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Nyheder2018oktober10

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Moons can have moons and they are called moonmoons

If a moon is big enough and far enough from its planet, it can host its own smaller moon, called a ‘moonmoon’ – and four worlds in our solar system fit the bill

7h

THC amounts identical in most cannabis strains, study finds

A rose by any other name is still a rose. The same, it turns out, can be said for cannabis.

1h

Byplanchef om Lynetteholmen: Invester hellere i kollektiv trafik til omegnskommuner

Der er masser af plads til både boliger og erhverv i kommunerne omkring København. Så invester hellere i bedre transport i stedet for anlægge en ny ø i København, mener formanden for Danske Planchefer. Byplanforsker mener, at der bliver brug for begge dele.

18h

LATEST

Psychotherapy is not harmless: on the side effects of CBT

The structured nature of cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) and its clearly defined principles (based on the links between thoughts, feelings and behaviours) make it relatively easy to train practitioners, ensure standardised delivery and measure outcomes. Consequently, CBT has revolutionised mental-health care, allowing psychologists to alchemise therapy from an art into a science. For many men

14min

No black scientist has ever won a Nobel – that’s bad for science, and bad for society

Many in the scientific world are celebrating the fact that two women received this year's Nobel prizes in physics and chemistry. Donna Strickland and Frances Arnold are only the 20th and 21st female scientists to be recognised by the Nobel Committee. Yet in over 100 years, we have never seen a black scientist become a Nobel laureate. Every year, the annual October Nobel Prize announcements coinci

14min

Religion is about emotion regulation, and it’s very good at it

Religion does not help us to explain nature. It did what it could in pre-scientific times, but that job was properly unseated by science. Most religious laypeople and even clergy agree: Pope John Paul II declared in 1996 that evolution is a fact and Catholics should get over it. No doubt some extreme anti-scientific thinking lives on in such places as Ken Ham's Creation Museum in Kentucky, but it

14min

Why Hurricane Michael's Storm Surge Is So High

Storm surge depends on wind speed, shoreline shape, and timing. On two out of three, Florida got slammed.

16min

Cancer patients with rare deadly brain infection treated successfully with off-the-shelf adoptive T-cell therapy

An emerging treatment known as adoptive T-cell therapy has proven effective in a Phase II clinical trial for treating progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML), a rare and often fatal brain infection sometimes observed in patients with cancer and other diseases in which the immune system is compromised.

18min

Hundreds of patients with undiagnosed diseases find answers, study reports

More than 100 patients afflicted by mysterious illnesses have been diagnosed through a network of detective-doctors who investigate unidentified diseases, reports a study conducted by scientists at the Stanford University School of Medicine and multiple collaborating institutes.

18min

Genetics allows personalized disease predictions for chronic blood cancers

Scientists have developed a successful method to make truly personalised predictions of future disease outcomes for patients with certain types of chronic blood cancers. Wellcome Sanger Institute researchers and collaborators combined extensive genetic and clinical information to predict the prognosis for patients with myeloproliferative neoplasms. Published in the New England Journal of Medicine,

18min

Redrawing the structure of an immune system protein

Researchers have revealed the structure of an essential immune protein, creating future possibilities to develop more effective medicines for a range of illnesses from cancer to neurological diseases. Researchers made this discovery with computerized image analysis and modern electron microscope imaging.

19min

Nutrients may reduce blood glucose levels

One amino acid, alanine, may produce a short-term lowering of glucose levels by altering energy metabolism in the cell.

19min

GeoSEA array records sliding of Mount Etna's southeastern flank

The southeast flank of Mount Etna slowly slides towards the sea. A team of scientists showed for the first time movement of Etna's underwater flank using a new, sound-based geodetic monitoring network. A sudden and rapid descent of the entire slope could lead to a tsunami with disastrous effects for the entire region.

19min

Testing new drugs with 'ALS-on-a-chip'

In an advance that could help scientists develop and test new drugs for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), engineers have developed the first 3-D human tissue model of the interface between motor neurons and muscle fibers, known as the neuromuscular junction.

19min

City of Koh Ker was occupied for centuries longer than previously thought

The classic account of the ancient city of Koh Ker is one of a briefly-occupied and abruptly-abandoned region, but in reality, the area may have been occupied for several centuries beyond what is traditionally acknowledged, according to a new study.

19min

Humans may have colonized Madagascar later than previously thought

New archaeological evidence from southwest Madagascar reveals that modern humans colonized the island thousands of years later than previously thought, according to a new study.

19min

Path to deadly sepsis varies by bacterial infection

Sepsis remains a common and deadly condition that occurs when the body reacts to an infection in the bloodstream. However, scientists know little about the early stages of the condition. Now, researchers have discovered that host responses during sepsis progression can vary in important ways based on pathogen type — which could lead to more effective treatments.

19min

New approach could jumpstart breathing after spinal cord injury

A research team has developed an innovative strategy that could help to restore breathing following traumatic spinal cord injury.

19min

New York City area wetlands may be unwitting generator of greenhouse gasses

A new study suggests that New York City-area wetlands are capable of using CSO inputs in a manner that actually increases greenhouse gas emissions such as carbon dioxide and methane.

33min

World must slash meat consumption to save climate: study

The world must drastically reduce its meat consumption in order to avoid devastating climate change, scientists said Wednesday in the most thorough study so far on how what we eat affects the environment.

43min

FAA orders engine software upgrade after aborted takeoffs

Safety regulators are ordering that engine software be replaced on some Airbus passenger jets because of a problem that has caused pilots to abort several takeoffs in cold weather.

43min

Giant, Prehistoric Bird Chowed Down on This Neanderthal Child's Bones

One Neanderthal child had a very bad day about 115,000 years ago. The child died — that much is certain — and the bones were gulped down and digested by a giant, prehistoric bird, according to archaeologists in Poland.

45min

Mysterious Leptoquarks Could Bind Both Types of Matter. That Is, If They Exist

The leptoquark is down to couple with leptons and quarks.

45min

Satellite sees Tropical Cyclone Titli nearing landfall in Northeastern India

Tropical Cyclone Titli formed late on Oct. 9 and continued to strengthen as it moved through the Northern Indian Ocean toward the Indian continent. NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite provided a visible image of the storm.

49min

Mount Etna's Slide into the Sea Could Trigger a Catastrophic Collapse

New research raises questions about Mount Etna's dangers.

52min

Astronomers Confirm Earth Is Being Bombarded with Ancient, Invisible Energy from Another Galaxy

The brightest lights you cannot see are bombarding Earth from another galaxy, and they could be signs of aliens.

52min

New study helps explain recent scarcity of Bay nettles

A new, long-term study of how environmental conditions affect the abundance and distribution of jellyfish in the nation's largest estuary helps explain the widely reported scarcity of sea nettles within Chesapeake Bay during the past few months and raises concerns about how a long-term continuation of this trend might harm Bay fisheries as climate continues to warm.

53min

Satellite sees Tropical Cyclone Titli nearing landfall in Northeastern India

Tropical Cyclone Titli formed late on Oct. 9, 2018 and continued to strengthen as it moved through the Northern Indian Ocean toward the Indian continent. NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite provided a visible image of the storm.

53min

Stop Military Aid to Saudi Arabia

By now you’ve seen the headlines: An American resident, a Saudi Arabian journalist who wrote for The Washington Post , has gone missing abroad and is presumed dead. Jamal Khashoggi was last seen walking into the Saudi consulate in Istanbul, and Turkish security officials believe he was killed “on the orders of the Saudi royal court,” according to The New York Time s . He was a vocal critic of the

57min

If Beale Street Could Talk Gets a Harlem Homecoming

In the July 1960 issue of Esquire magazine, the essayist and fiction author James Baldwin wrote a piercing love letter to the neighborhood of his birth. “Fifth Avenue, Uptown” detailed the beauty and burdens of life in Harlem, tracing the roots—and more importantly, the effects—of housing segregation, anti-black policing, and the mundane horror of poverty. Baldwin’s reflection ended with an exhor

57min

How To Prevent Brain-Sapping Delirium In The ICU

People who suffer from prolonged delirium in the hospital are likely to develop long-term mental problems like dementia. Doctors have come up with techniques they say can reduce delirium in the ICU. (Image credit: Morgan Hornsby for NPR)

1h

Dubai airport begins using biometric tech at security

Passport control looks a little different in Dubai International Airport—the world's busiest for international travel.

1h

Wyoming Proposes Its Own Methane Regulations As Federal Level Sees Rules Relaxed

The Trump administration is rolling back regulations on methane, saying that should be left to states. So Wyoming is stepping in with its own proposal, which even some oil and gas companies support.

1h

Why Experts Have A Hard Time Predicting A Hurricane's Intensity

Hurricane forecasters still face the challenge of predicting a storm's intensity. NPR's Mary Louise Kelly talks with meteorologist Angela Fritz of The Washington Post's Capital Weather Gang about why.

1h

The Sudden, Shocking Growth of Hurricane Michael

The already-bad 2018 hurricane season has gotten even worse. On Wednesday afternoon, Hurricane Michael became the second major storm to make landfall this year. Michael is an incredibly dangerous, history-making storm, bringing catastrophic high winds and deadly storm surge to Florida’s Panhandle. It ranks among the most ferocious landfalling hurricanes in American history. “THIS IS A WORST CASE

1h

There is simply no precedent for Hurricane MichaelHurricane Michael Florida

Environment It just hit the Florida Panhandle with 155 MPH winds. Hurricane Michael’s strength lists among the most intense hurricanes ever recorded at landfall in the United States.

1h

'Catching some hell': Hurricane Michael slams into FloridaHurricane Michael Florida

Supercharged by abnormally warm waters in the Gulf of Mexico, Hurricane Michael slammed into the Florida Panhandle with terrifying winds of 155 mph Wednesday, splintering homes and submerging neighborhoods. It was the most powerful hurricane to hit the continental U.S. in nearly 50 years.

1h

6.0-magnitude quake rocks Indonesia's Java, Bali

A shallow 6.0-magnitude earthquake struck off the coast of the Indonesian islands of Java and Bali early Thursday, the United States Geological Survey said, causing panicked people to flee their homes.

1h

AT&T to launch streaming service, latest to counter NetflixAT&T WarnerMedia HBO

AT&T's WarnerMedia said Wednesday it will launch a direct-to-consumer streaming service in late 2019, becoming the latest challenger to fast-growing operators such as Netflix and Amazon.

1h

Satellite sees Tropical Cyclone Luban nearing Oman

Tropical Cyclone Luban continued to move through the Arabian Sea toward the coast of Oman when the NOAA-20 satellite provided a visible image of the storm.

1h

NASA sees Atlantic's Leslie become a hurricane

NASA's Aqua satellite captured an infrared image of Hurricane Leslie that revealed strong storms circled the center.

1h

1h

Disruption makes startup investors balance caution against fear of missing out

A new study by researchers from the University of California, Riverside, and the Rotterdam School of Management finds that fear of missing out motivates investors to give money early to startups with a disruptive vision. However, those backers are reluctant to invest too much in unproven ideas that might not take off.

1h

Tech to prepare manufacturers, workers for the 'factory of the future'

Today's manufacturers struggle to keep pace with rapid changes in technology because of the inability to adapt and the new skills required of their workforce.

1h

Tropical Storm Sergio's rainfall examined by GPM satellite

The Global Precipitation Measurement mission or GPM core satellite provided an analysis of the rate in which rain is falling throughout the Eastern Pacific Ocean's Tropical Storm Sergio. Sergio is close enough to Baja California now that it has triggered watches.

1h

Brave Volunteers Got Whooping Cough Bacteria Put Up Their Noses, For Science

Thirty four people in the United Kingdom volunteered to get live whooping cough bacteria dripped into their noses, for science.

1h

Hurricane Michael Is Officially More Powerful than Hurricane Katrina

The storm struck the Gulf coast of Florida this afternoon as the third most intense hurricane ever to strike the continental U.S., and the most intense since 1969.

1h

Satellite sees Tropical Cyclone Luban nearing Oman

Tropical Cyclone Luban continued to move through the Arabian Sea toward the coast of Oman when the NOAA-20 satellite provided a visible image of the storm.

1h

Research on light-matter interaction could improve electronic and optoelectronic devices

A paper published in Nature Communications by Sufei Shi, assistant professor of chemical and biological engineering at Rensselaer, increases our understanding of how light interacts with atomically thin semiconductors and creates unique excitonic complex particles, multiple electrons, and holes strongly bound together. These particles possess a new quantum degree of freedom, called "valley spin."

1h

How single cells can shed light on ‘fungal dark matter’

Researchers have developed a way to generate genomes from single cells of uncultivated fungi. Fungi can be found on forest floors, in swamps, and in houses, ranging in size from smaller than the period on your smartphone’s keyboard to stretching over several city blocks. Scientists estimate more than a million species live on this planet, but most of that diversity remains unknown because the fun

1h

Miranda to Europa: You think you’ve got treacherous landing zones? Hold my beer

Space Meet the moon with 11 mile high cliff Recent research may suggest that Europa is going to be a hard landing for any spacecraft, what with 50 foot ice spikes potentially jutting out at its equator. But…

1h

Peer into Hurricane Michael's Mesmerizing Eye in This Eerie Time-Lapse Video

A close-up view captures the whirling clouds circling Hurricane Michael's eye

1h

Map of political book sales shows a polarized nation

Barnes & Noble reported a 57% increase in political book sales compared to 2017. The top three best-selling political books of 2018 have been mostly critical of President Donald Trump, though each state varies in which political books it buys most. Despite the boost in sales, Barnes & Noble could put itself up for sale in the near future. Americans are buying more political books in 2018 than in

2h

Bad News for People Who Can’t Remember Names

A good friend of one of my good friends forgets me every time I see him. We’ve hung out four times in the past several years, and on each occasion, he’s greeted me with a beaming smile and an outstretched hand. “Hi, I’m Jerkface,” he says. (Jerkface’s name has been changed to avoid unnecessary shaming.) “Hi, yes,” I reply. “We saw each other at that bar that one time, and at our friend’s apartmen

2h

The People v. the U.S. Senate

Brett Kavanaugh was confirmed to the United States Supreme Court by a vote of 50–48 , with one senator absent and one abstaining. Only one Democrat, Joe Manchin of West Virginia, voted with the solidly Republican majority, which represented just 44 percent of the country’s population . Indeed, when Americans last voted for their senators (over a period of six years), Democrats won the popular vot

2h

Tropical Storm Sergio's rainfall examined by GPM satellite

The Global Precipitation Measurement mission or GPM core satellite provided an analysis of the rate in which rain is falling throughout the Eastern Pacific Ocean's Tropical Storm Sergio. Sergio is close enough to Baja California now that it has triggered watches.

2h

If the past is a guide, Hubble’s new trouble won’t doom the space telescope

Hubble is in safe mode, but astronomers are optimistic that the observatory will keep working.

2h

Research on light-matter interaction could improve electronic and optoelectronic devices

New research increases our understanding of how light interacts with atomically thin semiconductors and creates unique excitonic complex particles, multiple electrons, and holes strongly bound together.

2h

Volcano researcher learns how Earth builds supereruption-feeding magma systems

After studying layers of pumice, measuring the amount of crystals in the samples and using thermodynamic models, the team determined that magma moved closer to the surface with each successive eruption.

2h

Infants capable of complex babble may grow into stronger readers

Infants' early speech production may predict their later literacy, according to a new study.

2h

The Final Appearance of the Giant Puppets of Royal de Luxe

The French street-theatre company Royal de Luxe has presented multiday outdoor performances featuring their giant marionettes for millions of people around the world for more than 20 years. Their current cast of puppets—Big Giant, Little Giantess, Xolo the Dog, Giant Grandmother, and Little Boy Giant—have just been retired, following their final performance last week in Liverpool, England. The BB

2h

When Normal Touch Becomes Painful, the Same Neurons Are Involved

In a condition called mechanical allodynia, when everyday activities exact misery, the same neurons that ordinarily transmit normal touch are involved in feelings of pain.

2h

Tales From The Bering Sea: Sig’s Ball Story | Deadliest Catch

Captain Sig has a story that will change the way you see mouthwash. Stream Full Episodes of Deadliest Catch: https://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/deadliest-catch/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/DeadliestCatch https://www.facebook.com/Discovery Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/DeadliestCatch https://twitter.com/Discover

2h

THC amounts identical in most cannabis strains, UBC study finds

Newly published research from UBC's Okanagan campus has determined that many strains of cannabis have virtually identical levels of tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and cannabidiol (CBD), despite their unique street names.

2h

Vaccinate humans to protect mosquitoes from malaria?

Researchers have devised a simple way to boost the efficacy of a new kind of malaria vaccine. For decades, scientists have been trying to develop a vaccine that prevents mosquitoes from spreading malaria among humans. This unique approach—in which immunized humans transfer anti-malarial proteins to mosquitoes when bitten—is called a transmission-blocking vaccine (TBV). A few malarial TBVs have sh

2h

Group prenatal care cuts preterm birth risk

Researchers have discovered that group prenatal care for expecting mothers reduces the risks for preterm birth and low birth weight. A new study of more than 9,000 women compared those who received either CenteringPregnancy or Expect With Me group prenatal care to those who received traditional one-on-one care. Researchers found that group prenatal care patients had a 37 percent lower risk of hav

2h

Research on light-matter interaction could improve electronic and optoelectronic devices

A paper published in Nature Communications by Sufei Shi, assistant professor of chemical and biological engineering at Rensselaer, increases our understanding of how light interacts with atomically thin semiconductors and creates unique excitonic complex particles, multiple electrons, and holes strongly bound together.

2h

PIEZO2, a molecular target for treating clinical pain

The researchers think topical application of PIEZO2 blockers could be beneficial for patients suffering from neuropathic pain.

2h

Nutrients may reduce blood glucose levels

One amino acid, alanine, may produce a short-term lowering of glucose levels by altering energy metabolism in the cell.

2h

A Celestial Event Left Bees Speechless

For several minutes last August, a cosmic alignment between the Earth, sun, and moon plunged a narrow slice of the continental United States into near darkness in the middle of the day. As the spectators gathered in the shadow stared up at the sun, now nothing more than a sparkling white ring against a mulberry sky , they marveled at the sight. They shouted, hooted, cheered. Those were the humans

2h

The weirdest things we learned this week: eating your own twin, embalmed milk, and levitating frogs

Science Our editors scrounged up some truly bizarre facts. What’s the weirdest thing you learned this week? Well, whatever it is, we promise you’ll have an even weirder answer if you listen to PopSci’s newest podcast.

3h

Markers of dairy fat consumption linked to lower risk of type two diabetes

Higher levels of biomarkers of dairy fat consumption are associated with a lower risk of developing type 2 two diabetes, according to new research published today in PLOS Medicine. The study, in more than 60,000 adults, was undertaken by an international consortium led by scientists at the Medical Research Council Epidemiology Unit, University of Cambridge, and the Friedman School of Nutrition Sci

3h

GeoSEA array records sliding of Mount Etna's southeastern flank

The southeast flank of Mount Etna slowly slides towards the sea. A team of scientists from GEOMAR and the Kiel University showed for the first time movement of Etna's underwater flank using a new, sound-based geodetic monitoring network. A sudden and rapid descent of the entire slope could lead to a tsunami with disastrous effects for the entire region. The results have been published today in the

3h

Study identifies gene that makes gentle touch feel painful after injury

In a study of four patients with a rare genetic disorder, NIH researchers found that the PIEZO2 gene may be responsible for tactile allodynia: the skin's reaction to injury that makes normally gentle touches feel painful. This and a second NIH-funded study showed how the gene may play an essential role in the nervous system's reaction to injury and inflammation, making PIEZO2 a target for developi

3h

Volcano researcher learns how Earth builds supereruption-feeding magma systems

After studying layers of pumice, measuring the amount of crystals in the samples and using thermodynamic models, the team determined that magma moved closer to the surface with each successive eruption.

3h

Organs-on-chip technology reveals new drug candidates for Lou Gehrig's disease

The investigation of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) — also known as Lou Gehrig's disease — through muscle-on-a-chip technology has revealed a new drug combination that may serve as an effective treatment of the progressive neurodegenerative disease.

3h

Scientists get in touch with the biology underlying pain

Scientists now have a better understanding of why sensory neurons sometimes register light touches as painful (a common and debilitating condition called mechanical allodynia) following injury in mice and humans, thanks to the results of two studies.

3h

Cells in 'little brain' have distinctive metabolic needs

'Knocking out' an enzyme that regulates the flow of fuel into mitochondria specifically blocks the development of the mouse cerebellum more than the rest of the brain.

3h

The pentagon and the bean

Researchers have revealed the structure of an essential immune protein, creating future possibilities to develop more effective medicines for a range of illnesses from cancer to neurological diseases. University of Tokyo researchers made this discovery with computerized image analysis and modern electron microscope imaging.

3h

Newly described fossils could help reveal why some dinos got so big

A new, in-depth anatomical description of the best preserved specimens of a car-sized sauropod relative from North America could help paleontologists with unraveling the mystery of why some dinosaurs got so big.

3h

Testing new drugs with 'ALS-on-a-chip'

In an advance that could help scientists develop and test new drugs for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), MIT engineers have developed the first 3-D human tissue model of the interface between motor neurons and muscle fibers, known as the neuromuscular junction.

3h

Infants capable of complex babble may grow into stronger readers

Infants' early speech production may predict their later literacy, according to a study published Oct. 10, 2018, in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Kelly Farquharson from Florida State University and colleagues.

3h

Humans may have colonized Madagascar later than previously thought

New archaeological evidence from southwest Madagascar reveals that modern humans colonized the island thousands of years later than previously thought, according to a study published Oct. 10, 2018 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Atholl Anderson from the Australian National University, Canberra, Australia, and colleagues.

3h

City of Koh Ker was occupied for centuries longer than previously thought

The classic account of the ancient city of Koh Ker is one of a briefly-occupied and abruptly-abandoned region, but in reality, the area may have been occupied for several centuries beyond what is traditionally acknowledged, according to a study published Oct. 10, 2018 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Tegan Hall of the University of Sydney, Australia and colleagues.

3h

How to Tell When North Korea Starts to Denuclearize

On Monday, Secretary of State Mike Pompeo returned from what he described as “productive” conversations with North Korea’s leader, Kim Jong Un. Although details are still emerging from the meeting, which took place in Pyongyang, one outcome is clear: Both sides are eager to push forward with a second summit between President Donald Trump and Kim as soon as possible . But the question of denuclear

3h

How to Make Newborn Guitars Look Artfully Ancient

WATERFORD, Michigan — Not everybody wants a shiny new guitar these days. A few connoisseurs want one that looks like it’s taken more abuse than Keith Richards. Nailing the look and feel of a vintage guitar takes time. Guys like Vince Cunetto and Bill Nash, both known for their high-end “aged to perfection” instruments, make \[…\]

3h

An upshot of having ADHD? ‘Outside the box’ thinking

People often believe those with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder face challenges that could hinder future employment, but a new study finds that adults with ADHD feel empowered doing creative tasks, which could help them on the job. The tendency of individuals with ADHD—a mental disorder commonly diagnosed at childhood—to resist conformity and ignore typical information may be an asset in

3h

Neuron death in ALS more complex than previously thought

Researchers have discovered that two different kinds of motor neurons that die in people with ALS may die in different ways — an important insight for understanding the disease and, eventually, finding a cure.

3h

Ideal protein to help seniors rebuild lost muscle

While exercise buffs have long used protein supplements to gain muscle, new research suggests one protein source in particular, whey protein, is most effective for seniors struggling to rebuild muscle lost from inactivity associated with illness or long hospital stays.

3h

Statistical method recreates the history of a long-abandoned village

Archaeologists now have new tools for studying the development of medieval villages and the transformation of the historical landscapes surrounding them. Scientists have attempted to reconstruct the history of Zornoztegi, an abandoned medieval village located in the Basque Country, Spain.

3h

Seizures begin with a muffle

Contrary to long-held assumptions, researchers find that some seizures start after a burst from neurons that inhibit brain activity.

3h

Why Did Hurricane Michael Become Such a Monster Storm So Quickly?

Forecasters watching Hurricane Michael barrel toward the Gulf coast of Florida earlier this week saw the storm do something "most unusual."

3h

Volcano researchers learn how Earth builds supereruption-feeding magma systems

To figure out where magma gathers in the earth's crust and for how long, Vanderbilt University volcanologist Guilherme Gualda and his students traveled to their most active cluster: the Taupo Volcanic Zone of New Zealand, where some of the biggest eruptions of the last 2 million years occurred—seven in a period between 350,000 and 240,000 years ago.

3h

The pentagon and the bean—redrawing the structure of an immune system protein

Researchers have revealed the structure of an essential immune protein, creating future possibilities to develop more effective medicines for a range of illnesses from cancer to neurological diseases. University of Tokyo researchers made this discovery with computerized image analysis and modern electron microscope imaging.

3h

City of Koh Ker was occupied for centuries longer than previously thought

The classic account of the ancient city of Koh Ker is one of a briefly-occupied and abruptly-abandoned region, but in reality, the area may have been occupied for several centuries beyond what is traditionally acknowledged, according to a study published October 10, 2018 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Tegan Hall of the University of Sydney, Australia and colleagues.

3h

Humans may have colonized Madagascar later than previously thought

New archaeological evidence from southwest Madagascar reveals that modern humans colonized the island thousands of years later than previously thought, according to a study published October 10, 2018 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Atholl Anderson from the Australian National University, Canberra, Australia, and colleagues.

3h

Newly described fossils could help reveal why some dinos got so big

By the time non-avian dinosaurs went extinct, plant-eating sauropods like the Brontosaurus had grown to gargantuan proportions. Weighing in as much as 100 tons, the long-neck behemoths are the largest land animals to ever walk the earth.

3h

Probiotic bacillus eliminates staphylococcus bacteria

A new study shows that a 'good' bacterium commonly found in probiotic digestive supplements helps eliminate Staphylococcus aureus, a type of bacteria that can cause serious antibiotic-resistant infections. The researchers unexpectedly found that Bacillus bacteria prevented S. aureus bacteria from growing in the gut and nose of healthy individuals.

3h

Feeding 10 billion people by 2050 within planetary limits may be achievable

A new study quantifies how food production and consumption affects the planetary boundaries that describe a safe operating space for humanity beyond which Earth's vital systems could become unstable.

3h

Disruption makes startup investors balance caution against fear of missing out

A new study finds that fear of missing out motivates investors to give money early to startups with a disruptive vision. However, those backers are reluctant to invest too much in unproven ideas that might not take off. In other words, disruptive startups are more likely to raise money, but they receive smaller amounts than less-threatening ventures.

3h

Blue roses could be coming soon to a garden near you

For centuries, gardeners have attempted to breed blue roses with no success. But now, thanks to modern biotechnology, the elusive blue rose may finally be attainable. Researchers have found a way to express pigment-producing enzymes from bacteria in the petals of a white rose, tinting the flowers blue.

3h

Understanding catalysts at the atomic level can provide a cleaner environment

By studying materials down to the atomic level, researchers have found a way to make catalysts more efficient and environmentally friendly. The methods can be used to improve many different types of catalysts.

3h

Catalytic active sites determined using carbon nanotubes

Catalytic research has developed a new and more definitive way to determine the active site in a complex catalyst.

3h

NASA sees Atlantic's Leslie become a hurricane

NASA's Aqua satellite captured an infrared image of Hurricane Leslie that revealed strong storms circled the center.

3h

NIH study finds probiotic Bacillus eliminates Staphylococcus bacteria

A new study from NIH scientists and their Thai colleagues shows that a 'good' bacterium commonly found in probiotic digestive supplements helps eliminate Staphylococcus aureus, a type of bacteria that can cause serious antibiotic-resistant infections. The researchers, led by NIAID, unexpectedly found that Bacillus bacteria prevented S. aureus bacteria from growing in the gut and nose of healthy in

3h

The making of soldier ants

Scientists have found the answer to a question that perplexed Charles Darwin. It seems that the ant colony itself generates soldiers and regulates the balance between soldiers and 'minor' workers thanks to a seemingly unimportant rudimentary 'organ' which appears only briefly during the final stages of larval development. And only in some of the ants — the ones that will become soldiers.

3h

New telescope almost doubles known number of mysterious 'fast radio bursts'

Astronomers have nearly doubled the known number of 'fast radio bursts'– powerful flashes of radio waves from deep space. The team's discoveries include the closest and brightest fast radio bursts ever detected and they have proved that fast radio bursts are coming from the other side of the Universe rather than from our own galactic neighborhood.

3h

The Disappearance of a Saudi Critic Signals a Broader Danger for Journalists

On October 2, Jamal Khashoggi entered the Saudi consulate in Istanbul to obtain paperwork in order to get married to his Turkish fiancée. The Saudi journalist and dissident hasn’t been seen or heard from since then, though there has been no shortage of morbid speculation about his fate. Saudi Arabia has hardly been a beacon of press freedom at the best of times. But the new crown prince, Mohammed

3h

Nature-studie: Spis plantebaseret kost, halver madspild og transformer landbruget

Vi skal spise mere grønt, udnytte fødevarer bedre og gennemføre dyrkningsmæssige samt teknologiske landvindinger i landbruget for at få mad i 2050 uden at klimabelaste kloden ekstra.

4h

This wacky-looking font can help you remember what you read

Technology Typefaces are typically easy to read. Not Sans Forgetica. Sans Forgetica, a new memory-boosting font, is built around the principle of desirable difficulty.

4h

Disruption makes startup investors balance caution against fear of missing out

A new study by researchers from the University of California, Riverside, and the Rotterdam School of Management finds that fear of missing out motivates investors to give money early to startups with a disruptive vision. However, those backers are reluctant to invest too much in unproven ideas that might not take off. In other words, disruptive startups are more likely to raise money, but they rec

4h

Creating custom brains from the ground up

In today's Nature, scientists from Boston Children's Hospital and UC San Francisco describe a new way to create customized mouse models for studying the brain. After killing off young brain cells, the developing forebrain can then be reconstituted from genetically engineered stem cells containing the specific genetic modifications desired for study.

4h

New approach could jumpstart breathing after spinal cord injury

A research team at the Krembil Research Institute in Toronto has developed an innovative strategy that could help to restore breathing following traumatic spinal cord injury.

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UK Biobank genetics of brain structure and description of largest human genetic study

Two papers in Nature, one describing UK Biobank genetics and other using it.

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The making of soldier ants

Scientists at McGill have found the answer to a question that perplexed Charles Darwin. According to a paper published today in Nature, it seems that the colony itself generates soldiers and regulates the balance between soldiers and 'minor' workers thanks to a seemingly unimportant rudimentary 'organ' which appears only briefly during the final stages of larval development. And only in some of th

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Aussie telescope almost doubles known number of mysterious 'fast radio bursts'

Australian astronomers have nearly doubled the known number of 'fast radio bursts'– powerful flashes of radio waves from deep space. The team's discoveries include the closest and brightest fast radio bursts ever detected and they have proved that fast radio bursts are coming from the other side of the Universe rather than from our own galactic neighbourhood.

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Feeding 10 billion people by 2050 within planetary limits may be achievable

The study is the first to quantify how food production and consumption affects the planetary boundaries that describe a safe operating space for humanity beyond which Earth's vital systems could become unstable.

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Do ‘weed tampons’ really work? Harvard researcher plans to find out

A new observational study will ask 400 women to track their menstrual symptoms over the course of a few months during which they'll administer marijuana suppositories. Marijuana suppositories are designed to alleviate the pain and stress of periods. The observational study is described as a "first step," with the ultimate goal being a clinical trial that includes placebos. Women have long used ma

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Great Ormond Street launches hospital of the future with AI and robots

Step inside the hospital of the future, where face recognition tracks everyone who enters and robots roam the corridors

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AI’s dirty secret: Energy-guzzling machines may fuel global warming

Advances in artificial intelligence could lead to massive growth in energy use as smart machines push into every corner of our lives

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New NIST method measures 3D polymer processing precisely

Recipes for three-dimensional (3D) printing, or additive manufacturing, of parts have required as much guesswork as science. Until now. Researchers have demonstrated a novel light-based atomic force microscopy (AFM) technique — sample-coupled-resonance photorheology (SCRPR) — that measures how and where a material's properties change in real time at the smallest scales during the curing process.

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Crosstalk between fallopian tube, ovary may drive the spread of ovarian cancer

New research shows that cancer cells in the fallopian tube affect normal chemical signaling between reproductive tissues and stimulate the release of norepinephrine from the ovary, causing cancer cells to migrate.

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EU forests can't help climate fight: study

Europe cannot rely on its forests to help ward off the effects of climate change, experts warned Wednesday, calling instead for nations to protect their natural resources against the warming planet.

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Israel's maiden moon launch delayed to 2019

The Israeli organisation behind the country's first mission to the moon on Wednesday announced a delay in the vessel's launch from December to early 2019.

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How the seeds of planets take shape

In theoretical research that could explain everything from planet formation to outflows from stars, to even the settling of volcanic ash, Caltech researchers have discovered a new mechanism to explain how the act of dust moving through gas leads to clumps of dust. While dust clumps were already known to play a role in seeding new planets and many other systems in space and on Earth, how the clumps

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Increased survival in patients with metastatic NSCLC receiving treatment in academic centers

Patients with metastatic NSCLC receiving treatment at academic centers (ACs) have an increased 2-year survival compared to patients treated at community-based centers (CCs). An overall histology-dependent survival was also noted in patients with adenocarcinoma verses squamous cell carcinoma and varied by treatment facility.

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The Far Right Isn’t the Only Rising Force in Germany

When Germany’s southern state of Bavaria holds its regional election on Sunday, its ruling Christian Social Union (CSU) is expected to lose its absolute majority—by a lot. The party’s projected losses appear to be part of a much broader trend of political fragmentation across Europe, in which bigger parties are shrinking while smaller parties—especially those on the far right—are growing. Such ha

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Aussie telescope almost doubles known number of mysterious 'fast radio bursts'

Australian researchers using a CSIRO radio telescope in Western Australia have nearly doubled the known number of 'fast radio bursts'— powerful flashes of radio waves from deep space.

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Ants regulate growth of seemingly 'useless' organ to make huge soldiers

Scientists at McGill have found the answer to a question that perplexed Charles Darwin. So much so, that it actually led him to doubt his own theory of evolution. He wondered, if natural selection works at the level of the individual, fighting for survival and reproduction, how can a single colony produce worker ants that are so dramatically different in size—from the "minor" workers with their sm

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Turbocharged: How Michael got 55 percent stronger in 1 day

Moist air, warm waters in the Gulf of Mexico, and ideal wind patterns turbocharged Hurricane Michael in the hours before it smacked Florida's Panhandle.

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Feeding 10 billion people by 2050 within planetary limits may be achievable

A global shift toward healthy and more plant-based diets, halving food loss and waste, and improving farming practices and technologies are required to feed 10 billion people sustainably by 2050, a new study finds. Adopting these options reduces the risk of crossing global environmental limits related to climate change, the use of agricultural land, the extraction of freshwater resources, and the

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It’s time for October open promotions!

Hello Eyewirers! Our next round of open promotions for Scouts, Scythes , Mystics , Mods , and Mentors is approaching! During this time you can fill out the open promotion form here to be considered by HQ without requiring player sponsors. Scout, Scythe, and Mentor Qualifications: Have at least earned 50,000 points and completed 500 cubes Maintain at least 90% accuracy overall, with some flexibili

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NASA analyzes category 4 Hurricane Michael approaching landfallHurricane Michael Florida

NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite examined Hurricane Michael after it reached Category 4 status and neared the Florida Panhandle on Oct. 10. Suomi NPP provided an infrared and night-time view of the powerful storm.

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Understanding water's role in antibiotic resistance emergence and dissemination in Africa

Greater access to antibiotic drugs, together with their misuse and overuse, has accelerated the emergence of antibiotic resistant bacteria worldwide.

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Remember my name: when recognising 5,000 faces isn't enough

Humans can memorise thousands of faces, say scientists. But that only makes the social awkwardness of not being able to place an acquaintance even worse. Here’s how to brazen it out Scientists from the University of York have claimed that humans can recognise and memorise 5,000 faces – making those occasions where you can’t quite place or name someone even more excruciating. Here is the modern et

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Team gets a closer look at how proteins meet on the cell membrane

Scripps Research scientists have uncovered the workings of a critical process in cell survival. Their study, published recently in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, is the first to show exactly how a protein called talin activates another critical protein, called integrin, to do its job on the cell membrane.

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Molecular details of protein reveal glimpse into how kidney stones form

Kidney stones—solid, pebble-like grit that forms when too much of certain minerals like calcium are in the urine—can strike men, women, and increasingly, children, and the presence and pain of stones afflicts more than 12 percent of the world's population. Using the 2017 Nobel Prize-winning technique of cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) to capture a high-resolution image of an ion channel protein

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Novel machine learning based framework could lead to breakthroughs in material design

Computers used to take up entire rooms. Today, a two-pound laptop can slide effortlessly into a backpack. But that wouldn't have been possible without the creation of new, smaller processors—which are only possible with the innovation of new materials.

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NASA finds Nadine a compact tropical storm

NASA's Aqua satellite provided a visible image of Tropical Storm Nadine in the Eastern Atlantic that revealed it was a compact storm.

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Team gets a closer look at how proteins meet on the cell membrane

At last, the researchers have defined the molecular basis of the cell membrane in integrin activation.

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Mount Sinai builds modeling systems identifying gene-drug and environment interaction

A team of researchers at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai and the University of Washington has designed a modeling system that integrates genomic and temporal information to infer causal relationships between genes, drugs, and their environment, allowing for a more accurate prediction of their interactions over time.

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Tracking a killer

A major cause of human disability and death throughout the world, sepsis is a condition that begins with an infection, progresses rapidly and can set off a chain of effects that result in multiple organ failure and irreparable damage to the body. Because of the condition's rapid onset, physicians must respond immediately to the symptoms with broad-spectrum antibiotics for infection, drugs to comba

4h

Galactic archaeology

An international team of researchers, including David S. Aguado, Jonay González and Carlos Allende Prieto of the Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias (IAC), has found a star with extremely low metallicyt, one of the oldest in the Milky Way, and for that reason an excellent messenger from the early universe.

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Advances in deep learning for drug discovery and biomarker development published in top journal

Insilico Medicine, one of the industry leaders bridging deep learning for biology, chemistry and digital medicine, announced the publication of a special issue dedicated to 'Deep Learing for Drug Discovery and Biomarker Development' in one of the top industry journals celebrating its 15th anniversary published by the American Chemical Society, Molecular Pharmaceutics. The special issue starts with

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NASA analyzes category 4 Hurricane Michael approaching landfall

NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite examined Hurricane Michael after it reached Category 4 status and neared the Florida Panhandle on Oct. 10. Suomi NPP provided an infrared and night-time view of the powerful storm.

4h

Understanding water's role in antibiotic resistance emergence and dissemination in Africa

Greater access to antibiotic drugs, together with their misuse and overuse, has accelerated the emergence of antibiotic resistant bacteria worldwide. A new study now suggests that surface water dynamics are a crucial contributor to this growing global health concern.

4h

Lung cancer deaths are 28 percent lower in California

Early adoption of tobacco control efforts in California lead to fewer people ever smoking, reduced the amount used by those who do smoke and helped smokers quit at a younger age — when their risk of developing lung cancer is lowest. As a result, lung cancer deaths are 28 percent lower in California compared to the rest of the country and the gap is widening each year by almost a percentage point.

4h

Efforts to save the Amazon threaten neighboring savanna

Protecting the Amazon rainforest from deforestation may just be shifting the damage to a less renowned neighbor, according to new research. The unintended consequences are profound. Efforts to rein in agriculture activities in the Amazon have led to an 80 percent reduction in rainforest destruction between the early 2000s to 2015. Yet, farming and ranching have caused 6.6 times more destruction o

4h

Silicon Valley Sieve: A Timeline of Tech-Industry Leaks

Google has sprung yet another leak about its secret plans to build a Chinese-government-friendly search engine, apparently in contradiction to the company’s public statements about the possibility. It’s just the latest piece of unauthorized information to escape from the tech industry’s increasingly polarized and disgruntled employees. But just a few years ago, tech companies such as Facebook wer

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We need to get better at supporting people who lose a pregnancy

This week is Baby Loss Awareness Week, but more must be done to help those who, like me, have suffered a loss, says Petra Boynton

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Role of 'natural factors' on recent climate change underestimated, research shows

Pioneering new research has given a new perspective on the crucial role that 'natural factors' play in global warming.

5h

How to make fish shine

Scientists from the University of Bath have helped to figure out why shoals of fish flash silver as they twist through the water by studying how the shiny silver cells are created in zebrafish.

5h

Constitutional uncertainty and political disputes put Green Brexit at risk, research shows

A Green Brexit could be under threat without greater cooperation between devolved nations and the UK government, a study led by the University of Sheffield has found.

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Tiny tools for a big industry

Even with technological advances in recent years, the petroleum industry still struggles to squeeze as much oil and gas as possible out of underground reservoirs. Now the big industry is looking to nanotechnology to boost efficiency. According to an article in Chemical & Engineering News, the weekly newsmagazine of the American Chemical Society, the tiny particles could help pinpoint oil pockets,

5h

Researchers discover molecular mechanisms of ancient herbal remedies

Researchers in the Department of Physiology & Biophysics at the University of California, Irvine School of Medicine have discovered the molecular basis for a therapeutic action of an ancient herbal medicine used across Africa to treat various illnesses, including epilepsy.

5h

'Her Radiant Rolls' Put Her Over The Top: Alaska Park Names Its 'Fattest Bear'

It's the bear body-positive competition you didn't know you needed. (Image credit: Used with permission from Katmai National Park and Preserve)

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In black men, baseline screening in midlife strongly predicts aggressive prostate cancer

First study focusing on this population addresses important research gap.

5h

NASA finds Nadine a compact tropical storm

NASA's Aqua satellite provided a visible image of Tropical Storm Nadine in the Eastern Atlantic that revealed it was a compact storm.

5h

Novel machine learning based framework could lead to breakthroughs in material design

"This novel framework not only uses the machine learning in a unique fashion for the first time," Deshmukh said, "but it also dramatically accelerates the development of accurate computational models of materials."

5h

E-cigarettes should be used more actively to help smokers quit, experts recommend

'Ongoing nervousness' about the use of e-cigarettes in stop-smoking services can be a 'significant' barrier to people finding support, research revealed during 'Stoptober' shows.

5h

Molecular details of protein reveal glimpse into how kidney stones form

Using the 2017 Nobel Prize-winning technique of cryo-electron microscopy to capture a high-resolution image of an ion channel protein, called TRPV5, that removes calcium from urine, researchers have found fresh clues as to how kidney stones form.

5h

Survey finds significant gaps in doctor-patient conversations

Nearly half (45 percent) of U.S. adults who have a primary care physician (PCP) say they wish they talked with their doctor more about why they want to be healthy, and a majority of younger people (57 percent of those aged 18-44) say they wish their doctor would talk to them about non-medication treatments, according to a new survey released today by Samueli Integrative Health Programs.

5h

How the Yankees Became Baseball’s Most Improbable Underdogs

Bucky Dent threw out the first pitch. Aaron Boone assumed his managerial perch in the home-team dugout. And in an agonizing ninth inning—as Craig Kimbrel hunched over the mound, the New York Yankees loaded the bases, and fans watched breathlessly—Babe Ruth seemed to wink at the Red Sox from his plaque in Monument Park. But try as they might, the ghosts of Octobers past didn’t haunt the Red Sox on

5h

Researchers show effectiveness of new noninvasive blood glucose test

For those living with diabetes, monitoring blood glucose accurately is necessary to prevent diabetes-related complications such as heart attacks, blindness and coma. Researchers from the University of Missouri School of Medicine and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology recently evaluated the accuracy of an MIT-developed technology to monitor blood glucose levels without needles or a finger pr

5h

Color-changing contact lens could enhance monitoring of eye disease treatments

For all the good they do, eye drops and ointments have one major drawback: It's hard to tell how much of the medication is actually getting to the eye. Now in a study appearing in ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces, scientists report that they have developed a contact lens that changes color as drugs are released. This visual indicator could help eye doctors and patients readily determine whether

5h

Interstellar Visitor Found to Be Unlike a Comet or an Asteroid

Like a hit-and-run driver who races from the scene of a crash, the interstellar guest known as ’Oumuamua has bolted out of the solar system, leaving confusion in its wake. Early measurements seemed to indicate that it was an asteroid — a dry rock much like those found orbiting between Mars and Jupiter. Then by this past summer, astronomers largely came around to the conclusion that it was instead

5h

Icy moon of Jupiter, Ganymede, shows evidence of past strike-slip faulting

A recently published study led by researchers at the University of Hawai'i at Manoa School of Ocean and Earth Science and Technology reveals Ganymede, an icy moon of Jupiter, appears to have undergone complex periods of geologic activity, specifically strike-slip tectonism, as is seen in Earth's San Andreas fault. This is the first study to exhaustively consider the role of strike-slip tectonism i

5h

Versatile molecular system extends the promise of light-activated switches

Light-activated switches are too small to be seen by the naked eye, but the molecular systems are hard at work in research related to drug design, adaptive materials and data storage. To unlock the promise of new generations of medical therapies and memory systems, researchers must first overcome the drawbacks of the microscopic devices that can be difficult to produce and lack versatility.

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Blue roses could be coming soon to a garden near you

For centuries, gardeners have attempted to breed blue roses with no success. But now, thanks to modern biotechnology, the elusive blue rose may finally be attainable. Researchers have found a way to express pigment-producing enzymes from bacteria in the petals of a white rose, tinting the flowers blue. They report their results in ACS Synthetic Biology.

5h

Innovative sensing technique could improve greenhouse gas analysis

An international team of researchers has used an unconventional imaging technique known as ghost imaging to make spectroscopic measurements of a gas molecule. The new approach by scientists at Tampere University of Technology in Finland, the University of Eastern Finland and the University of Burgundy Franche-Comté in France, works over a wide range of wavelengths and could improve measurements of

5h

European officials seek tougher emissions rules for cars

European Union officials are pushing ahead with tougher car emissions standards aimed at fighting global warming—but which auto industry representatives said could hurt a major source of manufacturing jobs.

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Snapchat unveils new original shows under own brandSnap Shows Discover

The youth-focused social network Snapchat announced Wednesday it was launching a new slate of original video shows under its own brand in the latest move to spark growth.

5h

Study to explore how cognitive development shapes attitudes about physical activity

Iowa State University researchers are working to understand how the emotional connection we develop with physical activity as children influences attitudes and behaviors throughout our lifetime. They suspect our prefrontal cortex, which regulates emotions, plays a significant role.

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Setting personal goals for dementia care

In a new study, researchers used a tool called 'goal attainment scaling' (GAS) when caring for people with dementia to learn more about these individuals' personalized goals for care. Their study was published in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society.

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Higher levels of urinary fluoride associated with ADHD in children

Higher levels of urinary fluoride during pregnancy are associated with more ADHD-like symptoms in school-age children.

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Implant dissolves into the body after it speeds nerve healing

Scientists have developed the first ever bioresorbable electronic medicine: a biodegradable wireless implant that speeds nerve regeneration and improves the healing of damaged nerves. In a study with rats, the device delivered regular pulses of electricity to damaged peripheral nerves after a surgical repair process, accelerating the regrowth of nerves in the rats’ legs and enhancing the ultimate

5h

German satellites sense Earth's lumps and bumps

The German space agency releases a spectacular 3D map of the Earth's land surfaces.

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Brain circuits for successful emotional development established during infancy

Researchers at Cedars-Sinai, Los Angeles, Calif. and University of North Carolina Chapel Hill, N.C., USA, have tracked the development of the brain's emotion circuitry in infancy, and report that adult-like functional connections for emotional regulation emerge during the first year of life.

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Color-changing contact lens could enhance monitoring of eye disease treatments

For all the good they do, eye drops and ointments have one major drawback: It's hard to tell how much of the medication is actually getting to the eye. Now in a study appearing in ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces, scientists report that they have developed a contact lens that changes color as drugs are released. This visual indicator could help eye doctors and patients readily determine whether

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Study: Online positive psychology exercises improve quality of life in hemodialysis patients

Patients with depression who used tablet computers to complete brief positive psychology exercises online several times a week scored lower on depressive symptoms and reported that they felt better able to cope with their kidney disease by the end of the five-week pilot study, led by University of Illinois social work professor Rosalba Hernandez.

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University of Guelph researcher develops 3-in-1 vaccine against traveller's diarrhea

A U of G Prof. has discovered a novel approach to developing a first-ever vaccine for three common pathogens that cause traveller's diarrhea and kill more than 100,000 children living in developing countries each year. The vaccine yokes together proteins from pathogenic E.coli with sugars from Shigella and Camplyobacter jejuni — three bugs that are major causes of bacterial diarrhea globally. Cur

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Seed oils are best for LDL cholesterol

Using a statistical technique called network meta-analysis, researchers have combined the results of dozens of studies of dietary oils to identify those with the best effect on patients' LDL cholesterol and other blood lipids.

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World's largest sleep study shows too much shut-eye can be bad for your brain

Preliminary results from the world's largest sleep study have shown that people who sleep on average between 7 to 8 hours per night performed better cognitively than those who slept less, or more, than this amount.

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Unseen infections harming world's children

Children around the world are suffering from unnoticed infections that are stunting their growth and mental development, new research from an international coalition of scientists reveals.

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Bug that causes stomach cancer could play a role in colorectal cancer

A bacterium known for causing stomach cancer might also increase the risk of certain colorectal cancers, particularly among African Americans, according to a new study.

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Teens Are Being Bullied “Constantly” On Instagram

No app is more integral to teens’ social lives than Instagram. While Millennials relied on Facebook to navigate high school and college, connect with friends, and express themselves online, Gen Z’s networks exist almost entirely on Instagram. According to a recent study by the Pew Research Center , 72 percent of teens use the platform, which now has more than 1 billion monthly users . Instagram a

6h

First Man Is a Dazzling Portrait of Obsession

Obsession is a running theme in Damien Chazelle’s burgeoning filmmaking career. In 2014’s Whiplash , a student drummer’s relationship with his art takes a grim turn as he seeks to impress his abusive teacher. In 2016’s La La Land , a musician and an actress sacrifice their swooning romance at the altar of their careers. Now, Neil Armstrong, the first person to walk on the moon, is far more accomp

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Hurricane forecasts can be confusing—here's a helpful glossary

Environment All the terms you need to know to stay ahead of the storm. Most people know at least a little about the weather, but some terms meteorologists use to describe incoming storms are complicated even for experienced enthusiasts.

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GN Hearing hopes to connect Android phones and hearing aids

Modern hearing aids run on digital technology and rechargeable batteries. They come in flashy hues like fashion accessories or can be miniaturized to disappear in the ear. They can communicate over Bluetooth, becoming tiny wearable speakers for streaming music and navigation.

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To crash or swerve? Study reveals which actions taken by self-driving cars are morally defensible

Researchers asked the public what they believed would be the most morally and ethically sound behavior for an autonomous vehicle (AV) faced with an oncoming collision. Even a perfectly functioning AV will not be able to avoid every collision and in some situations, every option will result in some type of crash.

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AI tool automatically reveals how to write apps that drain less battery

Researchers have created a new tool, called 'DiffProf,' that uses artificial intelligence to automatically decide for the developer if a feature should be improved to drain less battery and how to make that improvement.

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Improving paleotemperature reconstruction: Swiss lakes as a model system

For years, scientists have been trying to determine the climate of the past in order to make better predictions about future climate conditions. Now, there has been a breakthrough in the methodology of climate reconstruction based on microbial molecular fossils. Researchers have analyzed sediment samples collected from more than 30 Swiss lakes. Their findings can be applied to lakes worldwide.

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Gene mutation points to new way to fight diabetes, obesity, heart disease

Researchers say they have discovered a gene mutation that slows the metabolism of sugar in the gut, giving people who have the mutation a distinct advantage over those who do not. Those with the mutation have a lower risk of diabetes, obesity, heart failure, and even death.

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Increased cyto-adhesion of malaria parasites during fever uncovered

New research shows how the cyto-adhesion of plasmodium-infected red blood cells is enhanced at febrile temperatures.

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A tumor cell population responsible for resistance to therapy and tumor relapse

Researchers have uncovered a tumor cell population responsible for resistance to therapy and tumor relapse in the most frequent human cancer. They also identify a novel therapeutic strategy that target this resisting tumor population and prevents tumor relapse.

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Sexes differ when it comes to comfort during and after exercise, study finds

A new study highlights sex differences in thermal behavior and could one day inform the development of new athletic apparel.

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Thinking outside the box: Adults with ADHD not constrained in creativity

People often believe those with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder face challenges that could hinder future employment, but a new study found that adults with ADHD feel empowered doing creative tasks that could help them on the job.

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Being overweight or obese in your 20s will take years off your life, according to a new report

Young adults classified as obese can expect to lose up to 10 years in life expectancy, according to a major new study.New modelling from The George Institute for Global Health and the University of Sydney also predicts that 36.3 million years of life will be lost over the lifetime of today's Australian adult population as a result of overweight and obesity.

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Clues to lupus's autoimmune origins in precursor cells

Recent Emory research sheds light on precursor B cells and their role in the development of systemic lupus erythematosus/SLE.

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Blue roses could be coming soon to a garden near you

For centuries, gardeners have attempted to breed blue roses with no success. But now, thanks to modern biotechnology, the elusive blue rose may finally be attainable. Researchers have found a way to express pigment-producing enzymes from bacteria in the petals of a white rose, tinting the flowers blue. They report their results in ACS Synthetic Biology.

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Fluoride levels in pregnant women in Canada show drinking water is primary source of exposure

new study led by York University researchers has found that fluoride levels in urine are twice as high for pregnant women living in Canadian cities where fluoride is added to public drinking water as for those living in cities that do not add fluoride to public water supplies.

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Bitcoin better than the dollar?

The name itself, cryptocurrency, does not inspire trust. Clusters of bits, considered by many as money of a doubtful nature. Advanced statistical analysis for the Bitcoin market carried out at the Institute of Nuclear Physics of the Polish Academy of Sciences in Cracow, however, has not shown any significant differences between its basic statistical parameters and their equivalents for respected f

6h

Innovative sensing technique could improve greenhouse gas analysis

An international team of researchers has used an unconventional imaging technique known as ghost imaging to make spectroscopic measurements of a gas molecule.

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MU, MIT researchers show effectiveness of new noninvasive blood glucose test

For those living with diabetes, monitoring blood glucose accurately is necessary to prevent diabetes-related complications. Researchers from the University of Missouri School of Medicine and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology recently evaluated the accuracy of an MIT-developed technology to monitor blood glucose levels without needles or a finger prick. Early results show that the noninvasi

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Synapse 'protection' signal found; helps to refine brain circuits

The developing brain is constantly forming new connections, or synapses, while discarding others. In 2012, Beth Stevens and colleagues at Boston Children's Hospital showed that immune cells in the brain, microglia, prune back unwanted synapses, prompted by certain 'eat me' signals. Now, they reveal the flip side: a 'don't eat me' signal, called CD47, that protects synapses from being pruned. The f

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Long-term follow-up of using patients' own fat to correct deformities after breast cancer surgery

One technique to correct disfiguring deformities after breast cancer surgery is autologous fat transfer (AFT or fat grafting), which involves injecting a patient's own fat into a soft tissue deformity. Previous studies examining the safety of this procedure in regard to cancer relapse have been limited by a relatively short follow-up. This study included nearly 600 women with breast cancer who und

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Path to deadly sepsis varies by bacterial infection

Sepsis remains a common and deadly condition that occurs when the body reacts to an infection in the bloodstream. However, scientists know little about the early stages of the condition. Now, researchers from Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute (SBP) and UC Santa Barbara have discovered that host responses during sepsis progression can vary in important ways based on pathogen type–

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Recognizing the uniqueness of different individuals with schizophrenia

Individuals diagnosed with schizophrenia differ greatly from one another. Researchers from Radboud university medical center, along with colleagues from England and Norway, have demonstrated that very few identical brain differences are shared amongst different patients. Therefore, insights based on research at the group level (i.e. in the 'average' patient) say little about the individual. The re

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Eczema drug restores hair growth in patient with longstanding alopecia

Massachusetts General Hospital physicians describe how their 13-year-old patient with alopecia totalis — a total lack of scalp hair — along with eczema, experienced significant hair regrowth while being treated with dupilumab.

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Prescience: Helping doctors predict the future

UW engineers developed a new machine-learning system that can help anesthesiologists predict the likelihood that a patient will experience low blood oxygen levels during surgery. This condition, called hypoxemia, can lead to serious consequences, such as infections and abnormal heart behavior. The team's system also gives real-world explanations behind its predictions. The researchers estimate tha

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How This Time-Traveling Illusion Tricks Your Brain

Would you like to travel back in time, even if only for a moment?

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Slut med at fumle med elektronik i sikkerhedskontrollen

Aalborg Lufthavn har som en af de første lufthavne i Europa opgraderet til sikkerhedsstandarden C2 for røntgenmaskiner i sikkerhedskontrollen. Det betyder at du kan lade computer og tablet blive i håndbagagen.

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Getting relief from sexual dysfunction and incontinence caused by menopause

Microablative fractional CO2 lasers are energy-based devices designed to help manage troublesome menopause symptoms such as painful sex, dryness, itching/burning, urinary frequency, and incontinence. Although there is ongoing debate regarding the safety and effectiveness of vaginal laser surgery, a new study suggests that it may be effective, especially after multiple treatments. Study results are

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New study finds that inflammatory proteins in the colon increase incrementally with weight

A new study from Tufts researchers finds that two inflammatory proteins in the colon increase incrementally with weight. In individuals with obesity, this was accompanied by activation of precancerous cellular pathways.

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The fine print

University of Utah biomedical engineering assistant professor Robby Bowles and his team have developed a method to 3D print cells to produce human tissue such as ligaments and tendons to greatly improve a patient's recovery. A person with a badly damaged ligament, tendon, or ruptured disc could simply have new replacement tissue printed and ultimately implanted in the damaged area.

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Constitutional uncertainty and political disputes put Green Brexit at risk, research shows

A Green Brexit could be under threat without greater cooperation between devolved nations and the UK government, a study led by the University of Sheffield has found.

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Reconstructing the history of mankind with the help of fecal sterols — first test on the Maori

The story of mankind's presence on the planet can be told by studying the sediment and soil accumulation of these chemical compounds in human feces. Scientists at Ca' Foscari University of Venice and the Institute for the Dynamics of Environmental Processes (CNR) have proven the presence of the individuals who colonized the oceanic islands, and the resulting environmental transformation. The study

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Near-infrared spectroscopy could improve flu vaccine manufacturing

Recent research outlines how near-infrared spectroscopy could be used to make cell-culture-based flu vaccine manufacturing faster and more efficient.

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A genome under influence

References form the basis of our comprehension of the world: they enable us to measure the height of our children or the efficiency of a drug. But when such yardsticks are faulty, doubts are cast on all the measurements that derive from them.

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Not all neurons die the same way in people with ALS

Researchers have discovered that two different kinds of motor neurons that die in people with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) may not die the same way. The research offers an important insight for understanding the disease and, eventually, finding a cure. ALS is a surprisingly common disease that causes the death of motor neurons in the spine that control voluntary muscles such as those invol

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New nanosatellite energy solution increases reliability and efficiency, at reduced cost

Between the late 1990s and 2012, around 10 small satellites were launched annually; the next six-year forecast is for over 3 000. The European space sector has a chance to gain a prime global position, helped by the right energy storage system.

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Leonardo da Vinci's take on dynamic soaring

Although Leonardo da Vinci (1452-1519) is known to have studied bird flight, few people realise that he was the first to document flight maneuvers, now called dynamic soaring. Birds use these maneuvers to extract energy from wind shear for sustained flight. A recent paper published in Notes and Records explores Leonardo's early description of dynamic soaring, which is one of his major aerodynamic

6h

Pentagon Weapons Systems Are Easy Cyberattack Targets, New Report Finds

A new report says the Department of Defense "likely has an entire generation of systems that were designed and built without adequately considering cybersecurity."

6h

Hurricane Michael Could Do Billions of Dollars of Damage

Some 84,000 homes are at risk from the major storm, one analytics firm projects — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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High winds for power generation

Renewable energy sources hold great promise for a future free of fossil fuels, but some forms of renewable energy remain out of reach. Researchers have developed a new kind of wind turbine that can produce clean energy from previously untapped winds at high altitudes.

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Novel technology for optimised food processing

Food processing technologies have come a long way in terms of time and energy savings, extended retail shelf life and ready-to-use products. However, the implementation of such technologies in industrial food production is still rather limited.

6h

Risk of blindness among premature babies with low levels of blood platelets

Premature babies with low levels of platelets (thrombocytes) in their blood run a greatly increased risk of being afflicted with a severe variation of retinopathy of prematurity (ROP), an eye disease that can cause blindness, according to a study from Sweden and US published in the journal JCI Insight. In experiments on mice, injections of blood platelets reduce the pathological development of ret

6h

DGIST, identifying an initial growth process of calcium phosphate

Korean researchers identified the initial growth process of calcium phosphate, a key component of bones, using 'TOP-MEIS (Time-of-Flight Medium Energy Ion Scattering)'. The research findings differ from existing theories and are expected to be used in research into controlling the growth and characteristics of nanoparticles.

6h

Role of 'natural factors' on recent climate change underestimated, research shows

Pioneering new research has given a new perspective on the crucial role that 'natural factors' play in global warming.

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Chromosomal instability may predict patients that will benefit from colorectal cancer drug

Researchers at RCSI, along with international collaborators within the ANGIOPREDICT research consortium, have discovered that chromosomal instability (where whole human chromosomes or parts of chromosomes are duplicated or deleted) may predict which patients will receive most benefit from a key drug used to treat colorectal cancer (Avastin).

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Larger families reduce cancer risk

Families with many children have a lower risk of cancer. Greater family size reduces the risk not only in women but also in men, a global study using data from 178 countries by the University of Zurich and the Adelaide Medical School has found.

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Muscular men prefer an unequal society

For men, physical strength and political attitudes are linked. This is not the case for women. New research from Aarhus BSS shows that ancestral human instincts affect men's political reflections.

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Killer cell immunotherapy offers potential cure for advanced pancreatic cancer

A new approach to treating pancreatic cancer using 'educated killer cells' has shown promise, according to early research by Queen Mary University of London.

6h

RUDN mathematicians confirmed the possibility of data transfer via gravitational waves

RUDN mathematicians analyzed the properties of gravitational waves in a generalized affine- metrical space (an algebraic construction operating the notions of a vector and a point) similarly to the properties of electromagnetic waves in Minkowski space-time. It turned out that there is the possibility of transmitting information with the help of nonmetricity waves and transferring it spatially wit

6h

Wild chimpanzees share food with their friends

Why share food with non-family members when there is no immediate gain? An international team of researchers conducted observations of natural food sharing behavior of the chimpanzees of the Tai National Park, Ivory Coast. They found that chimpanzees who possess large, desirable food items, like meat, honey or large fruit share food with their friends, and that neither high dominance status nor ha

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Affable apes live longer, study shows

Male chimps that are less aggressive and form strong social bonds tend to live longer, research suggests.

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Nyt forskningscenter skal høste synergi mellem energiarterne med big data

Center Danmark er navnet på et 30 hektar stort forskningscenter mellem Fredericia og Kolding, der bygges op som et minisamfund, hvor synergier mellem energiarterne skal testes i real-life.

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Painting cars for Mars

When John Campanella's friend wanted his beloved Ferrari painted, he knew exactly who to call. After all, Campanella had been painting, pinstriping and even airbrushing flames on to cars, motorcycles, airplanes, 18-wheelers and guitars in his spare time for decades.

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English speakers more likely to receive automated suicide prevention advice

When users of Google's search engine submit suicide-related queries, they are repeatedly provided with helpline hotlines on suicide prevention services. But whether such information is actually displayed depends on the user's location and language.

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Brain circuits for successful emotional development established during infancy

Researchers tracking the development of the brain's emotion circuitry in infancy found that adult-like functional brain connections for emotional regulation emerge during the first year of life. And the growth of these brain circuits during the second year of life predicted the IQ and emotional control of the children at 4 years old, suggesting new avenues for early detection and intervention for

7h

Evolutionary 'arms race' — how dolphins and whales fight disease threats

A groundbreaking study reveals how dolphins, whales and other cetaceans compete for survival in an evolutionary 'arms race' with changing pathogenic threats like mercury and brevotoxin (e.g. Red Tide). Researchers show that cetaceans use several strategies for success in this race. They have developed tools to help wildlife managers and health professionals assess disease risk from the perspective

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Success is sweet: Researchers unlock the mysteries of the sugarcane genome

For centuries, sugarcane has supplied human societies with alcohol, biofuel, building and weaving materials, and the world's most relied-upon source of sugar. Now, researchers have extracted a sweet scientific prize from sugarcane: Its massive and complex genome sequence, which may lead to the development of hardier and more productive cultivars.

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Easter Island inhabitants collected freshwater from the ocean's edge in order to survive

Ancient inhabitants of Rapa Nui (Easter Island) maintained a society of thousands by utilizing coastal groundwater discharge as their main source of 'freshwater,' according to new research from a team of archaeologists.

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Metal leads to the desired configuration

Scientists have found a way to change the spatial arrangement of bipyridine molecules on a surface. These potential components of dye-sensitized solar cells form complexes with metals and thereby alter their chemical conformation.

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Code of ethics doesn't influence decisions of software developers

The world's largest computing society, ACM, updated its code of ethics in July 2018 — but new research shows that the code of ethics does not appear to affect the decisions made by software developers.

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Bees suddenly stopped buzzing in the US during the 2017 solar eclipse

When the moon hid the sun in the 2017 total solar eclipse, bees across the US suddenly stopped buzzing around – only one bee aross 16 locations buzzed

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Potentially catastrophic Hurricane Michael is about to hit Florida

Hurricane Michael intensified faster than expected overnight and is now headed for Florida. It was fuelled by abnormally warm waters in the Gulf of Mexico

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We’ve missed many chances to curb global warming. This may be our last

Keeping warming to a manageable (but still dangerous) 1.5°C is possible, strictly speaking, but it will be the largest project humanity has ever undertaken

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Polar jet circulation changes bring Sahara dust to Arctic, increasing temperatures, melting ice

A new atmospheric mechanism by which dust travels from the Sahara Desert across the eastern side of the North Atlantic Ocean towards the Arctic has been discovered. The dust emission was generated by a Saharan cyclone that was triggered by the intrusion of a trough emanating from the polar jet. The poleward transport of warm dust was caused by a meandering polar jet stream.

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Babies of overweight mothers may risk developing self-regulation problems

A mother's weight during early pregnancy may affect how well her baby is able to self-regulate during its first months and years of life. This is according to a study of more than 3100 Finnish women in the journal Pediatric Research, which is published by Springer Nature.

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Altruism can be trained

Mental training can effectively cultivate care, compassion and even altruistically motivated behaviour psychologists from Würzburg and Leipzig have shown in a recent study.

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Indigenous fire practice protecting the Gibson Desert's biodiversity

Traditional Indigenous burning practices are protecting plant biodiversity in Australia's Gibson Desert, according to University of Queensland research.The study analysed how environments dominated by flammable spinifex grasses and fire-sensitive desert myrtle shrubs reacted to wildfires, and to the low-intensity burning practices of the Pintupi people.

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English first: Suicide prevention

When users of Google's search engine submit suicide-related queries, they are repeatedly provided with helpline hotlines on suicide prevention services. But whether such information is actually displayed depends on the user's location and language.

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Understanding catalysts at the atomic level can provide a cleaner environment

By studying materials down to the atomic level, researchers at Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden, have found a way to make catalysts more efficient and environmentally friendly. The results have been published in Nature Communications. The methods can be used to improve many different types of catalysts.

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Measurement-device-independent quantum communication without encryption

Quantum secure direct communication transmits secret information directly without encryption. Recently, a research team led by Prof. Gui-Lu Long from Tsinghua University proposed a measurement- device- independent quantum secure direct communication protocol using Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen pairs. This protocol eliminates all loopholes related to measurement devices, which solves a key obstacle in pr

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How to make fish shine

Scientists from the University of Bath have helped to figure out why shoals of fish flash silver as they twist through the water by studying how the shiny silver cells are created in zebrafish.

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Versatile molecular system extends the promise of light-activated switches

A newly-developed molecule is easy to make, simple to work with and may potentially be used for the development of targeted medications and high-density memory devices with the volume of a speck of a dust.

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DNA vaccine against Ebola virus shows potent & long-term efficacy in preclinical studies

A novel synthetic DNA vaccine developed based on technology pioneered by scientists at The Wistar Institute Vaccine & Immunotherapy Center offers complete protection from Zaire Ebolavirus (EBOV) infection in promising preclinical research.

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Comprehensive report says tobacco control must be highest priority in cancer control

The highest priority in a national cancer control plan must be expansion of tobacco control — the intervention with the largest potential health benefits — according to a new American Cancer Society report, the second in a series of articles that together inform priorities for a comprehensive cancer control plan.

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A break from the buzz: bees go silent during total solar eclipse

In an unprecedented study of a solar eclipse's influence on bee behavior, researchers at the University of Missouri organized citizen scientists and elementary school classrooms to set up acoustic monitoring stations to listen in on bees' buzzing — or lack thereof — as the August 2017 total solar eclipse passed over North America. The results were clear and consistent at locations across the Uni

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Chewing gum may be effective for delivering vitamins

Nearly 15 percent of all chewing gum varieties sold promise to provide health-enhancing supplements to users, so Penn State researchers studied whether two vitamin-supplemented products were effective at delivering vitamins to the body. Their results validate the concept of gum as an effective delivery system for at least some vitamins.

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Successful tests mark important milestone toward a 5G future

A future vision of high speed wireless Internet that promises to break down two major 5G challenges has taken a leap forward following milestone tests of a cutting-edge European millimeter wave wireless technology.

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Organic farming with gene editing—an oxymoron or a tool for sustainable agriculture?

A University of California, Berkeley professor stands at the front of the room, delivering her invited talk about the potential of genetic engineering. Her audience, full of organic farming advocates, listens uneasily. She notices a man get up from his seat and move toward the front of the room. Confused, the speaker pauses mid-sentence as she watches him bend over, reach for the power cord, and u

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What southern Africa needs to do to manage rising temperatures

The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change has released a special report outlining what would need to be done to keep the world from warming up by more than 1.5°C.

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Don't be afraid to talk about the costs of dealing with climate change

Climate advocates have struggled to persuade half of the U.S. public of the need to do more to slow the pace of global warming.

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Wild chimpanzees share food with their friends

Sharing meat after hunting and exchanging other valued food items is considered key in the evolution of cooperation in human societies. One prominent idea is that humans share valuable foods to gain future favors, such that those we chose to share with are more likely to cooperate with us in the future. Despite regularly occurring in humans, sharing food outside of kinship or mating relationships

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Rigsrevision kigger på sygehusbyggerier i hovedstaden

En forundersøgelse af Region Hovedstadens styring af sygehusbyggerier skal, om Rigsrevisionen vil iværksætte en større undersøgelse.

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Ny ledende overlæge til Neurologisk Afdeling N på OUH

Michael Oettinger bliver ny ledende overlæge på Neurologisk Afdeling N på Odense Universitetshospital fra 1. januar 2019.

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'Strikingly' Effective at Fighting Cancer — But at What Cost?

'Strikingly' Effective at Fighting Cancer — But at What Cost? Checkpoint inhibitors lift the brakes on the immune system, but may join other new drugs in pressing the accelerator on health care costs. MedicalBill_topNteaser.jpg Image credits: 9dream studio via Shutterstock Human Wednesday, October 10, 2018 – 08:45 James Gaines, Contributor (Inside Science) — On Oct. 1, two researchers, James P.

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Boxing up ag field nitrogen

Spring in America's heartland is often wet. That makes its soil too soft for planting. One solution to that issue is tile drainage. Growers insert a series of pipes (drain tiles) under their fields, which drains water from the soil into nearby streams and lakes.

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Researchers determine catalytic active sites using carbon nanotubes

Catalytic research led by University of Oklahoma researcher Steven Crossley has developed a new and more definitive way to determine the active site in a complex catalyst. His team's research was recently published in Nature Communications.

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Puppy-killing disease rampant in Australia

A University of Sydney study has found that canine parvovirus (CPV), a highly contagious and deadly disease that tragically kills puppies, is more prevalent than previously thought with 20,000 cases found in Australia each year, and nearly half of these cases result in death.

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What bees did during the Great American Eclipse

A rare study of bees during a total solar eclipse finds that the insects buzzed around as usual — until totality.

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The Most-Read WIRED.com Stories of the Past Five Years Say So Much

We are a culture obsessed with flash-in-the-pan memes.

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What Americans agree on when it comes to health | Rebecca Onie

We may not be as deeply divided as we think — at least when it comes to health, says Rebecca Onie. In a talk that cuts through the noise, Onie shares research that shows how, even across economic, political and racial divides, Americans agree on what they need to live good lives — and asks both health care providers and patients to focus on what makes us healthy, not what makes us angry.

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A break from the buzz—bees go silent during total solar eclipse

While millions of Americans took a break from their daily routines on August 21, 2017, to witness a total solar eclipse, they might not have noticed a similar phenomenon happening nearby: In the path of totality, bees took a break from their daily routines, too.

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How we solved a centuries-old mystery by discovering a rare form of star collision

A bright new star appeared in the sky in June, 1670. It was seen by the Carthusian monk Père Dom Anthelme in Dijon, France, and astronomer Johannes Hevelius in Gdansk, Poland. Over the next few months, it slowly faded to invisibility. But in March 1671, it reappeared – now even more luminous and among the 100 brightest stars in the sky. Again it faded, and by the end of the summer it was gone. The

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SwissFEL makes protein structures visible

For the development of new medicinal agents, accurate knowledge of biological processes in the body is a prerequisite. Here proteins play a crucial role. At the Paul Scherrer Institute PSI, the X-ray free-electron laser SwissFEL has now, for the first time, directed its strong light onto protein crystals and made their structures visible. The special characteristics of the X-ray laser enable compl

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First telescope on a Cherenkov Telescope Array site makes its debut

On Wednesday, 10 October 2018, more than 200 guests from around the world gathered on the northern array site of the Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA) to celebrate the inauguration of the first prototype Large-Sized Telescope (LST). The telescope, named LST-1, is intended to become the first of four LSTs of the north site of the CTA Observatory, which is located on the existing site of the Instituto

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UCI researchers discover molecular mechanisms of ancient herbal remedies

Researchers in the Department of Physiology & Biophysics at the University of California, Irvine School of Medicine have discovered the molecular basis for a therapeutic action of an ancient herbal medicine used across Africa to treat various illnesses, including epilepsy.

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Antiepileptic drugs linked to higher risk of stroke in persons with Alzheimer's disease

Antiepileptic drug use is associated with an increased risk of stroke among persons with Alzheimer's disease, according to a new study from the University of Eastern Finland. The risk did not differ between old and new antiepileptic drugs. The results were published in the Journal of the American Heart Association.

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Simple fabrication of full-color perovskite LEDs

An international team of researchers, affiliated with South Korea's Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology (UNIST) introduced a simple technique to fabricate full-color perovskite LEDs.

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Icy moon of Jupiter, Ganymede, shows evidence of past strike-slip faulting

A recently published study led by researchers at the University of Hawai'i at Manoa School of Ocean and Earth Science and Technology reveals Ganymede, an icy moon of Jupiter, appears to have undergone complex periods of geologic activity, specifically strike-slip tectonism, as is seen in Earth's San Andreas fault.

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Diamond tech destroys ‘forever chemicals’ in water

Researchers are developing a scalable treatment option for PFAS-contaminated wastewater. More than 1.5 million Michigan residents and potentially more than hundreds of sites nationwide—and counting—have PFAS-tainted water. PFAS, or per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances, are colloquially known as “forever chemicals” because they are so difficult to break down. They are found in water supplies wherev

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Study firms up diet and depression link

In an unusual experiment, researchers have found that among Torres Strait Islander people the amount of fish and processed food eaten is related to depression.

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Topology, symmetry and magnetism: Heusler, Weyl and Berry

Scientists have written a review paper about magnetic topological materials in the family of Heusler compounds. The review explains the connection between topology, symmetry and magnetism at a level suitable for undergraduate students in physics, chemistry and materials science with a basic knowledge of condensed matter physics.

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Boxing up agricultural field nitrogen

Scientists develop edge-of-field practices so growers can keep the early planting offered by the tile drains while protecting nearby streams-and the Gulf of Mexico-from nitrate contamination.

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Mystery at the center of the Milky Way solved

Astronomers have now found the explanation to a recent mystery at the center of the Milky Way galaxy: the high levels of scandium discovered last spring near the galaxy's giant black hole were in fact an optical illusion.

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Infective endocarditis increases tenfold in North Carolina

A side effect of opioid use is an infection of the heart valves called drug-associated infective endocarditis. Researchers have found a tenfold increase in the number of hospitalizations and surgeries for endocarditis in the past decade.

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Blocking protein restores insulin cell function in type 2 diabetes

By blocking a protein, VDAC1, in the insulin-producing beta cells, it is possible to restore their normal function in case of type 2 diabetes. In preclinical experiments, researchers behind a new study have also shown that it is possible to prevent the development of the disease.

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These scientists may be your next members of Congress

Science We spoke to candidates with science backgrounds from across the political spectrum These candidates share a commitment to bringing evidence-based decision-making to government and a desire for elected officials to better reflect the varied backgrounds…

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German car industry warns CO2 targets risk jobs

European targets for reducing greenhouse gas emissions threaten jobs in the bloc, Germany's powerful car industry federation said Wednesday after ministers set new goals.

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The most interesting education solutions from Seattle's Startup Weekend EDU 2018

They holed up for a cumulative 54 hours in the Seattle Public Library's glassy downtown branch. Their mission? To find solutions to some of the most pressing issues facing students and educators.

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Time travel with bat guano

To help determine forest restoration goals in Costa Rica, postdoctoral scholar Rachel Reid will travel to Central America this winter to explore a cave long inhabited by bats. The work is supported by WashU's Living Earth Collaborative.

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Wild chimpanzees share food with their friends

Why share food with non-family members when there is no immediate gain? An international team of researchers from the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology (MPI-EVA) in Leipzig, Germany, conducted observations of natural food sharing behavior of the chimpanzees of the Tai National Park, Ivory Coast. They found that chimpanzees who possess large, desirable food items, like meat, honey

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Klebsiella pneumoniae drug resistance in infants studied in Kazan

In neonates with sepsis testing of K. pneumoniae isolates for ESBL production was positive in 60 percent of cases, in neonates with UTI — in 40 percent of cases. The authors commented that one of key virulence factors — the rmpA gene — was found in both groups of infants. This means the prevalence of virulent K. pneumoniae strains is higher than was previously thought, and heavier clinical form

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Boxing up ag field nitrogen

Scientists develop edge-of-field practices so growers can keep the early planting offered by the tile drains while protecting nearby streams-and the Gulf of Mexico-from nitrate contamination.

7h

Puppy-killing disease rampant in Australia

A University of Sydney study has found that canine parvovirus (CPV), a highly contagious and deadly disease that tragically kills puppies, is more prevalent than previously thought with 20,000 cases found in Australia each year, and nearly half of these cases result in death.

7h

Study firms up diet and depression link

In an unusual experiment, James Cook University researchers in Australia have found that among Torres Strait Islander people the amount of fish and processed food eaten is related to depression.

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Researchers develop 3D printed objects that can track and store how they are used

Engineers at the University of Washington have developed 3D printed devices that can track and store their own use — without using batteries or electronics. Instead, this system uses a method called backscatter, through which a device can share information by reflecting signals that have been transmitted to it with an antenna.

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OU researcher determines catalytic active sites using carbon nanotubes

Catalytic research led by University of Oklahoma researcher Steven Crossley has developed a new and more definitive way to determine the active site in a complex catalyst. His team's research was recently published in Nature Communications.

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Synergy in two-dimensional materials, membranes research clear in professor's new work

Piran Kidambi's team applied the overlap in research on two-dimensional materials and membranes to address some of the most critical challenges in membrane research.

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Individual action won't achieve 1.5 C warming – social change is needed, as history shows

Following the 2015 Paris Agreement to hold the global increase in climate to below 2℃ above pre-industrial levels, the UN's Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) was asked to produce a report on the impacts of global warming of 1.5℃. The report focuses on what must be done if we want to avoid warming above 1.5℃, and the difference between 1.5℃ and 2℃ warming. The general message is that

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Lite Run wins innovation award for 'spacesuit' pants

A St. Paul, Minn., company's invention that uses air-powered "spacesuit" pants to train people to walk normally has won an innovation competition at an industry conference in Dallas.

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Israeli frankincense farmer cashes in on rare honey

An Israeli farmer has cashed in by making exotic honey from a rare tree that produces frankincense—the resin once worth its weight in gold and venerated in the Bible. But the farm's location in a far-flung West Bank settlement has left a bitter taste in at least one investor's mouth.

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When American Indian Women Go Missing

“If you’re just out there somewhere on the land, dead, and nobody’s looking for you—that’s the worst thing in the world,” says Lissa Yellowbird-Chase in Vanished , a new documentary from The Atlantic . Yellowbird-Chase, a private citizen and volunteer investigator, has devoted her life to searching for missing American Indians. American Indian women and girls are reported missing at a disproporti

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Why Pickup Artists Are Reading Ovid

In 2013, the pickup-artist blog Chateau Heartiste —a resource for the sexually frustrated heterosexual man looking to learn how to seduce women—published a list of “Recommended Great Books For Aspiring Womanizers.” Compiled by the site’s main author, known online as Roissy, the list kicked off with the ancient seduction manual Ars Amatoria , or The Art of Love , written in A.D. 2 by the Roman poe

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Near-infrared spectroscopy could improve flu vaccine manufacturing

Recent research from North Carolina State University outlines how near-infrared (NIR) spectroscopy could be used to make cell-culture-based flu vaccine manufacturing faster and more efficient.

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‘Stationary waves’ fuel extreme wet and dry weather

New research that examines the role of stationary low- and high-pressure systems projects that global warming will spawn more extreme wet and dry weather around the world. Those extremes include more frequent dry spells in the northwestern, central, and southern United States and in Mexico, and more frequent heavy rainfall events in south Asia, the Indochinese Peninsula, and southern China. One r

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Astronomy Rewind fast-forwards to reanimate "zombie" astrophotos

More than 30,000 celestial images that were all but lost to science are about to find their way back into researchers' hands thanks to the efforts of thousands of citizen scientists. The photographs, radio maps, and other telescopic images were scanned from the pages of dusty old journals for a cosmic reclamation project called Astronomy Rewind. Its goal is to bring these "zombie" images back to l

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Aluminum on the way to titanium strength

NUST MISIS scientists have proposed a technology that can double the strength of composites obtained by 3-D printing from aluminum powder, and advance the characteristics of these products to the quality of titanium alloys: titanium's strength is about six times higher than that of aluminum, but the density of titanium is 1.7 times higher.

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Science Funding Is Broken

The way we pay for science does not encourage the best results — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Wired for life: Study links infants' brain circuitry to future health

Growth rates of brain circuits in infancy may help experts predict what a child's intelligence and emotional health could be when the child turns four, a new study has found. Along with prior research, these findings could help future physicians identify cognitive and behavioral challenges in the first months and years of life, leading to early treatment.

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Researchers solve mystery at the center of the Milky Way

Astronomers from Lund University in Sweden have now found the explanation to a recent mystery at the centre of the Milky Way galaxy: the high levels of scandium discovered last spring near the galaxy's giant black hole were in fact an optical illusion.

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Evolutionary 'arms race' — how dolphins and whales fight disease threats

A groundbreaking study reveals how dolphins, whales and other cetaceans compete for survival in an evolutionary 'arms race' with changing pathogenic threats like mercury and brevotoxin (e.g. Red Tide). Researchers show that cetaceans use several strategies for success in this race. They have developed tools to help wildlife managers and health professionals assess disease risk from the perspective

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On the Trail of Missing American Indian Women

On a Friday morning in May, Lissa Yellowbird-Chase woke up to more Facebook messages than she could hope to answer. Her inbox was full of friends, acquaintances, and strangers asking for her help locating loved ones, or offering their services for future searches. But that morning, Yellowbird-Chase’s focus was on finding Melissa Eagleshield. Eagleshield, a middle-aged American Indian woman, disap

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Research into equine vision leads to trial of new fence and hurdle design to further improve safety in jump racing

Research into equine vision leads to trial of new fence and hurdle design to further improve safety in jump racing

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Indigenous fire practice protecting the Gibson Desert's biodiversity

Traditional Indigenous burning practices are protecting plant biodiversity in Australia's Gibson Desert, according to University of Queensland research.

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Report: Facebook captures 25 percent of U.S. digital video ad revenue

Facebook Inc. is rapidly increasing its ad revenue from video, capturing 25 percent of the nation's digital ad spending in that category, according to a forecast released Tuesday.

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Evolutionary 'arms race'—how dolphins and whales fight disease threats

Dolphins, whales and other cetaceans are susceptible to many of the same health hazards as humans including mercury, brevotoxin (e.g. Red Tide), and lobomycosis. They also serve as important sentinel species to highlight concerns relevant to environmental and public health. Yet understanding how these aquatic mammals fight disease-causing pathogens, how they adapt to changing pathogenic threats, a

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Ancient pigment can boost energy efficiency

A color developed by Egyptians thousands of years ago has a modern-day application as well – the pigment can boost energy efficiency by cooling rooftops and walls, and could also enable solar generation of electricity via windows.

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Scientists successfully implant a polymeric prosthesis imitating bone structure

For the first time ever, a research team from the small innovative enterprise Biomimetix, implementing several NUST MISIS developments, has successfully implanted a biomimetic hybrid prosthesis-imitating bone structure made from ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene and titanium alloy into a patient's femoral bone. The successful surgery was carried out at the request of the MedVet veterinary c

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Scientists suggest an eco-friendly way of obtaining highly active catalysts

A team from Sechenov University and Russian colleagues developed a method for obtaining substances that accelerate the binding of hydrogen molecules with hydrocarbons via double bonds. The peculiarity of this approach lies in the impregnation of a polymeric carcass with rhodium- and palladium-containing salts in the supercritical CO2 environment. The latter is an eco-friendly alternative of tradit

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Supermaterials out of the microwave

Using non-conventional methods, Christina Birkel and her colleagues in the Department of Chemistry of the TU Darmstadt produce metallic ceramics and new materials for the energy supply of the future.

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Video: BepiColombo mission to Mercury

BepiColombo is scheduled for launch at 01:45 GMT (03:45 CEST) on 20 October on an Ariane 5 from Europe's Spaceport in Kourou.

8h

Understanding catalysts at the atomic level can provide a cleaner environment

By studying materials down to the atomic level, researchers at Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden, have found a way to make catalysts more efficient and environmentally friendly. The results have been published in Nature Communications. The methods can be used to improve many different types of catalysts.

8h

Ko-bøvser og lattergas: Her er landbrugets store klimaproblemer

Regeringens spritnye klimaplan kritiseres for at holde hånden over landbruget. Men hvor meget betyder landbruget egentlig i klimasammenhæng?

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Waymo’s cars drive 10 million miles a day in a perilous virtual worldWaymo 10M Miles Cruise

A simulation lets autonomous cars experience situations that are too dangerous to try in reality.

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'Podcast: The Ride' and the Joys of Obsession Learning

Deep-dive podcasts make info-immersion audio fun.

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High levels of scandium near the galaxy's giant black hole were illusory, astronomers find

Astronomers from Lund University in Sweden have now found the explanation to a recent mystery at the centre of the Milky Way galaxy: the high levels of scandium discovered last spring near the galaxy's giant black hole were in fact an optical illusion.

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Jair Bolsonaro's Brazil would be a disaster for the Amazon and global climate change

It is perhaps a cruel irony that, on the same day the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change released a landmark call for urgent action, Jair Bolsonaro surged to victory in the first round of Brazil's presidential elections. Although the leader of the far-right Partido Social Liberal did not achieve the 50% of the popular vote required to win outright, and will now have a run-off against Fernan

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Where will Amazon put its second headquarters? What you need to know

Amazon has promised to announce the location of its second headquarters by the end of the year, leaving 20 finalist cities on the edge. Where do things stand with the process, what are the stakes and concerns and what's the latest news? Here's what you need to know.

8h

Three renowned scientists: Heusler, Weyl and Berry

Scientists at the Max Planck Institute Chemical Physics of Solids have written a review paper about magnetic topological materials in the family of Heusler compounds. The review explains the connection between topology, symmetry and magnetism at a level suitable for undergraduate students in physics, chemistry and materials science with a basic knowledge of condensed matter physics.

8h

Increased cyto-adhesion of malaria parasites during fever uncovered

Malaria is the most prevalent blood-borne infectious disease caused by parasites of the species Plasmodium. In 2016, more than 216 million malaria infections were reported resulting in 445,000 deaths across the developing world.

8h

Early Warnings of Terrible Earthquakes Appear High in the Sky, a New Theory Says

The best early warnings of a big disaster may appear 180 miles above the ground, a controversial new theory says — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

8h

Machine learning makes a cost-effective environmental watchdog

Machine learning could help safeguard public health and spot environmental dangers, according to new research. As Hurricane Florence ground its way through North Carolina, it released what might politely be called an excrement storm. Massive hog farm manure pools washed a stew of dangerous bacteria and heavy metals into nearby waterways. More efficient oversight might have prevented some of the w

8h

What the latest assessment on global warming means for southern Africa

The release this week of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change's (IPCC) special report on global warming of 1.5℃ above pre-industrial levels marks a critical point in climate negotiations. Billed in the media as "life changing," the report illustrates how crossing the ever-nearer threshold of 1.5℃ warming will affect the planet, and how difficult it will be to avoid overshooting this targe

8h

How we can turn the tide for women in science

For the first time in 55 years, a woman has won the Nobel Prize in physics —Prof. Donna Strickland. This win has publicly highlighted that women are still under-represented in science, particularly in physics.

8h

Six things you can do to get boys reading more

The OECD consistently finds girls perform significantly better than boys in reading. This gap can also be observed across the Australian NAPLAN reading data.

8h

Dredging the data lake

Data lakes allow information to be added to a system without pre-processing or modelling. Contrast this with a conventional database where data must be delivered in a much more refined and formal manner. Thus a data lake offers much timelier speed of entry. However, as research from Brazil shows, even though a data lake preserves highest granularity level of the data, that useful flexibility can b

8h

Chemist creates nanoreactors to synthesize organic substances under visible light

A RUDN chemist has developed new photocatalysts consisting of nanostructures from titanium dioxide. Hollow nanocubes with ultra-thin walls act like nanoreactors and provide for 28-fold more effective organic reactions at room temperature under the influence of visible light. The results are published in Applied Catalysis B: Environmental.

8h

3-D computer modeling simulates impacts, depicts most efficient arrangement for tidal turbines

Around the world, energy producers are looking for the most reliable and efficient means for generating renewable energy through sustainable practices. Turbines using water currents to power communities is one of these methods.

8h

New composite materials prolong the service life of spare parts for equipment and vehicles

Studies have shown that hybrid powder materials based on natural layered silicates developed by the chemists of the Far Eastern Federal University (FEFU) and the Far Eastern Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences (FEB RAS) decrease the friction ratio in metals sevenfold. These new materials offer new prospects for the development of more efficient anti-friction additives, increasing the durabil

8h

Study shows people died from body fluid vaporization due to pyroclastic flows from Vesuvius

A team of researchers at the Federico II University Hospital in Italy has found evidence that suggests many people living in Herculaneum during the 79 AD eruption of Mt. Vesuvius were killed by the extreme heat characteristic of pyroclastic flows. In their paper published on the open access site PLOS ONE, the group describes telltale signs of heat damage they found in the remains of people living

8h

FPGA’er og kunstig intelligens gør dansk overvågning ‘privacy-venlig’

Lavt strømforbrug og optimeret ydelse gør FPGA-chips til et oplagt valg for danske Grazper, der udvikler overvågningsløsninger med privacy som integreret del af designet.

9h

A pheromone-sensing gene that predates land-dwelling vertebrates

Scientists at Tokyo Institute of Technology (Tokyo Tech) have discovered a gene that appears to play a vital role in pheromone sensing. The gene is conserved across fish and mammals and over 400 million years of vertebrate evolution, indicating that the pheromone sensing system is much more ancient than previously believed. This discovery opens new avenues of research into the origin, evolution, a

9h

National Science Teachers Association Conference in Reno

Now that it’s October, our busiest conference season has begun! We will be exhibiting at a few teacher-focused conferences this year, and our first stop is at the National Science Teachers Association meeting in Reno, Nevada. If any of our readers are attending, please stop by our booth (#804) to pick up some of our free publications and puzzles, and to learn about Brain Awareness Week (March 11-

9h

Micro-/nano architectures in MOF membrane accelerate oil-water separation

Frequent oil spills during oil transportation have become a critical global environmental and economic problem. Traditional oil-water separation technologies, including centrifugation, filtration, dissolved air flotation, oil skimmers and adsorption, have low efficiency and consume large amounts of energy during complex separation processes.

9h

Root extract of Chinese medicinal plant makes worms to live longer

A root extract of the Fallopia multiflora, or Chinese knotweed, has special properties: It enables the nematode C. elegans to live longer and protects it from oxidative stress. This has been demonstrated in a new study by nutritional scientists at Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg (MLU). The researchers provide scientifically substantiated evidence for the effectiveness of this extract, wh

9h

The cosmological lithium problem

The international collaborative n_TOF, in which a group of University of Seville researchers participated, has made use of the unique capacities of three of the world's nuclear facilities to carry out a new experiment aimed at finding an explanation of the cosmological lithium problem. This problem is among the still unresolved questions of the current standard description of the Big Bang. The new

9h

Moringa, the next superfood

There's nothing super-looking about moringa. It's skinny and sparse in foliage. Its fragile branches sprout puny white flowers and droop with long twisted pods knobby with seeds. But if plants were superheroes, then moringa would be Iron Man.

9h

Major Publishers File Second Lawsuit Against ResearchGate

As the American Chemical Society and Elsevier move litigation forward, other academic publishers have opted to collaborate with the academic network platform instead.

9h

5 Tricks to Handle Passive-Aggressive People

Savvy Psychologist Dr. Ellen Hendriksen helps you deal with the passive-aggressive people in your life. Because, after all, you’re not passive-aggressive…unlike some people you know — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

9h

Brain circuits for successful emotional development established during infancy

Researchers in the UNC Early Brain Development Study tracking the development of the brain's emotion circuitry in infancy found that adult-like functional brain connections for emotional regulation emerge during the first year of life. And the growth of these brain circuits during the second year of life predicted the IQ and emotional control of the children at 4 years old, suggesting new avenues

9h

Nail polishes with 'n-free' labels are not necessarily free of toxic compounds

Consumers are growing more knowledgeable about the potential health effects of nail polish, and manufacturers have taken action. They have started removing potentially toxic ingredients and labeling their products as being free of those substances. However, these labels aren't always accurate, and reformulated products aren't necessarily safer, according to a report in Environmental Science & Tech

9h

Potential assay artefacts in anti-malarial screening

Malaria remains an economic and health burden to the developing world. As plasmodium, the causative agent of malaria, is acquiring rapid resistance against currently used drugs, identification of new classes of anti-malarials remains an urgent need.

9h

NASA study connects Southern California, Mexico faults

A multiyear study has uncovered evidence that a 21-mile-long (34-kilometer-long) section of a fault links known, longer faults in Southern California and northern Mexico into a much longer continuous system. The entire system is at least 217 miles (350 kilometers) long.

9h

Minimizing ammonia fuel emissions

New simulations indicate that swirling ammonia in combustion chambers can help reduce harmful emissions – insight that may help on-going efforts to develop ammonia as a carbon-free fuel source.

9h

This machine could turn your power walking into usable energy

Nexus Media News Is your body the new clean energy battery? Body movements could generate clean, renewable energy in the next three years.

9h

The Pentagon’s Push to Program Soldiers’ Brains

I. Who Could Object? “Tonight I would like to share with you an idea that I am extremely passionate about,” the young man said. His long black hair was swept back like a rock star’s, or a gangster’s. “Think about this,” he continued. “Throughout all human history, the way that we have expressed our intent, the way we have expressed our goals, the way we have expressed our desires, has been limite

9h

Thin films for more efficient solar cells

The efficiency of solar cells can be increased by thin-film contacts developed by researchers at KAUST.

9h

Mobile apps might make you feel better about travelling alone, but they won't necessarily make you safer

As I was writing this article, I was fortunate enough to be at a conference in Florence, Italy. Like a growing number of women who travel overseas, whether for work or leisure, many of the trips I've done in recent years have been alone. And as a digital criminologist (as well as a mobile app enthusiast), I'm certainly a convert to the practical usefulness of technologies for travel.

9h

Stamp-sized graphene sheets riddled with holes could be boon for molecular separation

MIT engineers have found a way to directly "pinprick" microscopic holes into graphene as the material is grown in the lab. With this technique, they have fabricated relatively large sheets of graphene ("large," meaning roughly the size of a postage stamp), with pores that could make filtering certain molecules out of solutions vastly more efficient.

9h

Oysters On The Half Shell Are Actually Saving New York's Eroding Harbor

More than 70 New York City restaurants are pouring their discarded shells into the Billion Oyster Project, through which students recycle and transform them into healthy reefs in once-toxic waters. (Image credit: Courtesy of Agata Poniatowski)

9h

The Quest to Make California’s Weed the Champagne of Cannabis

Growers in California want to do for their legendary marijuana what the champagne appellation has done for French bubbly.

9h

'Riverdale' Season 3: Just Give In to the Ridiculousness Already

The CW teen soap may be a high drama hormone-fest, but it's got brains. (OK, and biker gangs.)

9h

Three Commandments for Technology Optimists

Technology can be a powerful force for good, but its impacts are unpredictable. On the 25th anniversary of WIRED, technologists should temper their enthusiasm with proper caution.

9h

Hankook's New Tire Uses Tree Resin to Keep Electric Cars Rolling

The Kinergy AS EV tire uses a substance called "Aqua Pine" to improve performance, and is designed to limit noise and improve efficiency.

9h

The Best Smart Displays (2018): Google Home Hub, Amazon Echo View, JBL, Lenovo

Smart displays are now officially a thing. Here are the models you should know about.

9h

Image of the Day: Pain or O-Face?

Expressions of pain and orgasm are distinguishable, study finds.

9h

Giraffes Inherit Spot Patterns From Their Mamas, Study Says

Scientists have previously hypothesized that spots are conferred at random or that they are influenced by environmental factors. (Image credit: Robin Van Lonkhuijsen/AFP/Getty Images)

9h

Harnessing silicon fabrication technology to build quantum optical circuits

A new study by scientists from the University of Bristol brings us a significant step closer to unleashing the revolutionary potential of quantum computing by harnessing silicon fabrication technology to build complex on-chip quantum optical circuits.

9h

The stuff that planets are made of

UZH researchers have analyzed the composition and structure of faraway exoplanets using statistical tools. Their analysis indicates whether a planet is Earth-like, made up of pure rock, or a water-world. The larger the planet, the more hydrogen and helium surround it.

9h

One-third of fish found in two fresh water estuaries have ingested plastics, new research reveals

Microplastics are defined as small pieces of plastic no larger than 5mm in size, that have been broken down by time, and this new research identifies the extent in which it is a threat to marine life. Whilst much attention has been focused on oceanic plastic pollution, this new study explores the impact plastic waste is having on rivers and the fresh water species that inhabit them.

9h

A remote Greek island is on its way to becoming energy self-sufficient

Climate change vulnerability and sustainable development challenges are becoming more apparent, particularly for islands. Their insularity implies energy dependency on fossil fuels and energy imports that also involve high transportation costs. Facing such difficulties, island communities are increasingly focusing on clean energy solutions. Enter the EU-funded TILOS project, which has set out to m

9h

Improving paleotemperature reconstruction—Swiss lakes as a model system

For years, scientists have been trying to determine the climate of the past in order to make better predictions about future climate conditions. Now, there has been a breakthrough in the methodology of climate reconstruction based on microbial molecular fossils. Researchers under the direction of the University of Basel analyzed sediment samples collected from more than 30 Swiss lakes. Their findi

9h

This index measures progress and sustainability better than GDP

Conventionally, economists use gross domestic product (GDP) to estimate the sustainability of the economy and the quality of societal welfare. However, this approach is not only incorrect and logically flawed, but also in gross neglect of nature's contribution to the society.

9h

Uncovering the role of the ilio-sacral joint in frogs

A trio of researchers, two with the Royal Veterinary College, the other the University of Portsmouth, has found evidence that suggests that the ilio-sacral joint in frogs evolved after they started jumping. In their paper published in the journal Biology Letters, Christopher Richards, Enrico Eberhard and Amber Collings describe their study of the joint and what they found.

9h

Chromosome responsible for asparagus gender characterized

Garden asparagus is, from a financial perspective, the most important asparagus species of all. Its cultivation area is equal to that of garlic, carrots and eggplants, making it decisive for the asparagus sector.

9h

Thy-læger får talentpris

Praksislægerne Søren Kæseler Andersen og Morten Sig Ager Jensen modtager DSAMs talentpris for deres indsats for at få medicinstuderende i praksisophold og fremme forskning i lokalområdet.

9h

Does ‘White Male Rage’ Exist?

Last week, Brett Kavanaugh stood accused of sexual assault and gang rape. He insisted in Senate testimony that he was being smeared. In doing so, he showed anger. And the press sought to comment on that anger. Many compared his approach before the Senate Judiciary Committee to that of Clarence Thomas, another Republican nominee to the Supreme Court who stood accused of sexual misconduct and lashe

9h

Are Virgin Galactic and Richard Branson really going to space soon?

Richard Branson has said that his space flight company, Virgin Galactic, will go to space “within weeks”. Here’s what you need to know about his claims

10h

Americans Strongly Dislike PC Culture

On social media, the country seems to divide into two neat camps: Call them the woke and the resentful. Team Resentment is manned—pun very much intended—by people who are predominantly old and almost exclusively white. Team Woke is young, likely to be female, and predominantly black, brown, or Asian (though white “allies” do their dutiful part). These teams are roughly equal in number, and they d

10h

How Marketers Talk About Motherhood Behind Closed Doors

On a recent clear-skied autumn morning, families milled about Rockefeller Center in Manhattan—clasping shopping bags, gazing into their phones, waiting on benches for straggling loved ones—unaware that 31 floors above them, in a sleek meeting space, a room full of marketers were trying to get inside their heads. “Moms are the most powerful influencers on the planet,” said one. “She is caring for

10h

Praktiserende læge frygter fejl som følge af tolkegebyr

Johan Ludvig Reventlow vil have Styrelsen for Patientsikkerhed til at svare på, om læger kan fritages for ansvaret ved fejlbehandlinger, som skyldes mangelfuld tolkning.

10h

EU-aftale spænder ben for første del af klimaplanen

Ministre for EU-landene er blevet enige om nye krav til emissionerne fra nye biler i 2030. Men kravene er langt fra ambitiøse nok til at bakke regeringens klimaplan op. Dansk forhandler langer ud efter andre EU-lande.

10h

So Much Genetic Testing. So Few People to Explain It to You

Personal genomics is booming, but there's a nationwide shortage of genetic counselors who can make sense of that DNA data.

10h

Traces of mystery ancient humans found lurking in our genomes

Prehistoric humans were sexual adventurers, mating with Neanderthals and Denisovans, but DNA studies reveal dalliances with populations we never knew existed

10h

50 years ago, a 550-year-old seed sprouted

Old seeds can sprout new plants even after centuries of dormancy.

10h

3 Tribes at the Heart of the Fracking Boom

In North Dakota oil exploration opens new opportunities—and old wounds — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

10h

Cleaning, but safely! Cocoons protect sensitive ant brood during toxic disinfection

Ants are tidy—when they move into a new nest box, they spend the first days cleaning it thoroughly, just like humans moving into a new home. Many ants produce highly acidic chemicals from specialized glands in their body. Researchers have assumed that ants only spray this poison, which is made mostly of formic acid, to fight other ants and would-be predators. But in two studies published in 2013 a

10h

The threat of centaur solar system objects for the Earth

Astrophysicists Mattia Galiazzo and Rudolf Dvorak from the University of Vienna, in collaboration with Elizabeth A. Silber (Brown University, U.S.) investigated the long-term path development of centaurs, solar system minor bodies that originally have orbits between Jupiter and Neptune. The researchers have estimated the number of close encounters and impacts with the terrestrial planets after the

10h

Controlling chemical reactions near absolute zero

It is an understatement to say that chemical reactions take place everywhere, constantly. In both nature and the lab, chemistry is ubiquitous. But despite advances, it remains a fundamental challenge to gain a complete understanding and control over all aspects of a chemical reaction, such as temperature and the orientation of reacting molecules and atoms.

10h

How Accurate Are Personality Tests?

Precious few personality assessments are known to be reliable, and researchers say their use outside academia is debatable — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

10h

Rabbits flee when they smell dead relatives in predators’ droppings

Rabbits avoid nibbling grass in areas scattered with predator droppings – particularly if those predators have been fed on bunnies

10h

You can recognise around 5000 faces, from family to celebrities

For much of human evolution our ancestors may have encountered only a few hundred people in their lives – but we can each recall about 5000 distinct faces

10h

Google-bil skal opsnuse luftforurening i København

En Google-bil i Københavns gader skal lave et præcist kort over forureningsniveauet på hver enkelt gade. Projektet skal frem mod 2020 supplere de tre stationære forureningsmålere, der er opsat i øjeblikket.

11h

Video: Her er Google-bilen, der skal kortlægge københavnerluft

En modificeret Google Streetview-bil skal i over et år snuse københavnsk luft ind for at supplere de tre målestationer, der i dag måler byens forureningsniveau. Professor Ole Hertel fra Aarhus Universitet fortæller om teknologien bag.

11h

Alien-Hunting Agents Seek the Truth About UFOs in 'Project Blue Book'

How (and why) was the U.S. Air Force investigating UFOs between 1952 and 1969?

11h

Hurricane Michael Strengthens to 'Unprecedented' Category 4 Storm Overnight

Florida is bracing for winds up to 140 mph and a potentially deadly storm surge.

11h

The Trump Campaign Says Exploiting Hacked Emails Is Free Speech

In a motion to dismiss a new lawsuit accusing President Donald Trump’s campaign team of illegally conspiring with Russian agents to disseminate stolen emails during the election, Trump campaign lawyers have tried out a new defense: free speech. The lawsuit, filed last month by two donors and one former employee of the Democratic National Committee, alleges that the Trump campaign, along with form

11h

Lindsey Graham Doesn’t Want a Primary

The smoke from the Brett Kavanaugh war is beginning to dissipate, but Lindsey Graham is still smoldering . On Fox News Sunday , the South Carolina senator declared, “I’ve never been so pissed in my life.” He denounced the sexual-assault allegations leveled against Kavanaugh as “McCarthyism,” vowed to stump this fall against Democrats as payback, and announced that he would spend Sunday golfing ag

11h

The Wounds Won’t Heal

The battle over Brett Kavanaugh was more divisive—and stands to be more consequential—than the 2016 election that made his nomination to the Supreme Court possible. While no one can doubt the viciousness of the last presidential election, the contest between Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump was a poor proxy for the true cultural and intellectual divides between left and right. By contrast, the co

11h

John Roberts’s Chance for Greatness

Among Chief Justice John Roberts’s many talents is an ability to mask ambition. Though conversational in chambers, about the day’s headlines or the Notre Dame game over the weekend, he is by nature reticent. Law clerks don’t feel they get to know him as well as, say, Justices Clarence Thomas and Stephen Breyer. So a few years ago, when the chief let his guard down, the moment astonished his liste

11h

When the Senate Was Civil and Bipartisan

In the bitter winter of 1964, when the landmark Civil Rights Act was struggling to be born in the House of Representatives, a crucial young woman was at the center of the fight. Jane O’Grady, a 24-year-old graduate student fresh from Berkeley, had signed up to work for the Amalgamated Clothing and Textile Workers Union, to lobby for the bill. Her task was complex. The pro-civil-rights forces knew

11h

Brands Like Nike and PepsiCo Are the New Art Patrons

When PepsiCo decided to create a new premium water brand last year, it came up with LIFEWTR—a clear plastic bottle with a black cap and a colorful, eclectic series of labels designed by emerging artists. Art is a central part of the LIFEWTR brand. Through it, PepsiCo also donates art supplies to public schools and has endowed a $100,000 annual fund for the Brooklyn Museum to purchase new works. P

11h

Google appeals $5 billion EU fine in Android antitrust case

Google has appealed a record $5 billion fine that European Union authorities levied against the tech giant for allegedly abusing the dominance of its Android operating system to stifle competitors.

11h

Cost of climate-linked disasters soars: UN

The economic cost of climate-related disasters hit $2.25 trillion over the last two decades, an increase of more than 250 percent compared to the previous 20 years, the UN said Wednesday.

11h

Five men and the sea: huge marlin sinks Filipino fishing boat

It reads like a modern day take on 'The Old Man and the Sea'—five Filipino fishermen cast adrift for days on a makeshift raft after a huge marlin sinks their boat.

11h

82-årig død efter overdosis af gigtmedicin

Styrelsen for Patientsikkerhed sætter sygeplejerske fra Brønderslev Kommune under skærpet tilsyn på grund af fejldosering af gigtmidlet methotrexat.

11h

What does climate change really cost society? This lab is trying to find out

Studies by the Climate Impact Lab have found that higher temperatures increase suicide rates One of the biggest hubs of real-time climate research is a lab hundreds of miles from the rising seas and melting ice caps. There are no test tubes or beakers. Instead young scientists and economists hunch over computers analyzing the newest data. A group of them are currently reviewing a study that consi

11h

Google 2.0: Why MIT scientists are building a new search engine

In 2005, Danny Hillis co-founded Freebase, an open-source knowledge database that was acquired by Google in 2010. Freebase formed the foundation of Google's famous Knowledge Graph, which enhances its search engine results and powers Google Assistant and Google Home. Hillis is now building The Underlay, a new knowledge database and future search engine app that is meant to serve the common good ra

11h

With $1 Million, Exxon Mobil Corp Helps Fund Carbon Tax Campaign

Exxon Mobil pledges to support passage of a carbon tax. Analysts say the company would rather face a single, overarching tax than a patchwork of taxes and regulation to address climate change.

11h

Efter knap 2 års ulovlig masseovervågning: Pape ser på lov for telelogning

Justitsminister Søren Pape Poulsen siger han nu vil se på bestemmelserne i retsplejeloven og logningsbekendtgørelsen, der giver politiet adgang til at indhente loggede teleoplysninger.

12h

Analyse: Energirenovering skal op i dobbelt tempo, men regeringen fortsætter i slæbesporet

Selvom energiforbruget i bygninger udgør næsten 40 procent af energiforbruget i Danmark, er regeringens klima- og luftudspil renset for nye energirenoveringstiltag. Fraværet møder kritik. Vi dykker ned i analyser og statistik for at finde forklaringen.

12h

Stemmestyrede skærme er på vej ind i din stue

Amazon, Google og Facebook har inden for få uger lanceret såkaldte ‘smart displays’, som er en slags fastmonterede tablets, designet til hjemmet.

12h

Mayo Clinic researchers identify gene types driving racial disparities in myeloma

Researchers at Mayo Clinic have identified three specific gene types that account for a known two-to-three-fold increase in myeloma diagnoses among African-Americans. Researchers also demonstrated the ability to study race and racial admixture more accurately using DNA analysis. The findings were published today in Blood Cancer Journal.

12h

Worse outcomes for Hispanic infants with critical congenital heart disease

Hispanic infants born with critical types of heart disease had significantly worse one-year outcomes than infants born to white mothers. Lower maternal education and greater reliance on public health insurance were closely associated with poor outcomes.

12h

When ICU Delirium Leads To Symptoms Of Dementia After Discharge

Up to half of all patients who survive emergency medical treatment in the intensive care unit have mental problems when they return home. Doctors studying the problem say it starts with delirium. (Image credit: Morgan Hornsby for NPR)

12h

Her måler de billed-opløsningen i nanometer

Danske billedforskere kan analysere mikroskopiske 3D-strukturer i materialer med opløsninger på ned til 25 nanometer på den svenske synkrotron Max IV.

13h

Follow the money

Targeting profits linked to the illegal wildlife trade could help protect threatened species

14h

'Carbon sink' Bhutan counts cost of plans for green future

The gentle whirring of the wind turbine speaks volumes of Bhutan's record as the world's only carbon negative country, but major challenges stand in the way of the Himalayan kingdom's decision to follow a green path over rampant economic expansion.

14h

Philippines revs up flagging green energy engine

Deep below the ancient volcanoes scattered around the Philippines sits a simmering stockpile of intense heat that officials hope will help revive the nation's sputtering green energy machine.

14h

14h

Debunking the magical power of the placebo effect for chronic pain (yet again)

The opioid crisis and growing awareness of the dangers of addiction to pain medication are prompting renewed calls for the use of pill placebos in place of active treatments, backed by familiar claims about the magical powers of the placebo.

14h

Haiti quake toll rises to 17

The death toll from the earthquake that struck northwest Haiti over the weekend has risen to 17, with nearly 350 others injured, the interior ministry said Tuesday.

14h

Exxon Mobil gives $1 mn to lobby for US carbon tax

Exxon Mobil said Tuesday it would spend $1 million to support a US lobbying campaign behind a carbon tax, boosting an initiative that faces long odds in Washington in the near-term

14h

Instagram ramps up battle against bullying

Instagram on Tuesday added more weapons to battle cyber bullying, using artificial intelligence to scan photos for abusive content at the Facebook-owned service.

14h

NASA sees the development of Eastern Atlantic Tropical Storm Nadine

As Hurricane Michael barrels toward the U.S. states along the northwestern Gulf of Mexico, and Tropical Storm Leslie lingers in the Central Atlantic, Tropical Storm Nadine has formed off the west coast of Africa in the far eastern Atlantic. NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite provided a visible image of the new named storm.

14h

A NASA infrared view at Arabian Sea's Tropical Cyclone Luban

NASA's Aqua satellite analyzed Tropical Cyclone Luban with infrared light to determine if the storm was intensifying or weakening. Luban formed on Oct. 8 in the Arabian Sea, Northern Indian Ocean and threatens Oman.

14h

Crowd-sourced data wins protection for endangered tricolored blackbird

When scientists first proposed adding the Tricolored Blackbird to the California endangered species list in 2004, they had a problem. Tricolored Blackbirds nest in large colonies that can move from year to year, and because the locations of these colonies in any given year may not be known, existing survey data were not enough to convince the California Fish and Game Commission to approve the list

14h

Army research lights the way for new materials

What happens when gold and silver just don't cut it anymore? You turn to metallic alloys, which are what Army researchers are using to develop new designer materials with a broad range of capabilities for our Soldiers.

14h

Scientists forge ahead with electron microscopy to build quantum materials atom by atom

A novel technique that nudges single atoms to switch places within an atomically thin material could bring scientists another step closer to realizing theoretical physicist Richard Feynman's vision of building tiny machines from the atom up.

14h

Technique locates robots, soldiers in GPS-challenged areas

Scientists at the U.S. Army Research Laboratory have developed a novel algorithm that enables localization of humans and robots in areas where GPS is unavailable.

14h

Novel design could help shed excess heat in next-generation fusion power plants

A class exercise at MIT, aided by industry researchers, has led to an innovative solution to one of the longstanding challenges facing the development of practical fusion power plants: how to get rid of excess heat that would cause structural damage to the plant.

15h

Wind holds key to climate change turnaround

Antarctica has a current that circles the landmass as part of the Southern Ocean. This current is called the Antarctic Circumpolar Current. When the westerly winds strengthen during the Southern Hemisphere's summer, waters south of the current acidify faster than can be accounted for in carbon dioxide from the atmosphere alone. The opposite pattern was observed north of the current.

15h

Market forces put America's recycling industry in the dumps

America's recycling industry is in the dumps.

15h

Bogota implores tourists to stop feeding pigeons

On a bright Sunday afternoon, a group of government workers walked around Bogota's most famous square dressed as pigeons, with cardboard beaks covering their noses, as thousands of real birds swarmed overhead and left their droppings on stately monuments.

15h

The one good thing about Brexit? Leaving the EU’s disgraceful farming system | George Monbiot

The government’s plans are an improvement, but still fatally flawed. We need a proper agriculture debate I’m a remainer, but there’s one result of Brexit I can’t wait to see: leaving the EU’s common agricultural policy. This is the farm subsidy system that spends €50bn (£44bn) a year on achieving none of its objectives . It is among the most powerful drivers of environmental destruction in the nor

16h

Blog: Få firmaer ved mere om os end Amazon og Google. Og nu får de en lyttepost i vores hjem

At placere teknologi i hjemmet, som gør det muligt for et selskab at optage alt, vi siger, ville for nogle år siden have virket som en rimelig vild ide, lyder det fra konsulent i det norske Datatilsyn.

16h

Heusler, Weyl and Berry

Scientists at the Max Planck Institute Chemical Physics of Solids have written a review paper about magnetic topological materials in the family of Heusler compounds. The review explains the connection between topology, symmetry and magnetism at a level suitable for undergraduate students in physics, chemistry and materials science with a basic knowledge of condensed matter physics.

17h

New appropriate use criteria for lumbar puncture in Alzheimer's diagnosis

In preparation for more tools that detect and measure the biology associated with Alzheimer's and other dementias earlier and with more accuracy, an Alzheimer's Association-led Workgroup has published appropriate use criteria (AUC) for lumbar puncture (spinal tap) and spinal fluid analysis in the diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease.

17h

Jeg ved ikke, om jeg kan se porno om tyve år – men jeg har ikke tænkt mig at tage chancen

Jesper levede med pornoafhængighed i 18 år. Det kostede ham flere forhold.

17h

Ultrafast optical fiber-based electron gun to reveal atomic motions

A new method will enable researchers to directly observe and capture atomic motions at surfaces and interfaces in real time.

18h

The Kahne Lab builds an arsenal to fight antibiotic-resistant bacteria

Antibiotic resistance in bacteria is a growing global health crisis. Now, new research provides crucial details on bacterial defenses and how we could undermine them.

18h

Precise electron spin control yields faster memory storage

Enhancing the speed and reducing the size of data storage devices requires gaining control over the force making electrons spins. In a recent study scientists have developed a new theory to predict the complex dynamics of spin procession in materials subjected to ultra-short laser pulses. The advantage of this approach is that it is predictive.

18h

Air pollution may be linked to heightened mouth cancer risk

High levels of air pollutants, especially fine particulate matter (PM2.5) and to a lesser extent, ozone, may be linked to a heightened risk of developing mouth cancer, suggests the first study of its kind.

18h

Crowd-sourced data wins protection for endangered tricolored blackbird

Researchers used eBird data to convince California to list the Tricolored Blackbird as endangered.

18h

Polar bears gorged on whales to survive past warm periods; won't suffice as climate warms

A new study found that while dead whales are valuable sources of fat and protein for some polar bears, this resource will likely not be enough to sustain most bear populations in the future when the Arctic becomes ice-free in summers.

18h

Earlier treatment could help reverse autistic-like behavior in tuberous sclerosis

New research in a mouse model suggests that the drug rapamycin can reverse autism-like social deficits — but only if given early. The study is the first to shed light on the crucial timing of therapy to improve social impairments in a condition associated with autism spectrum disorder. Its findings could help inform future clinical trials in children with tuberous sclerosis complex.

18h

The threat of Centaurs for the Earth

Astrophysicists have investigated the long-term path development of Centaurs — small icy bodies that orbit the Sun between Jupiter and Neptune.

18h

For wineries, competition boosts profits from sustainability

An international study of small- to medium-sized wineries and vineyards finds that the more sustainability practices a winery has in place, the better its financial performance — and the effect is enhanced when a winery perceives significant pressure from competitors.

18h

Largest ever genetic study of blood pressure

The largest ever genetic analysis of over one million people has identified 535 new genes associated with high blood pressure.

18h

Approach paves way for new antimicrobial materials

Researchers have successfully incorporated 'photosensitizers' into a range of polymers, giving those materials the ability to render bacteria and viruses inactive using only ambient oxygen and visible-wavelength light.

18h

Mechanism of resistance to novel targeted therapy for ovarian cancer identified

Scientists have unraveled a mechanism of resistance to EZH2 inhibitors in ovarian cancers with mutations in the ARID1A gene.

18h

The cosmological lithium problem

An international research group has tried to find a solution to one of the unknowns in the current description of the Big Bang. Different nuclear reactions responsible for the creation and destruction of atomic nuclei in nucleosynthesis during the Big Bang are crucial in determining the primordial abundance of lithium, the third (and last) chemical element formed during the very early phase of the

19h

Fingerprint drug screen test works on the living and deceased

A revolutionary drug test can detect amphetamines, cannabis, cocaine and opiates from the sweat of single fingerprint sample in just 10 minutes. The research shows that the technology works on both the living and deceased.

19h

Controlling chemical reactions near absolute zero

Chemists have demonstrated complete experimental control over a chemical reaction just above absolute zero.

19h

Scorpion census: Researchers update global record of medically significant scorpions

Researchers have documented 104 scorpions spanning dozens of countries, providing a vital update to the global record of medically significant scorpions, or scorpions whose venom could be alternately gravely harmful or medically beneficial to human beings.

19h

New knowledge about retrovirus-host coevolution

Retroviruses have colonized vertebrate hosts for millions of years by inserting their genes into host genomes, enabling their inheritance through generations as endogenous retroviruses (ERVs). Researchers now provide new knowledge about the long-term associations of retroviruses and their hosts by studying ERV variation and segregation in wild and domestic rabbit populations.

19h

Root extract of Chinese medicinal plant makes worms live longer

A root extract of the Fallopia multiflora, or Chinese knotweed, has special properties: it enables the nematode C. elegans to live longer and protects it from oxidative stress, according to a new study.

19h

Statins show little promise for conditions other than heart disease

Medicines commonly prescribed to reduce people's risk of heart attack may have limited use for treating other diseases, research suggests.

19h

Immunotherapy effective against hereditary melanoma

Individuals with an inherited form of skin cancer often have a poor prognosis. The type of immunotherapy that was awarded this year's Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine is, however, particularly effective in this patient group, new research shows.

19h

Potential assay artefacts in anti-malarial screening documented

Researchers have documented the permissible limits of a number of chemicals that are often part of anti-malarial efficacy tests. Their results provide a previously undetermined dataset on drug reconstitution conditions at which both the red cell integrity and plasmodium growth and proliferation are not compromised.

19h

A step towards biological warfare with insects?

A project by a research agency of the US Department of Defense could easily be misused for developing biological weapons, according to researchers.

19h

Lessons from Dutch geological history might be useful for other present-day deltas

Even long before medieval inhabitants reclaimed land and raised dykes at a large scale, humans have had a strong impact on river behavior in the Dutch delta plain. Physical geographers have demonstrated that two present Rhine branches developed stepwise in the first centuries CE, because of two combined man-induced effects.

19h

A pheromone-sensing gene that predates land-dwelling vertebrates

Scientists have discovered a gene that appears to play a vital role in pheromone sensing. The gene is conserved across fish and mammals and over 400 million years of vertebrate evolution, indicating that the pheromone sensing system is much more ancient than previously believed.

19h

Too much vitamin A may increase risk of bone fractures

Consuming too much vitamin A may decrease bone thickness, leading to weak and fracture prone bones, according to a new study in mice.

19h

Supercharged natural killer cells may hold promise for cancer

New research suggests that a type of 'supercharged' immune cell could be mass-produced to help fight cancer.

19h

Planned intermittent fasting may help reverse type 2 diabetes, suggest doctors

Planned intermittent fasting may help to reverse type 2 diabetes, suggest doctors after three patients in their care, who did this, were able to cut out the need for insulin treatment altogether.

20h

More young people are choosing not to drink alcohol

Young people in England aren't just drinking less alcohol — a new study shows that more of them are never taking up alcohol at all, and that the increase is widespread among young people.

20h

Lighting the way for new materials

Researchers are using metallic alloys to lighten the load and enhance the power of Soldier devices used on the battlefield.

20h

Oceans are changing

New research finds that when westerly winds in the Antarctic Ocean strengthen during the austral summer (October to February), surface waters in the region acidify faster than can be accounted for by increases in carbon dioxide from the atmosphere alone.

20h

Even when presented with facts, supported by evidence, many choose not to believe them

In an era of fact-checking and 'alternative facts,' many people simply choose not to believe research findings and other established facts, according to a new article.

20h

Study shows DNA of people with childhood abuse or depression ages faster

DNA from people who suffer from major depression is biologically older than that of healthy people by on average 8 months, suggesting that they are biologically older than their corresponding calendar age. This effect was greater in people who have had childhood trauma, such as violence, neglect or sexual abuse, who show a biological age around a year older than their actual age.

20h

Becoming promiscuous to ensure reproduction

Females of a socially monogamous passerine, the Japanese great tit (Parus minor), become more promiscuous after hatchings fail in the first breeding attempt — apparently attempting to ensure successful reproduction.

20h

Electrons go with the flow

You turn on a switch and the light switches on because electricity 'flows'. The usual perception is that this is like opening a faucet and the water starts to flow. But this analogy is misleading. The flow of water is determined by the theory of hydrodynamics, where the behavior of the fluid requires no knowledge of the movements of individual molecules.

20h

More young people are choosing not to drink alcohol

Young people in England aren't just drinking less alcohol — a new study published in BMC Public Health shows that more of them are never taking up alcohol at all, and that the increase is widespread among young people.

21h

The Atlantic Daily: Is There a Crime at the Center of the Narrative?

What We’re Following Around the World: A journalist who’d urged reform in Saudi Arabia entered his country’s consulate in Turkey on Tuesday to obtain some routine documents. He never came out. Saudis who’ve fled to other parts of the world might now also have “to weigh whether their self-imposed exile might also count as treasonous, and whether the Saudi state … will eventually get around to them

21h

Never forget a face? Research suggests people know an average of 5,000 faces

A research team, from the University of York, tested study participants on how many faces they could recall from their personal lives and the media, as well as the number of famous faces they recognised.

22h

Psychologists' face off reveals humans can recognise 5,000 people

University of York says first evidence-based study nails down facial-recognition ability The next time an old friend meets your greeting with a quizzical who-are-you stare, you’re right to take offence: new research suggests the average person can recognise 5,000 different faces. Psychologists at the University of York embarked on the study after realising that for all the work scientists have do

22h

Micropeptide restores heart function in mice

Researchers have discovered a micropeptide molecule that can restore normal heart function in mice, according to a new study.

22h

Scientists mimic the earliest stages of human development

Scientists have modeled the first step in human development in a laboratory with the goal of better understanding how organs form. In the new study, the researchers edited groups of human pluripotent stem cells to silence genes important for cellular mechanics. The alterations prompted the cells to move around and self-organize until they were divided into two groups: Those that had been manipulat

22h

Rapid, widespread changes may be coming to Antarctica's Dry Valleys

Antarctica's sandy polar desert, the McMurdo Dry Valleys, has undergone changes over the past decade and the recent discovery of thawing permafrost, thinning glaciers and melting ground ice by a research team are signs that rapid and widespread change could be on the horizon.

22h

Air pollution linked to greater risk of mouth cancer, finds study

Research in Taiwan has show a link between very high levels of air pollution and oral cancer High levels of air pollution are linked to an increased risk of mouth cancer, new research has revealed. Scientists have previously linked high air pollution to a host of health problems, from an increased risk of dementia to asthma and even changes in the structure of the heart , with recent research sug

22h

After Prison, Many People Living With HIV Go Without Treatment

When HIV-positive people leave prison, they often lose access to medical care and the drugs that suppress the virus. It's a missed opportunity in the fight against HIV, public health advocates say. (Image credit: Kenyon Ellsworth for NPR)

22h

How cellular pumps protect the gut from toxic stuff

The master regulators of gut stem cells, called intestinal myofibroblasts, have pumps that protect them, and therefore the gut, from the toxic effects of a wide range of compounds, including the anticancer drug tamoxifen, according to new research. “We have identified a unique population of cells that are master regulators of gut stem cells. These important support cells are uniquely protected fr

22h

Downward mobility link to violent crime and self-harm

The children of families who fall upon hard times are at significantly greater risk of being involved in violent crime and harming themselves as young adults, according to a major new study.The research by University of Manchester epidemiologists is a major addition to our understanding of the risk factors for self-harm and violent criminality.

22h

Planned intermittent fasting may help reverse type 2 diabetes, suggest doctors

Planned intermittent fasting may help to reverse type 2 diabetes, suggest doctors writing in the journal BMJ Case Reports after three patients in their care, who did this, were able to cut out the need for insulin treatment altogether.

22h

Air pollution may be linked to heightened mouth cancer risk

High levels of air pollutants, especially fine particulate matter (PM2.5) and to a lesser extent, ozone, may be linked to a heightened risk of developing mouth cancer, suggests the first study of its kind, published online in the Journal of Investigative Medicine.

22h

Mount Vesuvius murdered its victims in more brutal ways than we thought

Science Boiling blood and exploding skulls. For nearly two millennia, the eruption of Mount Vesuvius has served as a stark reminder that nature is capable of some serious violence.

23h

Trust in non-conventional therapies by cancer patients not matching awareness about risks

Sarcoma patients show great openness to the use of complementary alternative medicines (CAMs) for supportive care, but they are poorly informed about safety issues and risk of interactions with anti-cancer drugs, a study to be presented at ESMO 2018 reported.

23h

23h

The Shortlist to Replace Nikki Haley

Nikki Haley’s upcoming departure from the United Nations opens up the most prominent diplomatic posting other than secretary of state, and a position that presidents have historically used to showcase rising stars or reward elder statesmen. President Donald Trump on Tuesday told reporters he has known that Haley planned to leave his administration for “probably six months” and that he would name

23h

How to Understand the UN’s Dire New Climate Report

People must be burnt out on major climate reports, and can you really blame them? Every year, it seems, yet another group of scientists compiles what we know about climate change. And every year, with few exceptions, the broad outlines of that knowledge seem worrying. But nothing ever really changes—and so our ongoing apocalypse becomes not only all the more terrifying, but all the more tedious.

23h

Taylor Swift breaks her political silence, and America erupts

Taylor Swift breaks her political silence by endorsing Tennessee Democratic candidates. Mistakenly believing her to be one of theirs up until now, the alt-right is furious. New voter registrations have spiked since her announcement In their heyday, The Beatles never told anyone how to vote, fearful as they were of their own power over their fan base. As one of their promoters put it , "Only Hitle

23h

The font that can improve your memory

A font has been developed with the aim of improving your memory. 57% of respondents were able to remember text written in this font. It's free to download. None Graphic design students, psychologists, and researchers at Australia's RMIT has created a font with the aim of improving memory retention. It's been dubbed Sans Forgetica . The letters slant to the left. There's a gap left in each letter.

23h

Scientists propose blasting space junk out of orbit with powerful plasma beam

Japanese researchers have developed a magnetic nozzle plasma thruster that could clean up our atmosphere. The satellite solves a long-standing issue by including two thrusters to ensure junk is pushed out of orbit. While the project is not without risks, it marks a potential solution for the growing problem of space debris. None Humans have some crazy ideas. On occasion, a radical vision becomes

23h

23h

The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: Haley’s Comment

Elaine Godfrey ( @elainejgodfrey ), Madeleine Carlisle (@maddiecarlisle2) , Olivia Paschal (@oliviacpaschal) Today in 5 Lines Nikki Haley, the U.S. ambassador to the United Nations, resigned , effective at the end of the year. In a joint appearance with Haley, President Donald Trump said that he would announce her successor “within the next two to three weeks.” Read a transcript of their remarks

23h

A new path to solving a longstanding fusion challenge

A design developed at MIT suggests a solution to a longstanding problem for next-generation fusion power plants: how to get rid of excess heat they generate.

1d

Lost Chain of Underwater Volcanoes Is a Massive Whale Superhighway

There is an ancient "highway" of massive, underwater volcanoes near Tasmania, and apparently whales love it.

1d

See Hurricane Michael from Space in These Satellite Images

Hurricane Michael is expected to hit the Florida panhandle as a major storm on Wednesday afternoon (Oct. 10) — and U.S. weather satellites are busy watching the storm to help meteorologists keep people safe.

1d

NASA sees the development of Eastern Atlantic Tropical Storm Nadine

As Hurricane Michael barrels toward the U.S. states along the northwestern Gulf of Mexico, and Tropical Storm Leslie lingers in the Central Atlantic, Tropical Storm Nadine has formed off the west coast of Africa in the far eastern Atlantic. NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite provided a visible image of the new named storm.

1d

What Is Voldemorting? The Ultimate SEO Dis

When writers swap Trump for Cheeto and 45, it's not just a put-down. Removing a keyword is the anti-SEO—transforming your subject into a slippery, ungraspable, swarm.

1d

There Is Good News In The Universe, You Just Have To Look At Some Dirt To Find It

Astrophysicist Adam Frank says you don't have to look to the stars to be impressed with the cosmic matter that binds us together. Pick up some dirt!

1d

Inside The EPA: How Employees Are Reacting To The U.N. Climate Report

The United Nations released a climate report on Monday, but how does it fit with EPA policies? NPR's Mary Louise Kelly speaks with Washington Post reporter Brady Dennis about how EPA employees are responding.

1d

A NASA infrared view at Arabian Sea's Tropical Cyclone Luban

NASA's Aqua satellite analyzed Tropical Cyclone Luban with infrared light to determine if the storm was intensifying or weakening. Luban formed on Oct. 8, 2018 in the Arabian Sea, Northern Indian Ocean and threatens Oman.

1d

Wind holds key to climate change turnaround

Research co-led by a University of Delaware professor could help bring about the kind of far-reaching changes deemed necessary in the UN's dire new climate change report. He found that when westerly winds in the Antarctic Ocean strengthen during the austral summer (Oct.-Feb.), surface waters in the region acidify faster than can be accounted for by increases in carbon dioxide from the atmosphere a

1d

Army research lights the way for new materials

Army researchers are using metallic alloys to lighten the load and enhance the power of Soldier devices used on the battlefield. This research was recently featured on the cover of Advanced Optical Materials.

1d

Crowd-sourced data wins protection for endangered tricolored blackbird

Cornell University Lab of Ornithology fellow Orin Robinson used eBird data to convince California to list the Tricolored Blackbird as endangered.

1d

Army researchers' technique locates robots, soldiers in GPS-challenged areas

Army scientists have developed a novel algorithm that enables localization of humans and robots in areas where GPS is unavailable.

1d

These light-loving bacteria may survive surprisingly deep underground

Traces of cyanobacteria DNA suggest that the microbes live deep below Earth’s surface.

1d

No black scientist has ever won a Nobel – that’s bad for science, and bad for society

Many in the scientific world are celebrating the fact that two women received this year's Nobel prizes in physics and chemistry. Donna Strickland and Frances Arnold are only the 20th and 21st female scientists to be recognised by the Nobel Committee. Yet in over 100 years, we have never seen a black scientist become a Nobel laureate. Every year, the annual October Nobel Prize announcements coinci

1d

The Pine Island Glacier is about to calve another monster iceberg

It's the same glacier that calved in September 2017, losing an iceberg 4.5 times the size of Manhattan. The size of this one, however, is about 15% bigger than the last. It's the sixth large-calving event from this glacier since 2001. The irreversible collapse of the West Antarctic ice sheet would raise sea levels 20 feet, says the UN. The Pine Island Glacier (a.k.a. PIG) About one year ago, in A

1d

Are 3 brains connected via BrainNet better than one?

Scientists connect three people's brains together to play Tetris. BrainNet may represent first baby steps in brain "social networking". Imagine having two other people in on your most private deliberations. The title of the paper just submitted for peer review says it all: 'BrainNet: A Multi-Person Brain-to-Brain Interface for Direct Collaboration Between Brains'. Developed by scientists from the

1d

Major Publishers File Second Lawsuit Against ResearchGate

As the American Chemical Society and Elsevier move litigation forward, other academic publishers have opted to collaborate with the academic network platform instead.

1d

Scientists Find Weird Reason Diving Plates Get Stuck 400 Miles Beneath Earth's Surface

A slippery layer beneath Earth stops chunks of crust in their tracks, creating "stagnant slabs" in the middle of the mantle.

1d

Leveraging restaurant menus to combat obesity

Findings from a new study suggest that calorie labeling information on menus might be more effective in motivating consumers to order healthier options if the information is placed to the left of the menu item.

1d

Newly discovered moth named Icarus sports a flame-shaped mark and prefers high elevations

A new species of owlet moth recently discovered to inhabit high-elevation mountains in western North America has been named after the Greek mythological character Icarus.

1d

Icy warning for space missions to Jupiter's moon

A location often earmarked as a potential habitat for extra-terrestrial life could prove to be a tricky place for spacecraft to land, new research has revealed.

1d

3 ways to create a space that moves you, from a Broadway set designer | David Korins

You don't have to work on Broadway to design a set, says creative director David Korins — you can be the set designer of any space in your life. Sharing insights from his work on hits like "Hamilton" and "Dear Evan Hansen," Korins offers a three-step process to start creating the world you want to live in.

1d

So, what's the deal with homeopathy?

Entertainment Excerpt: The Sawbones Book Looking to cure that illness? Try this toxic herbal mixture diluted until it’s basically just pricey water. That’ll work . . . won’t it?

1d

Time-traveling illusion tricks the brain

Researchers have developed two new illusions that reveal how the senses can influence each other — in particular, how sound can give rise to visual illusions. These illusions occur so quickly that they illustrate a phenomenon called postdiction (as opposed to prediction) in which a stimulus that occurs later can retroactively affect our perceptions of an earlier event.

1d

The many structures of the light-active biomolecules

Some molecules change their spatial structure when exposed to light — in other words, they look different in light and darkness. What exactly happens during the conversion has not yet been researched in detail.

1d

Economics Nobel Highlights Climate Action Necessity

William Nordhaus shared the 2018 Nobel Memorial Prize in Economic Sciences, "for integrating climate change into long-run macroeconomic analysis,” with Paul Romer, "for integrating… — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

1d

Ultrafast optical fiber-based electron gun to reveal atomic motions

One of the most enduring "Holy Grail" experiments in science has been attempts to directly observe atomic motions during structural changes. This prospect underpins the entire field of chemistry because a chemical process occurs during a transition state—the point of no return separating the reactant configuration from the product configuration.

1d

New York City area wetlands may be unwitting generator of greenhouse gasses

New York City (NYC), located within the Hudson River Estuary, inputs over 100 billion liters of combined sewage overflow (CSO) into surrounding surface waters annually. Little is known, however, about the impact of CSOs on wetlands that act as carbon sinks and provide buffers against climate change. Now a new study in the Soil Science Society of America Journal from researchers at The Graduate Cen

1d

Google appeals record EU fine over Android

Google on Tuesday appealed the biggest ever anti-trust fine by the EU, which imposed a 4.34 billion euro ($5 billion) penalty on the US tech giant for illegally abusing the dominance of its operating system for mobile devices.

1d

Scientists go 'back to the future,' create flies with ancient genes to study evolution

Scientists have created fruit flies carrying reconstructed ancient genes to reveal how ancient mutations drove major evolutionary changes in embryonic development–the impact of which we see today.

1d

Oldest fossil of a flying squirrel sheds new light on its evolutionary tree

The oldest flying squirrel fossil ever found has unearthed new insight on the origin and evolution of these airborne animals.

1d

The Advantage of Hollow Fiber Bioreactors

Download this eBook from FiberCell Systems to learn about using hollow fiber bioreactors for the production of recombinant proteins, difficult-to-express proteins, exosomes, and monoclonal antibodies!

1d

This Is the Oldest Known Inscription Bearing the Full Name of Jerusalem

This is the first known instance of the modern spelling of the city's name.

1d

New York City area wetlands may be unwitting generator of greenhouse gasses

A new study from researchers at The Graduate Center of The City University of New York suggests that New York City-area wetlands are capable of using CSO inputs in a manner that actually increases greenhouse gas emissions such as carbon dioxide and methane.

1d

Ultrafast optical fiber-based electron gun to reveal atomic motions

A new method will enable researchers to directly observe and capture atomic motions at surfaces and interfaces in real time.

1d

1d

NASA checks out Hurricane Sergio's cloud temperature

NASA's Aqua satellite peered into Hurricane Sergio with infrared light to determine if the storm was intensifying or weakening. Infrared data showed cloud top temperatures were getting warmer on the western half of the storm, indicating the uplift of air in storms had weakened.

1d

Intense microwave pulse ionizes its own channel through plasma

Breakthrough new research shows that ionization-induced self-channeling of a microwave beam can be achieved at a significantly lower power of the microwave beam and gas pressure for radially nonuniform plasma with minimal on-axis density than in the case of plasma formed as the result of gas ionization.

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1d

Diamond technology cleans up PFAS-contaminated wastewater

More than 1.5 million Michigan residents and potentially more than hundreds of sites nationwide—and counting—have PFAS-tainted water. Michigan State University-Fraunhofer USA, Inc. Center for Coatings and Diamond Technologies (MSU-Fraunhofer) is developing a scalable treatment option for PFAS-contaminated wastewater.

1d

NASA gets tropical storm Leslie by the tail

What appears to be a long tail in satellite imagery of Tropical Storm Leslie is in fact clouds associated with a nearby elongated area of low pressure, or a trough.

1d

Louisiana amphibian shows unique resistance to global disease

Amphibian populations around the world are declining due to a skin disease caused by fungus. However, an amphibian commonly found in Louisiana, the three-toed amphiuma, has shown a resistance to the fungus, in a new study led by researchers at LSU, Southeastern Louisiana University, Duquesne University and the University of Washington. The study was published in the Journal of Experimental Biology

1d

NASA checks out Hurricane Sergio's cloud temperature

NASA's Aqua satellite peered into Hurricane Sergio with infrared light to determine if the storm was intensifying or weakening. Infrared data showed cloud top temperatures were getting warmer on the western half of the storm, indicating the uplift of air in storms had weakened.

1d

Earlier treatment could help reverse autistic-like behavior in tuberous sclerosis

New research in a mouse model suggests that the drug rapamycin can reverse autism-like social deficits — but only if given early. The study is the first to shed light on the crucial timing of therapy to improve social impairments in a condition associated with autism spectrum disorder. Its findings could help inform future clinical trials in children with tuberous sclerosis complex.

1d

Harvesting solar fuels through a bacterium's unusual appetite for gold

A bacterium named Moorella thermoacetica won't work for free. But UC Berkeley researchers have figured out it has an appetite for gold. And in exchange for this special treat, the bacterium has revealed a more efficient path to producing solar fuels through artificial photosynthesis.

1d

Facebook seeing growth in business network Workplace

Facebook on Tuesday hosted its first global summit spotlighting a growing Workplace platform launched two years ago as a private social network for businesses.

1d

'Sentinels of the sea' at risk from changing climate

Climate change's effect on coastal ecosystems is very likely to increase mortality risks of adult oyster populations in the next 20 years.

1d

In the absence of bees, flies are responsible for pollination in the Arctic region

Most of the fauna in the Arctic region take part in pollinating, yet during the busiest flowering weeks, there's a shortage of such services. A recent study indicates that the pollination services provided to plants and, thus, the plants' ability to produce seeds are dependent on the timing of the blooming season, and on how many other species are in bloom simultaneously.

1d

The stuff that planets are made of

Researchers have analyzed the composition and structure of faraway exoplanets using statistical tools. Their analysis indicates whether a planet is earth-like, made up of pure rock or a water-world. The larger the planet, the more hydrogen and helium surround it.

1d

Malignant breast cancer cells dig escape tunnels to spread

Breast cancer cells can physically push their way out of their normal confines to become invasive tumors, new research shows. The findings could point to new ways of preventing cancers from spreading. Cancers pose the greatest danger when they become invasive and then spread from their originating tissues throughout the body. The findings, which appear in Nature Communications , could also apply

1d

Religion is about emotion regulation, and it’s very good at it

Religion does not help us to explain nature. It did what it could in pre-scientific times, but that job was properly unseated by science. Most religious laypeople and even clergy agree: Pope John Paul II declared in 1996 that evolution is a fact and Catholics should get over it. No doubt some extreme anti-scientific thinking lives on in such places as Ken Ham's Creation Museum in Kentucky, but it

1d

This bacterium gets paid in gold

Scientists have placed light-absorbing gold nanoclusters inside a bacterium, creating a biohybrid system that produces a higher yield of chemical products, such as biofuels, than previously demonstrated. The biohybrid captures sunlight and carbon dioxide to make chemicals useful not only on Earth but also in the exotic environment of space.

1d

Typhus Outbreak Tied to Fleas Sickens Dozens in LA

Dozens of people in the Los Angeles area have fallen ill with typhus, a relatively rare bacterial disease spread by fleas.

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15 emerging technologies that could reduce global catastrophic biological risks

Strategic investment in 15 promising technologies could help make the world better prepared and equipped to prevent future infectious disease outbreaks from becoming catastrophic events. This subset of emerging technologies and their potential application are the focus of a new report by a team of researchers at the Johns Hopkins Center for Health Security.

1d

Louisiana amphibian shows unique resistance to global disease

Amphibian populations around the world are declining due to a skin disease caused by fungus. However, an amphibian commonly found in Louisiana, the three-toed amphiuma, has shown a resistance to the fungus, in a new study led by researchers at LSU, Southeastern Louisiana University, Duquesne University and the University of Washington. The study was published in the Journal of Experimental Biology

1d

Intense microwave pulse ionizes its own channel through plasma

More than 30 years ago, researchers theoretically predicted the ionization-induced channeling of an intense microwave beam propagating through a neutral gas (>103 Pa) — and now it's finally been observed experimentally.

1d

Bacterial ‘hairs’ may offer new ways to fight antibiotic resistance

A better understanding of the mechanisms of pili, the hair-like surface appendages on bacteria that kickstart infection, could hold a key to developing new and more effective therapeutics, according to a new study. Antibiotic resistance is an urgent problem globally when treating infections, and scientists continue to search for new ways to combat it. The new research could be another step in tha

1d

Nikki Haley’s Concern for Human Rights Only Went So Far

During her confirmation hearing to be President Donald Trump’s envoy to the United Nations, Nikki Haley told U.S. senators, “I will never shy away from calling out other countries for actions taken in conflict with U.S. values and in violation of human rights and international norms.” For the most part, Haley, who announced Tuesday that she would step down at the end of the year, held true to tha

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Fall Is in the Air: Images of the Season

Autumn really is the best season. The autumnal equinox took place a couple of weeks ago, marking the end of summer and the start of fall across the Northern Hemisphere. Now it is the season of harvests, festivals, migrations, winter preparations, and, of course, spectacular foliage. Across the North, people are beginning to feel a crisp chill in the evening air, leaves are splashing mountainsides

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The Newest Password Technology Is Making Your Phone Easier for Police to Search

In August, the 28-year-old Grant Michalski was implicated as part of a ring of men sharing images and videos of a young girl, the daughter of one of the ring’s members, being sexually abused. The FBI arrived at Michalski’s home with the authority to require him to unlock his iPhone X using the phone’s Face ID feature . It was the first search warrant of its kind . The implications are huge. From

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Project searches for alien signals in space

A new project, the Trillion Planet Survey, is searching for alien life in new ways. The project uses a suite of telescopes near and far aimed at the nearby Andromeda galaxy, as well as other galaxies including our own, a “pipeline” of software to process images, and a little bit of game theory. So far, it would seem that intelligent extraterrestrial life—at least as fits our narrow definition of

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Researchers discover new type of stellar collision

What did the French monk and astronomer Père Dom Anthelme see when he described a star that burst into view in June 1670, just below the head of the constellation Cygnus, the swan? An international team of astrophysicists, including two professors at the University of Minnesota, have cracked the 348-year-old conundrum.

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NASA gets Tropical Storm Leslie by the tail

What appears to be a long tail in satellite imagery of Tropical Storm Leslie is in fact clouds associated with a nearby elongated area of low pressure, or a trough.

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Retention in HIV care drops after release from incarceration

Fewer than half of people with HIV are retained in care three years after release from incarceration, according to a study in the US published Oct. 9 in the open-access journal PLOS Medicine by Kelsey Loeliger of Yale School of Medicine, and colleagues. The findings also suggest that better access to health insurance and transitional case-management services may improve retention in HIV care and v

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Gene changes driving myopia reveal new focus for drug development

Myopia (nearsightedness) and hyperopia (farsightedness) develop through different molecular pathways, according to a new study publishing Oct. 9 in the open-access journal PLOS Biology by Andrei Tkatchenko of Columbia University and colleagues. The finding provides a new understanding of myopia, the most common form of visual impairment worldwide, and opens the way for development of drugs to prev

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Confronting climate change in the age of denial: a special collection launched in PLOS Biology

People are hard-wired to respond to stories, but climate-denial narratives can be just as compelling as those that convey the facts about global warming. A new collection, 'Confronting Climate Change in the Age of Denial,' publishing Oct. 9, 2018 in PLOS Biology, explores the challenges and pitfalls of using stories to communicate scientific evidence around climate change, offering both caveats an

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Google Pixel Event Highlights: Pixel 3, Home Hub, Pixel Slate, Chromecast

From the Pixel 3 and its AI-powered camera, to the Home Hub display, to the Chrome-powered Pixel Slate tablet, here's all the new Google hardware.

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Genetic Risk Factor for Erectile Dysfunction Identified

Researchers believe the genetic locus affects the regulation of another gene involved in sexual function.

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Confronting climate change in the age of denial

People are hard-wired to respond to stories, but climate-denial narratives can be just as compelling as those that convey the facts about global warming. A new collection, "Confronting Climate Change in the Age of Denial," publishing 9 October in the open access journal PLOS Biology, explores the challenges and pitfalls of using stories to communicate scientific evidence around climate change, off

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Snydt igen: Googles nye telefoner kommer heller ikke til Danmark i år

Hverken Googles nye Pixel-telefoner, tablet eller smart-skærm til køkkenbordet kommer til Danmark.

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Giant clams give algae nitrogen to get back nutrients

Researchers have discovered that the fluted giant clam absorbs urea from its surroundings by working with a certain kind of algae and that exposure to light enhances the absorption rate. Giant clams live in nutrient-poor reef waters of the Indo-Pacific region and rely on symbiotic zooxanthellae for nutrients. Zooxanthellae are photosynthetic algae and behave like tiny plant-like organisms that li

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This bacterium gets paid in gold

UC Berkeley and Berkeley Lab scientists have placed light-absorbing gold nanoclusters inside a bacterium, creating a biohybrid system that produces a higher yield of chemical products, such as biofuels, than previously demonstrated. The biohybrid captures sunlight and carbon dioxide to make chemicals useful not only on Earth but also in the exotic environment of space.

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Gene mutation points to new way to fight diabetes, obesity, heart disease

Researchers say they have discovered a gene mutation that slows the metabolism of sugar in the gut, giving people who have the mutation a distinct advantage over those who do not. Those with the mutation have a lower risk of diabetes, obesity, heart failure, and even death. The researchers say their finding could provide the basis for drug therapies that could mimic the workings of this gene mutat

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Big Mouth Grows Up (Kinda)

The animated Netflix series Big Mouth is a raucous, delightfully vulgar exploration of puberty. Created by Nick Kroll, Jennifer Flackett, Mark Levin, and Andrew Goldberg, the show has never shied away from the grotesque banalities of adolescence. It’s a putrid circus of fluttering stomachs, tonsil hockey, and masturbation. In Season 1, Big Mouth ’s bumbling young protagonists stumbled through the

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Cholesterol Levels: High, Low, Good & Bad

HDL is “good” cholesterol; LDL is “bad” cholesterol. HDL helps lower LDL. Too much LDL can lead to heart disease and heart attacks.

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Maximizing the carbon and biodiversity benefits of restoration along rivers and streams

Restoring forests has become a world-wide strategy for simultaneously addressing the challenges of climate change and biodiversity conservation. In a new study, scientists at Point Blue Conservation Science assessed how successful restoration efforts in California's Central Valley were at these two goals. Key among the findings was the conclusion that, in some cases, optimizing for carbon storage

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To Get to a Zero-Carbon World, a Firm Time Line Is Needed

Too much focus is being put on how much carbon can still be emitted to achieve warming goals, experts say — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Scientists mimic the earliest stages of human development

Human embryos start as a tiny mass of cells that are all the same. The first step in growing from a homogenous ball of cells into a complex individual with distinct organs and tissues is for the cells to divide into distinct populations. Scientists at the Gladstone Institutes have modeled this first step in human development in a laboratory with the goal of better understanding how organs form. Wi

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Rapid, widespread changes may be coming to Antarctica's Dry Valleys, study finds

Antarctica's sandy polar desert, the McMurdo Dry Valleys, has undergone changes over the past decade and the recent discovery of thawing permafrost, thinning glaciers and melting ground ice by a Portland State University-led research team are signs that rapid and widespread change could be on the horizon.

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Scientists go 'back to the future,' create flies with ancient genes to study evolution

Scientists at New York University and the University of Chicago have created fruit flies carrying reconstructed ancient genes to reveal how ancient mutations drove major evolutionary changes in embryonic development—the impact of which we see today.

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Freeloaders beware: Incentives to foster cooperation are just around the corner

In our society, there are always a certain percentage of people who adopt a freeloader attitude. They let other members of society do all the work and do not do their part. By not contributing their share of effort, to the detriment of the rest of society, freeloaders pose a serious social threat, and can even lead to social collapse. In a new study published in EPJ B, Chunpeng Du from Yunnan Univ

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World cybercrime shifts to state-backed hackers: Russian group

The latest innovations in cybercrime have shifted from financially motivated actors to state-backed hackers focussed on sabotage and intelligence gathering, a Russian cybersecurity firm said Tuesday.

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Whale calf rescued from shark net near Australian coast

It look two hours to free the new-born humpback whale, off Australia's Gold Coast.

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NASA head: Space station hole cause will be determined

The head of the U.S. space agency said Tuesday that he's sure that investigators will determine the cause of a mysterious hole that appeared on the International Space Station, which his Russian counterpart has said was deliberately drilled.

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How European cities are battling diesel-polluted air

A Berlin court ruled Tuesday that older diesel cars must be banned from some major roads in the German capital.

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New Pentagon weapons systems easily hacked: report

New US weapons systems being developed by the US Department of Defense can be easily be hacked by adversaries, a new government report said on Tuesday.

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Google launches connected speaker with screen, but no camera

Google on Tuesday launched a new version of its connected speaker with a touchscreen display designed to be a hub for smart home devices but without a camera for privacy reasons.

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New study shows how depression rises with the temperature

The study examined survey data reported by 2 million Americans between 2002 and 2012. The results showed that hotter and wetter months were associated with increases in mental health issues like stress and depression. Women and low-income Americans seem to have been most affected by the weather changes. The United Nations' top climate science panel recently warned that the world would see "rapid,

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UN warning: We have 12 years left until the point of no return on climate change

It's statistically possible to make enough changes to stave it off, but politically it looks unlikely if attitudes at the top do not change. We're already seeing effects from a 1-degree (C) change. What can we do? There are a few things… None The problem, as I see it, is that there isn't the political will to make the serious changes we need to in order to stave this off. Stave what off, you as

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Why IBM is speculating on blockchain

With everyone from Google, to Amazon, to Long Island Iced Tea dipping their toes into blockchain recently, it's hardly surprising that IBM has decided to jump on the bandwagon – and on a huge scale. IBM stands to gain a significant amount by getting in on the action early. There's a reason why blockchain is gaining popularity so quickly. Its potential to improve business efficiency across a huge

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Are women in science any better off than in Ada Lovelace’s day? | Jess Wade

On Ada Lovelace Day, let’s rethink how we ensure scientists from diverse backgrounds can contribute to our understanding of the world In recognition of the fact that their obituary pages had been dominated by white men , in 2018 the New York Times published an obituary of the Countess Ada Lovelace. Alongside Grace Hopper and Katherine Johnson, Lovelace has become an icon for women in technology. S

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Oldest fossil of a flying squirrel sheds new light on its evolutionary tree

The oldest flying squirrel fossil ever found has unearthed new insight on the origin and evolution of these airborne animals.

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Nearly 2 million U.S. adult nonsmokers vape

A new study finds that an estimated 1.9 million U.S. adult nonsmokers use e-cigarettes, highlighting worries that the devices are addictive.

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The Death of the IPO

Tyler Comrie One week this summer, the Nasdaq stock market listed five recent initial public offerings, including Sonos, the home-audio company, and Vaccinex, which makes a promising cancer drug. That same week, an investor looking at Nasdaq’s Listing Center would have seen the names of 16 stocks set to disappear. The reasons for the delistings varied. Synchronoss Technologies, a software company

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Polar bears gorged on whales to survive past warm periods; won't suffice as climate warms

Polar bears likely survived past warm periods in the Arctic, when sea ice cover was low, by scavenging on the carcasses of stranded large whales. This food source sustained the bears when they were largely restricted to land, unable to roam the ice in search of seals to hunt.

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Hook injury caused by catch-and-release hampers feeding performance in fish

Anglers don't expect to take home dinner when they practice catch-and-release fishing, but they might not be the only ones missing out on a meal.

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Hurricane Michael is slamming into Florida as a devastating category 4Hurricane Michael Florida

Environment An unpleasant surprise for the region. Hurricane Michael could reach major hurricane status before making landfall on the Florida Panhandle on Wednesday.

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‘Sandwich’ materials may lead to shape-shifting cars

By optimizing the core elements of sandwich structures, researchers have created materials that are extremely light, robust, and adaptable at once—ideal for aerospace applications. “It is our philosophy to develop modern composite materials for adaptive systems and, while doing so, to optimize their structural efficiency—that is, obtaining the same performance with fewer resources or better funct

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To crash or swerve? Study reveals which actions taken by self-driving cars are morally defensible

A crash by one of Uber Technologies, Inc.'s self-driving cars earlier this year resulted in the first pedestrian death associated with self-driving technology. The incident highlighted the challenges technology companies are facing in developing software that can adequately detect and respond to hazards in the road and immediate surroundings. The vehicle could have come to a complete stop in three

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AI tool automatically reveals how to write apps that drain less battery

To send a text message, there's not only "an app for that," there are dozens of apps for that.

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Scientists aim to use crowdsourced data to improve flood predictions

In spring of 2011, University at Buffalo hydrogeologist Chris Lowry hammered a giant measuring staff into the bottom of a pond in Western New York. Nearby, he posted instructions explaining how passersby could read the staff and text him the water level.

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Aqua satellite sees Hurricane Michael strengtheningHurricane Michael Florida

Hurricane Michael continued strengthening while moving north-northwestward over the southeastern Gulf of Mexico as NASA's Aqua satellite provided infrared and visible imagery of the storm.

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NASA investigated rainfall in Hurricane Michael as it was developingHurricane Michael Florida

The Global Precipitation Measurement mission or GPM core satellite analyzed rainfall and structure of an intensifying low pressure area in the western Caribbean Sea on Oct. 5. That system strengthened into what has become Category 2 Hurricane Michael on Oct. 9.

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Statistical method recreates the history of a long-abandoned village

Archaeologists now have new tools for studying the development of medieval villages and the transformation of the historical landscapes surrounding them. In a study recently published in EPJ Plus, scientists have attempted to reconstruct the history of Zornoztegi, an abandoned medieval village located in the Basque Country, Spain. To do so they rely on the various analysis methods available to arc

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In This Issue [This Week in PNAS]

Genetic correlates of fox domestication Silver fox. Image courtesy of iStock/ChristiLaLiberte. The genetic changes that underpin animal domestication are difficult to identify. Xu Wang et al. (pp. 10398–10403) attempted to pinpoint genetic variations tied to tameness in a group of silver foxes (Vulpes vulpes) domesticated under controlled conditions for more…

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Accurate timetrees require accurate calibrations [Biological Sciences]

Morris et al. (1) estimate divergence times for land plants (embryophytes), concluding that they originated in the early Phanerozoic (515 to 473 Ma; midpoint, 494 Ma). In contrast, other molecular clock studies have placed that event 40% earlier, in the Precambrian (707 to 670 Ma) (2–4). Knowing the correct time…

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Reply to Hedges et al.: Accurate timetrees do indeed require accurate calibrations [Biological Sciences]

We (1) attempted to establish an evolutionary timescale for land plant evolution utilizing available genome-scale data and a new set of calibrations constraining the age of clades based on critical analysis of paleontologic, phylogenetic (2), and geologic evidence. We explored many factors, such as the inclusion or exclusion of a…

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Profile of Jonathan D. G. Jones [Profiles]

Plant molecular geneticist Jonathan D. G. Jones has made seminal contributions to understanding mechanisms underlying resistance to plant disease. A group leader at The Sainsbury Laboratory in Norwich, United Kingdom, Jones was among the first to isolate and characterize disease resistance genes. His discovery of receptor-like proteins (RLPs) preceded discovery…

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Ryanodine receptor cluster size sets the tone in cerebral smooth muscle [Physiology]

Ryanodine receptors (RyRs) are large intracellular Ca2+ channels that provide the molecular basis of the process termed Ca2+-induced Ca2+ release (1). Ca2+ signaling through RyRs has been shown to be critical for skeletal, cardiac, and smooth muscle physiology (2) as well as for neurons (3) and secretory cells like pancreatic…

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Direct visualization of ion-channel gating in a native environment [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

Pentameric ligand-gated ion channels (pLGICs), also known as Cys-loop receptors, are localized primarily in the postsynaptic membranes, and mediate fast chemical transmission in the central and peripheral nervous systems. Binding of neurotransmitter activates these receptors, causing changes in postsynaptic membrane potential and consequently modulation of neuronal or muscle activity. pLGIC…

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Collusion between neutralizing antibodies and other immune factions in the destruction of adenoviral vectors [Microbiology]

Adenoviral vectors hold great promise for gene therapy, the induction of antitumor immunity, and vaccination against viral infections (1, 2). But sometimes, preexisting antibodies elicited by natural infection with particular types of adenovirus prevent the desired expression of the transgene carried by the vector, such as a replication-defective adenovirus 5….

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Phevamine A, a small molecule that suppresses plant immune responses [Chemistry]

Bacterial plant pathogens cause significant crop damage worldwide. They invade plant cells by producing a variety of virulence factors, including small-molecule toxins and phytohormone mimics. Virulence of the model pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000 (Pto) is regulated in part by the sigma factor HrpL. Our study of the HrpL…

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Energy-dependent quenching adjusts the excitation diffusion length to regulate photosynthetic light harvesting [Chemistry]

An important determinant of crop yields is the regulation of photosystem II (PSII) light harvesting by energy-dependent quenching (qE). However, the molecular details of excitation quenching have not been quantitatively connected to the fraction of excitations converted to chemical energy by PSII reaction centers (PSII yield), which determines flux to…

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Use of scenario ensembles for deriving seismic risk [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]

High death tolls from recent earthquakes show that seismic risk remains high globally. While there has been much focus on seismic hazard, large uncertainties associated with exposure and vulnerability have led to more limited analyses of the potential impacts of future earthquakes. We argue that as both exposure and vulnerability…

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