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Nyheder2018oktober11

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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

74

Low copper levels linked to fatter fat cells

In studies of mouse cells, Johns Hopkins researchers have found that low levels of cellular copper appear to make fat cells fatter by altering how cells process their main metabolic fuels, such as fat and sugar.

9h

Viden

500+

Faktatjek: Er e-cigaretter et sundt alternativ til cigaretter?

Langtidskonsekvenserne af e-cigaretter kan være nogle helt andre, end dem man ser med cigaretter. Men ufarlige er de ikke.

17h

Ingeniøren

21

Metrocityringen i fare for at misse åbning i 2019

Den kommende cityring er ramt af en række problemer, der kan sætte den planlagte åbning i sommeren 2019 over styr. Østerport forventes først helt færdig i 2020.

11h

LATEST

ScienceDaily

2

Nerve stimulation in mice suggests new way to reduce delirium after surgery

For adults over age 65, surgical complications can dampen not only their physical health but also their mental sharpness, with more than half of high-risk cases declining into delirium. New research shows a current treatment for seizures can also reverse brain inflammation, such as inflammation after surgery, and the subsequent confusion or cognitive decline that results.

12min

ScienceDaily

7

A break from the buzz: Bees go silent during total solar eclipse

In an unprecedented study of a solar eclipse's influence on bee behavior, researchers organized citizen scientists and elementary school classrooms to set up acoustic monitoring stations to listen in on bees' buzzing — or lack thereof — as the August 2017 total solar eclipse passed over North America. The results were clear and consistent at locations across the United States: Bees stopped flyin

12min

The Atlantic

The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: Kanye Guest

Written by Madeleine Carlisle ( @maddiecarlisle2 ) and Olivia Paschal ( @oliviacpaschal ) Today in 5 Lines At least five people were killed as a result of Hurricane Michael , officials said. Virginia Governor Ralph Northam declared a state of emergency in anticipation of the storm, which has weakened to a tropical storm. In an impromptu monologue in the Oval Office, rapper Kanye West, who was inv

22min

The Scientist RSS

Thomas Steitz, Biologist and X-Ray Crystallographer, Dies

Steitz determined the atomic structure of the ribosome, work for which he won the 2009 Nobel Prize in chemistry.

25min

NPR

4

U.S. And Russian Astronauts Safe Following Rocket Malfunction After Launch

NPR's Ailsa Chang talks with retired Canadian astronaut Chris Hadfield about Thursday's failed launch of a Russian Soyuz rocket carrying a U.S.-Russian crew to the International Space Station.

26min

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Ultrasound helps predict the success of fistulas in individual dialysis patients

Certain parameters measured by ultrasound helped predict the success of an arteriovenous fistula, the preferred type of hemodialysis vascular access, in individual patients.

40min

The Atlantic

59

Hurricane Michael’s Remarkable, Terrifying Run

Just a few days ago, Hurricane Michael was forecast to strike the Florida Panhandle as a relatively weak hurricane—a dangerous storm, to be sure, but also nothing especially historic. Instead, Michael will be remembered as one of the most damaging and powerful storms ever to wallop the continental United States. After coming ashore Wednesday afternoon as a powerful Category 4 hurricane, Michael s

43min

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Russian scientists created a new method for diagnosing drilling rigs for oil production

Researchers of Peter the Great St. Petersburg Polytechnic University (SPbPU) came closer to solving one of the key issues of offshore oil production, namely they developed a special method of nondestructive testing of drilling rig elements in the oil wells, which will ensure the efficient oil production and reduce the time and cost of equipment repair.

54min

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Fake or real? New UC Davis study finds consumers wary of manipulated photos

In the age of fake news and doctored photos, wary consumers are not nearly as gullible as one might presume. But the source of the images does not matter much as people evaluate what is fake and what is real, a University of California, Davis, study suggests.

54min

Big Think

1

9 heartbreaking Hurricane Michael photos remind us of nature's power

Prepare yourself: Some of these images are simply gut-wrenching The main landfall area, Mexico Beach, is almost entirely gone Take heed, folks who might face something like it in the future: Many survivors say, "We should have left." These are just some of the images left behind after hurricane Michael decimated parts of the Florida panhandle; these are from Mexico beach and Panama City, the hard

56min

The Atlantic

500+

Kanye West Visits the White House—and Says Trump Makes Him Feel Like a Man

The fiendish kinship between Donald Trump and Kanye West is not a new development . The Chicago-born rapper has been outspoken about his support for the president for nearly two years . West, a narcissist whose commitment to bolstering his own celebrity is eclipsed only by a paradoxical obsession with the ideal of nonconformity, has fashioned the red Make America Great Again Hat into something of

57min

Phys.org

2

Risk of streaming fatigue as Walmart, AT&T, Disney join fray

As Walmart, AT&T and Disney join stalwarts such as Netflix in streaming video and creating original shows, a reality sets in: Not all will survive.

58min

ScienceDaily

6

Getting to the root of lavender's secrets

A team of researchers has identified the complete genetic makeup of the lavender plant, Lavandula angustifolia.

1h

Phys.org

3

Boy meets world: Life-long space buff and Western graduate student discovers exoplanet

Ever since Chris Fox was a young boy, he wanted to visit alien planets. With no immediate plans for such a voyage, the Western University graduate student has done the next best thing. He's gone and found one.

1h

Phys.org

Physics model finds that SCOTUS 'Super Court' votes are non-partisan

The maelstrom surrounding the nomination and subsequent confirmation of Brett Kavanaugh to the Supreme Court was to be expected, when one justice's vote could change the country's moral compass for generations. But looking at the high court over a period of decades, have political leanings been its strongest barometer?

1h

New on MIT Technology Review

40

The UK Parliament asking a robot to testify about AI is a dumb idea

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1h

The Scientist RSS

Technique to Track Golden State Killer Suspect Could Find You Too

Sixty percent of Americans with European ancestry can be traced to a given DNA sample, even if they’ve never had genetic testing, scientists say.

1h

Live Science

15

Lab-Grown 'Mini-Eyes' Show How Color Vision Develops

Researchers grew human retinal tissue in a lab "from scratch."

1h

Live Science

2

Astronomers Just Caught the Tiniest Cannibal Galaxy in the Universe

This cannibal galaxy is tiny, and it's right in our cosmic neighborhood.

1h

Popular Science

69

Russia's rocket failure could leave the ISS without a crewNASA Russian Soyuz

Space A lot on the ISS depends on the Soyuz. Here's what Thursday's Soyuz launch failure could mean for operations on the International Space Station.

1h

Futurity.org

1

Overlooked organ turns some ants into giant soldiers

A seemingly unimportant rudimentary organ that only appears briefly during the final stages of larval development may explain why some ants are tiny workers and others are huge soldiers, a new study finds. The new research answers a question that perplexed Charles Darwin. So much so, that it actually led him to doubt his own theory of evolution. Darwin wondered, if natural selection works at the

1h

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

1

Boy meets world: Life-long space buff and Western graduate student discovers exoplanet

Ever since Chris Fox was a young boy, he wanted to visit alien planets. With no immediate plans for such a voyage, the Western University graduate student has done the next best thing. He's gone and found one.

1h

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Fatal police shootings more frequent in US states with high household gun ownership

US states with high levels of household gun ownership have higher rates of fatal shootings of civilians by police than states with lower gun prevalence, according to a new study led by researchers from the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health and Northeastern University.

1h

NeuWrite San Diego

The Neuroscience of Mindfulness Meditation

When I think of meditation, the first image that typically comes to mind is that of a monk in flowing orange robes somewhere in the mountains of Tibet. Meditation has gotten a facelift in the last decade in pop culture, thanks in part to best selling books like 10% happier by the television journalist Dan […]

1h

Scientific American Content

16

How to Identify Almost Anyone in a Consumer Gene Database

New techniques that dig more deeply into genetic databases may soon make the anonymity of their customers’ DNA impossible to safeguard — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

1h

ScienceDaily

6

Thalamus wakes the brain during development

A new study suggests the thalamus controls the development of state dependency and continuity.

1h

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

1

Physics model finds that SCOTUS 'Super Court' votes are non-partisan

Eddie Lee, doctoral student in physics at Cornell University, applied a statistical physics model to a 'Super Court' of 36 Supreme Court justices and 24 nine-member courts from 1946 to 2016 and found that consensus dominates the court, and strong correlations in voting far outlast any one justice or court.

1h

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

2

World's fastest camera freezes time at 10 trillion frames per second

What happens when a new technology is so precise that it operates on a scale beyond our characterization capabilities? Professor Jinyang Liang and his colleagues, led by Caltech's Lihong Wang, have developed what they call T-CUP: the world's fastest camera, capable of capturing ten trillion (10 exp 13) frames per second. This new camera literally makes it possible to freeze time to see phenomena–

1h

NPR

50

Easy DNA Identifications With Genealogy Databases Raise Privacy Concerns

A majority of Americans of European descent could be linked to third cousins, or closer relatives, using genealogy databases, a study finds. Soon it may be possible to identify nearly everyone by DNA. (Image credit: Randy Pench/Sacramento Bee/TNS via Getty Images)

1h

Wired

500+

Watch Boston Dynamics' Humanoid Robot Do ParkourBoston Dynamics Atlas

A new video of Atlas, the company's two-legged robot, shows off its agility as it bounds up a platform.

2h

Futurity.org

1

Lab-grown retinas reveal how the real thing forms

Biologists have grown human retina tissue from scratch to learn how the cells that let us see in color are made. The work may lay the groundwork for therapies for eye diseases such as color blindness and macular degeneration. It also establishes lab-created “organoids”—artificially grown organ tissue—as a model to study human development on a cellular level. “Everything we examine [in a retina or

2h

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Photoactive bacteria bait may help in fight against MRSA infections

Purdue University researchers are testing whether a light-active version of heme, the molecule responsible for transporting oxygen in blood circulation, may help people infected with MRSA.Photodynamic therapy, or PDT, involves a compound known as a photosensitizer, which can be activated by visible light to kill diseased cells or bacteria. PDT is a clinically proven method for fighting cancer but

2h

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Immune cells in triple-negative breast cancer offer potential therapeutic target

New research led by the University of Pennsylvania School of Veterinary Medicine's Rumela Chakrabarti reveals how immune cells called myeloid-derived immunosuppressor cells contribute to the progression of triple-negative breast cancer, a particularly aggressive form of the disease. Pairing chemotherapy with a drug that blocks these cells may one day help stem the cancer's spread.

2h

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

How parenting affects antisocial behaviors in children

In a recent study of the parental caregiving environment, researchers from the University of Pennsylvania, the University of Michigan and Michigan State University, found that within identical twin pairs, the child who experienced harsher behavior and less parental warmth was at a greater risk for developing antisocial behaviors.

2h

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

1

White Americans see many immigrants as 'illegal' until proven otherwise, survey finds

Fueled by political rhetoric evoking dangerous criminal immigrants, many white Americans assume low-status immigrants from Mexico, El Salvador, Syria, Somalia and other countries President Donald Trump labeled 'shithole' nations have no legal right to be in the United States, new research in the journal American Sociological Review suggests.

2h

Big Think

2

Kanye shares big ideas with Trump at White House

West met with the President to discuss urban revitalization, stop-and-frisk policies, and crime in Chicago, among other topics. West praised Trump for his work in office so far, and pleaded for the rest of the country to support its leader. West's support of Trump has long been a source of controversy among his fans and fellow artists. Kanye West met with President Donald Trump on Thursday for a

2h

The Atlantic

100+

Ukraine’s Spiritual Split From Russia Could Trigger a Global Schism

“This is a victory of good over evil, light over darkness.” That’s how Ukrainian President Petro Poroshenko described the announcement Thursday that the Orthodox Church’s Istanbul-based leader, Patriarch Bartholomew, will grant Ukraine’s Church independence from Russia. In televised remarks, Ukraine’s president dubbed this a “historic event,” which it undoubtedly is: For more than three centuries

2h

Wired

28

How to Install 'Fortnite' on Your Android PhoneFortnite Android Available

Previously, 'Fortnite' on Android had been available only to Samsung devices and as a limited beta. As of now, everyone can have a turn.

2h

Phys.org

1

Research results in new kits for teaching science

An affordable children's educational kit is the latest commercial spinoff of research pursued by the U.S. Army to create advanced materials for Soldier systems.

2h

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Army-funded research results in new kits for teaching science

An affordable children's educational kit is the latest commercial spinoff of research pursued by the US Army to create advanced materials for Soldier systems.

2h

Phys.org

5

NASA provides takes powerful Hurricane Sergio's temperature

Infrared light provides scientists with temperature data and that's important when trying to understand the strength of storms. NASA's Aqua satellite provided those cloud top temperatures of Category 4 Hurricane Sergio in the Eastern Pacific Ocean.

2h

Phys.org

3

NASA catches Tropical Cyclone Titli headed for landfall in India

The Joint Typhoon Warning Center or JTWC issued the final warning on Tropical Cyclone Titli after it made landfall on the northeastern coast of India late on Oct. 10. NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite captured an image of the large storm before landfall.

2h

Phys.org

4

Recent National Academies report puts research participants' rights at risk, say law scholars

In a Policy Forum article appearing in the Oct. 12 issue of Science, leading bioethics and legal scholars sound the alarm about a recent report from National Academies of Science, Engineering, and Medicine. The Academies' report on "Returning Individual Research Results to Participants" makes recommendations on how to share research results and data with people who agree to participate in research

2h

Phys.org

21

Researchers discover what pneumococcus says to make you sick

Carnegie Mellon University researchers have identified a molecule that plays a key role in bacterial communication and infection. Their findings add a new word to pneumococcus' molecular dictionary and may lead to novel ways to manipulate the bacteria and prevent infection. The findings, from the lab of Associate Professor of Biological Sciences Luisa Hiller, are published in the Oct. 11 issue of

2h

Phys.org

2

Stringent password policies help prevent fraud, study finds

The all-too-common practice of using the same email address/password combination to log into multiple websites can be damaging, especially for employers with many users and valuable assets protected by passwords, like universities.

2h

Live Science

2

Puppy-Size Roaches (and Other Bizarre Creatures) Pop Up in 'Beyond the Sixth Extinction'

In a toxic landscape of the future, what strange animals might evolve?

2h

Phys.org

5

Polymer that heals like skin 'very close' to industrial-scale production

The cost of making plastics, paints, coatings for cell phone screens and other materials that heal themselves like skin could be dramatically reduced thanks to a breakthrough that a Clemson University team detailed in the latest edition of the journal Science.

2h

Phys.org

1

Opening the way for global innovation in biotechnology

A new easy-to-use legal tool that enables open exchange of biological materials is launched today.

2h

Phys.org

4

NASA finds Tropical Cyclone Luban crawling

NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite provided a visible image of Tropical Cyclone Luban as it continued to spin over the Arabian Sea and slowly head toward Oman.

2h

Phys.org

7

Facebook purges 251 accounts to thwart deception

Facebook on Thursday said it shut down 251 accounts for breaking rules against spam and coordinated deceit, some of it by ad farms pretending to be forums for political debate.

2h

Phys.org

5

NASA film by Rory Kennedy revisits her uncle's challenge

Filmmaker Rory Kennedy couldn't resist the obvious place to open her new documentary on NASA. That's a news clip of her uncle, President John F. Kennedy, challenging the space agency to land a man on the moon by the end of the 1960s.

2h

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

How teens with type 1 diabetes can guard their hearts

After interviewing both teens and parents, Joslin Diabetes Center researchers have identified strategies to help teens with type 1 diabetes who have hypertension (high blood pressure) or dyslipidemia (unhealthy levels of cholesterol or triglycerides), They offer realistic and specific guidance on steps both parents and healthcare providers can use.

2h

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Recent National Academies report puts research participants' rights at risk, say law scholars

In a Policy Forum article appearing in the Oct. 12, 2018 issue of Science, leading bioethics and legal scholars sound the alarm about a recent report from National Academies of Science, Engineering, and Medicine. The Academies' report on 'Returning Individual Research Results to Participants' makes recommendations on how to share research results and data with people who agree to participate in re

2h

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Canadian smokers support bold new approaches to end tobacco use

Most Canadian smokers are in favour of novel policies to reduce tobacco use, according to a national survey by the International Tobacco Control Policy Evaluation Project (ITC) at the University of Waterloo.

2h

The Atlantic

100+

The Rise of the Engagement Photo Shoot

There’s a certain type of photo that has slowly taken over many a social-media feed. I’ve learned to recognize them on sight: a couple wearing coordinating colors, holding each other in a field, dappled with golden light. Or, a couple in formal wear kissing in front of a backdrop of blurred-out trees. Or maybe, a couple wearing white and holding hands at the beach. (Sometimes, there’s even a dog

2h

Discovery (uploads) on YouTube

Rick Ness Is Ready to Find Gold | Gold Rush

Before new mine boss Rick Ness starts digging, he'll need his crew to familiarize themselves with the machinery. Catch the Season Premiere of GOLD RUSH Friday October 12th at 9p on Discovery. Stream Full Episodes of Gold Rush: https://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/gold-rush/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/GoldRush/ https://www.f

2h

Futurity.org

1

Online insomnia therapy offers round-the-clock benefits

Digital cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) improves not only insomnia symptoms, but functional health, psychological well-being, and sleep-related quality of life, according to a year-long study involving 1,711 people. A major limitation of insomnia treatments is the lack of providers to deliver CBT, but this study, which appears in JAMA Psychiatry , used an online platform that made it easily ac

3h

Scientific American Content

23

Einstein's Famous "God Letter" Is Up for Auction

A note the physicist wrote in 1954 reveals his thinking on religion and science — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

3h

Popular Science

9

How to set up your home Wi-Fi

Technology Secure your internet So you're ready to stop stealing your neighbor's internet and set-up your home WiFi network. Congratulations! You’ll just need three things to get yourself started.

3h

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

4

NASA finds Tropical Cyclone Luban crawling

NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite provided a visible image of Tropical Cyclone Luban as it continued to spin over the Arabian Sea and slowly head toward Oman.

3h

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

NASA catches Tropical Cyclone Titli headed for landfall in India

The Joint Typhoon Warning Center or JTWC issued the final warning on Tropical Cyclone Titli after it made landfall on the northeastern coast of India late on Oct. 10, 2018. NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite captured an image of the large storm before landfall.

3h

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

New ASTRO/ASCO/AUA guideline for prostate cancer supports shortened radiation therapy

Three prominent medical societies today issued a new clinical guideline for physicians treating men with early-stage prostate cancer using external beam radiation therapy (EBRT). Adoption of the guideline could make treatment shorter and more convenient for many patients with prostate cancer. Developed by a panel of experts from ASTRO, ASCO and AUA, the new guideline recommends offering patients a

3h

Futurity.org

2

Chewing gum may be a good way to get your vitamins

Chewing gum may be an effective delivery system for some vitamins, according the new research. Nearly 15 percent of all chewing gum varieties sold promise to provide health-enhancing supplements to users, so researchers studied whether two vitamin-supplemented products were effective at delivering vitamins to the body. The research marks the first time that researchers closely scrutinized vitamin

3h

The Atlantic

90

The Last Apolitical Institution in Washington

This week, President Donald Trump took aim at the Federal Reserve. Again. “The Fed is going wild. I mean, I don’t know what their problem is, but they’re raising interest rates and it’s ridiculous,” he said after the markets posted steep and sudden drops. “The Fed is going loco, and there’s no reason for them to do it.” The president was gesturing to the fact that the Federal Reserve has tightene

3h

New on MIT Technology Review

44

The US military wants to teach AI some basic common sense

Even the best AI programs still make stupid mistakes. So DARPA is launching a competition to remedy the field’s most glaring flaw.

3h

The Scientist RSS

Bees Stopped Buzzing During the 2017 Eclipse

The insects fell silent as the moon cast a shadow over parts of North America last summer, researchers report.

3h

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

NASA provides takes powerful Hurricane Sergio's temperature

NASA's Aqua satellite provided those cloud top temperatures of Category 4 Hurricane Sergio in the Eastern Pacific Ocean.

3h

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

The future of electronic devices: Strong and self-healing ion gels

Scientists at Yokohama National University and the University of Tokyo in Japan have designed an ion gel with excellent toughness and an ability to self-heal at ambient temperature without any external trigger or detectable change in the environment such as light or temperature. This new class of material has promising potential for building flexible electronic devices.

3h

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Stringent password policies help prevent fraud, study finds

An Indiana University study finds stringent password rules that encourage longer and more complicated passwords significantly lower the risk of personal data breaches, especially among employees at large organizations that handle sensitive data, like universities.

3h

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Researchers discover what pneumococcus says to make you sick

Carnegie Mellon University researchers have identified a molecule that plays a key role in bacterial communication and infection. Their findings add a new word to pneumococcus' molecular dictionary and may lead to novel ways to manipulate the bacteria and prevent infection. The findings are published in the Oct. 11 issue of PLOS Pathogens.

3h

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Human brain cell transplant offers insights into neurological conditions

Scientists have created a 'window' into the brain, which enables researchers to watch in incredible detail how human brain cells develop and connect to each other in real time.

3h

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Disorder induces topological Anderson insulator

A team of experimental physicists at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have made the first observation of a specific type of topological insulators that's induced by disorder. Professor Bryce Gadway and his graduate students Eric Meier and Alex An used atomic quantum simulation, an experimental technique employing finely tuned lasers and ultracold atoms about a billion times colder th

3h

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Optical illusion spooks raptors

Researchers from the CNRS and Université de Rennes 1, in collaboration with Airbus, have designed a visual pattern that elicits long-term avoidance of high-risk areas by raptors. The scientists' work clears the way for further investigation into the visual cognition of these birds, and it has applications for conservation, because raptors are among the most common victims of collisions with planes

3h

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Massive star's unusual death heralds the birth of compact neutron star binary

Carnegie's Anthony Piro was part of a Caltech-led team of astronomers who observed the peculiar death of a massive star that exploded in a surprisingly faint and rapidly fading supernova, possibly creating a compact neutron star binary system. Piro's theoretical work provided crucial context for the discovery.

3h

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Prize-winning research reveals how parenting behavior is controlled in the mouse brain

Johannes Kohl has been named the 2018 Grand Prize winner of The Eppendorf & Science Prize for Neurobiology, for research that makes sense of how a cluster of neurons controls parenting behavior in mice.

3h

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Bacterial DNA gets passed around in viral packages — in greater amounts than previously

Bacteria's ability to exchange genes amongst each other may occur more frequently and involve the transfer of even more genetic material than previously believed, a new study suggests.

3h

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Thyroid hormone regulates development of color vision

By growing human retinal tissue from stem cells, researchers have determined how the various types of cells that enable people to see colors develop.

3h

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Crime and privacy: Using consumer genomics to identify anonymous individuals

Over 60 percent of individuals in the US with European ancestry — including those that have not undergone genetic testing themselves — can be identified through their DNA using data from open genetic genealogy databases, a new study reports.

3h

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Hearing and visual aids linked to slower age-related memory loss

Hearing aids and cataract surgery are strongly linked to a slower rate of age-related cognitive decline, according to new research by University of Manchester academics.According to Dr. Piers Dawes and Dr. Asri Maharani, cognitive decline — which affects memory and thinking skills — is slowed after patient's hearing and sight are improved.

3h

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Do lizards dream like us?

Researchers from the CNRS, Claude Bernard Lyon 1 University, and Muséum National d'Histoire Naturelle have confirmed that lizards exhibit two sleep states, just like humans, other mammals, and birds. They corroborated the conclusions of a 2016 study on the bearded dragon and conducted the same sleep investigation on another lizard, the Argentine tegu. Their findings nevertheless point out differen

3h

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Dying star emits a whisper

The unexpectedly gentle death of a massive star suggests that it was being robbed by a dense companion lurking out of sight.

3h

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

New route of acquiring antibiotic resistance in bacteria is the most potent one to date

For the first time in 60 years, researchers at NUS Medicine and the University of Glasgow and colleagues have discovered a new mechanism of genetic transduction, the process by which bacteriophages transfer bacterial DNA between bacteria. As described in Science, this new mechanism (lateral transduction) is the most powerful to date, able to transfer large DNA stretches at high frequencies. It lik

3h

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Human retinas grown in a dish explain how color vision develops

Biologists grew human retina tissue from scratch to determine how cells that allow people to see in color are made.

3h

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Computational model links family members using genealogical and law-enforcement databases

The notion of using genetic ancestry databases to solve crimes recently crossed from hypothetical into credible when police used an online genealogical database to track down the alleged Golden State Killer, a serial criminal who terrorized much of California in the 1970s and 1980s. Now, in a study published Oct. 11 in Cell, researchers are reporting ways in which that type of inquiry could potent

3h

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Genetic Achilles heel hurts humans fighting hepatitis C

An antimicrobial signaling molecule called IFNλ4 has lower activity against the hepatitis C virus in the vast majority of humans compared with chimpanzees and African hunter-gatherer Pygmies, according to a study published Oct. 11 in the open-access journal PLOS Pathogens by John McLauchlan's research team at the MRC-University of Glasgow Centre for Virus Research in the UK, and colleagues.

3h

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

1

The FASEB Journal: Bile salt receptor linked to replication and repression of HBV virus

A new animal study published in The FASEB Journal reveals a significant link between HBV and the metabolic pathway of bile salts that could have implications for a new therapeutic strategy for HBV treatment.

3h

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Plant compound found to have therapeutic effect on complications from snakebites

Researchers have found that rutin, an inexpensive, plant-based compound may protect envenomed mice from bleeding and inflammation problems, according to a study published in PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases by Ana Teresa Azevedo Sachetto of Institute Butantan, São Paulo, Brazil.

3h

The Atlantic

74

Most People of European Ancestry Can Be Identified From a Relative’s DNA

In April, the world learned that police had tracked down the alleged Golden State Killer by using a genealogy site to match DNA from crime scenes to that of his distant relatives. The next arrest that resulted from the same technique—for a double murder in Washington State —came less than a month later. And then another and another and another . As the wave of reports went on, Yaniv Erlich, a com

3h

Science current issue

Next-generation self-healing materials

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Science current issue

Dimerization quality control via ubiquitylation

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Science current issue

A common trick for transferring bacterial DNA

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Science current issue

Treg cells–the next frontier of cell therapy

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Science current issue

Anti-CRISPRs on the march

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Science current issue

Easy access to elusive radical reactions

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Science current issue

Return of results and data to study participants

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Science current issue

The persistence of polio

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Science current issue

A Nobel laureate in exile

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Science current issue

Editor's note: Harassment policy

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Science current issue

PPR virus threatens wildlife conservation

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Science current issue

Preventing chemical release in hurricanes

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Science current issue

Circuits for care

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Science current issue

Building blocks of the human brain

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Science current issue

The effortless custody of automatism

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Science current issue

Mind-boggling brain development

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Science current issue

A fragile existence

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Science current issue

Neuronal specification in space and time

To understand how neurons assemble to form functional circuits, it is necessary to obtain a detailed knowledge of their diversity and to define the developmental specification programs that give rise to this diversity. Invertebrates and vertebrates appear to share common developmental principles of neuronal specification in which cascades of transcription factors temporally pattern progenitors, w

3h

Science current issue

Glia as architects of central nervous system formation and function

Glia constitute roughly half of the cells of the central nervous system (CNS) but were long-considered to be static bystanders to its formation and function. Here we provide an overview of how the diverse and dynamic functions of glial cells orchestrate essentially all aspects of nervous system formation and function. Radial glia, astrocytes, oligodendrocyte progenitor cells, oligodendrocytes, an

3h

Science current issue

Microglia and early brain development: An intimate journey

Cross-talk between the nervous and immune systems has been well described in the context of adult physiology and disease. Recent advances in our understanding of immune cell ontogeny have revealed a notable interplay between neurons and microglia during the prenatal and postnatal emergence of functional circuits. This Review focuses on the brain, where the early symbiotic relationship between mic

3h

Science current issue

Homology, neocortex, and the evolution of developmental mechanisms

The six-layered neocortex of the mammalian pallium has no clear homolog in birds or non-avian reptiles. Recent research indicates that although these extant amniotes possess a variety of divergent and nonhomologous pallial structures, they share a conserved set of neuronal cell types and circuitries. These findings suggest a principle of brain evolution: that natural selection preferentially pres

3h

Science current issue

Keeping the doors open for symbiosis

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3h

Science current issue

Modeling collapse with soaked cereal

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3h

Science current issue

Explosive origin of a binary neutron star

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3h

Science current issue

Cas12 inhibitors join the anti-CRISPR family

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3h

Science current issue

Move over myelin

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3h

Science current issue

Magnons propagating in graphene

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3h

Science current issue

Pathologizing Staphylococcus, fast

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Science current issue

The twisted carbon nanotube story

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Science current issue

Mining immunotherapy clinical trials

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Science current issue

A way to prevent deadly interaction

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Science current issue

From DNA unwrapping to histone exchange

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Science current issue

Thyroid hormone in color vision development

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Science current issue

An acid inaccessible to aldol products

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Science current issue

Simple routes to self-healing

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Science current issue

Iodine smooths the way to ketyl radicals

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Science current issue

The next step for cell therapy?

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Science current issue

Stabilizing the IL-17 response

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Science current issue

Brushing up on lung inflammation

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Science current issue

Plague, one lymph node at a time

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Science current issue

Rethinking aspirin use

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Science current issue

Making graphene useful for spintronics

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Science current issue

Deciphering atmospheric CO2 change

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Science current issue

Learning from diminutive ligand design

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Science current issue

The long reach of the gut

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Science current issue

Memory recirculation and integration

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3h

Science current issue

A hot and fast ultra-stripped supernova that likely formed a compact neutron star binary

Compact neutron star binary systems are produced from binary massive stars through stellar evolution involving up to two supernova explosions. The final stages in the formation of these systems have not been directly observed. We report the discovery of iPTF 14gqr (SN 2014ft), a type Ic supernova with a fast-evolving light curve indicating an extremely low ejecta mass (0.2 solar masses) and low k

3h

Science current issue

Genome hypermobility by lateral transduction

Genetic transduction is a major evolutionary force that underlies bacterial adaptation. Here we report that the temperate bacteriophages of Staphylococcus aureus engage in a distinct form of transduction we term lateral transduction. Staphylococcal prophages do not follow the previously described excision-replication-packaging pathway but instead excise late in their lytic program. Here, DNA pack

3h

Science current issue

Entropy-driven stability of chiral single-walled carbon nanotubes

Single-walled carbon nanotubes are hollow cylinders that can grow centimeters long via carbon incorporation at the interface with a catalyst. They display semiconducting or metallic characteristics, depending on their helicity, which is determined during their growth. To support the quest for a selective synthesis, we develop a thermodynamic model that relates the tube-catalyst interfacial energi

3h

Science current issue

Confined acids catalyze asymmetric single aldolizations of acetaldehyde enolates

Reactions that form a product with the same reactive functionality as that of one of the starting compounds frequently end in oligomerization. As a salient example, selective aldol coupling of the smallest, though arguably most useful, enolizable aldehyde, acetaldehyde, with just one partner substrate has proven to be extremely challenging. Here, we report a highly enantioselective Mukaiyama aldo

3h

Science current issue

Key-and-lock commodity self-healing copolymers

Self-healing materials are notable for their ability to recover from physical or chemical damage. We report that commodity copolymers, such as poly(methyl methacrylate)/n-butyl acrylate [p(MMA/nBA)] and their derivatives, can self-heal upon mechanical damage. This behavior occurs in a narrow compositional range for copolymer topologies that are preferentially alternating with a random component (

3h

Science current issue

Ketyl radical reactivity via atom transfer catalysis

Single-electron reduction of a carbonyl to a ketyl enables access to a polarity-reversed platform of reactivity for this cornerstone functional group. However, the synthetic utility of the ketyl radical is hindered by the strong reductants necessary for its generation, which also limit its reactivity to net reductive mechanisms. We report a strategy for net redox-neutral generation and reaction o

3h

Science current issue

Electrical generation and detection of spin waves in a quantum Hall ferromagnet

Spin waves are collective excitations of magnetic systems. An attractive setting for studying long-lived spin-wave physics is the quantum Hall (QH) ferromagnet, which forms spontaneously in clean two-dimensional electron systems at low temperature and in a perpendicular magnetic field. We used out-of-equilibrium occupation of QH edge channels in graphene to excite and detect spin waves in magneti

3h

Science current issue

Systemic control of legume susceptibility to rhizobial infection by a mobile microRNA

Nitrogen-fixing root nodules on legumes result from two developmental processes, bacterial infection and nodule organogenesis. To balance symbiosis and plant growth, legume hosts restrict nodule numbers through an inducible autoregulatory process. Here, we present a mechanism where repression of a negative regulator ensures symbiotic susceptibility of uninfected roots of the host Lotus japonicus

3h

Science current issue

Systematic discovery of natural CRISPR-Cas12a inhibitors

Cas12a (Cpf1) is a CRISPR-associated nuclease with broad utility for synthetic genome engineering, agricultural genomics, and biomedical applications. Although bacteria harboring CRISPR-Cas9 or CRISPR-Cas3 adaptive immune systems sometimes acquire mobile genetic elements encoding anti-CRISPR proteins that inhibit Cas9, Cas3, or the DNA-binding Cascade complex, no such inhibitors have been found f

3h

Science current issue

Discovery of widespread type I and type V CRISPR-Cas inhibitors

Bacterial CRISPR-Cas systems protect their host from bacteriophages and other mobile genetic elements. Mobile elements, in turn, encode various anti-CRISPR (Acr) proteins to inhibit the immune function of CRISPR-Cas. To date, Acr proteins have been discovered for type I (subtypes I-D, I-E, and I-F) and type II (II-A and II-C) but not other CRISPR systems. Here, we report the discovery of 12 acr g

3h

Science current issue

New Products

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Science current issue

Technology Feature | Replacing the replacements: Animal model alternatives

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Science current issue

A normal student parent

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Science current issue

1

Response to Comment on "U-Th dating of carbonate crusts reveals Neandertal origin of Iberian cave art"

Slimak et al . challenge the reliability of our oldest (>65,000 years) U-Th dates on carbonates associated with cave paintings in Spain. They cite a supposed lack of parietal art for the 25,000 years following this date, along with potential methodological issues relating to open-system behavior and corrections to detrital or source water 230 Th. We show that their criticisms are unfounded.

3h

Science current issue

Pan-tumor genomic biomarkers for PD-1 checkpoint blockade-based immunotherapy

Programmed cell death protein–1 (PD-1) and programmed cell death ligand–1 (PD-L1) checkpoint blockade immunotherapy elicits durable antitumor effects in multiple cancers, yet not all patients respond. We report the evaluation of >300 patient samples across 22 tumor types from four KEYNOTE clinical trials. Tumor mutational burden (TMB) and a T cell–inflamed gene expression profile (GEP) exhibited

3h

Science current issue

Thyroid hormone signaling specifies cone subtypes in human retinal organoids

The mechanisms underlying specification of neuronal subtypes within the human nervous system are largely unknown. The blue (S), green (M), and red (L) cones of the retina enable high-acuity daytime and color vision. To determine the mechanism that controls S versus L/M fates, we studied the differentiation of human retinal organoids. Organoids and retinas have similar distributions, expression pr

3h

Science current issue

Erratum for the Research Article "Saturns magnetic field revealed by the Cassini Grand Finale" by M. K. Dougherty, H. Cao, K. K. Khurana, G. J. Hunt, G. Provan, S. Kellock, M. E. Burton, T. A. Burk, E. J. Bunce, S. W. H. Cowley, M. G. Kivelson, C. T. Russell, D. J. Southwood

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3h

Science current issue

Structure and dynamics of the yeast SWR1-nucleosome complex

The yeast SWR1 complex exchanges histone H2A in nucleosomes with Htz1 (H2A.Z in humans). The cryo–electron microscopy structure of the SWR1 complex bound to a nucleosome at 3.6-angstrom resolution reveals details of the intricate interactions between components of the SWR1 complex and its nucleosome substrate. Interactions between the Swr1 motor domains and the DNA wrap at superhelical location 2

3h

Science current issue

Dimerization quality control ensures neuronal development and survival

Aberrant complex formation by recurrent interaction modules, such as BTB domains, leucine zippers, or coiled coils, can disrupt signal transduction, yet whether cells detect and eliminate complexes of irregular composition is unknown. By searching for regulators of the BTB family, we discovered a quality control pathway that ensures functional dimerization [dimerization quality control (DQC)]. Ke

3h

Science current issue

Japan needs gender equality

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Science current issue

News at a glance

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Science current issue

Leaks put Italy's underground lab in jeopardy

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Science current issue

NASA's next Mars rover aims to explore two promising sites

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Science current issue

Replumbing the lymphatic system

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Science current issue

Protein evolution earns chemistry Nobel

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Science current issue

DNA printers poised to jump from paragraphs to pages

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Science current issue

A new leaf

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Science current issue

Vive la resistant vines!

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Science current issue

An alternative urban green carpet

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3h

Phys.org

22

New route of acquiring antibiotic resistance in bacteria is the most potent one to date

Bacteriophages (or phages) are viruses that infect and parasitize bacteria. These phages can transfer DNA from one bacterium to another through a process known as genetic transduction. This is thought to be the major means by which bacteria evolve and acquire the antibiotic resistance and virulence factors that accelerate the emergence of new and progressively more pathogenic strains. Up to now, t

3h

Phys.org

91

Massive star's unusual death heralds the birth of compact neutron star binary

Carnegie's Anthony Piro was part of a Caltech-led team of astronomers who observed the peculiar death of a massive star that exploded in a surprisingly faint and rapidly fading supernova, possibly creating a compact neutron star binary system. Piro's theoretical work provided crucial context for the discovery. Their findings are published by Science.

3h

Phys.org

9

Do lizards dream like humans?

Researchers from the Sleep Team at the Lyon Neuroscience Research Center (CNRS/INSERM/Claude Bernard Lyon 1 University/Université Jean Monnet), together with a colleague from the MECADEV research laboratory (CNRS/Muséum National d'Histoire Naturelle) have confirmed that lizards exhibit two sleep states, just like humans, other mammals and birds. They corroborated the conclusions of a 2016 study on

3h

Phys.org

23

Disorder induces topological Anderson insulator

Topological insulators (TIs) host exotic physics that could shed new light on the fundamental laws of nature. What's more, the unusual properties of TIs hold tremendous promise for technological applications, including in quantum computing, next-generation miniaturized data storage, and spintronics. Scientists around the globe are working to understand the microscopic properties of these materials

3h

Phys.org

15

Human retinas grown in a dish explain how color vision develops

Biologists at Johns Hopkins University grew human retinas from scratch to determine how cells that allow people to see in color are made.

3h

Phys.org

30

Computational model links family members using genealogical and law-enforcement databases

The notion of using genetic ancestry databases to solve crimes recently crossed from hypothetical into credible when police used an online genealogical database to track down the alleged Golden State Killer, a serial criminal who terrorized much of California in the 1970s and 1980s. Now, in a study published October 11 in Cell, researchers are reporting ways in which that type of inquiry could pot

3h

Phys.org

29

Optical illusion spooks raptors

Researchers from the CNRS and Université de Rennes 1, in collaboration with Airbus, have designed a visual pattern that elicits long-term avoidance of high-risk areas by raptors. The work clears the way for further investigation into the visual cognition of these birds, and it has applications for conservation, because raptors are among the most common victims of collisions with planes and wind tu

3h

Wired

100+

Genome Hackers Show No One’s DNA Is Anonymous Anymore

Consumer genomics is making it easier than ever to identify individuals from anonymous DNA databases. Even if you’ve never spit in a tube.

3h

New Scientist

23

Police can now use millions more people’s DNA to find criminals

Consumer genetic databases are becoming powerful tools for identifying criminals, and a new technique could link you to forensic data held by US police

3h

The Atlantic

300+

Congress Is Forcing a Confrontation With Saudi Arabia

On October 2, Jamal Khashoggi, a well-known critic of the government of Saudi Arabia, walked into the Saudi consulate in Istanbul to obtain paperwork he needed to get married. He never walked out. Since then, Washington’s foreign-policy establishment has begun turning against Mohammed bin Salman, the brash, ambitious crown prince of Saudi Arabia. Within days, Turkish officials leaked details of K

3h

Futurity.org

3

For women, higher BMI ups risk for early onset colon cancer

Women who are overweight or obese have up to twice the risk of developing colorectal cancer before age 50 as women who have what is considered a normal body mass index, according to a new study. Overall rates of new colorectal cancer cases and deaths from the disease have decreased steadily since 1980 in the United States, largely owing to recommended colonoscopy screening starting at age 50. But

3h

Latest Headlines | Science News

100

The first observed wimpy supernova may have birthed a neutron star duo

Scientists have spotted a faint, fast supernova for the first time, possibly explaining how pairs of dense stellar corpses called neutron stars form.

3h

Phys.org

7

No more taxi service to Space Station after Soyuz fiascoNASA Russian Soyuz

The taxi service to the orbiting International Space Station is taking no passengers until further notice.

3h

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Clemson University breakthrough in self-healing materials detailed in journal Science

Marek Urban and his team write in the journal Science about how they were able to give self-healing qualities to polymers that are used in relatively inexpensive commodities, such as paints, plastics and coatings. 'It's not available at the industrial scale, but it's very close,' said Urban, who is the J.E. Sirrine Foundation Chair and Professor in the Department of Materials Science and Engineeri

3h

NPR

200+

Human Retinas Grown In A Dish Reveal Origin Of Color Vision

Our ability to see colors develops in the womb. Now scientists have replicated that process, which could help accelerate efforts to cure colorblindness and lead to new treatments for diseases. (Image credit: Johns Hopkins University)

4h

ScienceDaily

9

Scientists accidentally reprogram mature mouse GABA neurons into dopaminergic-like neurons

Attempting to make dopamine-producing neurons out of glial cells in mouse brains, a group of researchers instead converted mature inhibitory neurons into dopaminergic cells. Their findings reveal that — contrary to previous belief — it is possible to reprogram one mature neuron type into another without first reverting it to a stem-cell-like state.

4h

ScienceDaily

7

Changes in polar jet circulation bring more dust from Sahara Desert to the Arctic

Poleward transport of warm, moist, and dust-laden air masses from the Sahara Desert results in ice melting in southeast Greenland, scientists have found.

4h

Big Think

12

3 stunning ways Earth and spacetime could be destroyed

Respected astrophysicist Martin Reese has serious misgivings about the safety of the Large Hadron Collider. The collider could destroy us in 3 different ways, warns Reese. Despite the dangers, innovation should continue but with caution. The Large Hadron Collider (LHC), the world's biggest scientific instrument, is also the planet's most powerful particle accelerator. And that makes it a potentia

4h

Big Think

49

Why reading fiction is as important now as ever

"Fiction is the lie through which we tell the truth," wrote Albert Camus. It remains an important social and political tool. Reading fiction has been shown to increase empathy and understanding. In the Instagram age, novels are still a necessary form of communication. None Having a spy as a mother must be challenging, especially if she dumps you off with a strange cast of characters during your i

4h

Big Think

12

U.N. ambassador Nikki Haley suddenly resigns

Nikki Haley has resigned as U.S. ambassador to the United Nations. Haley didn't offer a clear reason why she's stepping down, but said "it's time." The resignation reportedly came as a surprise to many White House officials, though Trump said she first floated the idea of stepping down about six months ago. None Nikki Haley has resigned from her position as the U.S. ambassador to the United Natio

4h

Phys.org

4

Flooding caused by old data

Water is a powerful force, and as such can pose a major threat to our infrastructure. Thanks to our changing climate, that threat is greater than ever. U.S. stormwater infrastructure—including sewer lines and curbside grates—is designed using precipitation data gathered the Federal government and used by State Departments of Transportation (DOT). But according to Carnegie Mellon University Civil a

4h

The Atlantic

6

New PRRI/The Atlantic Poll: Only One in Three Young People Say They’re Certain to Vote in Midterms

A new PRRI/The Atlantic survey on civic engagement finds stark gaps between young and older Americans’ attitudes towards the utility of voting and other methods of civic engagement. The survey, the second in a series of reports assessing challenges to America’s democratic institutions and practices from PRRI and The Atlantic, shows little evidence that younger Americans will turnout at historic r

4h

The Atlantic

200+

Photographing the Microscopic: Winners of Nikon Small World 2018

Nikon just announced the winners of the 2018 Small World Photomicrography Competition , and it’s shared some of the winning and honored images with us. The contest invites photographers and scientists to submit images of all things visible under a microscope. Nearly 2,500 entries were received from 89 countries in 2018, the 44th year of the competition.

4h

Phys.org

7

Panel discusses effects of Red Tide on Florida

Red tide continues to be a source of concern for Florida, according to FIU experts.

4h

Phys.org

2

Hurricane Michael intensified as it approached landfall

Hurricane Michael continued to intensify as it made landfall off the coast of Mexico Beach, Fla.

4h

Science | The Guardian

23

Rocket launches to be grounded while mid-air failure is investigated

Problem with Soyuz’s thrusters must be identified before space flights can resume, say experts The Russian Soyuz rocket that launches astronauts to the International Space Station will be grounded for months after two crew members were forced to make an emergency landing in Kazakhstan . American Nick Hague and Alexey Ovchinin from Russia were aboard the Soyuz rocket when it developed a thruster p

4h

Phys.org

2

Is shipping freight by rail and water better for the environment?

Transporting freight by road accounts for around seven percent of the world's total energy-related carbon dioxide emissions. Recognizing that heavy road freight is particularly hard to decarbonize, Carnegie Mellon University researchers have published a paper to review the ways that goods can be transported via alternate means, such as by rail or water, to reduce both emissions and energy use.

4h

Phys.org

2

Opening communication lines between propulsion and airflow poses new questions

On the runway to more fuel-efficient aircraft, one alternative propulsion scheme being explored is an array of electrically powered ducted fans. The fans are distributed across the wing span or integrated into the wing. Researchers at the University of Illinois gained new understanding in how the fans and especially their precise placement on the aircraft can affect the cross-conversation between

4h

Phys.org

2

Shareholders must vote on Musk's return as Tesla chairman

If Tesla CEO Elon Musk wants to return as chairman, shareholders will have to vote on it.

4h

Phys.org

2

Scientists finger culprits decimating France's oysters

A two-pronged attack by a virus and bacteria is responsible for decimating France's 450-million euro ($520 million) oyster industry, scientists said Thursday, potentially solving a decade-long mystery.

4h

Wired

100+

Soyuz Rocket Failure Jeopardizes Future ISS MissionsNASA Russian Soyuz

The spacecraft’s failure minutes after launch—the second mishap in recent months—raises questions about how people will travel to and from the space station.

4h

Ingeniøren

Sublim ansigtsgenkendelse

Mennesker har en fantastisk evne til at genkende ansigter, men svært ved at placere fredelige dronningehære på udvidede skakbrætter.

4h

Scientific American Content

43

Giant Leap for Gene-Based Testing Estimates Risk of Heart Disease, Breast Cancer and Others

This new approach to predictive medicine takes genomics research by storm, but still generates controversy — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

4h

Phys.org

3

NASA finds wind shear weakening Tropical Storm Nadine

Wind shear is an adversary of tropical cyclones like Tropical Storm Nadine, and it is tearing the storm apart in the Eastern Atlantic Ocean. NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite captured an image of Nadine as wind shear was affecting it.

4h

Phys.org

2

Suomi-NPP satellite finds Hurricane Leslie's ragged eye

Hurricane Leslie had a ragged eye on imagery from NASA-NOAA's Suomi-NPP satellite when it passed over the Eastern Atlantic.

4h

Phys.org

2

NASA eyes Hurricane Michael moving inland

NASA's Aqua satellite and NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP Satellite passed over the Florida Panhandle and captured different views of Hurricane Michael after it made landfall on Oct. 10. Hurricane Michael is the most powerful storm on record to hit the Florida Panhandle.

4h

Phys.org

5

Video: What makes tardigrades such great survivors

Tardigrades are tiny animals that can live in water droplets just about anywhere. When those water droplets dry out, tardigrades undergo an astonishing transformation to survive the lack of water.

4h

Phys.org

1

Tool measures 'iffy' news on social media in time for 2018 election

As the crucial midterm election approaches, the University of Michigan Center for Social Media Responsibility offers media and the public a tool to help monitor the prevalence of fake news on social media through a Platform Health Metric called the Iffy Quotient.

4h

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Elderly housing with supportive social services can reduce hospital use, study finds

According to a Rutgers study, programs designed to provide social support may impact hospitalization rates and decrease spending. Expert says that investing in affordable housing that offers supportive social services to senior citizens on Medicare has the potential to reduce hospital admissions and the amount of time needing inpatient hospital care.

4h

Phys.org

1

Clay supplements in dairy cows improve immune response to aflatoxin challenge, study says

In the fight against aflatoxin, dairy producers often turn to sequestering agents such as clay to reduce transference of the toxin into milk. It's an effective tactic, but a new study from the University of Illinois shows that clay has additional benefits for overall cow health.

4h

Phys.org

2

With 66 million people living without proper housing, what can architects do?

The images are terrifying. Homes have been washed away, flooded, burnt or torn apart.

4h

Discovery (uploads) on YouTube

2

Tony Beets Isn't Happy with New Neighbor Parker | Gold Rush

Tony is fed up with Parker's inability to respect their land boundaries. Catch the Season Premiere of GOLD RUSH Friday October 12th at 9p on Discovery. Stream Full Episodes of Gold Rush: https://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/gold-rush/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/GoldRush/ https://www.facebook.com/Discovery Follow us on Twitt

5h

Phys.org

1

New clinical trials seek treatments for canine cancers, may offer clues on human cancers

Two studies into deadly cancers in dogs are now underway, offered through the newly formed Clinical Trials Office at Cummings Veterinary Medical Center at Tufts University. Dogs with spontaneous osteosarcoma, as well as dogs with mast cell tumors and solid tumors, may be eligible for enrollment.

5h

Phys.org

1

Professor studies impact of political incivility on partisanship

From Twitter to daily interactions on the street, the constant impoliteness in today's politics is under examination in UTSA Department of Political Science and Geography.

5h

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

'Domestic gag rule' will negatively impact women's health care

Texas study points to adverse impact of proposed federal title x guidelines on abortion counseling and referrals.

5h

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Opening communication lines between propulsion and airflow poses new questions

On the runway to more fuel-efficient aircraft, one alternative propulsion scheme being explored is an array of electrically powered ducted fans. The fans are distributed across the wing span or integrated into the wing. Researchers at the University of Illinois gained new understanding in how the fans and especially their precise placement on the aircraft can affect the cross-conversation between

5h

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

NASA-NOAA's Suomi-NPP satellite finds Hurricane Leslie's ragged eye

Hurricane Leslie had a ragged eye on imagery from NASA-NOAA's Suomi-NPP satellite when it passed over the Eastern Atlantic.

5h

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Hidden gapless states on the path to semiconductor nanocrystals

When chemists from the Institute of Physical Chemistry of the Polish Academy of Sciences in Warsaw were starting work on yet another material designed for the efficient production of nanocrystalline zinc oxide, they didn't expect any surprises. They were greatly astonished when the electrical properties of the changing material turned out to be extremely exotic.

5h

New Scientist

60

Soyuz crash could kill the ISS and set space flight back decades

A Russian Soyuz spacecraft has crash landed after an attempted launch to the International Space Station, which may throw a wrench in space flight plans

5h

The Atlantic

87

A Failed Launch May Ground the World’s Astronauts for the Foreseeable Future

Launching people into space will always be risky, but in the khaki-colored desert of southern Kazakhstan, it can feel routine. Since the 1980s, the Baikonur Cosmodrome, operated by Russia, has been the site of dozens of successful launches to the International Space Station, first of Russian cosmonauts, and then of astronauts from around the world. For nearly 40 years, crews have piled into a coz

5h

The Atlantic

10

The Philosophy of ‘Circular Design’

“A lot of people don't know that the fashion industry is one of the worst polluters in the world,” says Eileen Fisher. In a video filmed at the 2018 Aspen Ideas Festival, in June, Fisher explains how the fashion industry employs one in six people worldwide. “There's a huge opportunity to actually clean up the industry and clean up the planet because so much work is done there,” she adds. Fisher g

5h

The Atlantic

10

Can the Chinese Be Trusted to Lead Global Institutions?

China has spent years trying to gain an equal footing in international institutions originally set up by the West. Those efforts have seen gradual success, as Chinese nationals have come to occupy leading positions on United Nations committees, multilateral development banks, international courts, and many other organizations. So when Meng Hongwei, a high-ranking Chinese Communist Party member wh

5h

The Atlantic

300+

The Growing Crisis Over a Saudi Journalist’s Disappearance

The disappearance and possible murder of Jamal Khashoggi, the Saudi journalist and dissident, has brought sharp attention to Saudi-U.S. relations. On Thursday, President Donald Trump told Fox & Friends that Khashoggi “went in [to the Saudi consulate in Istanbul, Turkey] and it doesn’t look like he came out.” That itself is a marked departure from the Saudi line that he left the facility that he h

5h

Live Science

2

Liver Cancer: Symptoms and Treatment

Liver cancer is cancer that begins in the tissues of the liver, though it may also result from cancer spreading to the liver from other parts of the body.

5h

New on MIT Technology Review

100+

Chinese scientists have created mice that have two moms or two dads

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5h

Futurity.org

9

New tests offer faster Lyme disease detection

New techniques spot Lyme bacteria infection faster than the three weeks it currently takes, researchers say. The new techniques can detect an active infection with the Lyme bacteria faster than the three weeks it takes for the current indirect antibody-based tests, which have been a standard since 1994. Another advantage of the new tests is that a positive result in the blood indicates the infect

5h

ScienceDaily

7

Innovative sensing technique could improve greenhouse gas analysis

An international team of researchers has used an unconventional imaging technique known as ghost imaging to make spectroscopic measurements of a gas molecule.

5h

Popular Science

500+

Scientists just created healthy mice with same-sex parents

Science And some went on to have healthy babies of their own. A team of researchers used embryonic stem cells and gene editing to produce mice born from two parents of the same sex. Some offspring went on to have healthy babies of…

5h

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

NASA finds wind shear weakening Tropical Storm Nadine

Wind shear is an adversary of tropical cyclones like Tropical Storm Nadine, and it is tearing the storm apart in the Eastern Atlantic Ocean. NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite captured an image of Nadine as wind shear was affecting it.

5h

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Clay supplements in dairy cows improve immune response to aflatoxin challenge, study says

In the fight against aflatoxin, dairy producers often turn to sequestering agents such as clay to reduce transference of the toxin into milk. It's an effective tactic, but a new study from the University of Illinois shows that clay has additional benefits for overall cow health.

5h

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

1

New transgenic model of Parkinson's illuminates disease biology

Investigators from Brigham and Women's Hospital have developed a unique mouse model to induce PD-like αS aggregation, leading to resting tremor and abnormal movement control. This mouse model responds to L-DOPA, similarly to patients with PD. The research team's results on the use of this transgenic mouse model appear this week in Neuron.

5h

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Nerve stimulation in mice suggests new way to reduce delirium after surgery

For adults over age 65, surgical complications can dampen not only their physical health but also their mental sharpness, with more than half of high-risk cases declining into delirium. New Duke University research shows a current treatment for seizures can also reverse brain inflammation, such as inflammation after surgery, and the subsequent confusion or cognitive decline that results.

5h

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Researchers discover brain cortex activity differences in children with arthrogryposis

Researchers from the Higher School of Economics and the Turner Scientific and Research Institute for Children's Orthopedics have discovered that in children with arthrogryposis, the power of electrical activity in the brain cortex decreases, while its dynamics remains the same as in healthy children.

5h

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Scientists unexpectedly reprogram mature mouse neurons

UT Southwestern researchers attempting to transform supporting brain cells into neurons instead reprogrammed mature inhibitory neurons into a different type of neuron that creates the neurotransmitter lost in Parkinson's disease.

5h

Wired

23

Why So Many Fantasy Novels Are Obsessed With Academia

Even this year's most accomplished debut, 'The Poppy War,' spends its first half in a structural school daze.

5h

Latest Headlines | Science News

300+

Gene editing creates mice with two biological dads for the first time

Scientists have used CRISPR/Cas9 to make mice with two biological fathers.

5h

Scientific American Content

29

Slaying the Climate Dragon

A fairy tale whose ending, still unwritten, is by no means guaranteed to be happy — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

5h

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

The significance of water in a promising biomarker against cancer

The UPV/EHU's Department of Physical Chemistry and the Biofísika Institute have conducted a multidisciplinary study of the Tn antigen that appears in 90 percent of cancers. Two variants that appear to be similar but which have very different shapes in water have been studied. The work has been highlighted as the best of the month by one of the world's leading chemistry journals: the Journal of the

6h

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Researchers look beyond BMI to predict obesity-related disease risk

Predictors of future diabetes and cardiovascular disease for a person with obesity can be found among their body's metabolites, molecules that all of us produce as we live, breathe and eat.

6h

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

1

Self-healing material can build itself from carbon in the air

A new material developed at MIT can mimic plants by taking carbon dioxide from the air and turning it into a useful solid material, potentially helping in the battle against global climate change.

6h

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Study holds promise for new pediatric brain tumor treatment

New research published in Nature Communications from scientists at Huntsman Cancer Institute (HCI) at the University of Utah (U of U), in collaboration with the Stanford University School of Medicine, shows a specific protein regulates both the initiation of cancer spreading and the self-renewal of cancer cells in medulloblastoma, a type of pediatric brain cancer.

6h

ScienceDaily

21

Clues from a Somalian cavefish about modern mammals' dark past

After millions of years living in darkness, a species of blind cavefish has lost an ancient system of DNA repair. That DNA repair system, found in organisms including bacteria, fungi, plants, and most other animals, harnesses energy from visible light to repair DNA damage induced by ultraviolet (UV) light. The findings are intriguing in part because only placental mammals were previously known to

6h

ScienceDaily

7

Novel topological insulator

For the first time, physicists have built a unique topological insulator in which optical and electronic excitations hybridize and flow together.

6h

 

Latest Headlines | Science News

300+

Here’s what’s unusual about Hurricane Michael

Warm Gulf waters were the engine behind Hurricane Michael’s quick intensification.

1d

The Atlantic

300+

Taylor Swift’s Post-Reputation Approach to Politics

Taylor Swift is not, necessarily, about to swing the midterm elections. Nor is she exactly finding her political voice: Though her silence during the 2016 presidential election fueled intense speculation about whom she was voting for, she has commented on issues like gun violence and sexual harassment before . What the pop star has done, with a viral Instagram post on Tennessee’s upcoming electio

1d

The Atlantic

8

The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: ‘Hurricane Michael is Upon Us’

Written by Madeleine Carlisle (@maddiecarlisle2) , Olivia Paschal (@oliviacpaschal) Today in 5 Lines Hurricane Michael made landfall in the Florida Panhandle with winds reaching 155 mph. The storm has strengthened to a Category 4 hurricane, the strongest to ever hit the region. “Hurricane Michael is upon us,” said Florida Governor Rick Scott in a news conference. President Donald Trump said he sp

1d

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