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Nyheder2018oktober12

ScienceDaily

8

Light switch: Scientists develop method to control nanoscale manipulation in high-powered microscopes

Researchers from Japan have taken a step toward faster and more advanced electronics by developing a way to better measure and manipulate conductive materials through scanning tunneling microscopy.

6h

Science | The Guardian

300+

Healthy mice with same-sex parents born for first time

Findings show barriers to same-sex reproduction in humans can technically be overcome – but not yet Healthy mice with two mothers have been born for the first time in a study that pushes the boundaries of reproductive science. Mice with two fathers were also born, but only survived a couple of days, the Chinese team behind the work reported. There is no imminent prospect of the techniques being u

6h

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

How a common drug causes liver failure

A study of liver cells exposed to the common painkiller acetaminophen found a novel mechanism for the drug's toxicity at high doses. Researchers say a protein modification called glutathionylation, kicked off by acetaminophen treatment, impairs liver cell mitochondria.

6h

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

UC researchers say ritual for orthodox Jewish men may offer heart benefits

A pilot study led by researchers at the University of Cincinnati (UC) College of Medicine suggests Jewish men who practice wearing tefillin, which involves the tight wrapping of an arm with leather banding as part of daily prayer, may receive cardiovascular health benefits.

6h

ScienceDaily

3

Lassa fever vaccine shows promise and reveals new test for immunity

A new Lassa fever and rabies vaccine shows lasting immunity and suggests a new way to test for protection.

6h

ScienceDaily

7

New techniques can detect lyme disease weeks before current tests

Researchers have developed techniques to detect Lyme disease bacteria weeks sooner than current tests, allowing patients to start treatment earlier.

6h

ScienceDaily

8

Functional salivary gland organoid created

Scientists have, for the first time, succeeded in growing three-dimensional salivary gland tissue that, when implanted into mice, produced saliva like normal glands.

6h

Live Science

67

LaCroix Is Being Sued Over Its Ingredients. But Are They Actually Bad for You?

We talked to a food scientist.

6h

The Atlantic

2K

The Little College Where Tuition Is Free and Every Student Is Given a Job

T here’s a small burst of air that explodes from every clap. And when hundreds of people are clapping in unison, it begins to feel like a breeze—one that was pulsing through the Phelps Stokes Chapel at Berea College in Kentucky. The students and staff that had gathered here were stomping, clapping, and singing along, as they were led in a rendition of the Civil Rights era anthem, “Ain’t Gonna Let

6h

ScienceDaily

10

The culprit of superconductivity in cuprates

Researchers have uncovered an underlying mechanism related to the materials dependence in copper-based high-temperature superconductors. The research may open a new avenue for designing materials with high-temperature superconductivity.

6h

ScienceDaily

10

Molecular link between body weight, early puberty identified

Becoming overweight at a young age can trigger a molecular chain reaction that leads some girls to experience puberty early, according to new research. Scientists have discovered an enzyme in the brain that behaves differently in fat and thin rats, and leads overweight female rats to have early-onset puberty.

6h

Scientific American Content

300+

New Climate Report Was Too Cautious, Some Scientists Say

Experts cite important outcomes and costs of climate change left out of the latest IPCC report — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

6h

New Scientist

17

AIs invent weird new limbs to beat virtual obstacle courses

Simulated robots can learn to control their bodies in many creative ways, and now they can also build the best limbs for crossing through an obstacle course

6h

BBC News – Science & Environment

100+

Hawking's final science study released

Stephen Hawking's final scientific paper has been released, and deals with one of the central topics in the physicist's 56-year-long career.

6h

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

1

Light switch: Scientists develop method to control nanoscale manipulation in high-powered microscopes

Researchers from Japan have taken a step toward faster and more advanced electronics by developing a way to better measure and manipulate conductive materials through scanning tunneling microscopy.

6h

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

2

How are pulsed electric fields being used in cancer therapy?

Pulsed electric fields are helping fight cancer, whether by inducing tumor cell death or by stimulating the immune system. A comprehensive overview of this developing field is published in the preview issue of Bioelectricity.

6h

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

2

NASA eyes Hurricane Michael moving inland

NASA's Aqua satellite and NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP Satellite passed over the Florida Panhandle and captured different views of Hurricane Michael after it made landfall on Oct. 10. Hurricane Michael is the most powerful storm on record to hit the Florida Panhandle.

6h

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

UCI-led study reveals that cells involved in allergies also play a key role in survival

In a UCI-led study, researchers found evidence that mast cells, an important group of immune cells typically associated with allergies, actually enable the body to survive fasting or intense exercise. The study was published today in Cell Metabolism.

6h

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Blood test identifies more treatable cancer mutations than tissue biopsy alone

Researchers from the Abramson Cancer Center of the University of Pennsylvania found that they could identify significantly more mutations through liquid biopsy instead of a solid tissue biopsy alone. The findings also show that patients whose actionable mutations were detected by the blood based liquid biopsy responded favorably to targeted therapies.

6h

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

How yeast cells detect genetic infections

ETH researchers studying yeast cells have discovered a surprisingly located new mechanism for detecting foreign genetic material — whether from pathogens or environmental contamination — and rendering it harmless.

6h

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Obesity associated with higher colorectal cancer risk among younger women

Obesity was associated with an increased risk of early onset colorectal cancer (CRC) among women younger than 50.

6h

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Stanford researchers modify CRISPR to reorganize genome

Researchers at Stanford University have reworked CRISPR-Cas9 gene-editing technology to manipulate the genome in three-dimensional space, allowing them to ferry genetic snippets to different locations in a cell's nucleus.

6h

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

1

New microscope offers 4D look at embryonic development in living mice

With the development of an adaptive, multi-view light sheet microscope and a suite of computational tools, researchers have captured the first view of early organ development inside the mouse embryo.

6h

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

3

Mouse pups with same-sex parents born in China using stem cells and gene editing

Researchers at the Chinese Academy of Sciences were able to produce healthy mice with two mothers that went on to have normal offspring of their own. Mice from two dads were also born but only survived for a couple of days. The work, presented Oct. 11 in the journal Cell Stem Cell, looks at what makes it so challenging for animals of the same sex to produce offspring and suggests that some of thes

6h

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

The metabolome: A way to measure obesity and health beyond BMI

The current standard for determining obesity is body mass index (BMI), a simple mathematical formula that uses weight and height. Now a paper appearing Oct. 11 in the journal Cell Metabolism is reporting a large study of new ways to measure obesity. The study looked at both the metabolome and the genome, and their relationship to BMI.

6h

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Clues from a Somalian cavefish about modern mammals' dark past

After millions of years living in darkness, a species of blind cavefish has lost an ancient system of DNA repair. That DNA repair system, found in organisms including bacteria, fungi, plants, and most other animals, harnesses energy from visible light to repair DNA damage induced by ultraviolet (UV) light. The findings reported in journal Current Biology on Oct. 11 are intriguing in part because o

6h

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

1

Scientists accidentally reprogram mature mouse GABA neurons into dopaminergic-like neurons

Attempting to make dopamine-producing neurons out of glial cells in mouse brains, a group of researchers instead converted mature inhibitory neurons into dopaminergic cells. Their findings, appearing Oct. 11 in the journal Stem Cell Reports, reveal that — contrary to previous belief — it is possible to reprogram one mature neuron type into another without first reverting it to a stem-cell-like s

6h

Ingeniøren

Spørg Fagfolket: Hvad er det, der lyser mellem bjergtoppene?

En læser har været en tur i Napoli og har taget et flot foto fra tagterrassen. Men hvad er det for et lysende fænomen til højre for Solen?

6h

New Scientist

100+

We are a step closer to making babies with same-sex genetic parents

We are getting better at creating mice with same-sex parents but we are still nowhere near the point at which this could be attempted in people

6h

New Scientist

37

Nikon Small World photo competition reveals nature in minuscule detail

Peer into nature with these amazing images from the Nikon Small World microphotography prize. They include a bug bubble house and the eye of a weevil

6h

TED Talks Daily (SD video)

500+

What baby boomers can learn from millennials at work — and vice versa | Chip Conley

For the first time ever, we have five generations in the workplace at the same time, says entrepreneur Chip Conley. What would happen if we got intentional about how we all work together? In this accessible talk, Conley shows how age diversity makes companies stronger and calls for different generations to mentor each other at work, with wisdom flowing from old to young and young to old alike.

6h

BBC News – Science & Environment

7K

Same-sex mice have babies

Scientists break the rules of reproduction, so what does it mean for the future of sex?

6h

Wired

74

How Hurricane Michael Got Super Big, Super Fast

The phenomenon known as 'rapid intensification' used to be rare. With climate change, this most deadly type of hurricane is becoming more common.

6h

Wired

58

Watch Mouse Embryos Develop Under This 4-D Microscope

An unusual new instrument can peer inside a living mammalian embryo and watch its cells grow.

6h

The Scientist RSS

8

First Mouse Embryos Made from Two Fathers

The bipaternal pups died soon after birth, but mice with two mothers grew into fertile adults.

6h

Latest Headlines | Science News

84

See these dazzling images of a growing mouse embryo

A new microscope creates intimate home movies of mice embryos taking shape, and could shed light on the mysterious process of mammalian development.

6h

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Fruit fly protein could be new tool in tackling disease-carrying mosquitos

An insulin-binding protein in fruit flies could provide new opportunities for tackling disease-carrying mosquitos, such as malaria and yellow fever, scientists at the University of York have found.

6h

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Study identifies effective ketamine doses for treatment-resistant depression

A study led by Massachusetts General Hospital investigators identifies two subanesthetic dosage levels of the anesthetic drug ketamine that appear to provide significant symptom relief to patients with treatment-resistant depression.

6h

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

UNH researchers find video games effective for bystander intervention in sexual assaults

Researchers at the University of New Hampshire are looking at gaming as a way to introduce intervention strategies. They found that video games show promise as a tool to share information and influence bystander attitudes and efficacy in situations of sexual violence.

6h

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Scientists reveal new cystic fibrosis treatments work best in inflamed airways

A new UNC School of Medicine study shows that two cystic fibrosis (CF) drugs aimed at correcting the defected CFTR protein seem to be more effective when a patient's airway is inflamed. This is the first study to evaluate the efficacy of these drugs under inflammatory conditions relevant to CF airways.

6h

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

1

New study finds thalamus wakes the brain during development

The study published in the Journal of Neuroscience suggests the thalamus controls the development of state dependency and continuity.

6h

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

UTSA professor studies impact of political incivility on partisanship

From Twitter to daily interactions on the street, the constant impoliteness in today's politics is under examination in UTSA Department of Political Science and Geography. In his recent article, "Rousing the Partisan Combatant: Elite Incivility, Anger, and Anti-Deliberative Attitudes" published in Political Psychology, Bryan Gervais explores the connection between the lack of civility among politi

6h

Phys.org

70

Researchers modify CRISPR to reorganize genome

Researchers at Stanford University have reworked CRISPR-Cas9 gene-editing technology to manipulate the genome in three-dimensional space, allowing them to ferry genetic snippets to different locations in a cell's nucleus.

6h

Phys.org

55

New microscope offers 4-D look at embryonic development in living mice

A smart new microscope has given scientists a front-row seat to the drama of mammalian development.

6h

Phys.org

5

How yeast cells detect genetic infections

ETH researchers studying yeast cells have discovered a new mechanism for detecting foreign genetic material from pathogens or environmental contamination, and rendering it harmless.

6h

Phys.org

200+

Mouse pups with same-sex parents born in China using stem cells and gene editing

Researchers at the Chinese Academy of Sciences were able to produce healthy mice with two mothers that went on to have normal offspring of their own. Mice from two dads were also born but only survived for a couple of days. The work, presented October 11 in the journal Cell Stem Cell, looks at what makes it so challenging for animals of the same sex to produce offspring and suggests that some of t

6h

Phys.org

49

Clues from a Somalian cavefish about modern mammals' dark past

After millions of years living in constant darkness, a species of blind cavefish found only in Somalia has lost an ancient system of DNA repair. That DNA repair system, found in organisms including bacteria, fungi, plants, and most other animals, harnesses energy from visible light to repair DNA damage induced by ultraviolet (UV) light.

6h

Scientific American Content

100+

Same-Sex Mice Parents Give Birth to Healthy Brood

Gene editing and stem cell research have allowed for alternative rodent reproduction — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

7h

The Economist

2

Business this week

[no content]

7h

The Economist

2

Politics this week

[no content]

7h

The Economist

41

KAL’s cartoon

[no content]

7h

The Atlantic

500+

Photos From the Aftermath of Hurricane Michael

Hurricane Michael crashed into Florida on October 10 as a powerful Category 4 storm—the third-most powerful hurricane ever to strike the U.S. mainland. With sustained winds of 155 mph, Michael is the strongest storm to hit Florida in 80 years, and the most powerful to ever strike its panhandle region. Trees were stripped bare, toppled, and splintered; railroad cars were blown off the tracks; hous

7h

The Atlantic

3

Bad Times at the El Royale Is an Inventive and Indulgent Thriller

Bad Times at the El Royale is set in 1969. That’s the year that flashes up on the screen early on, but this detail would’ve been easy to glean regardless. Drew Goddard’s new film has a lot in common with his 2012 directorial debut, the sly satire The Cabin in the Woods . It’s centered on an ensemble coming together in a strange, vaguely magical location, where nobody is quite who they seem and st

7h

New Scientist

300+

Medicinal cannabis will be available in the UK from next month

The UK Home Secretary has announced that doctors will be able to prescribe medicinal cannabis from next month following a specially commissioned review

7h

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Novel topological insulator

For the first time, physicists have built a unique topological insulator in which optical and electronic excitations hybridize and flow together. They report their discovery in Nature.

7h

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Where is it, the foundation of quantum reality?

With the aid of simple theoretical models it is possible to build systems operating strictly according to the rules of classical physics, yet faithfully reproducing the predictions of quantum mechanics for single particles — even those that are the most paradoxical! So what is the real hallmark of quantum behavior?

7h

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Day of discharge does not influence heart surgery patient readmissions

Despite a common belief that weekend and holiday discharge after major heart surgery may impact hospital readmissions, research published online today in The Annals of Thoracic Surgery showed that day of discharge does not affect readmissions.

7h

New Scientist

2

Building better cities

Thanks to clever chemistry and innovative engineering, the cities of the future are being fashioned from cleaner, greener concrete

7h

Phys.org

25

Study of penguin colonies at Antarctic island shows decline

Results from a 21-year study into the breeding success of gentoo penguins at a well-known tourist site in Antarctica, reveal a 25 percent reduction in breeding pairs and a decrease of between 54-60 percent in chick numbers. Reporting this week in the journal Biodiversity and Conservation, researchers from British Antarctic Survey (BAS) say that the causes of the local decline is unclear.

7h

Wired

54

The Ick of AI That Impersonates Humans

As technology like Google Duplex continues to offload more basic human interaction to robots, it’s worth wondering what else might get lost in the process.

7h

Quanta Magazine

300+

Famous Experiment Dooms Alternative to Quantum Weirdness

In 2005, a student working in the fluid physicist Yves Couder ’s laboratory in Paris discovered by chance that tiny oil droplets bounced when plopped onto the surface of a vibrating oil bath. Moreover, as the droplets bounced, they started to bunny-hop around the liquid’s surface. Couder soon figured out that the droplets were “surfing on their own wave,” as he put it — kicking up the wave as the

7h

The Atlantic

500+

Taylor Swift Succumbs to Competitive Wokeness

Over the past few days, there’s been considerable discussion of the cultural power of the left and the political power, for now, of the right. The idea, as I understand it, is that while the left dominates the culture industries and elite academia, its devotees resent the fact that self-described conservatives are firmly in the driver’s seat of the federal government. This disconnect between the

7h

The Atlantic

24

A Spree of Signals From Across the Universe

About a decade ago, astrophysicists discovered an overlooked signal in some old telescope data: a flash of cosmic energy lasting only a few milliseconds. The signal seemed to have experienced a long and bumpy ride to Earth. Its radio waves had become distorted and were spread across a range of frequencies. This suggested that the radiation had traveled for billions of years, slowing down here and

7h

BBC News – Science & Environment

60

Soyuz crew back to Earth after malfunction

A capsule carrying two crew members on a Russian Soyuz rocket that malfunctioned has landed safely.

7h

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Long-term exposure to ozone has significant impacts on human health

A new study has utilized a novel method to estimate long-term ozone exposure and previously reported epidemiological results to quantify the health burden from long-term ozone exposure in three major regions of the world.The research, by Duke University (USA) and the University of York (UK), estimates that 266,000 (confidence interval: 186,000-338,000) premature mortalities across Europe, the USA

7h

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Personality differences between the sexes are largest in the most gender equal countries

The self-rated personalities of men and women differ more in more gender equal countries, according to recent research from the University of Gothenburg, University West and the University of Skövde.

7h

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

He's in a rush, she isn't: Reproductive strategy drives slower female aging

The aging of males and females is influenced by how they choose to invest their available energy, according to a study of fruit flies carried out at Linköping University, Sweden. The results, published in The American Naturalist, support the idea that differences in strategy between the sexes to maximise the number of offspring contribute to differences in aging between males and females.

7h

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

1

Link between gut flora and multiple sclerosis discovered

In multiple sclerosis, a defective response of the body's own immune system leads to brain tissue damage. Gastrointestinal microbiota could play a far greater role in the pathogenesis of the disease than previously assumed, researchers at the University of Zurich have now found.

7h

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Bioinspired camera could help self-driving cars see better

Inspired by the visual system of the mantis shrimp-researchers have created a new type of camera that could greatly improve the ability of cars to spot hazards in challenging imaging conditions.

7h

Phys.org

1

Sight-impaired people want to use technology but are excluded by cost and accessibility

Since the advent of home broadband, smartphones and other internet enabled devices, there has seen a shift in how we communicate with each other. The internet has certainly made many aspects of life easier, but for those with a disability, digital exclusion is still a real problem.

7h

Dagens Medicin

Færdigbehandlede patienter i Region Hovedstaden optager langt flest sengepladser

I Region Hovedstaden venter patienter efter behandling gennemsnitligt fire gange længere tid på at blive udskrevet, end patienter i Region Nordjylland, viser ny rapport fra Sundhedsministeriet. Men i Hvidovre har man fundet en løsning.

7h

Dagens Medicin

Hospitalsenheden Vest får sin første kliniske lektor i onkologi

Overlæge Halla Skuladottir har fået titlen klinisk lektor i onkologi. Hun glæder sig til at løfte forskning op på nyt og mere ambitiøst niveau på onkologisk afdeling på Hospitalsenheden Vest.

7h

Dagens Medicin

Medicinrådet sætter gang i seks nye behandlingsvejledninger

Nye vejledninger for type 2-diabetes, brystkræft, immundefekter, kræft i æggestokkene, nyrekræft og modermærkekræft er på vej fra Medicinrådet. 11 andre sygdomme fravalgt i denne omgang.

7h

Scientific American Content

100+

Soyuz Rocket Fails, Forces Emergency Landing for U.S.–Russian Space Station Crew

The accident occurred during the rocket’s ascent from the launch pad, allowing an abort system to jettison the crew to safety — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

7h

Ingeniøren

Sådan bygges Norges første indendørs skianlæg – til 630 millioner kroner

»Vi bygger øverst, i midten og nederst samtidig for at komme i mål,« fortæller entreprenøren om byggeriet af den nye indendørs skibakke i Lørenskog i Norge.

7h

Phys.org

4

Sports industry gears up for virtual reality revolution

From training with Major League Baseball pitchers to bone-jangling racing on board an F1 car, technology's potential to revolutionise sport was the hot topic as industry leaders met in London this week.

7h

Phys.org

33

Latest Cornell dot features a new cancer weapon: antibodies

Antibody-based imaging of a particularly aggressive form of breast cancer is undergoing clinical trials worldwide, but the path from trial to application is being hampered by a major obstacle: safety.

7h

Phys.org

5

'That was a short flight': crew of failed rocket keeps cool

Russian cosmonaut Aleksey Ovchinin retained an enviable sang-froid Thursday as he realised while travelling at thousands of miles an hour that his spacecraft would have to make an emergency landing.

7h

Wired

300+

The Camp in Alabama Bringing Outer Space to the Blind

Space Camp for Interested Visually Impaired Students takes place at the US Space and Rocket Center each fall.

7h

Wired

60

A Drone-Flinging Cannon Proves UAVs Can Mangle Planes

Researchers armed with a very fun kind of cannon have shown that drones have potential to do serious damage to aircraft.

7h

Phys.org

27

Low copper levels linked to fatter fat cells

In studies of mouse cells, Johns Hopkins researchers have found that low levels of cellular copper appear to make fat cells fatter by altering how cells process their main metabolic fuels, such as fat and sugar.

7h

Phys.org

1

Reproductive strategy drives slower female aging

The aging of males and females is influenced by how they choose to invest their available energy, according to a study of fruit flies carried out at Linköping University, Sweden. The results, published in The American Naturalist, support the idea that differences in strategy between the sexes to maximise the number of offspring contribute to differences in aging between males and females.

7h

Phys.org

3

Shrimp talent quest finds a winner

Shrimp help keep fish clean—and scientists have identified the 'cleaner shrimp' with the most talent for reducing parasites and chemical use in farmed fish.

7h

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Surfing on calcium waves: A larva's journey to becoming a fly

A group of researchers at the National Centre for Biological Sciences, Bangalore, have uncovered the neuronal typeset that determines a larva's decision to pupariate, especially when challenged for nutrients. The group, led by Prof. Gaiti Hasan has investigated this question in fruit flies to understand how they integrate internal and environmental nutritional cues to make decisions on pupariation

8h

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Latest Cornell dot features a new cancer weapon: Antibodies

Ulrich Wiesner, the Spencer T. Olin Professor of Engineering in materials science and engineering at Cornell University, in collaboration with Dr. Michelle Bradbury of Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center (MSKCC) and Weill Cornell Medicine, has proposed a novel approach to antibody-based imaging of cancer, using ultrasmall silica nanoparticles — better known as 'Cornell dots' (or C dots) — inv

8h

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Scientists develop novel vaccine for lassa fever and rabies

A novel vaccine designed to protect people from both Lassa fever and rabies showed promise in preclinical testing, according to new research published in Nature Communications. The investigational vaccine, called LASSARAB, was developed and tested by scientists at Thomas Jefferson University in Philadelphia; the University of Minho in Braga, Portugal; the University of California, San Diego; and t

8h

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Questioning the link between pollution by magnetite particles and Alzheimer's disease

A 2016 study showed that exposure to urban pollution involving magnetite particles played a role in the development of Alzheimer's disease. It began from the hypothesis that magnetite particles would generate chemical reactions that could cause oxidative stress for neurons. CNRS researchers have now called this connection into question, showing that it is very unlikely that magnetite is involved i

8h

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Did sexism play a role in Serena Williams' loss at the US Open?

A new Statistics Views article examines whether sexism played a role in what took place in the final round of the women's singles at the 2018 US Open, when American tennis superstar Serena Williams was fined for three code violations that caused her to be penalized during a game when she criticized the umpire for a controversial call and labeled him a 'thief.'

8h

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Geoengineering, other technologies won't solve climate woes

The IPCC report released in early October underscored the need to act quickly to cut greenhouse gas emissions before the planet's temperatures rise to an unacceptable level. A new study published in Nature Communications says that geoengineering or other technologies aren't enough on their own to prevent too much warming.

8h

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

New study examines Brexit's effect on 'Sugar Tax' and coronary heart disease

A new study published in Public Health Nutrition examines the potential effects of Brexit on the 'Sugar Tax' and coronary heart disease (CHD) in England.

8h

Science | The Guardian

22

Footage from inside Soyuz spacecraft shows crew at moment of failure – video

A Russian-American space crew have been forced to make an emergency landing in Kazakhstan after their Soyuz rocket suffered a failure shortly after launching from Russia’s Baikonur cosmodrome in one of the most serious space incidents in recent years Space crew abort flight after post-launch rocket failure Continue reading…

8h

Phys.org

6

A tiny antenna could be good for your health—all you have to do is stick it in your brain

Antennas have come a long way from the rabbit ears on your old TV. But the antenna that Northeastern doctoral student Hwaider Lin has been working on since 2015 is about 100 times smaller than the one currently in your smartphone.

8h

Phys.org

5

Researchers dig to get to the root of lavender's secrets

A team of researchers, including UBC's Soheil Mahmoud, have recently sequenced the genome of lavender.

8h

Popular Science

23

How to track the digital subscriptions silently draining your bank account

DIY Do you know where your money is going? You've signed up for so many digital subscriptions, you can't keep track of them anymore. Here's how to manage the ones you want—and cancel the ones you don't.

8h

Phys.org

18

Geoengineering, other technologies won't solve climate woes

The countries of the world still need to cut their carbon dioxide emissions to reach the Paris Agreement's climate targets, especially if that target is now 1.5 degrees C instead of 2 degrees C. Relying on tree planting and alternative technological solutions such as geoengineering will not make enough of a difference.

8h

Phys.org

2

Why some people won't evacuate: FEMA research

With Hurricane Michael threatening more than 300 miles of the Gulf Coast, prompting emergency declarations in more than 100 counties, the results of research done by Dr. Stacy Willett, a Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) expert, can provide insight into why some people "just won't leave" when advised to evacuate.

8h

Phys.org

13

Climate scientist sees stage set for reprise of worst known drought, famine

A Washington State University researcher has completed the most thorough analysis yet of The Great Drought—the most devastating known drought of the past 800 years—and how it led to the Global Famine, an unprecedented disaster that took 50 million lives.

8h

Phys.org

1

Does more education stem political violence?

Recent evidence of above-average levels of education among genocide perpetrators and terrorists, such as those who carried out the 9/11 attacks, has challenged the consensus among scholars that education has a general pacifying effect. Is it true that more schooling can promote peaceful behavior and reduce civil conflict and other forms of politically-motivated group violence?

8h

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

New technique for turning sunshine and water into hydrogen fuel

Korean researchers has developed new photocatalyst synthesis method using Magnesium hydride (MgH2) and Titanium dioxide (TiO2). The result is expected to contribute to hydrogen mass production through the development of photocatalyst that reacts to solar light.

8h

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Smaller, more frequent eruptions affect volcanic flare-ups

Eruption patterns in a New Zealand volcanic system reveal how the movement of magma rising through the crust leads to smaller, more frequent eruptions.

8h

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Pertuzumab in early BC: No added benefit proven despite exemplary surrogate validation

The treatment effect on disease-free survival is not large enough to derive an effect on overall survival from it.

8h

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Physical activity has health benefits for smokers, regardless of air pollution levels

A European study analyzed the effects of physical activity on lung function.

8h

Phys.org

5

Aborted launch of Soyuz spacecraft: what we knowNASA Russian Soyuz

A Soyuz space rocket carrying a NASA astronaut and a Russian cosmonaut suffered an engine problem and the crew had to make an emergency landing minutes after lift-off on Thursday.

8h

Phys.org

3

Russia's history of aborted manned space launches

The aborted launch of a Soyuz rocket with US astronaut Nick Hague and Russian cosmonaut Aleksey Ovchinin on Thursday was the first such accident in the history of manned launches in modern Russia.

8h

Phys.org

2

Tough CO2 targets 'could cost 100,000 jobs': VW chief

Setting European Union targets for reducing cars' greenhouse gas output that are too ambitious could backfire with the loss of 100,000 jobs, Volkswagen chief executive Herbert Diess said Thursday.

8h

Phys.org

21

Australia needs more carbon in its soil to help farmers through the drought

Australia has never been a stranger to droughts, but climate change is now super-charging them.

8h

Phys.org

6

Did sexism play a role in Serena Williams' loss at the US Open?

A new Statistics Views article examines whether sexism played a role in what took place in the final round of the women's singles at the 2018 US Open, when American tennis superstar Serena Williams was fined for three code violations that caused her to be penalized during a game when she criticized the umpire for a controversial call and labeled him a "thief."

8h

Viden

88

Faktatjek: Er plantedrikke bedre for klimaet end mælk?

Soja, ris, mandler og så videre – plantedrikke bliver stadigt mere populære. Og de er faktisk også langt bedre for klimaet end komælk.

8h

Phys.org

71

New tool simultaneously senses magnetic fields in various directions

Imagine trying to make sense of the cacophony of a speaker playing four songs at once, and you have some idea of the challenge faced by Jenny Schloss and Matt Turner.

8h

Phys.org

9

Sextans: The smallest cannibal galaxy discovered until now

A team at the Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias (IAC) has discovered a new case of galactic cannibalism in the neighbourhood of the Milky Way, which has caused the merging of two galaxies on the smallest scale so far known.

8h

Phys.org

1

UEA researchers to investigate mysterious hare deaths

Researchers at the University of East Anglia have joined forces with Norfolk and Suffolk Wildlife Trusts to investigate the cause of mysterious hare deaths in the region.

8h

Phys.org

3

Questioning the link between pollution by magnetite particles and Alzheimer's disease

A 2016 study showed that exposure to urban pollution involving magnetite particles played a role in the development of Alzheimer's disease. It began from the hypothesis that magnetite particles would generate chemical reactions that could cause oxidative stress for neurons. CNRS researchers have now called this connection into question, showing that it is very unlikely that magnetite is involved i

8h

The Atlantic

300+

Saudi Arabia Is Taunting Trump

Donald Trump’s Middle East policy is many things, but it is not incoherent. At the core of the president’s approach has been a stark redrawing of the friend-enemy distinction: doubling down on support, often unquestioning, for allies like Saudi Arabia and Israel, while refocusing the near-entirety of American ire on Iran. That Trump has bet big on the de facto leader of Saudi Arabia, Mohammed bin

8h

Futurity.org

1

Californian whales may save their Russian cousins

Hope for an alarmingly low number of gray whales in the western Pacific Ocean might rest with their cousins to the east, according to a study of the animals’ genetic resources. The population of gray whales that live along the coasts of California and Mexico is booming—numbering about 27,000. But there are only about 200 along the Russian coast. The new study is clarifying why. “At any one time,

8h

Phys.org

88

'Fudge factors' in physics?

Science is poised to take a "quantum leap" as more mysteries of how atoms behave and interact with each other are unlocked.

8h

Phys.org

16

Bitcoin better than the dollar?

The name cryptocurrency does not inspire trust. Advanced statistical analysis for the Bitcoin market carried out at the Institute of Nuclear Physics of the Polish Academy of Sciences in Cracow, however, has not shown any significant differences between its basic statistical parameters and their equivalents for respected financial markets. All indications are that Bitcoin is a better currency than

8h

Phys.org

6

Restoring balance in machine learning datasets

If you want to teach a child what an elephant looks like, you have an infinite number of options. Take a photo from National Geographic, a stuffed animal of Dumbo, or an elephant keychain; show it to the child; and the next time he sees an object which looks like an elephant he will likely point and say the word.

8h

Phys.org

2

Novel probe for metabolic diseases

NUS pharmaceutical scientists have developed a simple, yet highly sensitive probe to detect the fat mass and obesity-associated protein (FTO) levels in cells. This can potentially help in the early detection and diagnosis of metabolic diseases such as diabetes.

8h

Live Science

90

Mysterious Signals at the Center of Our Galaxy May Be an Optical Illusion

The universe might be tricking us with its optical illusions.

8h

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

UBC researchers dig to get to the root of lavender's secrets

A team of researchers, including UBC's Soheil Mahmoud, have recently sequenced the genome of lavender.

8h

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Efficiently turning light into electricity

Perovskites form a group of crystals that have many promising properties for applications in nano-technology. However, one useful property that so far was unobserved in perovskites is so-called carrier multiplication — an effect that makes materials much more efficient in converting light into electricity. New research performed in collaboration between the University of Amsterdam and Osaka Unive

8h

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

1

WSU Vancouver climate scientist sees stage set for reprise of worst known drought, famine

A Washington StateUniversity researcher has completed themost thorough analysis yet of The GreatDrought — the most devastating knowndrought of the past 800 years — and how itled to the Global Famine, anunprecedented disaster that took 50million lives.She warns that the Earth's current warming climate couldmake a similar drought even worse.

8h

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

'Fudge factors' in physics?

What if your theory to model and predict the electronic structure of atoms isn't accounting for dispersion energy? You come up with some 'fudge factors' to make it all work. But getting the right results for the wrong reasons can only take you so far.

8h

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Does more education stem political violence?

In a study released online today in Review of Educational Research, a peer-reviewed journal of the American Educational Research Association, three Norwegian researchers attempt to bring clarity to this question by undertaking the first systematic examination of quantitative research on this topic.

8h

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

1

New model mimics human tumors for accurate testing of cancer drugs

Walter and Eliza Hall Institute researchers have genetically engineered a new laboratory model that enables accurate testing of anti-cancer drugs by mimicking the complexity of human cancers. Using this advanced model, researchers will be able to discover the safest and most effective ways to use promising drugs called MCL-1 inhibitors in the clinic.

8h

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Nice people finish last when it comes to money

Nice people may be at greater risk of bankruptcy and other financial hardships compared with their less agreeable peers, not because they are more cooperative, but because they don't value money as much, according to research published by the American Psychological Association.

8h

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

1

Shrimp talent quest finds a winner

Shrimp help keep fish clean — and scientists have identified the 'cleaner shrimp' with the most talent for reducing parasites and chemical use in farmed fish.

8h

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Molecular link between body weight, early puberty identified

Becoming overweight at a young age can trigger a molecular chain reaction that leads some girls to experience puberty early, according to new research published in Nature Communications. Scientists have discovered an enzyme in the brain that behaves differently in fat and thin rats, and leads overweight female rats to have early-onset puberty.

8h

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

1

The culprit of superconductivity in cuprates

Researchers have uncovered an underlying mechanism related to the materials dependence in copper-based high-temperature superconductors. The research may open a new avenue for designing materials with high-temperature superconductivity.

8h

The Atlantic

15

Mark Warner Is Coming for Tech’s Too-Powerful

A troublesome realization has dawned on the big technology companies: In the near future, Congress will impose regulation on them. This prospect has spurred companies to preemptively draft privacy legislation, to jump in front of whatever more draconian measures politicians might devise. Big Tech is shrewd to move first. Congress has been quick to vent anger against Facebook and its ilk, but it h

8h

Phys.org

2

Tracking how mobile banking and texting are impacting lives in Africa

MIT Sloan applied economics professor Tavneet Suri wishes for the day when data sets are as readily available in developing countries as they are in the United States. In an effort to help that disparity, she's been researching the link between mobile banking apps and poverty levels in Kenya.

8h

Phys.org

25

Long-term exposure to ozone has significant impacts on human health

A new study has utilized a novel method to estimate long-term ozone exposure and previously reported epidemiological results to quantify the health burden from long-term ozone exposure in three major regions of the world.

8h

Phys.org

1

Busting the myths of the death penalty

October 10 is World Day against Death Penalty. Indonesia is one of the few remaining countries that still implements capital punishment. Despite many rejections from various circles, the Indonesian government still believes the death penalty serves as an effective deterrent against crime.

8h

Dagens Medicin

Bekymrende ventetid for patienter med bugspytkirtelkræft fortsætter

Kapacitetsudfordringer er fortsat skyld i, at for mange patienter med bugspytkirtelkræft venter for længe på operation. Sundhedsministeren forlænger den supplerende indberetningspligt

8h

Inside Science

8

Paleontologists' Discovery Suggests Dinosaur Kids' Table

Paleontologists' Discovery Suggests Dinosaur Kids' Table The smallest Diplodocus skull ever discovered reveals clues about the group's evolution. dino_kidsmenu_final2.jpg Image credits: Abigail Malate, Staff Illustrator Rights information: Copyright American Institute of Physics Creature Thursday, October 11, 2018 – 09:00 Claire Cleveland, Contributor (Inside Science) — Sauropods were the larges

8h

Ingeniøren

Her er den første ægte blå rose

Med et bioteknologisk trick kan forskere få en hvid rose til at blive blå – dog kun kortvarigt og delvist i første omgang.

8h

Phys.org

4

Smoke from wildfires has cooling effect on water temperatures

Smoke generated by wildfires can cool river and stream water temperatures by reducing solar radiation and cooling air temperatures, according to a new study in California's Klamath River Basin.

8h

Phys.org

1

The faulty yardstick in genomics studies and how to cope with it

Geneticists use standards to reconstruct the history of a species or to evaluate the impact of mutations, in the form of genetic markers scattered throughout the genome. Provided these markers are neutral, i.e. that they have evolved randomly rather than through a selective process, they can be reliably used as standards to compare various parameters across populations.

8h

Phys.org

400+

New half-light half-matter particles may hold the key to a computing revolution

Scientists have discovered new particles that could lie at the heart of a future technological revolution based on photonic circuitry, leading to superfast, light-based computing.

8h

Phys.org

1

The customer reviews most likely to influence purchasing decisions

Whether you are booking a hotel room, choosing a restaurant, deciding on what movie to see or buying any number of things, it is likely you have read online reviews before making your decision.

8h

Phys.org

Physicists suggest new way to measure speed in liquid micro-flows

Scientists from ITMO University developed a novel optical method of measuring reagent delivery rates for "labs on a chip." The method is based on a dynamic interaction between a nanoantenna and luminescent molecules as the distance between them affects light intensity. Processed mathematically, these light dynamics determine the flow speed. This method can also be used for measuring temperature an

8h

New Scientist

300+

Humongous fungus is older than Christianity and weighs 400 tonnes

A gigantic fungus that lives under the ground in a Michigan forest is even larger than initially estimated and may have been around for at least 2500 years

8h

Phys.org

1

Steering material scientists to better memory devices

Ideally, next-generation AI technologies should understand all our requests and commands, extracting them from a huge background of irrelevant information, in order to rapidly provide relevant answers and solutions to our everyday needs. Making these "smart" AI technologies pervasive—in our smartphones, our homes, and our cars—will require energy-efficient AI hardware, which we at IBM Research pla

8h

Phys.org

4

Stephen Hawking: Master of the multiverse

The multiverse challenges science as we know it, and Hawking wasn't pleased with it. But our journey to the edges of time has since reshaped our vision of the cosmos, and ourselves.

8h

Phys.org

2

Mussel-inspired coatings for drug delivery

Nature is full of wonderful, time-tested solutions to different challenges. Science has turned its attention to reproducing and repurposing these phenomena to create more sustainable responses to human challenges. This relatively new field, known as biomimicry, has been growing exponentially over the past decade to create entire scientific community inspired by the natural world. This week, a size

8h

Wired

19

Trainergram and the Focused, Personal Power of the Finsta

Instagram may seem like a passive experience, but it's an easy way to learn things at your own pace—like a good workout regimen.

8h

Futurity.org

6

These 3D-printed parts ‘remember’ how we use them

Researchers have developed 3D-printed devices that can track and store their own use—without batteries or electronics. Cheap and easily customizable, 3D-printed devices are perfect for assistive technology, like prosthetics or “smart” pill bottles that can help patients remember to take their daily medications. But these plastic parts don’t have electronics, which means they can’t monitor how pat

8h

Scientific American Content

4

Beyond Intelligence

— Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

8h

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

A novel biosensor to advance diverse high-level production of microbial cell factories

A research group at KAIST presented a novel biosensor which can produce diverse, high-level microbial cell factories. The biosensor monitors the concentration of products and even intermediates when new strains are being developed. This strategy provides a new platform for manufacturing diverse natural products from renewable resources. The team succeeded in creating four natural products of high-

8h

Phys.org

79

Galaxy NGC 3256 contains substantial amounts of dark matter, study suggests

A new research recently carried out by astronomers suggests that the galaxy NGC 3256 has substantial amounts of dark matter in its central region. The finding, presented in a paper published October 2 on arXiv.org, might pose a challenge to the modified Newtonian dynamics theory.

8h

Phys.org

4

The informal water markets of Bangalore are a view of the future

Bangalore is home to some 10 million people. It might also be the next city to experience "day zero": when it runs out of ground water entirely.

8h

Phys.org

3

First Man: A new vision of the Apollo 11 mission to set foot on the moon

The Apollo 11 lunar landing was the first time humans stepped on another celestial body, and the events leading up to that historic moment – which celebrates its 50th anniversary next year – are depicted in the new movie First Man, out in cinemas today.

9h

Phys.org

13

White Americans see many immigrants as 'illegal' until proven otherwise, survey finds

Fueled by political rhetoric evoking dangerous criminal immigrants, many white Americans assume low-status immigrants from Mexico, El Salvador, Syria, Somalia and other countries President Donald Trump labeled "shithole" nations have no legal right to be in the United States, new research in the journal American Sociological Review suggests.

9h

Phys.org

11

Beautiful photos put focus on Australian insects

Dramatic photos by Flinders natural sciences researcher James Dorey put a spotlight on an estimated 2000-3000 species of bees in Australia.

9h

Scientific American Content

57

Science Just Gets in the Way of Things Being How We Want Them

Look, I know what I know. I think — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

9h

Discovery (uploads) on YouTube

In the Pit | Now Streaming on Discovery GO

Whether they’re training, testing or racing, these drivers all have one thing in common: they’re only as strong as their pit crew. In the Pit looks at the role of the pit crew through some of the top drivers in NASCAR, INDY and IMSA. From: Discovery

9h

Discovery (uploads) on YouTube

Training with NASCAR's Bubba Wallace | In the Pit

Bubba Wallace and his pit crew muscle through a day of training at their home base in North Carolina. Stream Full Episodes of In the Pit: https://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/in-the-pit/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Discovery Follow on Twitter: https://twitter.com/Discovery We're on Instagram! https://instagram.com/DiscoveryC

9h

Phys.org

The interactions of chemical mirror images

Chemists from Ruhr-Universität Bochum are hoping to find out how strongly the mirror-image chemical molecules – called chiral compounds – interact with their interaction partners. They are concentrating on halogen bonds that molecules with a bromine or iodine atom can form. These interactions are currently being investigated in many areas of chemistry as design elements for functional molecules, s

9h

Popular Science

500+

Two astronauts just survived a ‘ballistic descent’ in a Russian rocket. Here’s everything we know.NASA Russian Soyuz

Space American Nick Hague and Russian Alexey Ovchinin endured a rough emergency landing. On Thursday morning, two astronauts en route to the International Space Station were forced to make an emergency landing after an issue with a booster during launch.

9h

The Atlantic

300+

When Abortion Is Illegal, Women Rarely Die. But They Still Suffer.

In August, the Argentine Senate rejected a bill that would have decriminalized abortion in the country within the first 14 weeks of pregnancy. Less than a week later, the newspaper Clairín reported that a 34-year-old woman died from septic shock after attempting to terminate her own pregnancy using parsley. The woman, referred to only as Elizabeth, became one of the 40-some Argentine women who di

9h

The Atlantic

1K

Letters: ‘It Is Clear Now That Republicans Are the Party of Wealth and Privilege’

Why I’m Leaving the Republican Party “The Republican Party now exists for one reason, and one reason only,” Tom Nichols wrote recently, “for the exercise of raw political power, and not for ends I would otherwise applaud or even support.” The Brett Kavanaugh confirmation fight, he argued, revealed the GOP to be the party of situational ethics and moral relativism in the name of winning at all cos

9h

The Atlantic

100+

How Much Would You Pay for a Prayer?

H ow can I get a divine intervention for my career? That’s the question Ravi Ganne, a young investment banker in Bangalore, typed into Google seven years ago. His search results led him to the website of a new company called ePuja . For about $15, the start-up would have a puja , a Hindu devotional-prayer ritual, performed on his behalf at one of its many in-network temples. A few clicks later, G

9h

Ingeniøren

Hjemmediagnostik skal holde patienter ude af hospitalerne

Ved hjælp af mikrolaboratorier og cloud computing – under ét ­kaldet ‘lab as a thing’ – arbejder DTU-forskere på at give kronisk syge et liv med ­færre ­besøg hos lægen og på hospitalet.

9h

Phys.org

4

The social implications of teens leaving Facebook

For years, Facebook grew in size and influence at a staggering rate. But recent reports suggest its hold on users —particularly in the developed world —may be weakening.

9h

Phys.org

1

New NSLS-II beamline illuminates electronic structures

On July 15, 2018, the Soft Inelastic X-ray Scattering (SIX) beamline at the National Synchrotron Light Source II (NSLS-II)—a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science User Facility at DOE's Brookhaven National Laboratory—welcomed its first visiting researchers. SIX is an experimental station designed to measure the electronic properties of solid materials using ultrabright x-rays. The mate

9h

Phys.org

15

It's totally possible to limit global warming to 1.5 degrees

The world is already feeling the impacts of global warming. Since before the Industrial Revolution, the global thermostat has climbed by about 1 degree Celsius. As a result, hurricanes are becoming more fierce; the seas are rising as ice sheets melt; droughts and extreme precipitation events are becoming more common.

9h

Wired

28

Jetson Metro Electric Folding Bike Review: Weak Charge

But when it comes to convenient commuter vehicles, more isn't always better.

9h

Phys.org

Improved amplifier technology for use in positron emission tomography

In the EU project ENEFRF, researchers at the Ångström Laboratory are working on improving the radio frequency amplifiers that will make technology for cancer diagnostics more efficient, accessible, and affordable. "We are seeing a dramatic increase in the number of PET scans and therefore the costs for society. With upgraded technology, the costs for maintenance and operation will be reduced," say

9h

Phys.org

1

Contactless 3-D fingerprint identification

A new system improves the speed and accuracy of fingerprint scanning and matching by using 3-D technology. No pressing required.

9h

Phys.org

6

How drought and other extremes impact water pollution

One in 10 Americans depends on the Colorado River for bathing and drinking. Last fall's record-high temperatures reduced Colorado snowpack in winter 2018 to 66 percent of normal, sparking concern over water shortages downstream and leaving water managers fearful of a repeat.

9h

Phys.org

57

The sublimation of solid ice happens just as quickly as the evaporation of liquid water

One might expect water to evaporate much faster than ice. Surprisingly, researchers from the University of Amsterdam have now shown that for small droplets of ice, this is not the case: ice and water droplets disappear equally quickly. This explains a fact that skiers know well: freshly fallen snow is very different from snow that is a few days old. The results were published in Nature Communicati

9h

Phys.org

1

The culprit of superconductivity in cuprates

When it comes to high-temperature superconductors, "high" is a relative term. In the field of superconductivity, "high temperature" means anything that can still be superconductive over 30 degrees Kelvin (K), or a balmy -405 degrees Fahrenheit (F).

9h

Scientific American Content

30

To Solve Real-World Problems, We Need Interdisciplinary Science

Solving today’s complex, global problems will take interdisciplinary science — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

9h

Phys.org

Antibiotic-free treatment of dairy cows underway

Is antibiotic resistance signalling the end for modern treatments of udder infections in the dairy industry? Not so fast, according to researchers who are developing breakthrough technology that's effective against all tested bacteria.

9h

The Scientist RSS

4

Image of the Day: First Contact

Cryo-electron tomography reveals how Salmonella sets up physical interactions with host cells.

10h

Phys.org

6

All eyes on Hurricane MichaelHurricane Michael Florida

Hurricane Michael plowed into the Florida panhandle Wednesday, Oct. 10, as a major Category 4 storm—the strongest hurricane ever to hit that region. Many NASA instruments are keeping tabs on Michael from space, including the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) and the Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR).

10h

NPR

500+

Manned Rocket Headed For International Space Station Fails, Makes Emergency LandingNASA Russian Soyuz ISS

Astronaut Nick Hague and Russian cosmonaut Alexey Ovchinin were on board when their Soyuz MS-10's booster malfunctioned. The two made it out safely. (Image credit: Dmitri Lovetsky/AP)

10h

Phys.org

3

Image: The space station transits the sun

This composite image, made from nine frames, shows the International Space Station, with a crew of three onboard, in silhouette as it transits the Sun at roughly five miles per second, Sunday, Oct. 7, 2018.

10h

Phys.org

A death-defying Icelandic organism may hold the key to withstanding extreme cold

Daniel Shain, Rutgers University-Camden chair of the Department of Biology and a member of Center for Computational and Integrative Biology at Rutgers University–Camden, can trace the roots of research that has dominated his career for 25 years to a stop at a diner in Alaska for lunch during a trip with his father.

10h

Phys.org

13

Genetic study provides new information about endangered whales

Hope for an alarmingly low number of gray whales in the western Pacific Ocean might rest with their cousins to the east, according to a Purdue University study of the animals' genetic resources.

10h

Phys.org

1

Study provides fuller picture of the human cost from terrorist attacks

Terrorist attacks injure far more people than they kill, leaving victims with lost limbs, hearing loss, respiratory disease, depression and other issues. But little research has measured the impact of that damage beyond the number of people who are hurt.

10h

Scientific American Content

200+

Why Did Hurricane Michael Rev Up to Category 4 So Quickly?

Scientists have made major strides in recent years in understanding why storms rapidly intensify — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

10h

Scientific American Content

300+

How to Help Pain Patients Cut Back on Opioids

The search is on for safe, effective ways to taper the drugs for people in chronic pain — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

10h

Live Science

200+

More Cases of Rare 'Polio-Like' Illness Pop Up Around the US

More and more cases of a rare polio-like illness are being reported across the country, according to news reports.

10h

Phys.org

1

Microfluidic molecular exchanger helps control therapeutic cell manufacturing

Researchers have demonstrated an integrated technique for monitoring specific biomolecules – such as growth factors – that could indicate the health of living cell cultures produced for the burgeoning field of cell-based therapeutics.

10h

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

3

E-cigarette additives increase inflammation and impair lung function, study finds

Flavoring and additive ingredients in e-cigarettes may increase inflammation and impair lung function, according to new research. The study, published ahead of print in the American Journal of Physiology – Lung Cellular and Molecular Physiology, also found that short-term exposure to e-cigarettes was enough to cause lung inflammation similar or worse than that seen in traditional cigarette use. Th

10h

Dagens Medicin

Traumecenter er en sællert på Kulturnatten

Sundhedssektoren byder sig til med få, men populære indslag på hovedstadens årlige kulturnat. Mens nogle af dem handler om at skabe børn, så er andre slet ikke for børn. Og det enlige hospital i centrum er et hit.

10h

The Atlantic

8

Two Alternatives to Trump’s Global Vision

Perhaps without intending it, President Donald Trump is providing a valuable service to the country by forcing a debate on America’s grand strategy in the world. Trump’s United Nations General Assembly speech drew immediate attention because of the derisive laughter it aroused from some in the audience, but its significance lies in its evocation of the pre–World War II American tradition of unila

10h

The Atlantic

200+

The Maya Kept Jaguar Zoos for Centuries

In the Mayan city of Copán, at the base of a 30-meter-tall pyramid, there’s a beautiful stone slab known as Altar Q. The altar is square, and each of its meter-wide faces preserves carvings of four of the city’s 16 rulers, including its final king, Yax Pasaj Chan Yoaat, who commissioned the structure in 776. It was as much propaganda as historical record. Though Yax Pasaj wasn’t part of a dynasti

10h

New Scientist

Could the world’s mightiest computers be too complicated to use?

China, Japan and the US are racing to build the first exascale computer – but devising programmes clever enough to run on them is a different story

10h

New Scientist

62

75-million-year old ocean microbes live forever on almost zero energy

There is so little food in the mud at the bottom of the Pacific Ocean that individual microbes living there use just 0.00000000001 Joules of energy each year

10h

Phys.org

8

Efficient light conversion with perovskite nanocrystals

Perovskites are a family of crystals that show promising properties for applications in nanotechnology. However, a property called carrier multiplication, an effect that makes materials much more efficient in converting light into electricity, has not been observed in perovskites. New research, led by UvA-IoP physicists Dr. Chris de Weerd and Dr. Leyre Gomez from the group of Prof. Tom Gregorkiewi

10h

Viden

Fejl ved opsendelse af rumraket: Astronauter måtte nødlande

Mandskabet på en russisk Soyuz-raket er nødlandet kort efter opsendelsen.

10h

Phys.org

1

Saudi Arabia opens high-speed railway to public

Saudi Arabia's new high-speed railway opened to the public on Thursday, whisking Muslim pilgrims and other travellers between Mecca and Medina, Islam's holiest cities.

10h

Phys.org

200+

Self-healing material can build itself from carbon in the air

A material designed by MIT chemical engineers can react with carbon dioxide from the air, to grow, strengthen, and even repair itself. The polymer, which might someday be used as construction or repair material or for protective coatings, continuously converts the greenhouse gas into a carbon-based material that reinforces itself.

10h

Phys.org

11

'Pulsar in a box' reveals surprising picture of a neutron star's surroundings

An international team of scientists studying what amounts to a computer-simulated "pulsar in a box" are gaining a more detailed understanding of the complex, high-energy environment around spinning neutron stars, also called pulsars. The model traces the paths of charged particles in magnetic and electric fields near the neutron star, revealing behaviors that may help explain how pulsars emit gamm

10h

Phys.org

16

GeoSEA array records sliding of Mount Etna's southeastern flank

The southeast flank of Mount Etna slowly slides toward the sea. A team of scientists from GEOMAR and the Kiel University have showed for the first time the movement of Etna's underwater flank using a new, sound-based geodetic monitoring network. A sudden and rapid descent of the entire slope could lead to a tsunami with disastrous effects for the entire region. The results have been published toda

10h

Phys.org

12

Measurement-device-independent quantum communication without encryption

Quantum secure direct communication transmits secret information directly without encryption. Recently, a research team led by Prof. Gui-Lu Long from Tsinghua University proposed a measurement-and-device-independent quantum secure direct communication protocol using Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen pairs. This protocol eliminates all loopholes related to measurement devices, which solves a key obstacle in

10h

Phys.org

32

Mathematicians confirm the possibility of data transfer via gravitational waves

RUDN mathematicians analyzed the properties of gravitational waves in a generalized affine-metrical space (an algebraic construction operating on the notions of a vector and a point) similarly to the properties of electromagnetic waves in Minkowski space-time. They report the possibility of transmitting information with the help of nonmetricity waves and transferring it spatially without distortio

10h

Live Science

400+

Astronaut and Cosmonaut Survive 'Ballistic' Fall to Earth After Failed Soyuz Launch

Sometime after 4:40 am Eastern, something went wrong with a rocket booster carrying two people to the International Space Station.

10h

Wired

48

How Tech Swagger Triggered the Era of Distrust in Government

Espoused by places like WIRED, early libertarian net culture condemned rigid government systems. Now, those views are mainstream. Heaven help us all.

10h

Phys.org

1

Simple fabrication of full-color perovskite LEDs

A next-generation optical material based on perovskite nanoparticles can achieve vivid colors even on very large screens. Due to their high color purity and low cost advantages, it has also gained much interests in industry. A recent study including researchers with UNIST has introduced a simple technique to extract the three primary colors (red, blue, green) from this material.

10h

Phys.org

100+

Muscular men prefer an unequal society

Men with large upper bodies have a tendency to favour inequality in society and a limited redistribution of resources. This is the conclusion drawn by Professor Michael Bang Petersen and Associate Professor Lasse Laustsen from the Department of Political Science in a study published in the journal, Political Psychology.

10h

Scientific American Content

200+

Is Chronic Anxiety a Learning Disorder?

Some psychiatrists think it might be, but the data are still too sparse to be sure — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

11h

Scientific American Content

41

Clara Is a Story of Exoplanets, Existential Longing—and Real Science

A conversation with the director and a science advisor behind a new film on the search for extraterrestrial life — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

11h

Ingeniøren

EU's databeskyttelsesvagthund: De første GDPR-sanktioner falder i år

Sanktioner over for GDPR-overtrædelser er vigtige for den offentlige meningsdannelse og for forbrugertilliden, argumenterer den fælleseuropæiske datavagthund.

11h

The Atlantic

200+

The Trump Era Is Destroying Black Civics, but Delivering Black Votes

The 2018 elections will mark one of the most consequential civic moments for black voters and candidates in modern times. No black governors currently hold office, but this fall could bring as many as three into power, and also promises a slate of black candidates rivaling that of any election year since Reconstruction. Black voters showed up in 2008 and 2012 in historic levels during Barack Obam

11h

The Atlantic

1K

Politics as the New Religion for Progressive Democrats

The voters who are most amped for the 2018 elections look elite in nearly every way. They are Democrats, college-educated, and largely secular. They are likely to be women, but they’re not necessarily white or particularly young. These are the people who might post rants about Donald Trump on Facebook or harass their friends to donate to Planned Parenthood. They may sign petitions on Change.org o

11h

The Atlantic

100+

Migos’ Crossover Win at the AMAs Signals an Imminent Industry Shift

One thing guaranteed to get people’s attention around awards shows is when a film, song, or artist is nominated in an unexpected category. Get Out , Jordan Peele’s surrealist horror thriller, was nominated for the 2018 Golden Globe for Best Musical or Comedy (despite the director’s wry suggestion that it was, in fact, a “ documentary ” on systemic racism), which infuriated many . Beyoncé’s submis

11h

The Atlantic

100+

Suburban-Rural Districts Are Turning on the GOP

ISSAQUAH, Wash.—It was difficult to find a good word for Donald Trump from patrons walking outside the public library in this quiet suburb just southeast of Seattle on a crisp recent afternoon. “I will choose a Republican, but I wouldn’t choose Trump,” said Robin Pineda, a medical auditor, as sunlight slanted through trees turning yellow, red, and orange. “The way he behaves, the way he portrays

11h

The Atlantic

100+

The Cow-Milking Robots Keeping Small Farms in Business

Ever since Nate Tullar was a toddler, when adults asked him what he wanted to be when he grew up, he knew what to tell them. In the ’50s, Tullar’s grandparents, George and Barbara, had bought Tullando Farm, a dairy farm located along the Connecticut River in Orford, a town in northwest New Hampshire, and started out milking a dozen cows; his parents, Rendell and Karen, had taken up the business a

11h

Ingeniøren

13

ISS-opsendelse fejler – astronauter måtte nødlande i kapslen

En raketopsendelse slog torsdag formiddag fejl, og mandskabet måtte frigøre rumkapslen for at redde livet. Det russiske rumagentur, Roscosmos, er straks gået i gang med at undersøge årsagen til ulykken.

11h

New on MIT Technology Review

100+

Astronauts have made an emergency landing after their Soyuz rocket malfunctioned on its way to the ISSNASA Russian Soyuz

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11h

Wired

100+

So, Self-Driving Cars Could Make Humans Unhealthier Than Ever

A widespread shift to autonomous vehicles could weaken America's already slipping stance in a two-front war against pollution and sedentary behavior, which are tightly linked to cancer and heart disease.

11h

Wired

500+

How the US Halted China’s Cybertheft—Using a Chinese Spy

For years, China has systematically looted American trade secrets. Here's the messy inside story of how DC got Beijing to clean up its act for a while.

11h

Big Think

8

The teenage brain: Why some years are (a lot) crazier than others

The human brain isn't fully developed until 25 years of age. Everything is there except for the frontal cortex, which is the last thing to mature. An immature frontal cortex explains the spectrum of teenage behaviors: it's what makes adolescents adolescent, says Sapolsky. "The sensation-seeking and the risk-taking; the highs are higher and the lows are lower," he says. Teenagers are more adventur

11h

Science | The Guardian

400+

Space crew abort flight after post-launch rocket failure

US and Russian crew of Soyuz spacecraft reported safe after emergency landing A Russian-American space crew have been forced to make an emergency landing in Kazakhstan after their Soyuz rocket suffered a failure shortly after launching from Russia’s Baikonur cosmodrome in one of the most serious space incidents in recent years. The launch began as a routine affair. Missions bound for the Internat

12h

New Scientist

100

Astronauts make emergency landing after Soyuz rocket malfunctions

A rocket carrying two people to the International Space Station has just made an emergency landing in Kazakhstan after a booster malfunctioned

12h

Ingeniøren

Dagen efter, at F-35B blev brugt i kamp første gang, gik det første fly tabt

F-35 styrter for første gang.

12h

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Researchers create a functional salivary gland organoid

A research group led by scientists from Showa University and the RIKEN Center for Biosystems Dynamics Research in Japan have, for the first time, succeeded in growing three-dimensional salivary gland tissue that, when implanted into mice, produced saliva like normal glands.

12h

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Lassa fever vaccine shows promise and reveals new test for immunity

A new Lassa fever and rabies vaccine shows lasting immunity and suggests a new way to test for protection.

12h

New on MIT Technology Review

100+

Data mining has revealed previously unknown Russian Twitter troll campaigns

Trolls left forensic fingerprints that cybersecurity experts used to find other disinformation campaigns both in the US and elsewhere.

12h

Phys.org

400+

US, Russian astronauts safe after emergency landing (Update)NASA Russian Soyuz

Two astronauts from the U.S. and Russia were safe after an emergency landing Thursday in the steppes of Kazakhstan following the failure of a Russian booster rocket carrying them to the International Space Station.

12h

NPR

1K

In A Drying Climate, Colorado's 'Water Cop' Patrols For Water Thieves

Sheriff's Deputy Dave Huhn's job has become more important after a series of hot, dry summers have made farmers more desperate for water, and more willing to steal it or go to battle over it. (Image credit: Luke Runyon/KUNC)

12h

Ingeniøren

IndustryTech: Nyt medie om fremtidens industriløsninger

Ingeniøren går nu helt tæt på danske industri- og produktionsvirksomheder med det nye medie IndustryTech. Lær fremtidens teknologiske løsninger at kende her.

12h

BBC News – Science & Environment

21K

Astronauts escape malfunctioning Soyuz rocketNASA Russian Soyuz

The capsule carrying the US and Russian crew members has landed safely in Kazakhstan.

12h

Phys.org

63

Japan delays touchdown of Hayabusa2 probe on asteroid: official

A Japanese probe sent to examine an asteroid in order to shed light on the origins of the solar system will now land on the rock several months later than planned, officials said Thursday.

13h

Ingeniøren

11

Hvor flytter man et renseanlæg hen?

Regeringen og Københavns Kommune vil anlægge en ny ø og byudvikle Refshaleøen. Det kræver, at det fælleskommunale renseanlæg flyttes. At finde 350.000 m2 til formålet bliver en udfordring.

13h

Ingeniøren

2

Regeringen vil investere 300 mio. i kunstig intelligens

Uddannelses- og forskningsminister Tommy Ahlers (V) vil investere 300 mio. kr. i digital udvikling, der især skal gå til at udvikle forskningen i kunstig intelligens.

14h

Phys.org

2

BMW plans to take control of China joint venture

German luxury carmaker BMW announced Thursday a plan to take control of its China joint-venture, the first foreign automaker to take advantage of Beijing's new ownership rules for the sector.

14h

Phys.org

4

Escaping the 'monster's roar': A US hurricane survivor's story

With Hurricane Michael swirling around her, Loren Beltran thought the safest place would be her boyfriend's apartment, in a sturdy building designed to withstand a Category Five storm—the maximum.

14h

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Deep learning can distinguish recalled-benign mammograms from malignant and negative images

An artificial intelligence (AI) approach based on deep learning convolutional neural network (CNN) could identify nuanced mammographic imaging features specific for recalled but benign (false-positive) mammograms and distinguish such mammograms from those identified as malignant or negative.

14h

Phys.org

4

UK Alabama rot risk may be linked to certain types of dog breed and habitat

The risk of contracting renal glomerular vasculopathy (CRGV), popularly known as Alabama Rot, may be higher in certain types of dog breed and land habitat, indicate two linked studies published in this week's Vet Record.

14h

Phys.org

26

Goat brigades help battle Portugal's deadly wildfires

Fernando Moura and his herd may not look like heroes but the Portuguese farmer and his 370 goats are the latest recruits in the country's battle against summer forest fires.

14h

Phys.org

6

Michael weakens to tropical storm after day of havoc in Florida

Michael weakened to a tropical storm early Thursday but only after wreaking a day of havoc along Florida's Gulf Coast as it flooded homes and streets and toppled trees and power lines in the beachfront areas where it roared ashore as a raging Category 4 hurricane.

15h

Phys.org

100+

Judge mulls slashing $290 mn award in Roundup cancer case

A judge on Wednesday was mulling whether to gut a jury order that Monsanto pay $290 million in damages for not warning a groundskeeper that its weed killer product Roundup might cause cancer.

15h

Phys.org

17

Toxic metal found in chain stores' jewelry

Jewelry with the toxic metal cadmium is showing up on the shelves of national retailers including Ross, Nordstrom Rack and Papaya, according to newly released test results.

15h

Phys.org

1

First tuna auction at Japan's 'new Tsukiji' market

The cries of the raucous pre-dawn tuna auction rang out for the first time at Tokyo's new fish market Thursday, just days after the world-famous Tsukiji site closed the door on its 83-year history.

15h

Ingeniøren

Blog: Bankernes kritiske systemer bliver pen-testet i et kontrolleret, skræddersyet setup

TIBER (Threat Intelligence Based Ethical Red Teaming) er et fælles, europæisk samarbejde mellem Den Europæiske Central Bank (EBC) og FSOR i Danmark, der skal sikre vores penge og banksystemerne.

15h

BBC News – Science & Environment

95

BBC helps bust Nepal chimp smuggling

A BBC investigation exposing the scale of chimpanzee trafficking last year has helped police in Nepal uncover a smuggling operation.

15h

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

9

New techniques can detect Lyme disease weeks before current tests

Researchers have developed techniques to detect Lyme disease bacteria weeks sooner than current tests, allowing patients to start treatment earlier.

16h

Science-Based Medicine

200+

A right to science

Unless forced to do so, the state and federal governments will continue to base law and policy on bad science. Maybe it's time for a constitutional amendment guaranteeing a "right to science."

17h

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Gene variants raise risk of migraines in African-American children

Pediatric researchers have discovered common gene variants associated with migraines in African-American children. The research adds to knowledge of genetic influences on childhood migraine and may lead to future precision medicine treatments for African-American children with these intense headaches.

17h

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

1

Smarter data analysis strategies will improve infertility treatment in the future

Scientists from Tartu have discovered a simple way how to improve infertility treatment in the future. The results of the study, published in Human Reproduction, a top journal in the field, can be used in precision medicine to account for the variability in each female patient's menstrual cycle. This personalised approach will first and foremost benefit those couples, who have experienced repeated

17h

Ingeniøren

Efter Niels Bohr-byggeskandale: Statens bygherre er færdig med naiv tiltro

Efter det milliardstore budgetskred på Niels Bohr Bygningen skal stærkere kvalitetssikring, risikostyring og større entrepriser få budgetterne til at holde.

18h

The Scientist RSS

1

DRC Government Cracks Down on Patients Refusing Ebola Care

As cases ramp up in Democratic Republic of Congo, the government has banned housing Ebola victims and promises police escorts for health workers at burials.

18h

Wired

200+

How Jamal Khashoggi's Apple Watch Could Solve His Disappearance

Data from wearables—like location, activity, and heart rate—provide valuable clues to investigators.

21h

BBC News – Science & Environment

84

Children on the frontline of climate change

The frightening impact of global warming is seen in drawings by schoolchildren in Vietnam's Mekong Delta.

21h

The Atlantic

7

The Atlantic Daily: Rapidly Intensifying

What We’re Following Planet Earth: Hurricane Michael, which made landfall Wednesday in one of Florida’s poorest regions, is the strongest recorded hurricane to hit the Panhandle. (It was only a month ago that another destructive hurricane of a different shape had come ashore north of Florida , in the Carolinas; the pace of recovery has been uneven there. ) Such “random acts of weather” will only

22h

cognitive science

1

Is there a Video Games UX masters after Bachelors in Psy?

submitted by /u/rev0lut [link] [comments]

22h

BBC News – Science & Environment

21K

'Flexitarian' diets key to feeding people in a warming world

Eating more plant-based foods, ending waste and improving farming are vital for the future, say scientists

22h

BBC News – Science & Environment

5K

Nepal busts chimp smugglers after BBC investigation

Police in Kathmandu rescue two trafficked chimps after the BBC revealed the smugglers' methods.

22h

New Scientist

100+

Almost all homes in the UK must be retrofitted to meet climate targets

Countries need to start a massive programme of retrofitting old homes to make them carbon neutral if the world is to meet the global emission reduction target

22h

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

UK Alabama rot risk may be linked to certain types of dog breed and habitat

The risk of contracting renal glomerular vasculopathy (CRGV), popularly known as Alabama rot, may be higher in certain types of dog breed and land habitat, indicate two linked studies published in this week's Vet Record.

22h

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

3

Ability to recover after 'maximum effort' is crucial to make football's top flight

Footballers' ability to recover after high-intensity effort may not depend on their age, but on their division level, a new study has suggested.A multinational team of scientists led by the Complutense University of Madrid (UCM) carried out maximum-effort tests with Spanish division one and division two soccer players.They then measured the players' oxygen consumption, heart rate and ventilation d

22h

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Home rehabilitation helps people with heart failure achieve better quality of life

A new home-based rehabilitation program could help thousands of heart failure patients to achieve a better quality of life.

22h

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

1

Pneumonia-causing bacteria can be spread by nose picking and rubbing

Pneumonia-causing bacteria can be spread through picking and rubbing the nose, according to new research published in the European Respiratory Journal. This study is the first to show that transmission can occur via contact between the nose and the hands after exposure to pneumococcus bacteria.

22h

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

1

Immigration restrictions for EU citizens could damage UK research and healthcare

An analysis of senior European scientists and doctors working in the UK underlines the high risk of considerable damage to the UK's science output and international research reputation caused by any post-Brexit immigration restrictions, as well as an associated reduction in healthcare quality.

22h

Big Think

31

Shame has an evolutionary purpose, say researchers

Scientists studied how people view shame in 15 societies across the world. Human societies developed shame as a way for people to act in the group's interest. Shame acts like pain, warning us of a threat to our long-term wellbeing. In the age of the Internet, shame has acquired a new side – you can now be shamed by thousands of people at once (who have probably little actual knowledge of what hap

22h

Big Think

1

FBI director defends "limited scope" of Kavanaugh probe

Sen. Kamala Harris (D-CA) pressed Wray on the Kavanaugh probe during a Senate hearing on Tuesday. Wray said the White House had corresponded with the agency about the probe but stopped short of addressing whether or to what extent the White House limited the investigation. The probe ultimately failed to produce new significant information, a result that expected by Republicans and Democrats, some

22h

Big Think

6

Why voters value loyalty over honesty in politics

New studies suggest that in competitive settings, group loyalty leads to group members displaying more dishonest tendencies. Research at Cornell found that there is a fundamental link between dishonesty and loyalty when it comes to group think. Dishonesty in politics which is an ever-present and timeless aspect is most likely due to this phenomenon. No matter what side of the political spectrum y

22h

Big Think

18

Mount Vesuvius eruption boiled people's blood, made skulls explode

The eruption occurred in the year 79 A.D. New research suggests the people of the town of Herculaneum were killed nearly instantly by intense heat According to recent findings, the victims' blood boiled, and their soft tissues were vaporized. Archaeological dig Imagine living next to Mount Vesuvius in the 1st century, four miles away in the ancient town of Herculaneum. And imagine not knowing tha

22h

Big Think

23

Nearly every country wants universal healthcare (except for one)

It's long been known that the U.S. is the only wealthy country without universal healthcare. But even significantly poorer countries also have some kind of universal healthcare system. The reasons why the U.S. doesn't have a universal healthcare system are unique in the world but aren't insurmountable. In order to join the rest of the developed world, the U.S. needs to realize that not having uni

22h

Big Think

31

What this epic obituary can teach us about living and dying

An obituary published in Delaware for the late Mr. Rick Stein has the internet ablaze with discussions on how unique it is. It stands in marked contrast to the normal, drab announcements we make when someone dies. It reminds us that there are other ways to mourn than the typical all-black, dour funeral and dreary obituary that doesn't tell you much about who the deceased really was. None Think of

22h

ScienceDaily

30

Researchers develop 3D printed objects that can track and store how they are used

Engineers have developed 3D printed devices that can track and store their own use — without using batteries or electronics. Instead, this system uses a method called backscatter, through which a device can share information by reflecting signals that have been transmitted to it with an antenna.

22h

ScienceDaily

21

All eyes on Hurricane Michael

Hurricane Michael plowed into the Florida panhandle Wednesday, Oct. 10, as a major Category 4 storm — the strongest hurricane ever to hit that region. Many NASA instruments are keeping tabs on Michael from space.

23h

ScienceDaily

3

Leveraging restaurant menus to combat obesity

Findings from a new study suggest that calorie labeling information on menus might be more effective in motivating consumers to order healthier options if the information is placed to the left of the menu item.

23h

ScienceDaily

8

New technique locates robots, soldiers in GPS-challenged areas

Scientists have developed a novel algorithm that enables localization of humans and robots in areas where GPS is unavailable.

23h

ScienceDaily

8

A new path to solving a longstanding fusion challenge

A new design suggests a solution to a longstanding problem for next-generation fusion power plants: how to get rid of excess heat they generate.

23h

ScienceDaily

4

Intense microwave pulse ionizes its own channel through plasma

More than 30 years ago, researchers theoretically predicted the ionization-induced channeling of an intense microwave beam propagating through a neutral gas (>103 Pa) — and now it's finally been observed experimentally.

23h

ScienceDaily

4

Louisiana amphibian shows unique resistance to global disease

Amphibian populations around the world are declining due to a skin disease caused by fungus. However, an amphibian commonly found in Louisiana, the three-toed amphiuma, has shown a resistance to the fungus.

23h

ScienceDaily

4

15 emerging technologies that could reduce global catastrophic biological risks

Strategic investment in 15 promising technologies could help make the world better prepared and equipped to prevent future infectious disease outbreaks from becoming catastrophic events. This subset of emerging technologies and their potential application are the focus of a new report.

23h

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Sit-stand office desks cut daily sitting time and appear to boost job performance

Sit-stand workstations that allow employees to stand, as well as sit, while working on a computer reduce daily sitting time and appear to have a positive impact on job performance and psychological health, finds a trial published by The BMJ today.

23h

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Investigation exposes 'scandal' that has left thousands of women irreversibly harmed

An investigation by The BMJ reveals how vaginal mesh implant manufacturers 'aggressively hustled' their products into widespread use, how regulators approved them 'on the flimsiest of evidence' and how the medical profession failed to set up registries that might have picked up problems far sooner.

23h

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

2

Do not give decongestants to young children for common cold symptoms, say experts

Decongestants should not be given to children under 6 — and given with caution in children under 12 — as there is no evidence that they alleviate symptoms such as a blocked or runny nose, and their safety is unclear, say experts in The BMJ today.

23h

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

1

Study challenges widely held belief that gout is primarily caused by diet

The widely held belief that gout is primarily caused by diet is not backed up by new evidence published in The BMJ today, which suggests that diet is substantially less important than genes in the development of high serum (blood) urate levels, that often precede gout.

23h

Science | The Guardian

2K

Stephen Hawking's final scientific paper released

Black Hole Entropy and Soft Hair was completed in the days before the physicist’s death in March • Black holes and soft hair: why Stephen Hawking’s final work is important Stephen Hawking’s final scientific paper has been released by physicists who worked with the late cosmologist on his career-long effort to understand what happens to information when objects fall into black holes. The work, whi

23h

Science | The Guardian

400+

Black holes and soft hair: why Stephen Hawking's final work is important

Malcolm Perry , who worked with Hawking on his final paper, explains how it improves our understanding of one of universe’s enduring mysteries Stephen Hawking’s final scientific paper released The information paradox is perhaps the most puzzling problem in fundamental theoretical physics today. It was discovered by Stephen Hawking 43 years ago, and until recently has puzzled many. Starting in 201

23h

Wired

200+

IBM Joins Fight Over Pentagon Cloud Contract Favoring Amazon

Rivals complain that specs for a potential $10 billion contract favor Amazon.

23h

ScienceDaily

78

Never forget a face? Research suggests people know an average of 5,000 faces

A research team tested study participants on how many faces they could recall from their personal lives and the media, as well as the number of famous faces they recognized.

23h

ScienceDaily

9

Gene changes driving myopia reveal new focus for drug development

Myopia (nearsightedness) and hyperopia (farsightedness) develop through different molecular pathways, according to a new study. The finding provides a new understanding of myopia, the most common form of visual impairment worldwide, and opens the way for development of drugs to prevent it.

23h

ScienceDaily

11

Freeloaders beware: Incentives to foster cooperation are just around the corner

In our society, there are always a certain percentage of people who adopt a freeloader attitude. They let other members of society do all the work and do not do their part. In a new study researchers show that it is possible to incentivize members of society to cooperate by providing them fixed bonuses and, thus, prevent freeloader behavior from becoming prevalent.

23h

ScienceDaily

3

Protein has unique effects in neural connections related to information processing

The protein SAP102, which is implicated in intellectual disability, appears to play a key and potentially unique role in regulating the form of postsynaptic AMPAR receptor currents in the brain, a new study finds.

23h

Scientific American Content

18

Mom's Genes Make Some Giraffes Hard to Spot

Baby giraffes inherit aspects of their mothers' patterning—which could give them a survival advantage if good camouflage runs in the family. Christopher Intagliata reports. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

23h

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