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Nyheder2018oktober09

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CRISPR Cures Inherited Disorder in Mice

The advance may pave the way for genetic therapy before birth — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

now

 

80 pct. »varm luft og kreativ bogføring«: Klimaplan i modvind fra første fløjt

Kritikken hagler ned over den nye klimaplan, hvis absolut væsentligste initiativer er at annullere CO2-kvoter og at modregne jordens optag af kulstof – to tiltag, der kan klares fra skrivebordet.

5h

 

Facebook vil placere kamera og mikrofon i dit hjem

Portal er navnet på Facebooks nye ‘smart display’, der skal gøre videochat via Messenger mere populært. I første omgang kommer den kun i USA.

3h

LATEST

 

NASA is using HoloLens AR headsets to build its new spacecraft faster

Lockheed Martin engineers wear the goggles to help them assemble the crew capsule Orion—without having to read thousands of pages of paper instructions.

7min

 

Europa Might Have 50-Foot Spikes on Its Surface that Could Destroy Visiting Spacecraft

It's almost as if Europa has something it doesn't want us to see.

11min

 

To crash or swerve? Study reveals which actions taken by self-driving cars are morally defensible

A new study, 'How should autonomous cars drive? A preference for defaults in moral judgments under risk and uncertainty,' published in Risk Analysis: An International Journal addressed this challenge by asking the public what they believed would be the most morally and ethically sound behavior for an autonomous vehicle (AV) faced with an oncoming collision. Even a perfectly functioning AV will not

12min

 

Researchers pinpoint ideal protein to help seniors rebuild lost muscle

While exercise buffs have long used protein supplements to gain muscle, new research from McMaster University suggests one protein source in particular, whey protein, is most effective for seniors struggling to rebuild muscle lost from inactivity associated with illness or long hospital stays.

12min

 

Electrons go with the flow

You turn on a switch and the light switches on because electricity 'flows'. The usual perception is that this is like opening a faucet and the water starts to flow. But this analogy is misleading. The flow of water is determined by the theory of hydrodynamics, where the behavior of the fluid requires no knowledge of the movements of individual molecules.

12min

 

Neuron death in ALS more complex than previously thought

Brown University researchers have discovered that two different kinds of motor neurons that die in people with ALS may die in different ways — an important insight for understanding the disease and, eventually, finding a cure.

12min

 

The order of response options on online questionnaires impacts respondents' choice

The Order of Response Options on Online Questionnaires Impacts Respondents' Choice. This was the conclusion made by researchers from the HSE Centre of Sociology of Higher Education who analysed responses to rating scale questions made by more than 22,000 respondents. Their results showed that the first option from the list of alternatives is chosen most often. https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/

12min

 

Scientists go 'back to the future,' create flies with ancient genes to study evolution

Scientists at New York University and the University of Chicago have created fruit flies carrying reconstructed ancient genes to reveal how ancient mutations drove major evolutionary changes in embryonic development–the impact of which we see today.

12min

 

New NIST method measures 3D polymer processing precisely

Recipes for three-dimensional (3D) printing, or additive manufacturing, of parts have required as much guesswork as science. Until now. Researchers at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) have demonstrated a novel light-based atomic force microscopy (AFM) technique — sample-coupled-resonance photorheology (SCRPR) — that measures how and where a material's properties change i

12min

 

World's largest sleep study shows too much shut-eye can be bad for your brain

Preliminary results from the world's largest sleep study have shown that people who sleep on average between 7 to 8 hours per night performed better cognitively than those who slept less, or more, than this amount. Neuroscientists from Western University's renowned Brain and Mind Institute released their findings today in the high-impact journal, SLEEP.

12min

 

Precise electron spin control yields faster memory storage

Enhancing the speed and reducing the size of data storage devices requires gaining control over the force making electrons spins. In a recent study published in EPJ B, John Kay Dewhurst and colleagues, have developed a new theory to predict the complex dynamics of spin procession in materials subjected to ultra-short laser pulses. The advantage of this approach is that it is predictive.

12min

 

The stuff that planets are made of

UZH researchers have analyzed the composition and structure of faraway exoplanets using statistical tools. Their analysis indicates whether a planet is earth-like, made up of pure rock or a water-world. The larger the planet, the more hydrogen and helium surround it.

12min

 

Mouse study shows how binge drinking and stress affect males, females differently

A VA and Oregon Health & Sciences University team found that a history of binge drinking made male and female mice react differently to traumatic stress. The research may help scientists understand why men and women seem to handle both alcohol and stress differently.

12min

 

Freeloaders beware: Incentives to foster cooperation are just around the corner

In our society, there are always a certain percentage of people who adopt a freeloader attitude. They let other members of society do all the work and do not do their part. In a new study published in EPJ B, Chunpeng Du from Yunnan University of Finance and Economics, Kunming, China, and colleagues show that it is possible to incentivize members of society to cooperate by providing them fixed bonu

12min

 

Protein has unique effects in neural connections related to information processing

The protein SAP102, which is implicated in intellectual disability, appears to play a key and potentially unique role in regulating the form of postsynaptic AMPAR receptor currents in the brain, a new study finds.

12min

 

Seizures begin with a muffle

Contrary to long-held assumptions, researchers find that some seizures start after a burst from neurons that inhibit brain activity.

12min

 

New composite materials prolong the service life of spare parts for equipment and vehicles

Studies have shown that hybrid powder materials based on natural layered silicates developed by the chemists of the Far Eastern Federal University (FEFU) and the Far Eastern Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences (FEB RAS) decrease the friction ratio in metals sevenfold.

12min

 

Statistical method recreates the history of a long-abandoned village

Archaeologists now have new tools for studying the development of medieval villages and the transformation of the historical landscapes surrounding them. In a study recently published in EPJ Plus, scientists have attempted to reconstruct the history of Zornoztegi, an abandoned medieval village located in the Basque Country, Spain.

12min

 

Anti-psychotic drug could treat aggressive breast cancer

A commonly-used anti-psychotic drug could also be effective against triple negative breast cancer, the form of the disease that is most difficult to treat, new research has found. The study, led by the University of Bradford in the UK, also showed that the drug, Pimozide, has the potential to treat the most common type of lung cancer.

12min

 

Hook injury caused by catch-and-release hampers feeding performance in fish

Published today in The Journal of Experimental Biology, a UC Riverside-led research team shows that mouth injuries caused by hook removal after catch-and-release fishing hamper the ability of fish to capture prey. The results add to a growing body of literature raising questions about the practice of catch-and release fishing, which is viewed by many as a way to conserve at-risk fish species.

12min

 

Polar bears gorged on whales to survive past warm periods; won't suffice as climate warms

A new study led by the University of Washington found that while dead whales are valuable sources of fat and protein for some polar bears, this resource will likely not be enough to sustain most bear populations in the future when the Arctic becomes ice-free in summers.

12min

 

The Unstable Identities of The Caregiver

Samuel Park’s new novel, The Caregiver, is a study in fragility: that of bodies, of boundaries, and of identity itself. Centering on two relationships—a mother and her daughter, and the daughter and her patient—it explores the complex bonds between people who are linked by the need that one has for the other, and by “the strange love that fills one’s heart when one gives, gives, and receives litt

18min

 

Formandskandidat i YL: Jeg håber, der kommer flere kandidater

Mandag meldte formand for Yngre Læger, Camilla Rathcke, ud, at hun ikke fortsætter på posten efter november. I kulissen har Helga Schultz meldt sig på banen som afløser med fokus på gode overenskomster og et opgør med seksårsreglen.

23min

 

Know your enemy

Antibiotic resistance in bacteria is a growing global health crisis. Now, new research provides crucial details on bacterial defenses and how we could undermine them.

26min

 

NASA investigated rainfall in Hurricane Michael as it was developing

The Global Precipitation Measurement mission or GPM core satellite analyzed rainfall and structure of an intensifying low pressure area in the western Caribbean Sea on Oct. 5. That system strengthened into what has become Category 2 Hurricane Michael on Oct. 9.

26min

 

New options for breast cancer drug development found in estrogen receptors

Many breast cancer drugs block estrogen receptors inside cancer cells. Blocking the receptors early in disease progression staves off metastasis. But most patients with advanced disease eventually develop drug resistance, leaving doctors desperate for alternatives. Now, researchers from Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine have uncovered a previously uncharacterized, bridge-like stru

26min

 

CDC-led study reports prevalence of out-of-pocket payments for screening mammograms

More than 20 percent of women aged 50-64 years and those aged 65-74 years with Medicare coverage reported paying out-of-pocket costs for their most recent screening mammogram, according to a study led by researchers from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

26min

 

CDC researchers examine HIV-related stigma among US healthcare providers

A Systemic Review from the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention analyzed studies of HIV-related stigma among healthcare provider and identified three main themes: attitudes, beliefs, and behaviors; quality of patient care; and education and training. The CDC researchers found that factors associated with HIV-related stigma varied by gender, race, category of provider, and type of clinical

26min

 

Google Home Hub Smart Display: Specs, Price, Release Date

The 7-inch, voice-controlled display is a home base for the Google Assistant.

27min

 

Google Pixel 3: Specs, Price, Release Date

The Pixel 3 and Pixel 3 XL, shipping this month starting at $799, feature a number of software enhancements that power the camera and the AI features.

27min

 

The Pixel Slate Is Here to Take on the iPad Pro and Surface

Google just revealed its first Chrome OS tablet, the Pixel Slate.

27min

 

Google Duplex, the Human-Sounding Phone Bot, Comes to the Pixel

The bot, which speaks with uncanny speech disfluencies like "um" and "umm-hmm," will be made available select Pixel smartphones before the end of the year.

27min

 

How Google Pixel 3's Camera Works Wonders With Just One Rear Lens

Google uses machine learning and AI to power new camera features, like Top Shot, Night Sight, and Photobooth.

27min

 

Full Transcript: Trump Announces Nikki Haley’s Resignation

On Tuesday, President Trump announced the resignation of Nikki Haley from her position as the U.S. ambassador to the United Nations. During remarks in the Oval Office, Trump lauded Haley’s work. “She’s done a fantastic job, and we have done a fantastic job together,” he said. Haley’s resignation came as a surprise to many observers, including Secretary of State Mike Pompeo and National Security A

36min

 

Brett Kavanaugh Could Extend Trump's Environmental Legacy by Decades

The law is magic, and perhaps nowhere is this more obvious than in environmental law. Through the consent of the people and the government’s monopoly on violence, the mere words of American environmental law has reshaped matter, exerted mastery over nature, and granted an incredible gift— extra years of healthy life —to unknown and unknowing souls. In the past half century, these laws have doused

36min

 

'Sentinels of the sea' at risk from changing climate

Climate change's effect on coastal ecosystems is very likely to increase mortality risks of adult oyster populations in the next 20 years. That is the finding of a new study led by the University of Nantes, the LEMAR (the Marine Environmental Science Laboratory) in Plouzané and the Cerfacs (European center for research and advanced training in scientific computing) in Toulouse (France).

48min

 

Urban Inuit communities suffer from poor health and limited access to healthcare

Cases of cancer and hypertension are much higher among Inuit living in and around Ottawa than for the general population of Canada's capital city. This is according to a study co-led by Janet Smylie of St. Michael's Hospital and the University of Toronto in Canada and published in the Springer-branded Canadian Journal of Public Health.

48min

 

Increased cyto-adhesion of malaria parasites during fever uncovered

A research team from Singapore demonstrated how the cyto-adhesion of plasmodium-infected red blood cells is enhanced at febrile temperatures. Through dual-micropipette step-pressure technique, they studied the interactions between P. falciparum-infected RBCs (iRBCs) and Chinese Hamster Ovary cells expressing Chondroitin sulfate A (CHO-CS), to discover that adhesion force and percentage are elevate

48min

 

HKBU scholar discovers strong evidence for links between drying climate and human evolution

Professor Richard Bernhart Owen of the HKBU Department of Geography has analysed African lake sedimentary cores and established connections between a drying climate and technological and evolutionary changes in early humans.

48min

 

Oldest fossil of a flying squirrel sheds new light on its evolutionary tree

The oldest flying squirrel fossil ever found has unearthed new insight on the origin and evolution of these airborne animals.

48min

 

Comcast becomes majority shareholder of Sky

US cable giant Comcast on Tuesday said it is now the majority shareholder of pan-European TV satellite company Sky after purchasing 21st Century Fox's 39-percent holding in the group.

49min

 

Affable apes live longer, study shows

Male chimps that are less aggressive and form strong social bonds tend to live longer, research suggests.

49min

 

Google launch event overshadowed by privacy firestorm

Google was supposed to be focusing Tuesday on its launch of a new smartphone and other devices, but the event was being overshadowed by a firestorm over a privacy glitch that forced it to shut down its struggling social network.

55min

 

Trapping toxic compounds with 'molecular baskets'

Researchers have developed designer molecules that may one day be able to seek out and trap deadly nerve agents and other toxic compounds in the environment—and possibly in humans.

55min

 

Even when presented with facts, supported by evidence, many choose not to believe them

In an era of fact-checking and "alternative facts," many people simply choose not to believe research findings and other established facts, according to a new paper co-authored by a professor at Indiana University's Kelley School of Business.

55min

 

You can improve your spatial skills with training: study

Do you marvel at your friend's ability to assemble complex IKEA furniture and navigate a new city, or do you all-around groan at your own lack of spatial skills? Don't fret! A new CIRES-led study found that you, too, can improve your spatial reasoning with practice.

55min

 

Voyager 2 is almost outside the sun's protective bubble

Space It follows its predecessor toward where no other (active) spacecraft has gone before. Data from Voyager 2 shows signs that the spacecraft is nearing the edge of the sun's influence.

1h

 

Easter Island inhabitants collected freshwater from the ocean's edge in order to survive

Ancient inhabitants of Rapa Nui (Easter Island) maintained a society of thousands by utilizing coastal groundwater discharge as their main source of "freshwater," according to new research from a team of archaeologists including faculty at Binghamton University, State University at New York.

1h

 

Scientists study African swine fever to prevent outbreak in US

African swine fever virus threatens to devastate the swine industry and is positioned to spread throughout Asia. The virus has spread throughout the Caucuses region of Eastern Europe and was reported in China in August. It recently was detected in wild boar in Belgium.

1h

 

Success is sweet: Researchers unlock the mysteries of the sugarcane genome

For centuries, sugarcane has supplied human societies with alcohol, biofuel, building and weaving materials, and the world's most relied-upon source of sugar. Now, researchers have extracted a sweet scientific prize from sugarcane: its massive and complex genome sequence, which may lead to the development of hardier and more productive cultivars.

1h

 

Cleaning, but safely! Cocoons protect sensitive ant brood during toxic disinfection

Ants are neat: when they move into a new nest box, they spend the first days cleaning it thoroughly. Despite keeping the nest clean, using poison within the nest is dangerous and can kill unprotected brood. However, the silk cocoon that surrounds the ant's sensitive pupae protects them from any harmful effects, as scientists from IST Austria and RHUL show in today's edition of Current Biology.

1h

 

New biomarker for Alzheimer's disease found thanks to the CRISPR technique

The scientists have found a deficiency in the protein STIM1 in brain tissue from patients with Alzheimer's disease. Its involvement in neurodegenerative processes has been verified thanks to the technique CRISPR / Cas9. Up to now, the effects of a deficiency in this protein critical to sporadic Alzheimer's were not known, and so this research provides a new biomarker for the illness, an indicator

1h

 

Clean Water Act dramatically cut pollution in US waterways

The 1972 Clean Water Act has driven significant improvements in US water quality, according to the first comprehensive study of water pollution over the past several decades, by researchers at the University of California, Berkeley and Iowa State University. The team analyzed data from 50 million water quality measurements collected at 240,000 monitoring sites throughout the US between 1962 and 20

1h

 

A pheromone-sensing gene that predates land-dwelling vertebrates

Scientists at Tokyo Tech have discovered a gene that appears to play a vital role in pheromone sensing. The gene is conserved across fish and mammals and over 400 million years of vertebrate evolution, indicating that the pheromone sensing system is much more ancient than previously believed. This discovery opens new avenues of research into the origin, evolution, and function of pheromone signali

1h

 

Newly discovered moth named Icarus sports a flame-shaped mark and prefers high elevations

New species of owlet moth recently discovered to inhabit high-elevation mountains in western North America was named after the Greek mythological character Icarus. In their paper published in the open-access journal ZooKeys, scientists Dr. Lars Crabo and Dr. Christian Schmidt explain that the combination of the distinct flame-shaped mark on the moth's forewing and its high-elevation habitat was qu

1h

 

The many structures of the light-active biomolecules

How the light-sensitive part of the biomolecule phytochrome changes from a light-adapted state to a dark-adapted state has been investigated by researchers at Ruhr-Universität Bochum and Philipps-Universität Marburg. So far, the structures of only a few light-sensitive biomolecules are known — and only for the final states in light and darkness, but not for the intermediate steps. Using various s

1h

 

Thinking outside the box: Adults with ADHD not constrained in creativity

People often believe those with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder face challenges that could hinder future employment, but a University of Michigan study found that adults with ADHD feel empowered doing creative tasks that could help them on the job.

1h

 

Affable apes live longer, study shows

Male chimps that are less aggressive and form strong social bonds tend to live longer, research suggests.

1h

 

Metal leads to the desired configuration

Scientists at the University of Basel have found a way to change the spatial arrangement of bipyridine molecules on a surface. These potential components of dye-sensitized solar cells form complexes with metals and thereby alter their chemical conformation. The results of this interdisciplinary collaboration between chemists and physicists from Basel were recently published in the scientific journ

1h

 

Timing of third-trimester maternal Tdap immunization associated with levels of whooping cough antibodies in newborns

Risk of whooping cough (pertussis) is highest in infants too young to have completed their primary immunization series (6 months old or younger) and they are at highest risk of developing life-threatening complications. Immunizing pregnant women with the tetanus, diphtheria and acellular pertussis (Tdap) vaccine can create enough maternal antibodies to protect infants, but the best time to immuniz

1h

 

Can the timing of pushing during delivery affect outcomes?

The best time to push during the second stage of labor (when the cervix is completely dilated through delivery) is unknown and it's unclear whether the timing affects rates of natural delivery or possible complications. The two most common approaches are either immediate pushing (pushing with uterine contractions once complete cervical dilation occurs) or delayed pushing to allow for spontaneous d

1h

 

Memory 'brainwaves' look the same in sleep and wakefulness

Identical brain mechanisms are responsible for triggering memory in both sleep and wakefulness, new research at the University of Birmingham has shown.

1h

 

In childbirth, when to begin pushing does not affect C-section rates

Obstetricians have differing opinions about when women should begin pushing during labor and whether the timing of pushing increases the likelihood of a cesarean section. Many obstetricians recommend that a woman begin pushing as soon the cervix is fully dilated, while others advise waiting until she feels the urge to push. Washington University School of Medicine led a multicenter study that foun

1h

 

Delayed pushing appears to have no effect on chances for spontaneous vaginal delivery

Delaying pushing during the second stage of labor — when the cervix is fully dilated at 10 centimeters — is a common practice at many US hospitals, but it may have no effect on whether pregnant women deliver spontaneously (without a cesarean section or other intervention), according to a study funded by the National Institutes of Health.

1h

 

'10,000 Immunomes' database opens a window on healthy immunity

Scientists at UC San Francisco have painstakingly assembled a searchable database of normal human immunity that researchers can now use as an instant comparison group in studies of the immune system and immune dysfunction. The new open-access data tool, called the 10,000 Immunomes Project (10KIP), pieces together the results of 83 studies that contain measurements on healthy people of various ages

1h

 

Shaking up how nursing homes and their clinicians are paid to care for sick residents

Regenstrief Institute and Indiana University Center for Aging Research investigators are testing whether providing nursing homes and the doctors and nurse practitioners who care for their residents with increased Medicare payments can further reduce avoidable hospitalizations beyond 33 percent improvement the investigators achieved without financial incentives. 'Improving Nursing Facility Care thr

1h

 

Lessons from Dutch geological history might be useful for other present-day deltas

Even long before medieval inhabitants reclaimed land and raised dykes at a large scale, humans have had a strong impact on river behavior in the Dutch delta plain. Physical geographers at Utrecht University, The Netherlands, have demonstrated that two present Rhine branches developed stepwise in the first centuries CE, because of two combined man-induced effects.

1h

 

Biosecurity Research Institute studies African swine fever to prevent US outbreak

Kansas State University researchers and the Biosecurity Research Institute have several projects focused on stopping the spread of African swine fever and preventing it from reaching the US.

1h

 

Falling rocks can explode so hard that only nuclear weapons beat them

If big rocks fall far enough they can explode with more energy than any non-nuclear bomb – and the ensuing shockwave can snap large trees half a kilometre away

1h

 

For wineries, competition boosts profits from sustainability

An international study of small- to medium-sized wineries and vineyards finds that the more sustainability practices a winery has in place, the better its financial performance—and the effect is enhanced when a winery perceives significant pressure from competitors. The study also found wineries that did not feel as much competitive pressure were more likely to adopt new sustainability practices.

1h

 

All the cool new gadgets from Google's Pixel 3 smartphone launch eventGoogle Pixel 3 Android

Technology Live from Google's announcement event in New York City. New gadgets, including the Pixel 3 smartphone and more.

1h

 

Study discovers new delivery system that could help prevent bacterial infections

In a recent study in the Journal of The American Chemical Society, Professor Tewodros Asefa and Associate Professor Jeffrey Boyd synthesized nanostructured silica particles, considered to be promising drug carriers, that contained payloads of an antimicrobial agent. The researchers found that the particles were effective at killing two human bacterial pathogens.

1h

 

Virgin Galactic space shot is go 'within weeks, not months'

Richard Branson commits to SpaceShipTwo VSS Unity flight beyond Earth’s atmosphere Virgin Galactic will take its first trip into space within weeks according to Richard Branson, the firm’s billionaire chief and founder. The feat would mark a milestone for the company which is in a race against Jeff Bezos’ Blue Origin and Elon Musk’s SpaceX to offer space flights to wealthy would-be astronauts. Co

1h

 

Newly discovered bacterium rids problematic pair of toxic groundwater contaminants

Known as a chemical manufacturing by-product of many cosmetics and home cleaning products, the industrial solvent 1,4-Dioxane is now considered by the Environmental Protection Agency to be an "emerging contaminant" and "likely human carcinogen" that can be found at thousands of groundwater sites nationally—potentially representing a multi-billion dollar environmental remediation challenge.

1h

 

Sealy, world-class 3D printers set to create dissolvable medical implants

As a kid, Michael Sealy was tall. A little clumsy, he says. And he has lasting proof: two metal screws in his left elbow.

1h

 

Sex with Neanderthals helped modern humans survive, says study

Homo Sapiens mated with Neanderthals when they left Africa for Eurasia. Neanderthals developed key genetic adaptations to fighting diseases. Modern humans have 152 genes inherited from the Neanderthals that interact with viruses. We tend to think of the human-like people before us, like the Neanderthals, as part of our biological history that's so far removed that it has little bearing on our cur

1h

 

Club drug GHB associated with brain and cognitive changes

Scientists have discovered that regular use of the party drug GHB, and especially unconsciousness following GHB use, is associated with brain changes including negative effects on long-term memory, working memory, IQ, and higher levels of stress and anxiety.

1h

 

Aluminum on the way to titanium strength

NUST MISIS scientists have proposed a technology that can double the strength of composites obtained by 3D printing from aluminum powder, and advance the characteristics of these products to the quality of titanium alloys: titanium's strength is about six times higher than that of aluminum, but the density of titanium is 1.7 times higher.

1h

 

Micro-/nano architectures in MOF membrane accelerate oil-water separation

Oil pollutions have been generated by the petroleum, steel, and textile industries and the frequent oil spills during oil transportation and have been becoming critical global environmental and economic. Recently, scientists from China introduced micro-/nano architectures into MOF membrane accelerate oil-water separation. This membrane exhibits high separation efficiency and chemical stability.

1h

 

First automated malnutrition screen implemented for hospitalized children

A team of clinicians, dietitians and researchers has created an innovative automated program to screen for malnutrition in hospitalized children, providing daily alerts to healthcare providers so they can quickly intervene with appropriate treatment. The malnutrition screen draws on existing patient data in electronic health records (EHR).

1h

 

Becoming promiscuous to ensure reproduction

Females of a socially monogamous passerine, the Japanese great tit (Parus minor), become more promiscuous after hatchings fail in the first breeding attempt — apparently attempting to ensure successful reproduction.

1h

 

New study shows promise for targeting breast cancer metastasis

A new study by University of Kentucky Markey Cancer Center researchers suggests that targeting a protein known as collagen XIII could be key for suppressing breast cancer metastasis.

1h

 

Time-traveling illusion tricks the brain

Caltech researchers show how sound can retroactively induce an optical illusion.

1h

 

Recovering from a heart attack? Hold the antibiotics

An international team of researchers has shown in mice that a healthy gut microbiome is important for recovery after a heart attack.

1h

 

Long-acting injectable implant shows promise for HIV treatment and prevention

A long-acting antiretroviral drug formulation, developed by UNC School of Medicine researchers, shows promise for HIV treatment and prevention in a study published in Nature Communications.

1h

 

Newly discovered bacterium rids problematic pair of toxic groundwater contaminants

NJIT researchers have detailed the discovery of the first bacterium known capable of simultaneously degrading the pair of chemical contaminants — 1,4-Dioxane and 1,1-DCE.

1h

 

Herning får to nye ingeniøruddannelser i 2019

Manglen på ingeniører i Vestdanmark får nu Ingeniørhøjskolen Aarhus Universitet til at åbne to nye diplomuddannelser inden for elektrisk energiteknologi og maskinteknik.

1h

 

Klimaplan 2018: Organisationer savner visioner

Interesseorganisationer, brancheorganisationer og selskaber har reageret på regeringens nye klimaplan med både tilfredshed og skuffelse. IDA savner bl.a. bud på energieffektivisering i byggeriet.

1h

 

Cougar vs. Puma vs. Mountain Lion

Just look at that fuzzy kitty baby… er, we mean… ferocious feline hunter! The range of p. concolor is enormous; the species can be found from the tip of Chile & Argentina up to southern Canada. While it’s about the size of an adult human (and soooooo cuuuuuute), it’s one of the deadliest ambush predators. And it really can seem like an overgrown house cat at times, because unlike some larger cous

1h

 

Når du ikke har råd til en elbil: Små hverdagsvaner, der hjælper miljøet

Det kræver kun en lille ændring af dit handlingsmønster at blive mere miljørigtig.

1h

 

Paul Greengrass, Auteur of Globalization and Its Discontents

LONDON—On July 22, 2011, Anders Behring Breivik, a 32-year-old Norwegian who was enraged that his country, as he saw it, was beholden to liberal elites and becoming overrun by Muslims, went on a murderous rampage. He killed eight people with a bomb he planted outside government buildings in Oslo, then slaughtered 69 others, almost all of them teenagers, at a historic Norwegian Labor Party youth r

1h

 

Brett Kavanaugh Has Two Options

No Supreme Court justice has ever arrived under a darker cloud than the one over Brett Kavanaugh. Americans believe the women accusing him of sexual assault and abuse 52 percent to 38 percent. Many also think he lied to the Senate. His angry confirmation testimony was so injudicious that he had to write a mea culpa op-ed in The Wall Street Journal promising to do better if he made it to the Court

1h

 

Nonfatal injuries in the U.S. cost $1.8 trillion in 2013

Nonfatal injuries in the United States cost more than $1.8 trillion in 2013, according to new research. And nearly all were preventable. For the new study, researchers analyzed anonymized data from hospital-treated nonfatal injuries and determined three different costs for the 31,038,072 injuries: total medical spending, work lost, and decreased quality of life. Medical spending—which includes co

1h

 

Seafloor mapping XPRIZE final will be in the Mediterranean, off Greek coast

Robots with novel seafloor mapping capabilities will demonstrate their skill in a Greek showdown.

1h

 

Trapping toxic compounds with 'molecular baskets'

Researchers have developed designer molecules that may one day be able to seek out and trap deadly nerve agents and other toxic compounds in the environment — and possibly in humans.

1h

 

Targeting abnormal signals suggests novel method to treat a rare childhood blood disease

Pediatric researchers studying the life-threatening blood disorder Fanconi anemia have devised a method to block the abnormal biological signals that drive the disease. This proof-of-concept finding in animals and stem cells from human cord blood may lay the foundation for better treatments for children with the rare, frequently fatal disease.

1h

 

Newly discovered long noncoding RNA plays critical role in brain growth and signaling

The results suggest that healthy growth and development of brain cells and brain circuits depends not just upon specific proteins but also upon specific long noncoding RNAs.

1h

 

Artificial intelligence helps reveal how people process abstract thought

As artificial intelligence becomes more sophisticated, much of the public attention has focused on how successfully these technologies can compete against humans at chess and other strategy games. A philosopher from the University of Houston has taken a different approach, deconstructing the complex neural networks used in machine learning to shed light on how humans process abstract learning.

1h

 

Study shows DNA of people with childhood abuse or depression ages faster

DNA from people who suffer from major depression is biologically older than that of healthy people by on average 8 months, suggesting that they are biologically older than their corresponding calendar age. This effect was greater in people who have had childhood trauma, such as violence, neglect or sexual abuse, who show a biological age around a year older than their actual age. This work is pres

1h

 

UTEP study finds link between childhood adversity, burnout and depression

The results of the study at the University Texas at El Paso titled, 'The Relationship of Childhood Adversity on Burnout and Depression Among BSN Students', were published in the Sept. 2018 issue of the Journal of Professional Nursing, the official journal of the American Association of Colleges of Nursing. The study found that undergraduate nursing students who were exposed to a higher number of a

1h

 

Code of ethics doesn't influence decisions of software developers

The world's largest computing society, ACM, updated its code of ethics in July 2018 — but new research shows that the code of ethics does not appear to affect the decisions made by software developers.

1h

 

Supercomputer predicts optical properties of complex hybrid materials

Materials scientists at Duke University computationally predicted the electrical and optical properties of semiconductors made from extended organic molecules sandwiched by inorganic structures. These types of so-called layered 'hybrid organic-inorganic perovskites' — or HOIPs — are popular targets for light-based devices such as solar cells and light-emitting diodes (LEDs). The ability to build

1h

 

A tumor cell population responsible for resistance to therapy and tumor relapse

Researchers at the Université libre de Bruxelles (ULB) uncover a tumor cell population responsible for resistance to therapy and tumor relapse in the most frequent human cancer. They also identify a novel therapeutic strategy that target this resisting tumor population and prevents tumor relapse.

1h

 

Even when presented with facts, supported by evidence, many choose not to believe them

In an era of fact-checking and 'alternative facts,' many people simply choose not to believe research findings and other established facts, according to a new paper co-authored by a professor at Indiana University's Kelley School of Business.

1h

 

Metastatic breast cancer patients report high level of financial impact

A study led by University of North Carolina Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center researchers investigated the extent and severity of negative financial effects of cancer among women with breast cancer that has spread in the body. The preliminary results were presented at the American Society of Clinical Oncology's Quality Care Symposium, held Sept. 28-29 in Phoenix.

1h

 

Work environment challenges nurses trying to adopt healthy behaviors

Research among nurses reports fewer than 10 percent meet physical activity guidelines and eat a healthy diet. The American Nurses Association underscored this issue by declaring 2017 as the Year of the Healthy Nurse. A new study published in the Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior found that despite providing pedometers, a smartphone app, and access to a Facebook group, study participants

1h

 

Easter Island inhabitants collected freshwater from the ocean's edge in order to survive

Ancient inhabitants of Rapa Nui (Easter Island) maintained a society of thousands by utilizing coastal groundwater discharge as their main source of 'freshwater,' according to new research from a team of archaeologists including faculty at Binghamton University, State University at New York.

1h

 

US researchers explore variations in employment outcomes for people with disabilities

'Employment outcomes were most strongly related to the economic conditions and physical environment; the policy environment was less of an influence,' noted John O'Neill, Ph.D., director of disability and employment research at Kessler Foundation. 'None of these factors, were as strongly related as individual health and personal characteristics, which is why all of these factors need to be weighed

1h

 

Rutgers discovers new delivery system that could help prevent bacterial infections

Rutgers researchers have discovered a new system to deliver antimicrobial agents — drugs, antiseptics or pesticides — that could more effectively treat or prevent bacterial infections.

1h

 

Study: Sexes differ when it comes to comfort during and after exercise

Study is the first to highlight sex differences in thermal behavior and could one day inform the development of new athletic apparel.

1h

 

Why single embryo transfer during IVF sometimes results in twins or triplets

Results from the largest study (nearly a million cycles) to investigate the prevalence and causes of multiple pregnancies after single embryo transfer (SET) finds that using frozen thawed embryos for SET, maturing the fertilized egg (blastocyst) in the laboratory for five or six days before SET, and assisted hatching could increase the risk.

1h

 

Australia defies climate warning to back coal

The Australian government has backed coal-fired power despite the recommendations of a major report on climate change.

1h

 

Forests Emerge as a Major Overlooked Climate Factor

When Abigail Swann started her career in the mid-2000s, she was one of just a handful of scientists exploring a potentially radical notion: that the green plants living on Earth’s surface could have a major influence on the planet’s climate. For decades, most atmospheric scientists had focused their weather and climate models on wind, rain and other physical phenomena. But with powerful computer

1h

 

How cryptocurrency can help startups get investment capital | Ashwini Anburajan

We're living in a golden era of innovation, says entrepreneur Ashwini Anburajan — but venture capital hasn't evolved to keep up, and startups aren't getting the funding they need to grow. In this quick talk, she shares the story of how her company became part of an entirely new way to raise capital, using the powers of cooperation and cryptocurrency.

2h

 

Google Pixel 3 Liveblog: All the News About the Event As It Happens

Follow Google's Pixel 3 event on October 9 in New York with our live news updates.

2h

 

What you should know about the new climate change report

Environment We have the technological capability to stop our earth from warming further. But it looks like that won't happen. A new report by the IPCC shows how even tiny increases in global temperature—give or take 0.5°C—could severely alter our planet.

2h

 

Future breast imaging and biopsy are not eliminated after mastectomy

A new study led by researchers at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai has determined that having a mastectomy does not completely eliminate the need for further breast imaging studies.

2h

 

Study uncovers 'sextortion' prevalence in teens

Sextortion, the threatened distribution of explicit, intimate and embarrassing sexual images without consent, is the fastest-growing cyberthreat to children. This study is the first to examine the prevalence and effects of sextortion among teens, using data from 5,568 middle and high school students in the US. Findings show that more males than females participated in sextortion both as a victim a

2h

 

Mapping genetic differences in breast cancer can improve care for underserved populations

A new study comparing DNA and RNA data from Nigerian breast cancer patients to patients in a United States database found that aggressive molecular features were far more prevalent in tumors from Nigerian women than in black or white American women. Those differences could explain disparities in breast cancer mortality for Nigerian women and hasten a shift to precisely targeted therapies.

2h

 

Carotid artery MRI improves risk assessment for cardiovascular disease

MRI measurements of wall thickness in the carotid arteries improve cardiovascular disease risk assessment, according to a new study.

2h

 

Success is sweet: Researchers unlock the mysteries of the sugarcane genome

For centuries, sugarcane has supplied human societies with alcohol, biofuel, building and weaving materials, and the world's most relied-upon source of sugar. Now, researchers have extracted a sweet scientific prize from sugarcane: Its massive and complex genome sequence, which may lead to the development of hardier and more productive cultivars.

2h

 

Racial discrimination linked to higher risk of chronic illness in African-American women

Less-educated African-American women who report experiencing high levels of racial discrimination may face greater risk of developing chronic diseases, says a new study by University of California, Berkeley, researchers. The study of 208 middle-aged African-American women from the San Francisco Bay Area is the first to examine the links between racial discrimination and allostatic load, a measure

2h

 

Largest ever genetic study of blood pressure

The largest ever genetic analysis of over one million people has identified 535 new genes associated with high blood pressure.Scientists examined around 7 million common genetic variants for an association with systolic and diastolic blood pressure as well as pulse pressure.There is also a genetic overlap between hypertension and lifestyle exposures, with many blood pressure genes also associated

2h

 

Mayo clinic researchers question benefits of long term oxygen therapy in COPD

Long-term oxygen therapy does not decrease the risk for hospitalizations or increase life expectancy for many patients with mild to moderate COPD, but may lower their quality of life, according to Mayo Clinic researchers published in The Journal of the American Osteopathic Association.

2h

 

Genetic risk factor for erectile dysfunction identified

In a new study that ultimately analyzed the genomes of nearly a quarter of a million men, a research team including UC San Francisco scientists has discovered that variants at a single site on Chromosome 6 are associated with a significantly higher risk of developing erectile dysfunction (ED).

2h

 

Groundbreaking study finds community efforts to combat childhood obesity can be effective

Groundbreaking research appearing in the current issue of Pediatric Obesity represents the most wide-ranging investigation to date of how broadly and successfully communities across the US implement programs and policies to prevent obesity in kids.

2h

 

You can improve your spatial skills with training

Do you marvel at your friend's ability to assemble complex IKEA furniture and navigate a new city, or do you all-around groan at your own lack of spatial skills? Don't fret! A new CIRES-led study found that you, too, can improve your spatial reasoning with practice.

2h

 

More exercise may not help all cancer patients to the same extent

A new article in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute finds that some cancer patients appear to benefit more from exercise than others.

2h

 

Scientists suggested an eco-friendly way of obtaining highly active catalysts

A team from Sechenov University together with Russian colleagues developed a method for obtaining substances that accelerate the binding of hydrogen molecules with hydrocarbons via double bonds. The peculiarity of this approach lies in the impregnation of a polymeric carcass with rhodium- and palladium-containing salts in the supercritical CO2 environment. The latter is an eco-friendly alternative

2h

 

Breast cancer drug could be used to treat life-threatening leukaemia

A recently-approved breast cancer drug could be used to target and treat a life-threatening leukaemia, new research has revealed.

2h

 

For wineries, competition boosts profits from sustainability

An international study of small- to medium-sized wineries and vineyards finds that the more sustainability practices a winery has in place, the better its financial performance — and the effect is enhanced when a winery perceives significant pressure from competitors.

2h

 

New discovery restores insulin cell function in type 2 diabetes

By blocking a protein, VDAC1, in the insulin-producing beta cells, it is possible to restore their normal function in case of type 2 diabetes. In preclinical experiments, the researchers behind a new study have also shown that it is possible to prevent the development of the disease. The findings are published in the scientific journal Cell Metabolism.

2h

 

Infective endocarditis increases tenfold in North Carolina

A side effect of opioid use is an infection of the heart valves called drug-associated infective endocarditis. Researchers at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill have found a tenfold increase in the number of hospitalizations and surgeries for endocarditis in the past decade.

2h

 

New knowledge about retrovirus-host coevolution

Retroviruses have colonized vertebrate hosts for millions of years by inserting their genes into host genomes, enabling their inheritance through generations as endogenous retroviruses (ERVs). Researchers from Uppsala University now provide new knowledge about the long-term associations of retroviruses and their hosts by studying ERV variation and segregation in wild and domestic rabbit population

2h

 

Icy warning for space missions to Jupiter's moon

A location often earmarked as a potential habitat for extra-terrestrial life could prove to be a tricky place for spacecraft to land, new research has revealed.

2h

 

Spider-Man Defies Physics When He Falls Backwards Off a Plane

If you care about the momentum principle, this should bother you.

2h

 

UK union calls for 24-hour strike of Uber drivers

A British union has called for a 24-hour strike of Uber drivers in London, Birmingham and Nottingham, putting up a "digital picket line" to demand better pay and conditions.

2h

 

‘Expat’ and the Fraught Language of Migration

The mass movement of people around the world is arguably one of the biggest stories of our time. Today, approximately 258 million people live outside their country of birth. By 2050, that number is expected to jump to 405 million . Some movements are voluntary (say, for a good job opportunity); others are driven by war, persecution, or environmental crisis. The reason for the movement gets reflec

2h

 

How wasp and bee stinger designs help deliver the pain

Next time you're stung by a wasp or a honeybee, consider the elegantly designed stinger that caused you so much pain.

2h

 

Endangered native oyster helped by invasive species

The presence of invasive oysters can support an endangered native oyster species in certain situations, a team led by a British Antarctic Survey scientist has found.

2h

 

A study to maintain food security in Uganda

By identifying the genes involved in resisting Africa's most widespread cattle disease, researchers at EPFL have developed a map of Uganda showing cattle farmers where the riskiest areas are.

2h

 

Målrettet indsats for at nedbringe antallet af bæltefikseringer hjælper

En evaluering af et satspuljeprojekt viser, at det er muligt næsten helt at undgå bæltefikseringer med den rette indsats.

2h

 

Antallet af ambulante behandlinger på sygehuse har store geografiske udsving

På landsbasis er antallet af ambulante behandlinger steget med 50 pct. fra 2009 til 2017. Men stigningen dækker over store forskelle, hvor andelen af ambulante behandlinger er næsten tre gange større i visse kommuner i syddanmark, mens hovedstaden halter bagefter.

2h

 

Nordjylland er ikke lykkedes med at få udenlandske læger til at overtage praksis

Region Nordjylland ansatte for to år siden fire udenlandske læger i samme praksis op Mors. Kun en af lægerne er der i dag.

2h

 

Targeted drugs for advanced cancer move from specialist units to community setting

Nearly 1 in 4 patients with advanced cancer, treated at Comprehensive Cancer Care Network (NCCN) centres in the US, are receiving innovative drugs matched to DNA mutations in their tumours. This achievement, to be reported at the ESMO 2018 Congress in Munich, shows that cutting-edge precision medicine is spreading from highly specialist cancer units to other healthcare facilities so more patients

2h

 

How wasp and bee stinger designs help deliver the pain

Next time you're stung by a wasp or a honeybee, consider the elegantly designed stinger that caused you so much pain. In a new study, researchers found that the stingers of the two species are about five times softer at the tip than at the base to make it easier to pierce skin. The stingers are harder closer to the insect's body so they don't bend too much, or break, as you yelp in agony.

2h

 

Mechanism of resistance to novel targeted therapy for ovarian cancer identified

Wistar scientists have unraveled a mechanism of resistance to EZH2 inhibitors in ovarian cancers with mutations in the ARID1A gene.

2h

 

A step towards biological warfare with insects?

A project by a research agency of the US Department of Defense could easily be misused for developing biological weapons.

2h

 

Scorpion census: Researchers update global record of medically significant scorpions

In a new report, FSU researchers document 104 scorpions spanning dozens of countries, providing a vital update to the global record of medically significant scorpions, or scorpions whose venom could be alternately gravely harmful or medically beneficial to human beings.

2h

 

The threat of Centaurs for the Earth

Astrophysicists from the University of Vienna, in collaboration with Elizabeth A. Silber (Brown University, USA) investigated the long-term path development of Centaurs. The researchers have estimated the number of close encounters and impacts with the terrestrial planets after the so-called Late Heavy Bombardment (about 3.8 billion years ago) as well as the possible sizes of craters that can occu

2h

 

Potential assay artefacts in anti-malarial screening documented

A research group led by Assistant Professor Rajesh Chandramohanadas from the Singapore University of Technology and Design (SUTD) documented the permissible limits of a number of chemicals that are often part of anti-malarial efficacy tests. Their results provide a previously undetermined dataset on drug reconstitution conditions at which both the red cell integrity and plasmodium growth and proli

2h

 

String theory: Is dark energy even allowed?

In string theory, a paradigm shift could be imminent. In June, a team of string theorists from Harvard and Caltech published a conjecture which sounded revolutionary: String theory is said to be fundamentally incompatible with our current understanding of 'dark energy'. Timm Wrase has now found out that this conjecture seems to be incompatible with the existence of the Higgs particle.

2h

 

Immunotherapy effective against hereditary melanoma

Individuals with an inherited form of skin cancer often have a poor prognosis. The type of immunotherapy that was awarded this year's Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine is, however, particularly effective in this patient group, research from Karolinska Institutet in Sweden shows. The study is published in the Journal of Medical Genetics.

2h

 

Approach paves way for new antimicrobial materials

Researchers have successfully incorporated 'photosensitizers' into a range of polymers, giving those materials the ability to render bacteria and viruses inactive using only ambient oxygen and visible-wavelength light.

2h

 

Controlling chemical reactions near absolute zero

EPFL chemists have demonstrated complete experimental control over a chemical reaction just above absolute zero.

2h

 

DFG presents position paper on synthetic biology

Clear distinction between synthetic biology and underlying methods required / No new potential risks associated with current research work

2h

 

Root extract of Chinese medicinal plant makes worms to live longer

A root extract of the Fallopia multiflora, or Chinese knotweed, has special properties: it enables the nematode C. elegans to live longer and protects it from oxidative stress. This has been demonstrated in a new study by nutritional scientists at Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg (MLU). The researchers provide scientifically substantiated evidence for the effectiveness of this extract.The

2h

 

Statins show little promise for conditions other than heart disease

Medicines commonly prescribed to reduce people's risk of heart attack may have limited use for treating other diseases, research suggests.

2h

 

Increase in plastics waste reaching remote South Atlantic islands

The amount of plastic washing up onto the shores of remote South Atlantic islands is 10 times greater than it was a decade ago, according to new research published today (8 October) in the journal Current Biology.Scientists investigating plastics in seas surrounding the remote British Overseas Territories discovered they are invading these unique biologically-rich regions. This includes areas that

2h

 

In the absence of bees, flies are responsible for pollination in the Arctic region

Mikko Tiusanen, MSc, in his doctoral dissertation, investigated the structure and functioning of plants and their pollinators in Arctic regions.

2h

 

Court orders diesel ban on major Berlin roads

Berlin could shut out diesel drivers from major arterial roads next year, after a court Tuesday ordered the German capital to follow in the footsteps of Hamburg, Frankfurt and Stuttgart with exclusion zones.

2h

 

20 million years ago, a ‘wave’ formed the U.S. High Plains

New research reconstructs the unusual geological history of the American High Plains. According to the research, a mantle wave passing beneath western North America over the last 20 million years is responsible for the formation of the High Plains, an area that starts at the eastern foot of the Rocky Mountains and extends across several of the United States. Dropping just a few hundred meters ove

2h

 

A Republican Fracture Could Hand Democrats the Kansas Governorship

OVERLAND PARK, Kan.—Barbara Bollier was far from home, and even further from her party, when she learned of her political defenestration this summer: The conservatives who control the government in Kansas had stripped her of a plum committee post in the state senate. Bollier’s crime, such as it was, was not a tawdry scandal. She was not accused of corruption or any other official malfeasance. Nor

2h

 

Team breaks exaop barrier with deep learning application

A team of computational scientists from Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and engineers from NVIDIA has, for the first time, demonstrated an exascale-class deep learning application that has broken the exaop barrier.

2h

 

Using the food wasted in New York City

Knowing that people in our own city are hungry and that children go to sleep without enough to eat is a moral outrage in a place as rich as this. One third of the garbage in the city's waste stream is food waste. There are many groups working to recover and distribute food so some of what we discard goes to feed people, but inevitably, we will be adding food to our waste stream. The question then

2h

 

Making better use of Earth observations to enhance terrestrial and marine ecosystems

Healthy ecosystems and a rich biodiversity are vital for human welfare and survival. Ecosystems provide a multitude of benefits to people. These range from food, clean water and raw materials to flood protection and cultural heritage. However, climate change and the shifts in land use can alter nature's ecosystems and the habitats that support life, from oceans to forests.

2h

 

How to integrate knowledge for managing future climate extremes

With the rising frequency of water-related natural-hazard events such as floods and droughts, policymakers are increasingly focusing on risk management and adaptation strategies. These require not only a better understanding and use of forecasts of extreme hydrological events, but also the involvement of stakeholders in the decision-making process. The EU-funded IMPREX project has been just doing

2h

 

During exercise, men and women have different ‘thermal behavior’

New research identifies differences between men and women in their preferences for maintaining comfort both while exercising and in recovery. The results could one day guide the development of new athletic apparel. The human body has a variety of automatic mechanisms in place to respond to being too warm, including sweating and increased skin blood flow. But people also have voluntary ways of coo

2h

 

Fingerprint drug screen test works on the living and deceased

A revolutionary drug test can detect amphetamines, cannabis, cocaine and opiates from the sweat of single fingerprint sample in just 10 minutes. The research shows that the technology works on both the living and deceased.

2h

 

A rack for ammonia

Handling, storing, and shipping of ammonia requires costly equipment and special precautions because of its inherent corrosiveness and toxicity. Scientists in Manchester, UK, have found that a metal-organic framework, MFM-300(Al), a porous solid, not only effectively filters harmful nitrogen dioxide gas, but it also has outstanding capabilities for ammonia storage. As detailed in the journal Angew

2h

 

Hyperspectral imaging helps conservation of outdoor bronze statue by Auguste Rodin

Outdoor bronze statues suffer from corrosion by the urban atmosphere. Short wavelength infrared hyperspectral imaging can determine the spatial distribution of corrosion products on the statue, none of which can be recognized by visual observation.

2h

 

The cosmological lithium problem

This problem is one of the still unresolved questions of the current standard description of the Big Bang. Different nuclear reactions responsible for the creation and destruction of atomic nuclei in the nucleosynthesis during the Big Bang are crucial in the determining the primordial abundance of lithium, the third (and last) chemical element formed during the very early phase of the creation of

2h

 

Supercharged natural killer cells may hold promise for cancer

A type of 'supercharged' immune cell could be mass-produced to help fight cancer.

2h

 

MIT, SMART and NTU scientists have discovered a potential treatment for severe malaria

Scientists from Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), Singapore-MIT Alliance for Research and Technology (SMART) and Nanyang Technological University, Singapore (NTU Singapore) have discovered a potential treatment that could be effective against severe malaria and even drug-resistant malaria.

2h

 

Statins vs. nutraceutical (Longevinex®) for vision threatening cholesterol deposits

Drusen deposits approached the visual center (fovea) of the patient's only functional eye. Use of the National Eye Institute AREDS antioxidant dietary supplement and then two successive statin drugs increased the drusen-free area from ~1500 to ~5000 pixels but were not able to eradicate visual distortions on a home vision test. A weight-loss diet and use of a resveratrol-based dietary supplement (

2h

 

Dummies not to blame for common speech disorder in kids

New University of Sydney research shows bottles, dummies, and thumb sucking in the early years of life do not cause or worsen phonological impairment, the most common type of speech disorder in children.

2h

 

Hurricane Michael reaches Category 2, threatens southern US

Hurricane Michael strengthened to a Category 2 storm with 100-mile-per-hour winds on Tuesday as Florida's governor warned it could bring "total devastation" to parts of the southern US state.

2h

 

Google drops out of bidding for massive Pentagon cloud contractGoogle Pentagon JEDI

Google is dropping out of the bidding for a huge Pentagon cloud computing contract that could be worth up to $10 billion, saying the deal would be inconsistent with its principles.

2h

 

Researchers build a model that predicts business closures in cities with 80% accuracy

Over the past decade, changes in the way people shop have led more and more businesses to close their doors, from small music venues to book shops and even major department stores. This trend has been attributed to several factors, including a shift towards online shopping and changing spending preferences. But business closures are complex, and often due to many intertwined factors.

3h

 

How your birth date influences how well you do in school, and later in life

Whether you were born in December, January, August or September can have a significant and long-lasting impact on your life. Our new research shows your birthday month may also contribute to shaping your personality. In particular, we found people's self-confidence can significantly differ because of their month of birth.

3h

 

LIVE-TV KL 16: Topforsker fortæller om katalyse

KLOKKEN 16: Modtager af Niels Bohr Medaljen, Jens Nørskov, holder foredrag om katalyse – hvor VE og CO2 omdannes til brændsler.

3h

 

Genetic tool to predict adult heart attack risk in childhood

People at high risk of a heart attack in adulthood could be spotted much earlier in life with a one-off DNA test.An international team of scientists has developed a powerful scoring system which can identify people who are at risk of developing coronary heart disease prematurely because of their genetics.

3h

 

Vaccinating humans to protect mosquitoes from malaria

For decades, scientists have been trying to develop a vaccine that prevents mosquitoes from spreading malaria among humans. This unique approach — in which immunized humans transfer anti-malarial proteins to mosquitoes when bitten — is called a transmission-blocking vaccine (TBV). A new biotech advancement moves us closer to this goal. If successful, it could help reduce the spread of the diseas

3h

 

Monitoring the air pollution in China from geostationary satellites is explored

Air pollution is one of the most important environment problem affecting the health and life of human, especially in China. To monitor and control the air pollution, observation from space is more and more widely used. Now researchers in China have explored the potential of measuring the air pollutant in China from geostationary satellite using model simulation and give some suggestions for instru

3h

 

Education interventions improve economic rationality

This study proves that education can be leveraged as a tool to help enhance an individual's economic decision-making quality, or economic rationality.

3h

 

NUS researchers uncover new role of TIP60 protein in controlling tumor formation

Scientists from the Cancer Science Institute of Singapore have discovered a new molecular pathway that controls colorectal cancer development, and their exciting findings open new therapeutic opportunities. They found that TIP60 protein, a known cancer suppressor for breast and colorectal tumours, works with BRD4 protein to suppress the expression of a group of genes (endogenous retroviral element

3h

 

UCalgary scientists discover a new way to eliminate allergen-induced asthma attacks

University of Calgary scientists with the Alberta Children's Hospital Research Institute and Hotchkiss Brain Institute at the Cumming School of Medicine have discovered another way to help asthmatics breathe more easily by targeting treatment at the nervous system. A recent study performed on rats shows the carotid bodies, tiny collections of neurons on each side of the neck, may be responsible fo

3h

 

Tracking fear-causing spaces in the city

Cyclists feel the cold sweat of fear when trucks come too close. Pedestrians feel uncomfortable in the subway, but just around the street corner they enjoy their relaxing strolls. Spatial and social structures of a city cause both individually and collectively different feelings. The Urban Emotions project of Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) develops methods to make these emotions measurabl

3h

 

Global warming below 1.5 degrees "still possible, but we need to act quickly and drastically"

Keeping the global temperature rise below 1.5 degrees Celsius is still possible, but we have to take immediate and drastic measures. That is the conclusion of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) in its latest report which was presented today. The report was requested by the countries that signed the 2015 Paris agreement and pledged to keep climate change well below 2°C and to aim

3h

 

Protecting marine areas may have insidious political effects

Zones of ocean known as Marine Protected Areas (MPAs) are all the rage. They have no single or agreed definition, but essentially they are areas of sea in which human activity is restricted or prohibited in order to preserve and protect marine habitat and species. They may be small coastal areas or very large off-shore expanses of ocean. MPAs are established by local or national governments in ord

3h

 

Study in Ethiopia links healthy soils to more nutritious cereals

Large fields, predictable rainfall and favourable temperatures have meant that farmers in Arsi Negele, a town in southeastern Ethiopia, have benefited from good crop yields. Their production of wheat and maize, two of the main food staples in Ethiopia, have also increased over time.

3h

 

Origin of life in membraneless protocells

How life arose from non-living chemicals more than 3.5 billion years ago on Earth is a still-unanswered question. The RNA world hypothesis assumes that RNA biomolecules were key players during this time as they carry genetic information and act as enzymes. However, one requirement for RNA activity is that there are a certain number of molecules within close enough proximity to one another. This wo

3h

 

Drier, less predictable environment may have spurred human evolution

Evidence of a variable but progressively drying climate coincides with a major shift in stone-tool-making abilities and the appearance of modern Homo sapiens. Sediment cores obtained by the Hominin Sites and Paleolakes Drilling Project provide the first continuous environmental context for the diverse archeological evidence recovered from nearby localities in the East African rift valley.

3h

 

Salt: Mover and shaker in ancient Maya society

Salt is essential for life. As ancient civilizations evolved from hunters and gatherers to agrarian societies, it has not been clear how people acquired this mineral that is a biological necessity. However, an anthropologist has discovered remnants of an ancient salt works in Belize that provide clues on how the ancient Maya at the peak of their civilization more than 1,000 years ago produced, sto

3h

 

Why we can't reverse climate change with 'negative emissions' technologies

In a much-anticipated report, the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) said the world will need to take dramatic and drastic steps to avoid the catastrophic effects of climate change.

3h

 

Graphene puts nanomaterials in their place

Nanomaterials offer unique optical and electrical properties and bottom-up integration within industrial semiconductor manufacturing processes. However, they also present one of the most challenging research problems. In essence, semiconductor manufacturing today lacks methods for depositing nanomaterials at predefined chip locations without chemical contamination. We think that graphene, one of t

3h

 

How Americans Described Evil Before Hitler

Adolf Hitler has been dead for more than 70 years, but he has gained immortality as a historical analogy. Simply glance at today’s news headlines: Major political figures from around the world, including Donald Trump, Vladimir Putin, and Recep Tayyip Erdogan, are routinely compared to the Nazi leader. Some scholars and journalists claim that Hitler analogies have great contemporary relevance for

3h

 

Methane-based fuels for the transport and energy sectors

The lead project "Methane from Renewable Sources in Mobile and Stationary Applications" (MethQuest) launched on September 14, 2018 is aimed at developing environmentally compatible, affordable, and feasible approaches to a successful energy transition. The project is funded with EUR 19 million by the Federal Ministry for Economic Affairs and Energy (BMWi). Responsibility for joint project coordina

3h

 

Reconstructing the history of mankind with the help of fecal sterols

It is now possible to tell the story of mankind's presence and evolution on the planet by analyzing trends in soil and sediment accumulation of fecal sterols, chemical compounds which are crucial in human physiology. Scientists at Ca' Foscari University of Venice and the Institute for the Dynamics of Environmental Processes of the National Research Council (CNR-IDPA) have identified and dated trac

3h

 

Your brain on space—the overview effect

Space travel is like a drug—and it could save the rest of us down here on planet Earth.

3h

 

First genetic risk factor for erectile dysfunction identified

For the first time, a team of researchers has found a specific place in the human genome that raises a person's risk of erectile dysfunction. The discovery is a significant advancement in the understanding of the genetics underlying erectile dysfunction.

3h

 

Genes responsible for difference in flower color of snapdragons identified

Snapdragons are tall plants, and flower in a range of colors. In Spain, where snapdragons grow wild, these flower colors show a remarkable pattern: areas of magenta and yellow blooming flowers are separated by just a two kilometer long stretch in which flower colors mix. Scientists have investigated the causes of this pattern and identified the genes responsible for flower color difference from DN

3h

 

Land-locked Atlantic salmon also use magnetic field to navigate

A new study shows that Atlantic salmon use the Earth's magnetic field as a navigational tool — much like their cousins, Pacific salmon — and don't lose that ability through several generations of fish even after they have been transplanted into a land-locked lake.

3h

 

Scientists create new map of brain region linked to Alzheimer's disease

Scientists have now completed an exceptionally detailed map of the brain's memory bank, the hippocampus. Intricate insight into hippocampus' structure and function opens new opportunities to treat diseases such as Alzheimer's.

3h

 

First example of a bioelectronic medicine

Researchers have developed the first example of a bioelectronic medicine: an implantable, biodegradable wireless device that speeds nerve regeneration and improves healing of a damaged nerve. Their device delivered pulses of electricity to damaged nerves in rats after a surgical repair process, accelerating the regrowth of nerves and enhancing the recovery of muscle strength and control. The devic

3h

 

Instagram Deploys a New Anti-Bullying Algorithm

Instagram is now patrolling your feed to flag threatening photos and comments.

3h

 

Our Favorite 25 Wired Covers of All Time

The magazine’s editors and art directors share behind-the-scenes details of what made the covers they helped create great.

3h

 

Toxic workplaces are feeding the impostor phenomenon – here's why

Research suggests that around 70% of people will experience an illogical sense of being a phoney at work at some point in their careers. It's called the impostor phenomenon (also known, erroneously, as a syndrome). These impostor feelings typically manifest as a fear of failure, fear of success, a sometimes obsessive need for perfection, and an inability to accept praise and achievement. The pheno

3h

 

Becoming promiscuous to ensure reproduction

Females of a socially monogamous passerine, the Japanese great tit (Parus minor), become more promiscuous after hatchings fail in the first breeding attempt—apparently attempting to ensure successful reproduction.

3h

 

Talking about sex is awkward, so how can teenagers 'just ask' for consent?

The topic of sexual consent seems to be in the news on a daily basis, especially since #MeToo went viral one year ago. From posters to podcasts, there are endless resources promoting the importance of getting and giving explicit consent. Many suggest that a "yes" must always be enthusiastic, and that partners should "ask first and ask often".

3h

 

The Unsolvable Problem

After a years-long intellectual journey, three mathematicians have discovered that a problem of central importance in physics is impossible to solve—and that means other big questions may be… — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

3h

 

Petrified Chains of 'Poop' Turn Out to Be One of Earth's Oldest Skeletons

This may be the oldest non-microscopic creature with a skeleton.

3h

 

PORTRÆT: Jun Wang bygger genernes Amazon

Professor i mole­kylær medicin Jun Wang er i færd med at skabe den mest omfangsrige digitalisering af samspillet mellem gener og miljø.

3h

 

The chromosome responsible for asparagus gender is characterized

A University of Cordoba research project draws a genetic map of garden asparagus and marks the chromosome determining gender.

3h

 

A warmer climate will also be a drier climate, with negative impacts on forest growth

Warmer temperatures brought on by climate change will lead to drier soils and reduce tree photosynthesis and growth in forests later this century, according to a new University of Minnesota study published in the journal Nature.

3h

 

Disorder can stabilize batteries

Novel materials can considerably improve storage capacity and cycling stability of rechargeable batteries. Among these materials are high-entropy oxides (HEO), whose stability results from a disordered distribution of the elements. With HEO, electrochemical properties can be tailored, as was found by scientists of the team of nanotechnology expert Horst Hahn at Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (K

3h

 

Meet the trillions of viruses that make up your virome

If you think you don't have viruses, think again.

3h

 

The many structures of the light-active biomolecules

How the light-sensitive part of the biomolecule phytochrome changes from a light-adapted state to a dark-adapted state has been investigated by researchers at Ruhr-Universität Bochum and Philipps-Universität Marburg. So far, the structures of only a few light-sensitive biomolecules are known – and only for the final states in light and darkness, but not for the intermediate steps. Using various sp

3h

 

Models of dinosaur movement could help us build stronger robots and buildings

From about 245 to 66 million years ago, dinosaurs roamed the Earth. Although well-preserved skeletons give us a good idea of what they looked like, the way their limbs worked remains a bigger mystery. But computer simulations may soon provide a realistic glimpse into how some species moved and inform work in fields such as robotics, prosthetics and architecture.

3h

 

Repurposing dimethyloxalylglycine to inhibit glutamine metabolism

A team of researchers from the U.K. and the U.S. has found that a drug used to study hypoxia can also be used to inhibit glutamine metabolism—a possible means for targeting cancer cells by cutting off their supply line. In their paper published in the journal Nature Chemical Biology, the group explains their study of the drug and its new possible use in targeting tumors. Barbara Nelson, Daniel Kre

3h

 

How kite skiing and weighing snow helps improve projections of sea level rise

On top of 1000 meters of moving ice, in early spring. Minus 15 degrees centigrade. 80 kilometres from the nearest settlement. Number of matches remaining: 74.

3h

 

High-res data offer most detailed look yet at trawl fishing footprint around the world

A new analysis that uses high-resolution data for 24 ocean regions in Africa, Europe, North and South America and Australasia shows that 14 percent of the overall seafloor shallower than 1,000 meters (3,280 feet) is trawled. The analysis shows that the footprint of bottom-trawl fishing on continental shelves and slopes across the world's oceans often has been substantially overestimated.

3h

 

Scientists pinpoint pathway that impacts features of autism

A study has uncovered a brain-signaling pathway that can be pharmacologically manipulated in mice to reverse an autism-related pathway. Using an experimental drug targeting this pathway, researchers normalized the disrupted physiology and behavior of these mice. Moreover, effects were seen in adult mice, suggesting a possible route to developing medications for adults with autism spectrum disorder

3h

 

Guided by CRISPR, prenatal gene editing shows proof-of-concept in treating disease before birth

For the first time, scientists have performed prenatal gene editing to prevent a lethal metabolic disorder in laboratory animals, offering the potential to treat human congenital diseases before birth. Researchers offer proof-of-concept for prenatal use of a sophisticated, low-toxicity tool that efficiently edits DNA building blocks in disease-causing genes.

3h

 

Genetic disease healed using genome editing

A team of researchers applied a newly developed editing tool to target and correct genetic mutations. By doing so, the researchers healed mice suffering from a genetic metabolic disorder that also affects humans.

3h

 

Hubble Telescope Stops Collecting Data after Mechanical Fault

A malfunctioning gyroscope has temporarily hobbled the aging space observatory — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

3h

 

This may reduce racial bias in groups at work

A small shift in the presentation of an assignment can reduce racial inequality within the group working on it and lead to better outcomes, according to a new study. Previous research has shown that groups often diminish the contributions of minorities, by dismissing their opinions more often, for example, or by being less likely to adopt their ideas. Researchers wondered whether reframing the pa

4h

 

New study helps explain recent scarcity of bay nettles in the Chesapeake Bay

Wondering why you saw so few jellyfish in the Chesapeake Bay this summer?

4h

 

Sophisticated sensors keep bridges, dams and buildings safe

The Story Bridge is 78 years old, the Sydney Harbour Bridge is hitting 95. Australian bridges are designed for a life span of 100 years.

4h

 

Will cracking my knuckles give me arthritis?

Ask Us Anything The splintering sound makes the habit seem far worse than it is. Scientists have conducted fairly rigorous research into the long held belief that cracking your knuckles will give you arthritis, and they've all come to largely the…

4h

 

The Chicago Culture That Created Jason Van Dyke

I was completing a decade-long study of the criminal court system in Chicago when I saw the autopsy diagram of Laquan McDonald. The Cook County medical examiner meticulously inventoried how all 16 bullets fired by a Chicago police officer, Jason Van Dyke, had entered and exited McDonald’s body on October 20, 2014. The Chicago Police Department’s official account of the incident claimed that McDon

4h

 

Alexa, Should We Trust You?

For a few days this summer, Alexa, the voice assistant who speaks to me through my Amazon Echo Dot, took to ending our interactions with a whisper: Sweet dreams . Every time it happened, I was startled, although I thought I understood why she was doing it, insofar as I understand anything that goes on inside that squat slice of black tube. I had gone onto Amazon.com and activated a third-party “s

4h

 

Robotic bees could pollinate plants in case of insect apocalypse

Dutch scientists say they can create swarms of bee-like drones to take over if the insects die out Intensive modern farming methods and the unravelling consequences of global climate change are said to have put the future of the common bee under threat like never before. But in Delft University of Technology in the Netherlands a group of scientists working on long-term solutions to some of the wo

4h

 

Asthma may contribute to childhood obesity epidemic

Toddlers with asthma are more likely to become obese children, according to the biggest study on the matter to date.

4h

 

Inflammation in the womb may explain why some babies are more prone to sepsis after birth

Each year 15 million infants are born preterm and face high risks of short- and long-term complications, including sepsis, severe inflammation of the gut, and neurodevelopmental disorders. A new report demonstrates a link between prenatal inflammation and postnatal immune status and organ function in preterm pigs, suggesting that early intervention (eg, antibiotics or anti-inflammatory drugs) may

4h

 

Scoliosis linked to essential mineral

An inability to properly use the essential mineral manganese could be to blame for some cases of severe scoliosis, according to a new study.

4h

 

No black scientist has ever won a Nobel – that's bad for science, and bad for society

Many in the scientific world are celebrating the fact that two women received this year's Nobel prizes in physics and chemistry. Donna Strickland and Frances Arnold are only the 20th and 21st female scientists to be recognised by the Nobel Committee. Yet in over 100 years, we have never seen a black scientist become a Nobel laureate.

4h

 

Branson says Virgin Galactic to launch space flight 'within weeks'

British entrepreneur Richard Branson said he expects his Virgin Galactic company to conduct its first space flight "within weeks, not months" in comments broadcast Tuesday.

4h

 

YouTube driving global consumption of music

If you are listening to music, chances are you're on YouTube.

4h

 

Ancient ‘living fossil’ fish has scales that act as adaptable armour

The coelacanth fish has scales that can change their internal structure if they are pierced by a predator to stop cracks spreading

4h

 

Shifting desires for forbidden goods

Ahead of a symposium organised by the Oxford Martin School on the Illegal Wildlife Trade, and international IWT conference hosted in London this week, Diogo Veríssimo, from Oxford University's Department of Zoology, reveals how campaigns have attempted to influence harmful consumer habits.

4h

 

Lessons from Dutch geological history might be useful for other present-day deltas

Even long before medieval inhabitants reclaimed land and raised dykes at a large scale, humans have had a strong impact on river behavior in the Dutch delta plain. Physical geographers at Utrecht University, the Netherlands, have demonstrated that two present Rhine branches developed stepwise in the first centuries CE, because of two combined human-induced effects.

4h

 

Oysters at risk from changing climate

Climate change's effect on coastal ecosystems is very likely to increase mortality risks of adult oyster populations in the next 20 years.

4h

 

CRISPR Editing Heads Off Disease in Mouse Livers

Separate proof-of-concept studies report success against two inherited diseases.

4h

 

Self-Improvement in the Internet Age: A WIRED Investigation

The internet has made us a planet of autodidacts—but just how are we improving ourselves?

4h

 

The 'Fortnite' Twitch Streamers Teaching Gen Z About Climate Change

Hey, there are worse things to be learned from videogames.

4h

 

Mānoa: Hybrid forest restoration benefits communities and increases resilience

An interdisciplinary research team from the University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa and the National Tropical Botanical Garden (NTBG) demonstrated how collaboratively-developed forest restoration in Limahuli Garden & Preserve (Limahuli) can increase community benefits and improve resilience at lower cost than standard forest restoration programs. Because conservation managers are increasingly faced with ma

4h

 

New knowledge about retrovirus-host co-evolution

Retroviruses have colonised vertebrate hosts for millions of years by inserting their genes into host genomes, enabling their inheritance through generations as endogenous retroviruses (ERVs). Researchers from Uppsala University now provide new knowledge about the long-term associations of retroviruses and their hosts by studying ERV variation and segregation in wild and domestic rabbit population

4h

 

Increase in plastics reaching remote South Atlantic Islands

The amount of plastic washing up onto the shores of remote South Atlantic islands is 10 times greater than it was a decade ago, according to new research published today (8 October) in the journal Current Biology.

4h

 

Metal leads to the desired configuration

Scientists at the University of Basel have found a way to change the spatial arrangement of bipyridine molecules on a surface. These potential components of dye-sensitized solar cells form complexes with metals and thereby alter their chemical conformation. The results of this interdisciplinary collaboration between chemists and physicists from Basel were recently published in the scientific journ

4h

 

Life Advice: Don't Find Your Passion

Study suggests meaningful work can be something you grow into, not something you discover — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

4h

 

The impact of hurricanes on the ecosystem in Puerto Rico

Powerful hurricanes leave a lasting legacy, and in Puerto Rico humans are not the only ones devastated by storms such as last year's Hurricane Maria. UConn professor of ecology and evolutionary biology Michael Willig is part of an international team that has spent the past 30 years studying elements of the ecosystem in hurricane-prone Puerto Rico, and how that ecosystem responds to weather-driven

4h

 

Broadband 'disconnect' has big consequences for midwest farmers

Sitting in the cab of a combine harvester on a soybean farm in Wells, Minnesota this summer, University of Virginia assistant media studies professor Christopher Ali was amazed as he looked down at the dashboard.

4h

 

Radiotherapy: Repairing proteins in search of the ring to protect DNA

To understand why some cancer cells resist radiotherapy, an international team of researchers has used crystallography to "photograph" the first moments of the molecular ballet that allows these cells to repair their DNA. The study involved teams from the CEA, CNRS, PROXIMA-1 beamline at SOLEIL, University of Paris-Sud, Gustave Roussy, Aix-Marseille University and University Paul Sabatier—Toulouse

4h

 

Clean Water Act dramatically cut pollution in U.S. waterways

The 1972 Clean Water Act has driven significant improvements in U.S. water quality, according to the first comprehensive study of water pollution over the past several decades, by researchers at UC Berkeley and Iowa State University.

4h

 

This Man's 'Pancake' Kidney Looks Like It Sounds

A medical scan revealed an "extraordinarily rare" condition.

4h

 

Tomb of a Pharaoh's 'Sole Friend' and 'Keeper of the Secret' Found in Egypt

Though the 4,400-year-old tomb had been robbed, archaeologists found the remains of a statue with inscriptions referring to its owner inside.

4h

 

Image: Mediterranean slick

The Copernicus Sentinel-1 mission has imaged the oil spill in the Mediterranean following a collision between two merchant ships on Sunday 7 October 2018. A Tunisian cargo ship is reported to have struck the hull of a Cypriot container ship in waters north of the French island of Corsica. There were no casualties, but the collision caused a fuel leak – which has resulted in an oil slick about 20 k

4h

 

Vaccinating humans to protect mosquitoes from malaria

For decades, scientists have been trying to develop a vaccine that prevents mosquitoes from spreading malaria among humans.

4h

 

Reduced Sierra Nevada snowmelt runoff to threaten California agriculture

An estimated three-quarters of the water used by farms, ranches and dairies in California originates as snow in the Sierra Nevada mountain range, but the future viability of that resource is projected to be at heightened risk due to global climate change.

4h

 

Scientists explain the low-temperature anomaly in superconductors

An international group of scientists, including a researcher from Skoltech, has completed an experimental and theoretical study into the properties displayed by strongly disordered superconductors at very low temperatures. Following a series of experiments, the scientists developed a theory that effectively describes the previously inexplicable anomalies encountered in superconductors. The results

4h

 

Ballistic graphene Josephson junctions enter microwave circuits

Superconducting quantum microwave circuits can function as qubits, the building blocks of a future quantum computer. A critical component of these circuits, the Josephson junction, is typically made using aluminium oxide. Researchers in the Quantum Nanoscience department at the Delft University of Technology have now successfully incorporated a graphene Josephson junction into a superconducting mi

4h

 

3-D printing hierarchical liquid-crystal-polymer structures

Biological materials from bone to spider-silk and wood are lightweight fibre composites arranged in a complex hierarchical structure, formed by directed self-assembly to demonstrate outstanding mechanical properties. When such bioinspired stiff and lightweight materials are typically developed for applications in aircraft, automobiles and biomedical implants, their manufacture requires energy and

4h

 

The Woman Who Could Be Israel’s Next Leader

Israel’s Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu is fond of showing his visitors an ancient seal unearthed in Jerusalem, thought to date back more than 2,700 years. Its inscription is similar to the prime minister’s family name—proof of the historic bond between the Jewish people and their land, and perhaps (one might surmise) also of the eternal bond between Netanyahu and his office. After nearly a de

4h

 

Soccer Headers Cause More Brain Damage in Female Players

New research could explain why women athletes report more severe brain injury symptoms than men — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

5h

 

Huge Iceberg Poised to Break Off Antarctica's Pine Island Glacier

A newly discovered long and craggy rift is splintering across West Antarctica's Pine Island Glacier, satellite images show.

5h

 

Home of the gentle giants: How humans live with Galapagos tortoises

The Galapagos archipelago is a growing tourist attraction, which is adding to the problems faced by the islands’ famous giant residents

5h

 

Bionic Limbs 'Learn' to Open a Beer

Deep learning is helping to make prosthetic arms behave more naturally.

5h

 

How to build an authoritarian regime — and how to stop one

People are overwhelmed by new ideas brought upon by new technologies. Could new media—like the internet—ruin the world before rebuilding it? Get ready for a rocky century: there was 150 years after the book was invented before the Great Enlightenment.

5h

 

‘Sawbones’ invites readers to laugh at the bizarre history of medicine

‘The Sawbones Book,’ based on the popular podcast by Dr. Sydnee and Justin McElroy, ties the strange history of modern medicine to modern pseudoscience.

5h

 

Google lukker Google+ efter afsløring af datalæk

Google opdagede sikkerhedsbrud, der påvirker mindst 500.000 personer, sidste forår, men holdte oplysningerne skjult af frygt for sammenligninger med Facebook, skriver The Wall Street Journal.

5h

 

Counting Crows

Research sheds light on the neural mechanisms behind the birds’ surprising inborn ability to judge quantities — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

5h

 

A Simple Blood Test Could Detect a Deadly Disorder in Pregnant Women

Preeclampsia can be treated, yet screenings are out of reach for many women — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

5h

 

Dutch appeals court upholds landmark climate case ruling

A Dutch appeals court on Tuesday upheld a landmark ruling that ordered the Dutch government to cut the country's greenhouse gas emissions by at least 25 percent by 2020 from benchmark 1990 levels.

6h

 

Video ad business booming in US: market tracker

The video ad business is booming the US, with spending expected to grow 30 percent this year to $27.82 billion, an eMarketer forecast released Tuesday showed.

6h

 

Er du tonedøv? Det er dine forældres skyld, for det ligger i generne

Det er i hjernen, at fejlen sker, når nogen synger pivfalsk. Og for de tonedøve er der ikke meget at stille op.

6h

 

Proof of the Impossible? A Mathematical Journey

— Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

6h

 

40 years on, Brittany tanker wreck is magnet for divers

Forty years after it sank, the remains of a super tanker wrecked off northwestern France have become a favourite spot for divers when the weather allows.

6h

 

Is China or Russia America’s Defining Rival?

Late last week, as most of America’s political class was transfixed by the denouement of the Kavanaugh confirmation battle, Vice President Mike Pence gave a wide-ranging address on the U.S. relationship with China, and why the Trump administration is committed to opposing its expansionist designs. For the most part, it was a familiar litany of complaints about China’s efforts to coerce its neighb

6h

 

Net worth v self worth: do we all need inequality therapy?

Inequality isn’t just changing the way we deal with economics – it’s perversely altering how we see ourselves and what we value Michael was a fortysomething middle manager at a mid-sized tech company who every day felt like a failure. Even though he was wealthy enough to send his two kids to private school, he was always anxious about his status. He frequently snapped at his wife and after workin

6h

 

WIRED TV: Our OTT Channel Just Got a Lot Bigger

We're going big on Apple TV, Roku, Amazon Fire TV, and more—with a ton of new series and content you'll of course want to watch on the biggest TV you can find.

6h

 

Google+ to shut down after 500,000 people’s personal details exposed

The social network Google+ is shutting down for regular users, after it discovered a flaw in March that exposed personal information of up to 500,000 people

6h

 

Her er planen: Regeringen sigter mod nul-udledning af CO2 i 2050

Med 34 mere eller mindre konkrete initiativer vil regeringen med sin nye klimaplan opnå netto-nul-udledning senest i 2050.

6h

 

Regeringen vil fjerne registreringsafgift på grønne biler de næste to år

Ejere af små og mellemstore plugin-hybridbiler og elbiler slipper for at betale registreringsafgift i 2019 og 2020.

6h

 

Scoliosis linked to essential mineral

An inability to properly use the essential mineral manganese could be to blame for some cases of severe scoliosis, according to a new study from Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis.

7h

 

Faith-based approach to changing lifestyle lowers blood pressure

A church-based program to encourage a healthy lifestyle reduced systolic blood pressure more than an educational program alone in blacks with uncontrolled high blood pressure. Delivered by trained lay church members, the faith-based program may help reduce heart disease due to high blood pressure in people with reduced access to medical care.

7h

 

Faith-based intervention successful at managing hypertension in black communities, new study finds

Lifestyle intervention delivered in churches by community-based health workers led to a significant reduction in blood pressure among African Americans compared to health education alone, according to a study led by researchers at NYU School of Medicine publishing online Oct. 9 in the journal Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes.

7h

 

7h

 

Why Are Black Women Less Likely To Stick With A Breast Cancer Follow-Up Treatment?

Black women are more likely to die from breast cancer than white women. One reason may be that they face economic and cultural barriers to taking the medications that can prevent recurrence. (Image credit: Justin Cook for NPR)

7h

 

Miljøstyrelsen: Ingen grund til alarm trods små fund af mikroplast i drikkevand

Med avanceret mikroskopi er det påvist, at mikroplast-lignende fund i vandprøverne især var celluloselignende fibre.

7h

 

Virus-sæson: Din dag er fuld af influenza-fælder

Hvert år rammes cirka 1 million danskere af influenza. Se her hvor, du kan blive smittet.

7h

 

Elbil, hybridbil og plug in-hybrid: Her har du overblikket over elbil-familien

Det miljørigtige alternativ til benzin- og dieseldrevne biler hedder en elbil i folkemunde. Men de grønne biler fås i forskellige nuancer af klimavenlighed.

7h

 

Despite A Ban, Arkansas Farmers Are Still Spraying Controversial Weedkiller

Many farmers in Arkansas are defying efforts by regulators to strictly limit use of dicamba, a popular weedkiller. They continue to damage neighboring crops, although less often than last year. (Image credit: Dan Charles/NPR)

7h

 

Vi skal have sundere brændeovne: Sådan virker de

Cirka hvert sjette danske hjem opvarmes med brænde. Nu skal ovnene udskiftes, mener regeringen. Men kan nye modeller fjerne de skadelige stoffer?

8h

 

From cyborgs to sex robots, U of M professor studies how brain science is changing legal system

Francis Shen spends a lot of time thinking about transhuman cyborgs, brain-wave lie detectors, sex robots and terrorists hacking into devices implanted in our heads.

8h

 

Fra magisk manna til menneskekød

Mad har en helt central rolle i de tekster, vi kalder Biblen. Lige fra Evas ”æble”…

8h

 

One-off genetic test could detect heart attack risk

The test could help explain why people with apparently no risk factors can still have a heart attack.

8h

 

5G service rolls out—but not without controversy

Lampposts around downtown Los Angeles are being wired with fiber optic cable and shoebox-sized gadgets to beam the fifth and fastest generation of cellular data, known as 5G, into homes and mobile devices.

9h

 

Giant, jagged 'ice spikes' cover Jupiter's moon Europa, new study suggests

If you're planning a trip to Jupiter's moon Europa, be prepared for a rough landing.

9h

 

Want to delete your Facebook account? It'll take 30 days

Facebook has given users many reasons to consider nuking their accounts lately from data breaches to scandals surrounding election interference.

9h

 

9h

 

The Science Behind a Frog’s Leap

A frog’s leap is a study in power and accuracy. So how do frogs do it, and what can humans learn from its mechanics?

9h

 

AAFP Promotes Acupuncture

The AAFP is not following its own standards for CME. Its monograph on Musculoskeletal Therapies devotes 1/4 of its content to acupuncture, dry needling, and cupping; and one of its four "key practice recommendations" is to consider electroacupuncture for fibromyalgia.

9h

 

Comcast faces continued doubts over wisdom of Sky purchase

As it prepares to take control of British telecommunications company Sky following a tense, months-long bidding war, American cable giant Comcast faces continued doubts about its strategy for content and technology—and whether it will pay off.

9h

 

Carbon tax gets renewed attention but still faces resistance

Advocates of taxing fossil fuels believe their position is stronger now because of an alarming new report on climate change and a Nobel Prize awarded to by two American economists, but neither development is likely to break down political resistance to a carbon tax.

10h

 

Japan space tourist says moon training 'shouldn't be too hard'

Billionaire Japanese tycoon and future space tourist Yusaku Maezawa's training to go the moon should not be too tricky, he joked Tuesday, adding that he planned to use free time from his six-hour work day to squeeze it in.

10h

 

Evacuations ordered as Florida braces for Hurricane Michael

Residents of northwest Florida had until early Tuesday to leave their homes ahead of Hurricane Michael, forecast to crash ashore midweek as a major Category 3 storm with "life-threatening" flash flooding possible.

10h

 

Indonesia expert warned of quake, gov't mapped risk areas

When the violent shaking from a massive magnitude 7.5 earthquake finally stopped, Selvi Susanti stood up and realized something strange was happening.

10h

 

UN report: Technologies can help lives but boost inequality

New technologies from artificial intelligence to gene editing hold immense potential to improve people's live—but can also drive greater inequality and social dislocation, according to a U.N. report launched Monday.

10h

 

SpaceX launches and lands Falcon 9 rocket on California coast – in pictures

First ground landing of reusable booster rocket on west coast of America hailed a success Continue reading…

10h

 

Energinet efter deling af eldata: Overraskende nemt at udvikle med blockchain

Det er lykkedes for Energinet at etablere en sikker digital fuldmagt til deling af eldata mellem Danmark og Estland med blockchain-teknologi. Projektet er dog ikke klar til implementering i Danmark endnu.

11h

 

The age of envy: how to be happy when everyone else's life looks perfect

Social media has created a world in which everyone seems ecstatic – apart from us. Is there any way for people to curb their resentment? One night about five years ago, just before bed, I saw a tweet from a friend announcing how delighted he was to have been shortlisted for a journalism award. I felt my stomach lurch and my head spin, my teeth clench and my chest tighten. I did not sleep until th

11h

 

Google rydder op i utroværdige sundhedsråd

En ny opdatering i Googles søgemaskine nedprioriterer, hvad Google vurderer som utroværdige sider.

11h

 

Asthma may contribute to childhood obesity epidemic

Toddlers with asthma are more likely to become obese children, according to the biggest study on the matter to date.

12h

 

Inflammation in the womb may explain why some babies are more prone to sepsis after birth

Each year 15 million infants are born preterm and face high risks of short- and long-term complications, including sepsis, severe inflammation of the gut, and neurodevelopmental disorders. A new report in The American Journal of Pathology demonstrates a link between prenatal inflammation and postnatal immune status and organ function in preterm pigs, suggesting that early intervention (eg, antibio

12h

 

New C-CHANGE guideline provides comprehensive recommendations to manage heart disease

The updated comprehensive C-CHANGE (Canadian Cardiovascular Harmonized National Guidelines Endeavour) guideline to manage cardiovascular disease will help primary care physicians across Canada provide better care for patients with, or who are at risk of, heart disease. The guideline, published in CMAJ, updates the 2014 guideline, with 52 newly added or updated recommendations.

12h

 

Immigrant, refugee youth most likely to visit the ED with a new mental health problem

Refugee and immigrant youth in Ontario may face barriers to accessing mental health services through primary care, say the authors of a study of emergency department visits published in CMAJ.

12h

 

Watch Google Unveil the Next Pixel Phone

We're expecting the Pixel 3 and Pixel 3 XL, plus a tablet, smart speakers, and more.

12h

 

Professor: Ambitiøs CO2-reduktion i landbruget kræver, at vi dropper dyrene

Landbrugets CO2-udledning stammer især fra den animalske produktion og kan kun begrænses til et vist niveau, hvis ikke man vil sløjfe husdyrene i dansk landbrug, forklarer professor ved Aarhus Universitet.

13h

 

Corbyn’s Complaint

Jews are a hyperbolic people. Even English Jews; no matter that we were not hyperbolic enough for Philip Roth. Reticent, unremarkable, and parochial, he is said to have found us during the short time he lived in London in the 1970s. “England’s made a Jew of me in only eight weeks,” says Nathan Zuckerman toward the end of The Counterlife , meaning that nothing confers identity quite like hostility

14h

 

Suspended Animation in the Age of Trump

For at least the past two years, Americans have lived in an extended state of suspense about what could be the most nefarious scandal in the nation’s political history. Evidence has piled up suggesting that the Trump campaign teamed with the Russian state in pursuit of electoral victory. Some of this evidence is circumstantial and hardly conclusive; some of it is pretty damn concrete . The hard e

15h

 

Too much vitamin A may increase risk of bone fractures

Consuming too much vitamin A may decrease bone thickness, leading to weak and fracture prone bones, according to a study published in the Journal of Endocrinology. The study, undertaken in mice, found that sustained intake of vitamin A, at levels equivalent to 4.5-13 times the human recommended daily allowance (RDA), caused significant weakening of the bones, and suggests that people should be cau

16h

 

Hubble space telescope left pointing wrong way after gyroscope fails

Ageing device cannot make observations after backup gyroscope failed too The Hubble space telescope has been sidelined after a gyroscope failed, leaving it unable to point in the right direction during observations. The device had been expected to fail at some point this year, but the surprise came when a backup did not kick in properly after Friday’s failure, said Nasa on Monday. Continue readin

16h

 

What is ‘problem internet use’ and is it really a problem?

Researchers are calling for recognition of mental health problems caused by excessive gaming, gambling and social media, but lumping these together may not be right

16h

 

Wreck n' Fix | Shifting Gears with Aaron Kaufman

Duct tape it up and get back on the road: that's rallying. Aaron Kaufman and the Arclight Fab team patch up his Subaru after a small crash on the course. Stream Full Episodes of Shifting Gears: https://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/shifting-gears/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Discovery Follow on Twitter: https://twitter.com/Di

16h

 

New U.N. Climate Report Says Put a High Price on Carbon

Most nations don't tax carbon. Those that do tax emissions have not set carbon prices high enough to bring deep reductions in carbon pollution.

16h

 

What It Would Take To Avert The Dire Situation Described In The U.N. Climate Report

NPR's Ailsa Chang talks with Andrew Jones of the nonprofit Climate Interactive about why he thinks people should fight to reverse the climate change trend, despite recent bleak projections.

16h

 

Austerity cuts 'twice as deep' in England than rest of Britain, study finds

Latest research finds significant inequalities in cuts to council services across the country, with deprived areas in the north of England and London seeing the biggest drops in local authority spending since 2010.

17h

 

Why single embryo transfer during IVF sometimes results in twins or triplets

Results from the largest study (nearly a million cycles) to investigate the prevalence and causes of multiple pregnancies after single embryo transfer (SET) finds that using frozen thawed embryos for SET, maturing the fertilized egg (blastocyst) in the laboratory for five or six days before SET, and assisted hatching could increase the risk. The study is published in Human Reproduction journal.

17h

 

Social media data used to predict retail failure

Researchers have used a combination of social media and transport data to predict the likelihood that a given retail business will succeed or fail.

17h

 

Cyberchondria and cyberhoarding: is internet fuelling new conditions?

More research is needed to understand new problems that may arise out of internet use, experts say The internet could be fuelling a rise in new conditions such as cyberchondria and cyberhoarding, experts have warned. While researchers say most internet use is benign, it can lead some people to develop problems. Now experts are calling for more research to understand the range of problems that exi

17h

 

Austerity cuts 'twice as deep' in England than rest of Britain, study finds

The first "fine-grained" analysis of local authority budgets across Britain since 2010 has found that the average reduction in service spending by councils was almost 24% in England compared to just 12% in Wales and 11.5% in Scotland.

17h

 

Test could predict risk of future heart disease for just £40

Genomic Risk Score test is cheap enough to allow population-wide screening of children, researchers believe A one-off genetic test costing less than £40 can show if a person is born with a predisposition to heart disease. The Genomic Risk Score (GRS) test is cheap enough to allow population-wide screening of children, researchers believe. Medical and lifestyle interventions could then be employed

17h

 

Google+ Shuts Down Over Breach as Google Offers New Privacy FeaturesGoogle+ Data WSJ Gmail

Google got caught hiding a privacy issue affecting 500,000 users on the same day it rolled out privacy protections.

17h

 

Gene editing can't help human fetuses yet, but it just made a big leap in mice

Health A promising proof of concept. We may be able to use a form of CRISPR-Cas9 gene editing to treat genetic diseases in human children before they’re even born.

18h

 

European researchers set out priorities for dealing with problem internet use

European Union funded researchers have launched the first international network to identify and understand problems associated with Internet use, such as gambling, pornography, bullying, excessive social media use. The Manifesto for a European Research Network into Problematic Usage of the Internet is published today in the peer-reviewed journal, European Neuropsychopharmacology.

18h

 

Nobel Prize in Economics 2018

The 2018 Sveriges Riksbank Prize in Economic Sciences in Memory of Alfred Nobel is being awarded to William D. Nordhaus "for integrating climate change into long-run macroeconomic analysis" and Paul M. Romer "for integrating technological innovations into long-run macroeconomic analysis."

18h

 

The Next Great (Digital) Extinction

How today's internet is rapidly and indifferently killing off many systems while allowing new types of organizations to emerge.

18h

 

Co-Author Of United Nations' Climate Report Discusses Group's Findings

The United Nations' scientific panel released a report that paints a dire picture of the world in 2040. NPR's Ailsa Chang speaks with one of the co-authors, Professor William Solecki.

18h

 

Evidence does not support statin use for conditions other than heart disease

Despite studies suggesting benefits for conditions beyond cardiovascular disease (CVD), the evidence does not support revising current statin prescribing guidelines. Findings from an evidence review and meta-analysis are published in Annals of Internal Medicine.

19h

 

*God Friended Me* and How Social Media Handles Deities

On the new CBS show, a Facebook account seems to be maintained by a deity—but if it is, said deity has almost definitely violated the social media platform's terms-and-services agreement.

19h

 

Climate change: How 1.5 degrees could change the world

Why it's vital we take steps to keep global warming to 1.5 degrees

19h

 

Climate change: What would you be prepared to do?

Here's five things we can do to help prevent global temperatures rising more than 1.5 degrees C.

19h

 

Techkorrespondent om sikkerhedsbrist: En god grund til at lukke fiaskoen Google+

Google lukker ned for sit sociale medie, Google+, efter omfattende sikkerhedsbrud.

19h

 

Image of the Day: Cracked Skin

Micrometer-scale fractures in elephant skin results from the way the epidermis grows.

19h

 

Report: Action Needed Now in Climate Crisis

The UN Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change calls for “unprecedented” changes to prevent the Earth's atmosphere climbing more than 1.5° C above preindustrial levels.

19h

 

Which came first: the chicken or the egg?

It's one of the oldest—and easiest to picture—philosophical conundrums of our time. It can be best answered by combining two of the most popular takes on it. Even so — there's a reason the question has been asked for at least 2,000 years. None Which came first, the chicken or the egg? It's the kind of question children ask each other on the playground in a bid to blow minds. Others include "Could

19h

 

Your Phone Can Help Predict the Weather

Your Phone Can Help Predict the Weather A network of smartphones can improve short-term weather forecasts. SmartphoneWeather_topNteaser.jpg Image credits: Pressmaster via Shutterstock Earth Monday, October 8, 2018 – 15:45 Marcus Woo, Contributor (Inside Science) — You may soon add "weather station" to the many functions of your phone. Researchers have shown that air pressure data from thousands

20h

 

Want better STEM research? Add more women to your team

Gender diversity in science comes down to more than just who is on the team. The research approaches and types of questions the field addresses also shift—and lead to better science, according to a new study. Women and girls are increasingly encouraged to pursue STEM (science, technology, engineering, and math) careers, potentially leading to greater gender diversity within research organizations

20h

 

New 700-mph hyperloop pod can go from L.A. to San Francisco in 30 minutes

Hyperloop Transportation Technologies, or HTT, is one of several companies seeking to build the world's first hyperloop. HTT's new passenger pod can carry about 30 to 40 people, and the company plans to test it at a track in France. The CEO hopes to have a full-scale hyperloop up and running in about three years. None Hyperloop Transportation Technologies, one of several companies racing to build

20h

 

Slower nanotech delivery system could stymie infections

A new way to deliver antimicrobial agents—drugs, antiseptics, or pesticides—could offer a more effective way to treat or prevent bacterial infections, researchers say. As reported in the Journal of the American Chemical Society , researchers synthesized nanostructured silica particles, considered to be promising drug carriers, that contained payloads of an antimicrobial agent. The researchers dis

20h

 

How to make jet fuel from used cooking oil

Air travel is a growing source of greenhouse gas emissions. But a project to turn used cooking oil into jet fuel could help change that, says Tom Parsons

20h

 

Fifty-foot-tall ice spikes might make it hard to land on Europa

Space There's still a lot to learn about the surface of Jupiter's moon Blades of ice the height of five-story buildings might cover the equatorial belt of Jupiter's moon Europa, potentially complicating any potential spacecraft landings…

20h

 

A Woman Took Over 'Doctor Who' and the World Didn't Collapse

After decades, a woman is taking over the TARDIS—and it's long overdue.

20h

 

Study shows land-locked Atlantic salmon also use magnetic field to navigate

A new study shows that Atlantic salmon use the Earth's magnetic field as a navigational tool — much like their cousins, Pacific salmon — and don't lose that ability through several generations of fish even after they have been transplanted into a land-locked lake.

21h

 

Genes responsible for difference in flower color of snapdragons identified

Snapdragons are tall plants, and flower in a range of colors. In Spain, where snapdragons grow wild, these flower colors show a remarkable pattern: areas of magenta and yellow blooming flowers are separated by just a two kilometer long stretch in which flower colors mix. Writing in today's edition of PNAS, scientists report that they investigate the causes of this pattern and identified the genes

21h

 

Scientists pinpoint pathway that impacts features of autism

A study has uncovered a brain-signaling pathway that can be pharmacologically manipulated in mice to reverse an autism-related pathway. Using an experimental drug targeting this pathway, researchers normalized the disrupted physiology and behavior of these mice. Moreover, effects were seen in adult mice, suggesting a possible route to developing medications for adults with autism spectrum disorder

21h

 

First genetic risk factor for erectile dysfunction identified

For the first time, a team of researchers has found a specific place in the human genome that raises a person's risk of erectile dysfunction. The discovery is a significant advancement in the understanding of the genetics underlying erectile dysfunction. The study, 'Genetic variation in the SIM1 locus is associated with erectile dysfunction,' will be published the week of Oct. 8 in the journal Pro

21h

 

High-res data offer most detailed look yet at trawl fishing footprint around the world

A new analysis that uses high-resolution data for 24 ocean regions in Africa, Europe, North and South America and Australasia shows that 14 percent of the overall seafloor shallower than 1,000 meters (3,280 feet) is trawled. The analysis shows that the footprint of bottom-trawl fishing on continental shelves and slopes across the world's oceans often has been substantially overestimated.

21h

 

Salt: Mover and shaker in ancient Maya society

Salt is essential for life. As ancient civilizations evolved from hunters and gatherers to agrarian societies, it has not been clear how people acquired this mineral that is a biological necessity. However, an anthropologist at LSU discovered remnants of an ancient salt works in Belize that provide clues on how the ancient Maya at the peak of their civilization more than 1,000 years ago produced,

21h

 

Drier, less predictable environment may have spurred human evolution

Evidence of a variable but progressively drying climate coincides with a major shift in stone-tool-making abilities and the appearance of modern Homo sapiens. Sediment cores obtained by the Hominin Sites and Paleolakes Drilling Project provide the first continuous environmental context for the diverse archeological evidence recovered from nearby localities in the East African rift valley.

21h

 

Ancient Maya: Astrologists, Farmers … And Salt Entrepreneurs?

Evidence from a site in Belize shows the Maya not only had large-scale salt-producing operations along the coast, they were also using salt to preserve fish for their extensive trade networks. (Image credit: David DUCOIN/Gamma-Rapho/Getty Images)

21h

 

Study shows land-locked Atlantic salmon also use magnetic field to navigate

A new study shows that Atlantic salmon use the Earth's magnetic field as a navigational tool—much like their cousins, Pacific salmon—and don't lose that ability through several generations of fish even after they have been transplanted into a land-locked lake.

21h

 

High-res data offer most detailed look yet at trawl fishing footprint around the world

About a quarter of the world's seafood caught in the ocean comes from bottom trawling, a method that involves dragging a net along the ocean's shelves and slopes to scoop up shrimp, cod, rockfish, sole and other kinds of bottom-dwelling fish and shellfish. The technique impacts these seafloor ecosystems, because other marine life and habitats can be killed or disturbed unintentionally as nets swee

21h

 

Genes responsible for difference in flower color of snapdragons identified

Snapdragons are tall, charming plants, and flower in a range of bright colors. In Spain, where snapdragons grow wild, these flower colors show a remarkable pattern: When driving up a road from Barcelona to the Pyrenees, snapdragons of the species Antirrhinum majus bloom in magenta at the beginning of the road, before a population of yellow flowering snapdragons takes over—separated by just a two-k

21h

 

Dryer, less predictable environment may have spurred human evolution

A progressively drying climate punctuated by variable wetter episodes may have precipitated the transition from our hominin ancestors to anatomically modern humans, according to research published on Oct. 8 in the online edition of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Science (PNAS).

21h

 

Salt: Mover and shaker in ancient Maya society

Salt is essential for life. As ancient civilizations evolved from hunters and gatherers to agrarian societies, it has not been clear how people acquired this mineral that is a biological necessity. However, an anthropologist at LSU discovered remnants of an ancient salt works in Belize that provide clues on how the ancient Maya at the peak of their civilization more than 1,000 years ago produced,

21h

 

Smallest integrated Kerr frequency comb generator

Optical frequency combs can enable ultrafast processes in physics, biology, and chemistry, as well as improve communication and navigation, medical testing, and security. Engineers have built a Kerr frequency comb generator that, for the first time, integrates the laser with the microresonator, significantly shrinking the system's size and power requirements. They no longer need to connect separat

21h

 

Neoadjuvant combination checkpoint blockade trial yields high response rates for patients with high-risk stage three melanoma

Combination checkpoint blockade before surgery (neoadjuvant therapy) produced a high response rate among patients with high-risk stage three melanoma, with nearly half having no sign of disease at surgery, but a high incidence of side effects caused the trial to be closed early.

21h

 

Hydrogel nudges stem cells to grow into liver cells

Researchers have created a new nanomaterial-based hydrogel that encourages amniotic epithelial cells (a type of stem cell) to grow into mature liver cells. These new liver cells could potentially be useful in cell therapy and tissue engineering to help patients with liver conditions. The liver performs many essential functions related to digestion, metabolism, immunity, and storage of nutrients w

21h

 

I invented an evaporation-driven car

Technology Bacterial spores turn moisture into mechanical energy. Ozgur Sahin was studying bacterial spores that swell significantly when they get wet. Naturally, he used this mechanical energy to power a toy car.

21h

 

Update to Scythe Complete

Completing cubes is an important part of Eyewire gameplay. When you declare a cube Scythe Complete it means that you believe it is 100% complete and ready to be used as real scientific data. Because completing is such an important part of the Eyewire process, we have made some changes to Scythe Completing to improve gameplay and data accuracy. Here is an overview of the changes: Scythe Reap nukes

21h

 

AFib patients with cancer history less likely to see cardiologist, fill prescriptions

Atrial fibrillation (AFib) patients with a history of cancer are less likely to see a cardiologist or fill anticoagulant prescriptions compared with AFib patients who never had cancer, according to a study in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology. By not filling and taking prescribed medication, these patients are potentially putting themselves at increased risk of stroke.

22h

 

Last week in tech: A massive hardware hack, new Microsoft devices, and concept cars

Technology Catch up on your tech news and listen to the latest edition of our podcast. Check out the latest episode of our podcast.

22h

 

Saturn's largest moon may hold key to cleaner engines

A new discovery on Titan's haze is revealing new information about burning fuels on Earth.

22h

 

Polar wandering on dwarf planet Ceres revealed

Dwarf planet Ceres experienced an indirect polar reorientation of approximately 36 degrees, a new paper by Planetary Science Institute Senior Scientist Pasquale Tricarico says.

22h

 

Novel technique quickly maps young ice deposits and formations on Mars

A new investigative technique has shown the latitudinal distribution of ice-rich landforms on Mars. This large-scale study enables future, more detailed investigations to study several young deposits of ice and sediment in the north polar basin.

22h

 

Supercomputer predicts optical and thermal properties of complex hybrid materials

Materials scientists at Duke University computationally predicted the electrical and optical properties of semiconductors made from extended organic molecules sandwiched by inorganic structures.

22h

 

Europa's Equator May Be Covered in Perilous Ice Towers

Jagged ice spikes called ‘penitentes’ on Jupiter’s ocean-bearing moon could pose grave risks for robotic landers — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

22h

 

Airbus name Guillaume Faury to replace Enders

The board of European aerospace giant Airbus said Monday it had nominated Guillaume Faury to replace Tom Enders as chief executive after its general assembly next April.

22h

 

Tropical storm Michael upgraded to hurricane in Gulf of Mexico

Tropical storm Michael strengthened to a Category 1 hurricane Monday as it barreled toward the US Gulf Coast packing maximum sustained winds of 75 miles per hour, meteorologists said.

22h

 

Climate action urgent, says world's only 'water ambassador'

Countries must work urgently to solve water issues caused by climate change, a Dutch official billed as the world's only "water ambassador" said Monday, backing a dire warning from the UN.

22h

 

Hubble Space Telescope sidelined by serious pointing failure (Update)

The Hubble Space Telescope has been sidelined by a serious pointing problem.

22h

 

SpaceX satellite launch lights up night sky, social media

When SpaceX launched a rocket carrying an Argentine Earth-observation satellite from California's Central Coast, both the night sky and social media lit up.

22h

 

A Mysterious Fossil Points to the Origins of Lizards and Snakes

The ancestors of today’s squamates were lost in time. Now paleontologists have identified the earliest known example: Meet Megachirella.

22h

 

Why good Census numbers are vital to hurricane recovery

New research highlights the effects of natural disasters on the US Census and how it can help with disaster recovery. With the impending threat of Hurricane Florence looming over the Carolinas, a group of graduate students at Duke University met with storms on their mind. “The big picture is that natural disasters happen and the more that communities and states can do to prepare before a natural

22h

 

Copper ions flow like liquid through crystalline structures

Materials scientists have sussed out the physical phenomenon underlying the promising electrical properties of a class of materials called superionic crystals through the investigation of CuCrSe2. A better understanding of such materials could lead to safer and more efficient rechargeable batteries than the current standard-bearer of lithium ion.

23h

 

Getting a grip on the slow but unique evolution of sharks

Scientists have decoded the whole genomes of two shark species for the first time and improved the whale shark genome sequences released previously. By analyzing the genomes and comparing them with those of other vertebrate species, they have constructed an overview of their unique life histories and evolutionary paths.

23h

 

Expanding fungal diversity, one cell at a time

Researchers have developed a pipeline to generate genomes from single cells of uncultivated fungi. The approach was tested on several uncultivated fungal species representing early diverging fungi, the earliest evolutionary branches in the fungal genealogy that provide a repertoire of important and valuable gene products.

23h

 

Life is like a box of hippocampal scenes

A neuroimaging study of human participants watching the 1994 film Forrest Gump and Alfred Hitchcock's 1961 television drama Bang! You're Dead suggests an important role for the hippocampus in segmenting our continuous everyday experience into discrete events for storage in long-term memory. The research, published in JNeurosci, is among the first to investigate hippocampal function during a natura

23h

 

Half the brain encodes both arm movements

Individual arm movements are represented by neural activity in both the left and right hemispheres of the brain, according to a study of epilepsy patients published in JNeurosci. This finding suggests the unaffected hemisphere in stroke could be harnessed to restore limb function on the same side of the body by controlling a brain-computer interface.

23h

 

Both Sides of the Brain Are Active During One-Sided Arm Movement

Researchers directly recorded neural activity in both sides of the brain’s cortex during the movement of only one arm in humans.

23h

 

IPCC Report: We Need Massive Change to Avoid Climate Hell

We can still hit the target of limiting global warming to 1.5 degree Celsius, as agreed on in Paris, but we have to act immediately and drastically.

23h

 

Limiting Warming to 1.5 °C Will Require Drastic Action, IPCC Says

Humanity has a limited window to avoid the more dire effects of climate change, according to a new climate report — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

23h

 

Hubble Telescope, Disoriented by Mechanical Failure, Takes a Nap to Reboot

NASA’s observational workhorse enters “safe mode” after a gyroscope malfunctions.

23h

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