

10h

UN report on global warming carries life-or-death warningUN Climate Change Report

Preventing an extra single degree of heat could make a life-or-death difference in the next few decades for multitudes of people and ecosystems on this fast-warming planet, an international panel of scientists reported Sunday. But they provide little hope the world will rise to the challenge.

10h

Carbon emissions from Amazonian forest fires up to four times worse than feared

Carbon losses caused by El Niño forest fires of 2015 and 2016 could be up to four times greater than thought, according to a study of 6.5 million hectares of forest in Brazilian Amazonia.

10h

Can you solve it? I've got a little (logical) list

Puzzles that make a statement UPDATE: The solutions can now be seen here. Hi guzzlers, (i) People who are logically minded like to list things. Continue reading…

10h

DTU køber supercomputer med 16.768 kerner

Fordelt på 524 servere får DTU Vindenergi en ny supercomputer med hele 16.768 kerner

11h

Kommunale smart-city projekter stikker i alle retninger: Fra normalisering af sensordata til nye datamodeller

De større danske kommuner arbejder vidt forskelligt på smart city-området. I Jylland står Aarhus kommune i spidsen for udviklingen af en ny IoT-platform til opsamling af sensordata, mens 21 hovedstadskommuner arbejder med helt ny datamodel for kommunale data.

11h

Greenpeace om klima-rapport: De næste 15 år er altafgørende

Organisationen håber, at regeringen vil tage rapporten yderst seriøst, når den fremlægger klimaplan.

11h

SpaceX Sticks Its Landing after a Showy California LaunchSpaceX California WC

SpaceX's latest Falcon rocket launch tore across a perfectly clear night sky as it delivered a satellite into space and returned its booster to a new West Coast landing pad.

11h

Genetics research 'biased towards studying white Europeans'

Ethnic minorities set to miss out on medical benefits of research, scientist warns People from minority ethnic backgrounds are set to lose out on medical benefits of genetics research due to an overwhelming bias towards studying white European populations, a leading scientist has warned. Prof David Curtis, a geneticist and psychiatrist at University College London, has called on funding bodies to

11h

'The world is against them': new era of cancer lawsuits threaten Monsanto

A landmark verdict found Roundup caused a man’s cancer, paving the way for thousands of other families to seek justice Dean Brooks grasped on to the shopping cart, suddenly unable to stand or breathe. Later, at a California emergency room, a nurse with teary eyes delivered the news, telling his wife, Deborah, to hold out hope for a miracle. It was December 2015 when they learned that a blood canc

11h

Country diary: pearl mussels settle down for a ripe old age

River Torridge, Devon: From drifting hitchhiker to sedentary filter-feeder, these rare shellfish lead a precarious existence – but they can reach the age of 80 Hidden from sight within the meandering lower reaches of the Torridge, one of Britain’s most endangered species is clinging on to life, holding fast among the rocks in the ever-changing flow. By a secluded wooded section of the bank, the t

12h

FN-panel: Global opvarmning kan begrænses til 1,5 grader – men det kræver hurtige ændringer

Det kræver hidtil usete tiltag at begrænse global opvarmning til 1,5 grader, siger FN's Klimapanel i rapport.

12h

When is a nova not a nova? When a white dwarf and a brown dwarf collide

An international team of astronomers has found for the first time that a white dwarf and a brown dwarf collided in a 'blaze of glory' that was witnessed on Earth in 1670.

12h

Novel technology enables detection of early-stage lung cancer when surgical cure still is possible

To improve outcomes for patients with non-small-cell lung carcinoma researchers are developing a blood test to detect lung cancer earlier in the disease. A report in The Journal of Molecular Diagnostics describes a new technology, electric field-induced release and measurement (EFIRM) that is both highly sensitive and specific in detecting two epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutations asso

12h

Weight loss linked to lower breast cancer risk for postmenopausal women

In a study of postmenopausal women, participants who lost weight had a lower risk of developing invasive breast cancer than those who maintained or gained weight. Published early online in CANCER, a peer-reviewed journal of the American Cancer Society, the findings suggest that weight loss may help lower postmenopausal women's breast cancer risk.

12h

Major Climate Report Describes a Strong Risk of Crisis as Early as 2040

A landmark United Nations report paints a far more dire picture of the immediate consequences of climate change than previously thought and says that avoiding damage requires quickly transforming the world economy.

15h

We must reduce greenhouse gas emissions to net zero or face more floods | Nicholas Stern

The world heating up by even 1.5C would have a brutal impact on future generations The authoritative new report by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change sets the world a clear target: we must reduce emissions of greenhouse gases to net zero by the middle of this century to have a reasonable chance of limiting global warming to 1.5C. Every government should read this report and recognise t

15h

World leaders told they must act over climate change 'cliff-edge'

Christiana Figueres, who led the 2015 Paris accord, stresses urgency of meeting 1.5C target Political leaders have been urged to act on the landmark special report from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, which has warned that strong efforts would be required to prevent disastrous consequences from dangerous levels of climate change. Christiana Figueres, the former UN climate chief who

15h

We have 12 years to limit climate change catastrophe, warns UN

Urgent changes needed to cut risk of extreme heat, drought, floods and poverty, says IPCC Overwhelmed by climate change? Here’s what you can do The world’s leading climate scientists have warned there is only a dozen years for global warming to be kept to a maximum of 1.5C, beyond which even half a degree will significantly worsen the risks of drought, floods, extreme heat and poverty for hundred

15h

Limiting global warming to 1.5 degrees versus 2 has big benefits, the IPCC says

A new report from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change compares the impact of warming targets on extreme weather, sea level rise and habitat loss.

16h

Carbon emissions from Amazonian forest fires up to 4 times worse than feared

Carbon losses caused by El Niño forest fires of 2015 and 2016 could be up to four times greater than thought.

16h

Annual price tag for nonfatal injuries in the US tops $1.8 trillion

Almost one in 10 people in the US visited the hospital for nonfatal injuries in 2013 for a total cost of $1.8 trillion. Falls and being hit by objects were the most prevalent causes of injury.

16h

Turns out anti-vaxxers were around even before vaccines

A new book explores the history of one of humankind’s greatest inventions: vaccines. Vaccines have saved more lives than any public health initiative, save clean water—yet millions of people worry that vaccines are a threat to themselves and their children. Such fears result in vaccination rates dropping, opening the door to outbreaks of preventable diseases such as measles, mumps, and whooping c

17h

‘Sea sludge’ could solve current problems with biofuels

What many consider sea sludge may in fact offer a solution to enhance oil production and harvest, according to new research. The new proof of concept is a biofuel production platform that uses two species of marine algae and soil fungi. It lowers cultivation and harvesting costs and increases productivity, factors that currently hold back biofuels from being widely adopted. The species of alga, N

17h

5 ways to make a better multiple-choice test

Multiple-choice tests and quizzes are an effective way to assess a student’s mastery of facts and concepts and help students learn and retain facts and concepts, according to new research. “Although people often think about multiple-choice tests as tools for assessment, they can also be used to facilitate learning,” says Andrew Butler, associate professor in the education and psychological & brai

18h

Viruses in your brain might bug your bowels, too

While studying viruses best known for infecting the brain, researchers stumbled upon clues to a conundrum involving a completely different part of the anatomy: the bowel. What they learned might explain why some people get digestive woes seemingly out of the blue. Viruses such as West Nile and Zika that target the nervous system in the brain and spinal cord can also kill neurons in the guts of mi

18h

For this 16th-century female writer, poetry was therapy

A new book introduces readers to Vittoria Colonna, a 16th-century writer who was the first woman to publish a book of poems in Italy. Little known and long neglected, she channeled her grief about her husband’s death and profound religious yearnings into sonnets that inspired women writers for centuries. Earlier this year, Ramie Targoff, a professor of English at Brandeis University, published a

18h

Sea lettuce thief gets its genome sequenced

Sea lettuce, a fast-growing seaweed that spawns massive “green tides,” is a prolific thief, according to researchers, who for the first time have sequenced its genome. Scientists found 13 cases where the sea lettuce Ulva mutabilis stole genes from bacteria. This ubiquitous seaweed expanded more than half of the pilfered genes—creating “gene families”—and used some of them to adapt to stresses suc

18h

Pregnant women recognize baby expressions differently depending on mental health history

A pilot study has found that pregnant women who have suffered from depression or bipolar disorder (i.e. both mania and depression) recognize babies' faces and how babies laugh or cry, differently to healthy controls. This happens even if they are not currently experiencing depressive or manic symptoms and may represent an early risk-factor for children of these women, although the authors stress t

18h

What the Disappearance of Jamal Khashoggi Portends

On Tuesday, a Saudi citizen named Jamal Khashoggi entered his country’s consulate in Istanbul, attempting to get a routine document relating to his impending marriage to a Turkish woman. His fiancée waited for him to emerge. He did not—at least not in a form she could see—and for the last several days, the Middle East has speculated about his fate. On Saturday, Reuters and others reported that Kh

18h

Diet and weight may affect response to bipolar disorder treatment

Data from a clinical trial has shown that how people respond to treatment for Bipolar Disorder may be influenced by their weight and the overall quality of their diet, including whether they are eating a diet high in foods thought to contribute to general inflammation. These are early results, but if replicated may mean that treatment of some mental health problems could benefit from the inclusion

18h

Gene which decreases risk of social network-related stress, increases finance-related stress risk

Researchers have discovered that the same gene which increases your risk of depression following financial stress as you grow older also reduces your chance of depression associated with friendship and relationships stresses when young- your social network. This may have implications for treatment, but also offers a possible answer to a question which has puzzled scientists: why has depression sur

18h

Successful mouse couples talk out infidelity in calm tones

The quality of conversations between California mice couples after one partner has been unfaithful can help predict which mouse pairs will successfully produce a litter of mouse pups and which males are good fathers, according to a new study on the evolution of monogamy.

18h

Diabetes may begin more than 20 years before diagnosis

Early signs of type 2 diabetes can be identified more than 20 years before diagnosis, according to new research.

18h

Analysis reveals genomic effects of a new cancer treatment now in clinical trials

A twist on the molecular mechanism of how a new cancer drug works could aid in better identifying the best treatments for patients for an array of cancers. The team identified over 500 sites in DNA that require an enzyme called ATR checkpoint kinase to not break when they are replicated.

18h

Gastric banding as effective as metformin in slowing prediabetes, type two diabetes

People with prediabetes or new-onset type 2 diabetes who had gastric banding, a type of bariatric surgery for weight loss, had similar stabilization of their disease to those who took metformin alone, according to a new study.

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