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Nyheder2018oktober13

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Shorter winters are stunting the growth of plants

Nexus Media News Rising temperatures are shrinking winters, causing plants to bloom early and die young. Climate change is shortening winters, bringing earlier springs and plant blooms. Until now, scientists believed premature blooming might not be all bad. But it turns out…

31min

Tech Backs Away From Saudis After Journalist's Alleged Murder

Silicon Valley executives suspended participation in a Saudi advisory committee and cancelled plans to attend a high-profile conference.

47min

Why modern men are losing their testosterone

Several studies have confirmed that testosterone counts in men are lower than what they used to be just a few decades ago. While most men still have perfectly healthy testosterone levels, its reduction puts men at risk for many negative health outcomes. The cause of this drop in testosterone isn't entirely clear, but evidence suggests that it is a multifaceted result of modern, industrialized lif

48min

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The Atlantic Daily: A Fatal Abandonment

What We’re Following #MeToo, Year Two: A year since the Harvey Weinstein allegations first broke in October of last year, what, if anything, has the #MeToo movement managed to change in Hollywood? Several prominent men implicated in the movement have returned to work. Moreover, “if this was really a reckoning, it wouldn’t mean that just a few guys have lost their jobs.” While some organizational

21min

Doctors in Scotland can now prescribe nature to their patients

Doctors in Shetland can now prescribe a walk in nature It's believed to be the first program of its kind in the U.K. The health benefits of engaging with nature are numerous. None Since October 5, doctors in Shetland, Scotland have been authorized to prescribe nature to their patients. It's thought to be the first program of its kind in the U.K., and seeks to reduce blood pressure, anxiety, and i

1h

Alexa Wants To Know How You’re Feeling Today

Amazon has patented a new technology that would empower Alexa to monitor users’ emotions, analyzing the pitch and volume of speaker commands, and respond according to how they’re “feeling.” As described in the patent , Alexa may come to recognize “happiness, joy, anger, sorrow, sadness, fear, disgust, boredom, [or] stress” and respond to commands accordingly, maybe with “highly targeted audio con

1h

Moonmoons (Moons That Orbit Other Moons) Could Exist, Scientists Say

What do you call a moon that orbits another moon?

1h

The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: Recovering from Michael

Written by Olivia Paschal ( @oliviacpaschal ) and Elaine Godfrey ( @elainejgodfrey ) Today in 5 Lines At least 14 people have died from Hurricane Michael, the category-4 storm that slammed into the Florida Panhandle on Wednesday and swept across the southeastern U.S. The Turkish government reportedly told U.S. officials it has audio and video evidence to support the conclusion that journalist Jam

1h

New catalyst opens door to CO2 capture in conversion of coal to liquid fuels

World energy consumption projections expect coal to stay one of the world's main energy sources in the coming decades, and a growing share of it will be used in CTL, the conversion of coal to liquid fuels. Researchers have developed iron-based catalysts that substantially reduce operating costs and open the door to capturing the large amounts of CO2 that are generated by CTL.

1h

Irrigating vegetables with wastewater in African cities may spread disease

Urban farmers growing vegetables to feed millions of people in Africa's ever-growing cities could unwittingly be helping to spread disease by irrigating crops with wastewater, a new study reveals.

1h

Meet The Internet Researchers Unmasking Russian Assassins

The group Bellingcat seeks to unmask covert operations, rogue groups and corruption around the globe. But can it keep its independence? (Image credit: Meredith Rizzo/NPR)

2h

Fake Adobe Flash Installers Come With a Little Malware Bonus

A clever new cryptomining scheme downloads the latest version of Adobe for you, but adds malware to the bargain.

2h

A Fatal Abandonment of American Leadership

The disappearance of Jamal Khashoggi has shocked many in the United States, but it should not come as a surprise. Indeed, it is a logical outgrowth of the policies that the Saudi leadership has been pursuing for the past two years, and the support that they have found for their approach in the Trump White House and parts of the American establishment. In April of 2016, President Barack Obama was

2h

The Future of Work Might Actually Be … Good?

The robots are coming, but they will find it hard to replace human empathy and judgment, speakers say at the WIRED25 Festival.

2h

Abnormal vision in childhood can affect brain functions

A research team has discovered that abnormal vision in childhood can affect the development of higher-level brain areas responsible for things such as attention.

2h

Microfluidic molecular exchanger helps control therapeutic cell manufacturing

Researchers have demonstrated an integrated technique for monitoring specific biomolecules — such as growth factors — that could indicate the health of living cell cultures produced for the burgeoning field of cell-based therapeutics.

2h

NASA sees Tropical Cyclone Luban nearing Oman

Tropical Cyclone Luban continued to track toward Oman as NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite passed over the Northern Indian Ocean.

2h

A new study indicates the possibility to monitor the progression of Alzheimer's Disease by monitoring major brain antioxidant levels using noninvasive techniques

In a breakthrough human study, anti-oxidant, glutathione (GSH), which protects the brain from stress, has been found to be significantly depleted in Alzheimer's patients compared to normal subjects. As GSH is a very important anti-oxidant that protects the brain from free radicals, the findings give us another measure to use when diagnosing potential for the advancement of Alzheimer's disease or r

2h

What’s the difference between a comet and an asteroid?

Space They both orbit the sun, but they're very different. But what are asteroids and comets, really?

2h

Ethanol is renewable, but that doesn't mean it's good for us

Environment Trump's ethanol plan would be good for farmers, terrible for your lungs. The Trump administration wants to increase the amount of ethanol in gasoline, a move that could add to summertime smog from cars.

2h

There's a Good Chance Your Relatives' DNA Is Online. That Means People Can Find You, Too.

Over 60 percent of people in the U.S. with European ancestry can probably be matched to at least a third cousin through genealogy databases

2h

Caesarean section use has almost doubled globally since 2000

Globally, the number of babies born through caesarean section (C-section) almost doubled between 2000 and 2015 — from 12% to 21% of all births. While the life-saving surgery is still unavailable for many women and children in low-income countries and regions, the procedure is overused in many middle- and high-income settings.

2h

New microscope offers 4-D look at embryonic development in living mice

With the development of an adaptive, multi-view light sheet microscope and a suite of computational tools, researchers have captured the first view of early organ development inside the mouse embryo.

2h

Genetic Achilles heel hurts humans fighting hepatitis C

An antimicrobial signaling molecule called interferon lambda 4 has lower activity against the hepatitis C virus in the vast majority of humans compared with chimpanzees and African hunter-gatherer Pygmies, according to a new study.

2h

Free Speech in the Age of Algorithmic Megaphones

Researchers have long known that local actors—as well as Russia—use manipulative tactics to spread information online. With Facebook suspending a slew of domestic accounts, a difficult reckoning is upon us.

2h

NASA official: Tense moments but calm crew in aborted launch

NASA's chief heard one reassuring sound over the radio link after the aborted launch of a Soyuz capsule with an American and a Russian aboard.

3h

Genealogy databases could reveal the identity of most Americans

Keeping your DNA private is getting harder.

3h

Smallest ever Tylosaurus fossil sheds light on species

The smallest Tylosaurus mosasaur fossil ever found has been revealed in a new study, and surprisingly it lacks a trademark feature of the species.

3h

Calm the immune system, halt premature birth

Cytokines, small proteins that alert the body to infection and cause inflammation, have been found in the amniotic fluid of many women who gave birth prematurely. Now, researchers are looking into whether halting the immune response will stop preterm births.

3h

Classifying microbes differently leads to discovery

Changing the way microbes are classified can reveal similarities among mammals' gut microbiomes, according to a new study that proposes an alternative method for classifying microbes to provide insight into human and environmental health.

3h

Widespread errors in 'proofreading' cause inherited blindness

Research has shown that mistakes in 'proofreading' the genetic code of retinal cells is the cause of a form of inherited blindness, retinitis pigmentosa (RP) with splicing factor defects, which affects up to 2.5 million people worldwide.

3h

Friday News Roundup – International

Plus, the first female Doctor Who. (Image credit: Alex Wong/Getty Images)

3h

Grim’s Haunted Carnival

Season’s greetings, Eyewirers! The Halloween season, that is. It’s our beloved Grim Reaper’s favorite month. Last year, as you may recall, he sought some caretakers for his haunted mansion while he took his annual vacation to gear up for crunch time. Now we seem to have a sequel quest on our hands! We’ve got it on authority from Grim himself that he’s been hard at work preparing a new, neurotasti

3h

NASA tracking Hurricane Leslie toward Southern Spain, Portugal

NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite passed over the Eastern Atlantic Ocean and captured a visible image of Hurricane Leslie as it continues to travel toward southern Spain and Portugal.

3h

Satellite finds wind shear battering Tropical Storm Nadine

Tropical Storm Nadine continues to be battered by vertical wind shear, winds that can tear a tropical cyclone apart. NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite captured a visible image that showed the bulk of Nadine's clouds were pushed northeast of the center.

3h

NASA tracking Hurricane Leslie toward Southern Spain, Portugal

NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite passed over the Eastern Atlantic Ocean and captured a visible image of Hurricane Leslie as it continues to travel toward southern Spain and Portugal.

3h

The Neil Armstrong biopic ‘First Man’ captures early spaceflight's terror

At a time when NASA is considering how to return astronauts to the moon, ‘First Man’ is a sobering reminder of how risky the first giant leap was.

3h

Did mosasaurs hunt like killer whales?

Researchers have examined the youngest-ever specimen of tylosaur ever found. Like orcas, mosasaurs might have used their bony noses to strike prey.

3h

An RNA key that unlocks innate immunity

New research shows that a versatile RNA molecule may be a key player in human cells' frontline defenses against viruses.

3h

New mechanism for how animal cells stay intact

Watching the movement of every cell in an adult animal all at once, researchers discovered ultra-fast cellular contractions. This research suggests a new role for cellular contractions in tissue cohesion, which could be the basis of a new material.

3h

Satellite finds wind shear battering Tropical Storm Nadine

Tropical Storm Nadine continues to be battered by vertical wind shear, winds that can tear a tropical cyclone apart. NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite captured a visible image that showed the bulk of Nadine's clouds were pushed northeast of the center.

3h

UT Dallas study provides fuller picture of the human cost from terrorist attacks

New research from The University of Texas at Dallas provides a more complete picture of the suffering caused by terrorist attacks. The study, published in the journal Public Choice, estimates the number of years of healthy life — years free of the injuries or disabilities caused by terrorist attacks — that victims lost due to injuries.

3h

Beautiful Boy Tries to Find a Punishing New Angle on Addiction

There are two perspectives at play in Felix Van Groeningen’s new film Beautiful Boy , reflecting the fact that two memoirs were adapted into a single tale about the ravages of addiction. The first, and more concrete, story centers on David Sheff (Steve Carell), an author and journalist who’s trying to solve his son’s substance-abuse issues through any means possible. The second is intentionally m

3h

Did mosasaurs hunt like killer whales?

University of Cincinnati professor Takuya Konishi examined the youngest-ever specimen of tylosaur ever found. Like orcas, mosasaurs might have used their bony noses to strike prey.

4h

Here's how to find out if you were part of the latest Facebook hack

Technology It affected 30 million people total, but 14 million of them got it worse than the rest.

4h

How Facebook Hackers Compromised 30 Million Accounts

Facebook has revealed more details about the unprecedented breach of its platform—including how hackers got away with the access tokens of 30 million users.

4h

Fat: A new player expands our definition of diabetes

Type 2 diabetes is reaching epidemic proportions around the world. The World Health Organization reports that more than 422 million people suffer from the disease, including over 1.2 million in Australia alone. The consequences of diabetes can be dire (cancer, kidney failure, and heart attacks) and its prevalence is rising fast. There is an urgent need to better understand how diabetes progresses

4h

Oscillations provide insights into the brain's navigation system

The brain creates a map of our environment, which enables reliable spatial navigation. The Nobel Prize was awarded in 2014 for research into how this navigation system works at the cellular level. Researchers have now shown that the characteristics of this navigation system are also present in brain oscillations that can be measured using depth electrodes in the human brain. The possibility of tes

4h

Cancer stem cells use normal genes in abnormal ways

An new study shows that CDK1 directly interacts with Sox2 to keep cancer cells 'stemmy.'

4h

Tropical moths in the mountains are larger

Researchers have measured more than 19,000 tropical moths from 1,100 species to find out whether their size varies with elevation. The researchers found clear patterns: moths increase in size significantly at higher elevations.

4h

Photos of the Week: Sea Monsters, Hawaiian Sunrise, Cosmodrome Camels

A seal pup in Wales, a luxury hotel in a quarry pit in Shanghai, horse racing in Cambodia, space-suit testing in a cave on a tropical island, dancers in Tanzania, damage from Hurricane Michael in Florida, human towers in Catalonia, Swiss fighter aircraft in the Alps, and much more.

4h

Simple, cost effective treatment following failed back surgery shows promise

Failed back surgery (continued low back and leg pain after surgery) is relatively common. With each reoperation, success, as defined by pain reduction, becomes less likely and most patients do not improve. However, preliminary studies using a simple procedure to remove scar tissue or adhesions suggests a new treatment could help those with post-surgical, chronic low back pain.

4h

Surfing on calcium waves: A larva's journey to becoming a fly

Researchers have uncovered the neuronal typeset that determines a larva's decision to pupariate, especially when challenged for nutrients. The group has investigated this question in fruit flies to understand how they integrate internal and environmental nutritional cues to make decisions on pupariation.

4h

Newly described fossils could help reveal why some dinos got so big

A new, in-depth anatomical description of the best preserved specimens of a car-sized sauropod relative from North America could help paleontologists with unraveling the mystery of why some dinosaurs got so big.

4h

Fracking to begin in Britain after court ruling

Energy company Cuadrilla will begin fracking Britain's first horizontal shale-gas well on Saturday after the High Court in London dismissed a last-minute request for an injunction by environmentalists.

4h

A new mechanism for how animal cells stay intact

Almost eight years ago, Stanford University bioengineer Manu Prakash was looking for a way to watch every cell in an adult living, behaving animal in elaborate detail. He searched the catalog of life and happened upon the simple marine animal Trichoplax adhaerens—or Tplax, as Prakash has come to call it.

4h

NASA tracks post-Tropical Cyclone Michael's heavy rains to Northeastern US

NASA satellite imagery showed that although Michael's center was off-shore of the Delmarva Peninsula and over the western Atlantic Ocean, rain from its western quadrant was affecting the northeastern U.S.

4h

An RNA key that unlocks innate immunity

RNA has long been the neglected middle child of biomolecules, the go-between between DNA, which encodes the cell's instructions, and proteins, which carry them out. Increasingly, though, researchers are recognizing RNA as a versatile molecule with, possibly, as many functions as proteins have. New research from Emory University, published in the Journal of Biological Chemistry, shows that one such

4h

US astronaut thanks Russian rescuers for their quick work

U.S. astronaut Nick Hague thanked Russian rescue teams Friday for quickly reaching him and his Russian crewmate after an aborted launch that led to their emergency landing in the barren steppes of Kazakhstan.

4h

NASA tracks post-Tropical Cyclone Michael's heavy rains to Northeastern US

NASA satellite imagery showed that although Michael's center was off-shore of the Delmarva Peninsula and over the western Atlantic Ocean, rain from its western quadrant was affecting the northeastern US

4h

A new mechanism for how animal cells stay intact

Watching the movement of every cell in an adult animal all at once, the Prakash lab discovered ultra-fast cellular contractions. This research suggests a new role for cellular contractions in tissue cohesion, which could be the basis of a new material.

4h

An RNA key that unlocks innate immunity

New research from Emory University, published in the Journal of Biological Chemistry, shows that a versatile RNA molecule may be a key player in human cells' frontline defenses against viruses.

4h

Pilots sue Ryanair over Dutch airport pullout

Pilots are suing Ryanair over the closure of its base in the Dutch city of Eindhoven, unions said Friday, accusing the carrier of trying to break strikes with the move.

4h

How to Check If Your Facebook Account Got Hacked—And How Badly

Facebook Friday offered more details about its recent breach. Here's how to see if you were affected.

4h

Tony and Parker's Feud Begins | Gold Rush

Before the mining season has even started, Tony and Parker's relationship is already tense. Catch the Season Premiere of GOLD RUSH Friday October 12th at 9p on Discovery. | https://www.discovery.com Stream Full Episodes of Gold Rush: https://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/gold-rush/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/GoldRush/ https:

4h

Facebook says hackers accessed data of 29 mn users

Facebook said Friday that hackers accessed personal data of 29 million users in a breach at the world's leading social network disclosed late last month.

4h

NASA sees Sergio's rains sweep into the US Southwest

NASA's Aqua satellite captured an infrared image of Tropical Storm Sergio's clouds and rainfall sweeping into the southwestern U.S.

4h

Purging long-forgotten online accounts: Worth the trouble?

The internet is riddled with long-forgotten accounts on social media, dating apps and various shopping sites used once or twice. Sure, you should delete all those unused logins and passwords. And eat your vegetables. And go to the gym.

4h

Quantifying evolutionary impacts of humans on the biosphere is harder than it seems

Are human disturbances to the environment driving evolutionary changes in animals and plants? A new study finds that, on average, human disturbances don't appear to accelerate the process of natural selection. While the finding may seem reassuring, this unexpected pattern could reflect the limited number of species for which data were available.

4h

Does open heart surgery affect cognitive abilities?

Understanding how heart valve surgery may affect your cognition is important for older adults. To learn more, researchers reviewed studies to see how patients' cognition changed before and after heart valve surgery. They also looked at whether surgeries on two types of heart valves, the mitral or the aortic, were associated with better or worse outcomes.

4h

Hundreds of dietary supplements are tainted with potentially harmful drugs

Most dietary supplements tainted with pharmaceutical drugs were marketed for sexual enhancement, weight loss or muscle building.

4h

NASA sees Sergio's rains sweep into the US Southwest

NASA's Aqua satellite captured an infrared image of Tropical Storm Sergio's clouds and rainfall sweeping into the southwestern US.

4h

New catalyst opens door to CO2 capture in conversion of coal to liquid fuels

World energy consumption projections expect coal to stay one of the world's main energy sources in the coming decades, and a growing share of it will be used in CTL, the conversion of coal to liquid fuels. Researchers from Beijing and Eindhoven have developed iron-based catalysts that substantially reduce operating costs and open the door to capturing the large amounts of CO2 that are generated by

4h

Guatemala's Fuego volcano erupts again

Guatemala's deadly Fuego volcano erupted anew early Friday, unleashing a 600-meter flow of lava and sending clouds of ash spiralling into the sky.

5h

Another NASA space telescope shuts down in orbit

Another NASA space telescope has shut down and halted science observations.

5h

Researchers quickly harvest 2-D materials, bringing them closer to commercialization

Researchers have developed a technique to harvest 2-inch diameter wafers of 2-D material within just a few minutes. They can then be stacked together to form an electronic device within an hour.

5h

Sidestepping the pitfalls of overconfidence with plausible deniability

Although confidence can serve as both a blessing and a curse, new research shows how people can reap the rewards without risking the social penalties for overconfidence.

5h

New catalyst opens door to carbon dioxide capture in conversion of coal to liquid fuels

World energy consumption projections predict that coal will remain one of the world's main energy sources in coming decades, and a growing share of it will be used in CTL, the conversion of coal to liquid fuels. Researchers from the National Institute of Clean-and-Low-Carbon Energy in Beijing and Eindhoven University of Technology have developed iron-based catalysts that substantially reduce opera

5h

Humans could survive underground, but it would take a lot more than shovels

Technology How to avoid becoming a full-blown mole person. With good design and a lot of psychological support, humans could make convincing—and surprisingly healthy—mole people.

5h

The UK Pharmaceutical Industry Braces for Brexit

As Britain's departure date from the European Union approaches, drugmakers are preparing for potential changes to regulatory procedures and border controls.

5h

Gadget Lab Podcast: Ivy Ross, Google’s Head of Hardware Design

The Gadget Lab team breaks down this week’s tech news and welcomes special guest Ivy Ross to the show, to talk about the new Google Pixel products.

5h

Snap, Crackle, Pop: What Rice Cereal Can Tell Us About Collapsing Ice Shelves

Snap, Crackle, Pop: What Rice Cereal Can Tell Us About Collapsing Ice Shelves New research reveals how wet porous materials collapse under pressure. RiceCereal_topNteaser.jpg Image credits: Francois Guillard and Itai Einav Physics Friday, October 12, 2018 – 14:00 Charles Q. Choi, Contributor Inside Science) — The crackle of wet rice puffs is more than snappy advertising strategy: Pouring milk in

5h

A Russian Mail-Order Bride and a Jaw-Dropping Twist

“The first time you hear this story, your jaw is on the floor,” said Nathan Miller in a recent interview with The Atlantic . “You just can’t believe it.” Miller is referring to a true story—his co-director Wes Hurley’s life story, to be exact. It comes to vivid and uproarious life in their short documentary, Little Potato. Told through artful film projections and interviews with Hurley and his mo

5h

Sidestepping the pitfalls of overconfidence with plausible deniability

Although confidence can serve as both a blessing and a curse, new research from the University of Notre Dame shows how people can reap the rewards without risking the social penalties for overconfidence.

5h

Researchers quickly harvest 2-D materials, bringing them closer to commercialization

Researchers in the Department of Mechanical Engineering at MIT have developed a technique to harvest 2-inch diameter wafers of 2-D material within just a few minutes. They can then be stacked together to form an electronic device within an hour.

5h

Humanoid Robot Atlas Can Now Do Parkour and That's Not at All Terrifying

Atlas, the humanoid robot that can run like a person, recently demonstrated a few new tricks.

5h

Google Home Hub vs. Amazon vs. Facebook: How the video devices compare

In the coming battle of the talking video speakers, Google is selling YouTube, Amazon looks to Prime Video and with Facebook, it's about the social network.

5h

Five giant backyard games to get you through fall

Gadgets The end-of-week dispatch from PopSci's commerce editor. Vol. 57. My job is to find cool stuff. Throughout the week I spend hours scouring the web for things that are ingenious or clever or ridiculously cheap.

5h

Hundreds of Dietary Supplements Are Tainted with Prescription Drugs

Less than half of the products were recalled, a U.S. Food and Drug Administration analysis found — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

5h

The End of American Lip Service to Human Rights

As the consensus grows that the Saudi journalist Jamal Khashoggi was murdered inside the Saudi consulate in Istanbul, there’s been a growing backlash to the regime in Riyadh. High-profile luminaries and media and business sponsors are bailing on Saudi initiatives and on a major upcoming investment conference in Riyadh. Thomas Friedman, who wrote a gushing endorsement of Saudi Crown Prince Mohamme

6h

Jamal Khashoggi’s Friends in Washington Are in Shock

K aren Attiah knew Jamal Khashoggi’s name and face . She saw him constantly on TV, heard him on the radio, and read his name quoted in countless articles. But it was only after she edited his first column in The Washington Post that she came to understand that he was living just a few miles away from The Post ’s newsroom, in exile from Saudi Arabia. Khashoggi had lived in Washington before, and q

6h

In the Georgia Governor’s Race, the Game Is Black Votes

In the 2018 midterm elections in Georgia, the math is simple. If turnout among black voters is low—somewhere near 2014’s midterm mark of 41 percent—the Republican gubernatorial candidate and Georgia Secretary of State Brian Kemp will probably win. If black turnout is high, and registrations among eligible black voters are solid, the Democratic candidate Stacey Abrams will probably win. All of the

6h

Ultrablack room makes everything disappear except you and the game

More often associated with artistic experiments and the innards of satellites, light-absorbing Vantablack paint may soon be heading to an arcade near you

6h

Facebook: 29 millioner profiler er blevet hacket

Det sociale medie har undersøgt, hvad der førte til angreb i september.

6h

'Huge concentrations' of toxins found in Grenfell soil, study finds

Exclusive: Public Health England has not acted on early findings of report warning of potential carcinogens Toxins that may have long-term health implications for the survivors of the Grenfell Tower fire, and thousands of people who live and work nearby, have been identified in the preliminary findings of a study led by one of the world’s leading toxicology experts, the Guardian can reveal. Early

6h

Obesity linked to increased risk of early-onset colorectal cancer

Women who are overweight or obese have up to twice the risk of developing colorectal cancer before age 50 as women who have what is considered a normal body mass index (BMI), according to new research led by Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis.

6h

The Men of #MeToo Go Back to Work

In February, I spent some time on the set of Dietland , a new AMC show created by Marti Noxon ( Buffy the Vampire Slayer, Girlfriends’ Guide to Divorce ). At that time, the number of high-profile men being publicly accused of harassment and assault had started to subside from its peak at the end of 2017, after two bombshell exposés about Harvey Weinstein in The New York Times and The New Yorker h

6h

How the grid cell system of the brain maps mental spaces

How exactly the grid cell system works in the human brain, and in particular with which temporal dynamics, has until now been speculation. A much-discussed possibility is that the signals from these cells create maps of 'cognitive spaces' in which humans mentally organize and store the complexities of their internal and external environments. A team of scientists has now been able to demonstrate,

6h

Blærebetændelse: Kortere antibiotika-kur gør dig også rask

Ny forskning viser, at tre dage med antibiotika er lige så effektivt mod blærebetændelse som fem dage på medicinen.

6h

No One Can Get Cybersecurity Disclosure Just Right

If Facebook and Google's recent security debacles proved anything, it's that disclosure is tricky business.

6h

Effects of epilepsy on neural activity in mice fluctuate with reproductive cycle

Mice with epilepsy have altered patterns of neuron activity in the portion of the brain that controls the reproductive endocrine system, University of Illinois researchers report in a new study. Furthermore, the differences in neuron activity in female mice fluctuate across the reproductive cycle, the team found. The study demonstrates that the effects of epilepsy on other areas of the brain may n

6h

Potential therapy for treatment-resistant hypothyroidism proves effective in lab study

A new 'metal-coordinated' drug-delivery technology potentially could be used to supplement the standard therapy for hypothyroidism, which affects nearly 10 million Americans, and many more patients worldwide, according to results of a study published in the journal Thyroid this month.

6h

Early changes to synapse gene regulation may cause Alzheimer's disease

New research has revealed a role for splicing proteins in the pathology of Alzheimer's disease. Increased phosphorylation of the SRRM2 protein, seen in AD mouse models and human patients, was found to block its transport to the nucleus. This reduced levels of the PQBP1 protein, causing abnormal changes to the splicing of synapse genes and cognitive decline. These phenotypes were reversed by restor

6h

How Saudi Media Is Addressing Jamal Khashoggi’s Disappearance

Here’s what we know for sure: On October 2, Jamal Khashoggi entered the Saudi consulate in Istanbul to obtain paperwork necessary to get married. He hasn’t been seen since then. Since that day, leaks from Turkish officials have painted a grim picture of what happened to the Saudi journalist and dissident: On Friday, The Washington Post reported that Turkish authorities possess audio and video rec

6h

The GOP’s Unearned Moral Indignation

Moral indignation is burgeoning again on the American right. Republican partisans are casting Supreme Court Justice Brett Kavanaugh as a victim of dastardly Democrats so depraved that they would forswear the presumption of innocence and gleefully assassinate a man’s character. Their anger is mostly genuine. Yet at the same time, the story has clearly been an enormous relief for some Never Trumper

6h

Betting with a smartphone? The casinos know who you are, and where you are located

When online gaming launches soon in Pennsylvania, bettors with a smartphone will be able to gamble from just about anywhere in the state.

6h

Simple, cost effective treatment following failed back surgery shows promise

Failed back surgery (continued low back and leg pain after surgery) is relatively common. With each reoperation, success, as defined by pain reduction, becomes less likely and most patients do not improve. However, preliminary studies using a simple procedure to remove scar tissue or adhesions suggests a new treatment could help those with post-surgical, chronic low back pain.

6h

Amy Winehouse's hologram is set to tour in 2019

Winehouse died of alcohol poisoning in 2011 at the age of 27. Los Angeles company BASE Hologram is set to put the show together, with a reported tour next year… … but many of her fans aren't happy with the news. Singer Amy Winehouse is to go back on tour in 2019, eight years after she passed away at the age of 27, thanks to technology that was in its nascent stages at the time of her death. N

7h

The Absurdity of the First Man Flag Controversy

This article contains spoilers for First Man ; yes, we all know how it ends, but there’s more to it than that. First Man , the Neil Armstrong biopic out in theaters on Friday, is many things: a breathtaking cinematic production that pays as much attention to the accurate replication of spacecraft as it does to the stunning visual rendering of the lunar surface. A dramatic retelling of a space rac

7h

Goldilocks principle in biology: Fine-tuning the 'just right' signal load

In 'Goldilock and the Three Bears', Goldilock finds that only one bowl of porridge has the "just right" temperature, and in the same way within biology, you can find the 'just right' conditions — called the Goldilocks principle. This a research team has done by demonstrating that in order to get the 'just right' amount of signalling for symbiosis in the roots of legumes, a specific enzyme calle

7h

Clues that suggest people are lying may be deceptive, study shows

The verbal and physical signs of lying are harder to detect than people believe, a study suggests.

7h

Plantar Fasciitis: Causes, Symptoms & Treatment

Heel pain felt during the first few steps in the morning might be plantar fasciitis, one of the most commonly diagnosed reasons for foot pain. Doctors have developed many treatment options that can help eliminate the pain.

7h

Multiscale Integration of Brain Data

The video illustrates key principles of the HBP workflows used for registration of data into common reference atlases of the brain. Find out how scientists can use the HBP Research Infrastructure to contextualise, relate and analyse their data. The workflows shown apply to both the rodent and human brain atlas systems of the HBP. For more visit https://www.humanbrainproject.eu/en/explore-the-brai

7h

Classifying microbes differently leads to discovery

Changing the way microbes are classified can reveal similarities among mammals' gut microbiomes, according to a new study published in mBio that proposes an alternative method for classifying microbes to provide insight into human and environmental health.

7h

The U.S. Has 1 Million Electric Vehicles, but Does It Matter?

Transportation is the largest, fastest-growing contributor to emissions in the country — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

7h

Three Theories on Jamal Khashoggi’s Fate

Last week, when Jamal Khashoggi disappeared after entering the Saudi consulate in Istanbul, I said the situation carried a strong aroma of foul play by the Saudis. Now, in the absence of even the feeblest explanation by the Saudis of what might have befallen Khashoggi, other than a planned hit, the strong aroma has graduated to a full-on cadaverous reek. What are the other possibilities? Did the

7h

The FDA Found Hundreds of Supplement Brands Tainted with Rx Drugs. Most Weren't Recalled.

Over the last decade, more than 750 supplement brands have been found to be tainted with drugs, but less than half were recalled.

7h

World's fastest camera freezes time at 10 trillion frames per second

Researchers have developed what they call T-CUP: the world's fastest camera, capable of capturing ten trillion frames per second. This new camera literally makes it possible to freeze time to see phenomena — and even light! — in extremely slow motion.

7h

Innovative tool allows continental-scale water, energy, and land system modeling

A new large-scale hydroeconomic model will allow researchers to study water systems across whole continents, looking at sustainability of supply and the impacts of water management on the energy and agricultural sectors.

7h

Ketogenic diet appears to prevent cognitive decline in mice, study finds

The Ketogenic Diet, simple caloric restriction, or the pharmaceutical rapamycin appear to improve neurovascular function and prevent cognitive decline in animal models.

7h

Photoactive bacteria bait may help in fight against MRSA infections

Researchers are testing whether a light-active version of heme, the molecule responsible for transporting oxygen in blood circulation, may help people infected with MRSA. Photodynamic therapy, or PDT, involves a compound known as a photosensitizer, which can be activated by visible light to kill diseased cells or bacteria. PDT is a clinically proven method for fighting cancer but has not yet been

7h

What ‘Go to Your Room’ Teaches Kids About Dealing With Emotions

For almost as long as children have had rooms, parents have been sending them there as punishment. But while barking “Go to your room!” surely represents an improvement over what used to be an all-too-common punishment for children—spanking—it can introduce problems of its own. As some child-development experts told me, the saying can work against a parent’s goal of raising a considerate kid. “Wh

7h

What Happened When Murphy Brown Tried to Tackle Sexual Assault

“The #MeToo movement is real. It matters. It is needed, and is long overdue.” That was Susan Collins announcing last Friday that she would vote to confirm Brett Kavanaugh’s Supreme Court nomination—effectively ensuring that he would become the Court’s newest associate justice. The senator explained her logic this way: Collins believed that Christine Blasey Ford had been sexually assaulted when sh

7h

NAM special publication outlines steps toward making health care systems fully interoperable

While health care has made great strides in recent years with the proliferation of electronic health records (EHRs), establishment of regional health information exchanges, and development of data exchange standards and interfaces, interoperability among health care technologies remains very limited, says a new National Academy of Medicine (NAM) special publication. The lack of interoperability re

7h

Calm the immune system, halt premature birth

Cytokines, small proteins that alert the body to infection and cause inflammation, have been found in the amniotic fluid of many women who gave birth prematurely. Now, researchers are looking into whether halting the immune response will stop preterm births.

7h

Guess what these young dinosaurs ate when their parents weren't looking

Imagine a crew of hungry toddlers and kindergartners with unrestricted access to the kitchen. Would they gorge themselves on candy, chips and ice cream?

7h

Glowing skin might start in your genes

Health Your DNA likely plays a key role, but there are still things you can do for your skin. Store-bought and prescription products are not the only factors that keep skin looking polished. Our genetics also influence how our skin looks and behaves, but…

7h

Insights on the effects of exercise on cognitive performance

A new study has looked at the details behind how cognitive performance may improve during aerobic exercise.

7h

Disrupting crystalline order to restore superfluidity

What if you could disrupt the crystalline order of quantum matter so that the superfluid could flow freely even at temperatures and pressures where it usually does not? This is indeed the idea that was demonstrated by a team of scientists led by Ludwig Mathey and Andreas Hemmerich from the University of Hamburg.

7h

Does climate vary more from century to century when it is warmer?

Century-scale climate variability was enhanced when the Earth was warmer during the Last Interglacial period (129,000-116,000 years ago) compared to the current interglacial (the last 11,700 years), according to a new study.

7h

Watch Boston Dynamics' SpotMini Robot Strut Through a Construction SiteBoston Dynamics Atlas

A new video of SpotMini, a quadruped robot, shows the mechanical pup looking more businesslike than usual.

7h

Snapchat launches original TV shows tailored to mobile audiences

Fall is here and the curtain is going up on new TV shows, ranging from mystery stories with young female tech-savvy crime-solvers, to reality shows following the lives of emerging drag queens and social media stars.

7h

iOS 12 has cool new feature—a tape measure for your cellphone

The latest Apple operating system comes with a handy new app: a virtual tape measure.

7h

Unapproved ingredients in over-the-counter supplements

Potentially harmful and undeclared pharmaceuticals were identified in more than 700 over-the-counter dietary supplements in an analysis of US Food and Drug Administration warnings from 2007 through 2016.

7h

Medical marijuana for symptoms in patients with multiple sclerosis

This study analyzed 17 clinical trials including 3,161 patients to evaluate medicinal cannabinoids — the chemical compounds in cannabis — for the treatment of symptoms in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS). Cannabinoids were associated with a limited and mild reduction in the subjective patient assessment of spasticity (contracted muscles), pain and bladder dysfunction in this systematic revi

7h

T. rex may have used its long feet for stealthy surprise attacks

Carnivorous dinosaurs generated seismic waves with every footfall – but because of the shape of their feet they may have masked their presence approaching prey

8h

Quantifying evolutionary impacts of humans on the biosphere is harder than it seems

Are human disturbances to the environment driving evolutionary changes in animals and plants? A new study conducted by McGill researchers finds that, on average, human disturbances don't appear to accelerate the process of natural selection. While the finding may seem reassuring, this unexpected pattern could reflect the limited number of species for which data were available.

8h

Sperm Counts Continue to Fall

Men’s sperm have been decreasing in number and getting worse at swimming for some time now—and, at least in the United States and Europe, new research says it’s getting worse. A pair of new studies unveiled this week at the Scientific Congress of the American Society for Reproductive Medicine (ASRM) in Denver suggest that American and European men’s sperm count and sperm motility—that is, the “sw

8h

The ‘Silent Majority’ Fighting Germany’s Far Right

BERLIN —In early September, as the sun set on one of this city’s final summer evenings, dozens of activists gathered at a bar in the lively Kreuzberg neighborhood to devise a plan to try to save their country from the far right. Much of the discussion concerned the details of a march taking place tomorrow in Berlin that they hoped would help reinvigorate the open-society values they felt defined

8h

Team Mountain Lion wins!

The Eyewirers have spoken! According to our very scientific competition, it appears we ought to call this fierce feline a mountain lion . How else can people make such decisions? Congrats to the winning team, and enjoy your bonuses! Artwork by Rabbit Giraud

8h

Can this diabetes drug prevent ‘pollution’ heart attacks?

Metformin, a safe and inexpensive drug used to treat type 2 diabetes, decreases the risk of heart attacks and strokes triggered by air pollution. It works by reducing inflammation in the lungs that triggers clotting, according to a new study. Metformin flips a switch in immune cells that reside in the lung and continuously samples the air we breathe. It prevents those immune cells, known as macro

8h

Shedding light on gene variants and their connections to health and disease

NIH's Clinical Genome Resource (ClinGen) and ClinVar programs are addressing a major barrier to incorporating genomic medicine into healthcare, which is a lack of evidence about the relationship between gene variants and diseases. A special issue of Human Mutation highlights the broad array of advances made through these programs, which work in concert to advance knowledge connecting human genomic

8h

How parenting affects antisocial behaviors in children

In a recent study of the parental caregiving environment, researchers found that within identical twin pairs, the child who experienced harsher behavior and less parental warmth was at a greater risk for developing antisocial behaviors.

8h

Fake or real? New study finds consumers wary of manipulated photos

In the age of fake news and doctored photos, wary consumers are not nearly as gullible as one might presume. But the source of the images does not matter much as people evaluate what is fake and what is real, a study suggests.

8h

Optical illusion spooks raptors

Researchers have designed a visual pattern that elicits long-term avoidance of high-risk areas by raptors. The scientists' work clears the way for further investigation into the visual cognition of these birds, and it has applications for conservation, because raptors are among the most common victims of collisions with planes and wind turbines.

8h

Mouse pups with same-sex parents born in China using stem cells and gene editing

Researchers were able to produce healthy mice with two mothers that went on to have normal offspring of their own. Mice from two dads were also born but only survived for a couple of days. The work looks at what makes it so challenging for animals of the same sex to produce offspring and suggests that some of these barriers can be overcome using stem cells and targeted gene editing.

8h

Do lizards dream like us?

Researchers have confirmed that lizards exhibit two sleep states, just like humans, other mammals, and birds. They corroborated the conclusions of a 2016 study on the bearded dragon and conducted the same sleep investigation on another lizard, the Argentine tegu. Their findings nevertheless point out differences between species, which raises new questions about the origin of sleep states.

8h

Does open heart surgery affect cognitive abilities?

Understanding how heart valve surgery may affect your cognition is important for older adults. To learn more, researchers reviewed studies to see how patients' cognition changed before and after heart valve surgery. They also looked at whether surgeries on two types of heart valves, the mitral or the aortic, were associated with better or worse outcomes. Their study was published in the Journal of

8h

Study provides insights on the effects of exercise on cognitive performance

A new British Journal of Psychology study has looked at the details behind how cognitive performance may improve during aerobic exercise.

8h

Quantifying evolutionary impacts of humans on the biosphere is harder than it seems

Are human disturbances to the environment driving evolutionary changes in animals and plants? A new study conducted by McGill researchers finds that, on average, human disturbances don't appear to accelerate the process of natural selection. While the finding may seem reassuring, this unexpected pattern could reflect the limited number of species for which data were available.

8h

Is there a benefit to switching from flash monitoring to RT-CGM for hypoglycemia?

In follow-up to the I HART CGM study, which showed the benefit of real-time continuous glucose monitoring (RT-CGM) compared to flash monitoring for time spent in hypoglycemia among adults with type 1 diabetes at high hypoglycemia risk, researchers conducted an extension trial that assessed the effects of continuing RT-CGM or switching from flash to RT-CGM of the subsequent 8 weeks.

8h

Dietary Supplements Can Contain Viagra, Steroids, or WorseFDA Viagra US Supplements

When the FDA discovers that a supplement is contaminated, it might issue a voluntary recall—and that's about where the action stops.

8h

NASA says will use Russia's Soyuz despite rocket failure

NASA chief Jim Bridenstine on Friday praised the Russian space programme and said he expected a new crew to go to the International Space Station in December despite a rocket failure.

8h

First Man and the Sci-Fi–Science Feedback Loop

Friday’s release of First Man , in which Ryan Gosling reenacts the true story of Neil Armstrong and the Apollo 11 mission, is in some ways a classic example of art imitating life. But many viewers may not realize that Armstrong’s real-life journey to the moon also imitated art. The figure-eight trajectory flown by the Apollo moon missions was the very same path followed by fictional astronauts in

8h

The Books Briefing: The Fictional Dystopias That Are Too Close for Comfort

Welcome to the first edition of The Books Briefing. Each Friday, we’ll thread together Atlantic stories on books that share similar ideas. Then, we’ll turn it over to readers, asking for your recommendations of books that our list left out. This week, we’re looking at how dystopian novels use the human body to explore questions about the purpose and value of life. In the essays below, you’ll find

8h

Næste strækning med S-togenes nye signalsystem bliver først klar i 2019

Den planlagte indvielse af det nye digitale signalsystem mellem Jægersborg, Klampenborg, Svanemøllen og Ryparken må udskydes til næste år.

8h

Building a better battery layer by layer

Scientists are now closer to a thin, high-capacity lithium-ion battery that could open the gates to better energy storage systems for electric vehicles.

8h

A new way to create molecules for drug development

Chemists have developed a new and improved way to generate molecules that can enable the design of new types of synthetic drugs.

8h

'Vampire burial' reveals efforts to prevent child's return from grave

Archaeologists found the remains of a 10-year-old child with a stone inserted into his or her mouth at a fifth-century Italian cemetery. They think the stone was meant to keep the child from rising from the dead and spreading malaria to the living.

8h

Why don't we understand statistics? Fixed mindsets may be to blame

The first study of why people struggle to solve statistical problems reveals a preference for complicated rather than simpler, more intuitive solutions — which often leads to failure in solving the problem altogether. The researchers suggest this is due to unfavorable methods of teaching statistics in schools and universities, and highlight the serious consequences when applied to professional se

8h

Effects of a high-fat diet may be passed on for three generations

A high-fat diet in female mice affects their offspring's obesity, insulin resistance and addictive-like behaviors for three generations, according to a new study.

8h

Understanding the neurological code behind how flies fly

Discoveries about the neurological processes by which flies stay steady in flight could help humans build more responsive drones or better-balanced robots.

8h

Death of a massive star and birth of compact neutron star binary

The unexpectedly gentle death of a massive star suggests that it was being robbed by a dense companion lurking out of sight.

8h

Human retinas grown in a dish explain how color vision develops

Biologists grew human retina tissue from scratch to determine how cells that allow people to see in color are made.

8h

How whistle-blowers shape history | Kelly Richmond Pope

Fraud researcher and documentary filmmaker Kelly Richmond Pope shares lessons from some of the most high-profile whistle-blowers of the past, explaining how they've shared information that has shaped society — and why they need our trust and protection.

8h

Neural networks don’t understand what optical illusions are

Machine-vision systems can match humans at recognizing faces and can even create realistic synthetic faces. But researchers have discovered that the same systems cannot recognize optical illusions, which means they also can’t create new ones.

8h

Cancer stem cells use normal genes in abnormal ways

University of Colorado Cancer Center study shows that CDK1 directly interacts with Sox2 to keep cancer cells 'stemmy.'

8h

Promising new therapeutic approach against Ebola virus identified

In a new study researchers have developed a two-pronged approach for targeting Ebola virus infection using linked nucleic acid (LNA) antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs)designed to interfere both genes essential for translation of Ebola virus genes and to block production of an intracellular human protein needed for the virus to enter cells.

8h

Tropical moths in the mountains are larger

Researchers from Friedrich Schiller University Jena (Germany) and two further universities have measured more than 19,000 tropical moths from 1,100 species to find out whether their size varies with elevation. The researchers found clear patterns: moths increase in size significantly at higher elevations.

8h

Goldilocks principle in biology — fine-tuning the 'just right' signal load

In 'Goldilock and the Three Bears', Goldilock finds that only one bowl of porridge has the "just right" temperature, and in the same way within biology, you can find the 'just right' conditions — called the Goldilocks principle. This a research team has done by demonstrating that in order to get the 'just right' amount of signalling for symbiosis in the roots of legumes, a specific enzyme called

8h

Oscillations provide insights into the brain's navigation system

The brain creates a map of our environment, which enables reliable spatial navigation. The Nobel Prize was awarded in 2014 for research into how this navigation system works at the cellular level. Researchers have now shown that the characteristics of this navigation system are also present in brain oscillations that can be measured using depth electrodes in the human brain. The possibility of tes

8h

Digital contraceptives and period trackers: the rise of femtech

With market predicted to be worth $50bn by 2025, is women’s health no longer being overlooked by tech? Digital contraceptive techniques have been on the receiving end of bad press recently after Swedish company Natural Cycles was described as “misleading” by the UK’s advertising body, and a number of women complained about becoming pregnant while relying on the app. But that hasn’t stopped the in

8h

Every NASA Mission Should Be Looking for Alien Life, Scientists Say

Searching for signs of alien life should be part of every NASA mission, according to a new report.

8h

Computational model links family members using genealogical and law-enforcement databases

Researchers are reporting ways in which using genetic ancestry databases to solve crimes could potentially be expanded.

8h

The metabolome: A way to measure obesity and health beyond BMI

The current standard for determining obesity is body mass index (BMI), a simple mathematical formula that uses weight and height. A new study looks at both the metabolome and the genome, and their relationship to BMI.

8h

White Americans peg ‘illegal’ immigrants by country of origin

Many white Americans make assumptions about whether an immigrant is “illegal” based on country of origin. According to researchers, political rhetoric and stereotypes are driving those false notions. A recent study shows that white Americans believe immigrants from Mexico, El Salvador, Syria, Somalia, and other countries President Donald Trump labeled “shithole” nations have no legal right to be

8h

A new way to create molecules for drug development

Chemists at The Ohio State University have developed a new and improved way to generate molecules that can enable the design of new types of synthetic drugs.

8h

Vi behøver ikke skyde køerne, for at landbruget kan levere større CO2-reduktion end elbiler

En rapport udarbejdet for regeringens eget fødevareministerium påviser fem veldokumenterede CO2-virkemidler i landbruget. Dermed modsiger den klimaministerens udtalelse i et debat-program torsdag om, at eneste løsning var at »skyde køerne«.

8h

Image: South Sudan

The Copernicus Sentinel-2B satellite takes us over South Sudan. Having gained independence from Sudan in July 2011, South Sudan is the youngest country in the world. It has an estimated population of 13 million people, more than 80% of whom live in rural areas. Most of the population relies on farming, fishing or herding to meet their food and income needs.

8h

9h

Disrupting crystalline order to restore superfluidity

What if you could disrupt the crystalline order of quantum matter so that the superfluid could flow freely even at temperatures and pressures where it usually does not? This is indeed the idea that was demonstrated by a team of scientists led by Ludwig Mathey and Andreas Hemmerich from the University of Hamburg.

9h

Scientists discovered genes that contribute to the ADHD development

A team from I.M. Sechenov First Moscow State Medical University together with foreign colleagues analyzed the genomes of several families that have members with ADHD. The results have shown that all patients had specific features in certain genes. The identification of such patterns may help diagnose ADHD. The work was published in the Molecular Psychiatry journal.

9h

How the grid cell system of the brain maps mental spaces

How exactly the grid cell system works in the human brain, and in particular with which temporal dynamics, has until now been speculation. A much-discussed possibility is that the signals from these cells create maps of 'cognitive spaces' in which humans mentally organize and store the complexities of their internal and external environments. A European-American team of scientists has now been abl

9h

NIH programs shed light on gene variants and their connections to health and disease

NIH's Clinical Genome Resource (ClinGen) and ClinVar programs are addressing a major barrier to incorporating genomic medicine into healthcare, which is a lack of evidence about the relationship between gene variants and diseases. A special issue of Human Mutation, published on Oct. 12, highlights the broad array of advances made through these programs, which work in concert to advance knowledge c

9h

A new way to create molecules for drug development

Chemists at The Ohio State University have developed a new and improved way to generate molecules that can enable the design of new types of synthetic drugs.

9h

Amateurs used a Chinese satellite to photograph Earth and the moon

A tiny Chinese satellite in lunar orbit is designed to accept commands from amateurs, and has captured a new view of the Earth and its moon

9h

Irrigating vegetables with wastewater in African cities may spread disease

Urban farmers growing vegetables to feed millions of people in Africa's ever-growing cities could unwittingly be helping to spread disease by irrigating crops with wastewater, a new study reveals.

9h

Mary Robinson on climate change: ‘Feeling “This is too big for me” is no use to anybody’

The former president of Ireland has a new raison d’être: saving the planet. Yet, despite the dire warnings of this week’s IPCC report, she is surprisingly upbeat On the morning that the world’s leading climate scientists warn that the planet has until 2030 to avert a global warming catastrophe , Mary Robinson appears suitably sombre. She wears black shoes, black trousers and a black sweater and p

9h

A savvy shopper's guide to spotting fake Amazon reviews

DIY Become a better judge. Amazon’s review system helps shoppers separate the great from the garbage. But dishonest reviews muddy the waters. Here’s how to sort the real ones from the fakes.

9h

Disorder induces topological Anderson insulator

In experiments with ultracold atoms trapped and driven by lasers, researchers have created a new disorder-induced topological state previously predicted to occur in electronic materials.

9h

What pneumococcus says to make you sick

Researchers have identified a molecule that plays a key role in bacterial communication and infection. Their findings add a new word to pneumococcus' molecular dictionary and may lead to novel ways to manipulate the bacteria and prevent infection.

9h

Xbox Reveals Details of Its Streaming Service, and the Rest of the Week in Games

Xbox's planned service, known internally as Project xCloud, could let you stream games anywhere.

9h

Researchers model how toxic proteins course through the brain, lead to disease

Many neurodegenerative diseases spread by hijacking the brain's connective circuitry to transport toxic proteins, which gradually accumulate and trigger symptoms of dementias. Now, researchers at Stevens Institute of Technology and colleagues have modeled how these toxic proteins spread throughout the brain to reproduce the telltale patterns of atrophy associated with Alzheimer's disease, Parkinso

9h

'Fake news' about volcanic eruptions could put lives at risk

The Icelandic volcano Eyjafjallajökull made worldwide headlines in 2010 when it erupted ash that was blown towards Europe, so that air traffic was grounded across the continent. More recently, the volcano's bigger sister and neighbour, Katla, has also been in the news. First the papers said the "giant volcano" was ready to blow, yet within days articles were appearing to say it was all a mistake a

9h

Irrigating vegetables with wastewater in African cities may spread disease

Urban farmers growing vegetables to feed millions of people in Africa's ever-growing cities could unwittingly be helping to spread disease by irrigating crops with wastewater, a new study reveals.

9h

Little supernova is big discovery: The origin of binary neutron stars

An international research team discovered the first recorded 'ultra-stripped supernova,' a rare, faint type of supernova that is believed to play a role in the formation of binary neutron star systems. These findings will advance our understanding of a wide variety of topics ranging from gravitational waves to the origin of precious metals like gold and platinum.

9h

Are electric fences really the best way to solve human-elephant land conflicts?

Conflict between humans and elephants has reached a crisis point in Kenya. As the elephants have begun to regularly raid farms in search of food, it has become not uncommon for local people to attack and kill them in retaliation. Between 2013 and 2016, 1,700 crop raiding incidents, 40 human deaths and 300 injuries caused by wildlife were reported in the Kajiado district alone.

9h

'Fortnite' teaches the wrong lessons

In recognition of the fact that "Fortnite" has quickly become one of the most popular video games in the world – one played by more than 125 million players – I decided to play the game myself in an attempt to understand its widespread appeal.

9h

Study: No surge in illicit cigarettes after menthol ban

Contrary to the tobacco industry's assertions, there was no surge in illicit cigarettes after a 2015 ban on menthol cigarette sales in the Canadian province of Nova Scotia, according to a brief report in Tobacco Control.

9h

Building a better battery layer by layer

A team of researchers from Shinshu University in Nagano, Japan is now closer to a thin, high-capacity lithium-ion battery that could open the gates to better energy storage systems for electric vehicles. 'The surface stabilization coatings represent a game-changing technology for the development of high-voltage cathode materials without the limitation of the electrochemical dilemma of efficiency v

9h

Early changes to synapse gene regulation may cause Alzheimer's disease

TMDU-led Japanese research revealed a role for splicing proteins in the pathology of Alzheimer's disease. Increased phosphorylation of the SRRM2 protein, seen in AD mouse models and human patients, was found to block its transport to the nucleus. This reduced levels of the PQBP1 protein, causing abnormal changes to the splicing of synapse genes and cognitive decline. These phenotypes were reversed

9h

Fat: A new player expands our definition of diabetes

Type 2 diabetes is reaching epidemic proportions around the world. The World Health Organization reports that more than 422 million people suffer from the disease, including over 1.2 million in Australia alone. The consequences of diabetes can be dire (cancer, kidney failure, and heart attacks) and its prevalence is rising fast. There is an urgent need to better understand how diabetes progresses

9h

Researchers discuss the probability of finding a gluon inside the pion

Researchers from NC State University have determined the probability of finding a gluon inside the pion. The Abstract sat down with graduate student and lead author Patrick Barry and his research advisor Chueng Ji, professor of physics at NC State, to talk about what this finding means for our understanding of how the universe works.

9h

The science is clear: We have to start creating our low-carbon future today

This week's release of the special report from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) has put scientific evidence on the front page of the world's newspapers.

9h

Antisocial kids may learn it from their parents

Less parental warmth and more harshness at home can affect how aggressive children become and whether they lack empathy and a moral compass, according to a new study. Researchers studied 227 pairs of identical twins. They analyzed small differences in the parenting that each twin experienced to see whether these differences could predict the likelihood of antisocial behaviors emerging. They disco

9h

The Catholic Sex-Abuse Scandal Takes Down a Cardinal

On Friday, Pope Francis accepted the resignation of Cardinal Donald Wuerl, the head of the Archdiocese of Washington. Wuerl submitted his letter of resignation three years ago, when he turned 75, as is customary for bishops. But in September, Wuerl traveled to Rome to urge the pope to finally accept it because of growing accusations over his role in handling sexual-abuse allegations in the Church

9h

'Vampire burial' reveals efforts to prevent child's return from grave

The discovery of a 10-year-old's body at an ancient Roman site in Italy suggests measures were taken to prevent the child, possibly infected with malaria, from rising from the dead and spreading disease to the living.

9h

Nutrient recovery from biowaste for mineral fertiliser production

Water, food and resource scarcity, alongside increasing waste are among the main challenges humanity will face in the years to come. To take advantage of the waste, European researchers have come up with a novel nutrient management solution.

9h

Vivek Maru: How Can We Make Legal Support Accessible To All?

Often, people who don't understand the law or can't pay for lawyers end up being mistreated. Lawyer Vivek Maru calls for a global community of paralegals to place the law on the side of the people. (Image credit: Ryan Lash/TED)

9h

Brett Hennig: Should We Replace Politicians With Random Citizens?

Brett Hennig says democracy — and the process of voting — is broken. To fix it, he has a radical suggestion: replacing politicians with a demographically representative selection of random citizens. (Image credit: Daniel Páth/TED)

9h

Steven Wise: If Chimpanzees Can Feel And Think, Should They Also Have Legal Rights?

Animals like chimpanzees are autonomous beings with rich emotional lives, says animal rights lawyer Steven Wise. He's working to get courts to recognize them as "legal persons" and grant them rights. (Image credit: Steven Wise)

9h

Robin Steinberg: How Can We End The Injustice Of Bail?

The bail system disproportionately impacts low-income people of color and pressures defendants into pleading guilty. But Robin Steinberg is implementing a plan to fix this–without waiting for reform. (Image credit: Ryan Lash/TED)

9h

Role of 'natural factors' on recent climate change underestimated, research shows

Pioneering new research has given a new perspective on the crucial role that 'natural factors' play in global warming.

9h

Nanoscale spin-wave circuits based on engineered reconfigurable spin-textures

Information processing technologies that are typically based on electron charges can also theoretically make use of the electric spin. Magnon spintronics can harness quantized spin waves, magnons, as carriers of spin currents in integrated magnonic circuits. The wave character and joule heating-free propagation of spin waves is a promising combination to engineer highly efficient computing platfor

9h

Graphene shows unique potential to exceed bandwidth demands of future telecommunications

Researchers within the Graphene Flagship project, one of the biggest research initiatives of the European Commission, showed that integrated graphene-based photonic devices offer a unique solution for the next generation of optical communications. Researchers in the initiative have demonstrated how properties of graphene enable ultra-wide bandwidth communications coupled with low power consumption

9h

Innovative tool allows continental-scale water, energy, and land system modeling

A new large-scale hydroeconomic model, developed by the Water Program at IIASA, will allow researchers to study water systems across whole continents, looking at sustainability of supply and the impacts of water management on the energy and agricultural sectors.

9h

Superconductivity and ferromagnetism fight an even match

Russian physicists from MIPT teamed up with foreign colleagues for a groundbreaking experimental study of a material that possesses both superconducting and ferromagnetic properties. In their paper published in Science Advances, the researchers also propose an analytical solution describing the unique phase transitions in such ferromagnetic superconductors.

9h

Team simulates how Alzheimer's disease spreads through the brain

For the first time, scientists have developed a computer simulation of how clumps of defective proteins in neurodegenerative diseases like Alzheimer's spread through the brain, much of the time in stealth mode, over as long as 30 years.

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Clues that suggest people are lying may be deceptive, study shows

The verbal and physical signs of lying are harder to detect than people believe, a study suggests.

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Graphene shows unique potential to exceed bandwidth demands of future telecommunications

Graphene Flagship industrial and academic partners published a new paper in Nature Reviews Materials analysing the possibilities of graphene in the internet of everything market, expected to reach over 12 billion connected devices in 2020

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Basophils — Underestimated players in lung development

The adult lung consists of highly specialized cell types that are protected by a variety of immune cells. How these immune cells migrate to the lungs during development and after birth and influence each other is poorly understood. Using single cell sequencing methods, researchers from Israel and Austria discovered a hitherto unknown, fundamental mechanism: immune cells mainly known in the context

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Innovative tool allows continental-scale water, energy, and land system modeling

A new large-scale hydroeconomic model, developed by the Water Program at IIASA, will allow researchers to study water systems across whole continents, looking at sustainability of supply and the impacts of water management on the energy and agricultural sectors.

9h

High-performance self-assembled catalyst for SOFC

An international team of researchers , affiliated with South Korea's Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology (UNIST) has unveiled a novel catalyst that can significantly enhance the performance of perovskite electrodes in Solid Oxide Fuel Cell.

9h

'Vampire burial' reveals efforts to prevent child's return from grave

Archaeologists found the remains of a 10-year-old child with a stone inserted into his or her mouth at a fifth-century Italian cemetery. They think the stone was meant to keep the child from rising from the dead and spreading malaria to the living.

9h

A little help from your friends is key to natural disaster recovery, study suggests

Natural disasters are life-changers for all involved, and understanding why some communities recover faster than others can be better achieved by looking at both the social and physical networks within these communities and their interplay, according to a four-year Purdue University study of Hurricane Sandy.

9h

New sustainable pulping technologies

The vision of the pulp and paper industry is to significantly reduce carbon dioxide emissions while improving energy and resource efficiency. Hence, a European initiative has developed a breakthrough technology for greener pulp production.

9h

PLO-formænd: Tvang løser ikke lægemangel

Alle regionale PLO-formænd ryster på hovedet af Socialdemokratiets nye forslag, hvor nyuddannede læger skal tvinges til at arbejde i almen praksis. De kalder på nye, kreative løsninger uden tvang.

10h

Sygehus Lillebælt sætter navn på sygehuset nye top-direktør

Den nye administrerende direktør på Sygehus Lillebælt kommer fra egne række. Valget er faldet på sygehuset økonomi- og planlægningschef Christian Sauvr.

10h

Regionshospital Nordjylland har udsigt til underskud på 46 mio. kr.

For at Regionshospital Nordjylland undgår at at overskride sit budget, skal hospitalet spare 75 stillinger og operere færre i efteråret.

10h

A novel topological insulator

For the first time, physicists have built a unique topological insulator in which optical and electronic excitations hybridize and flow together. They report their discovery in Nature.

10h

Health and balance of the gut microbiota is important in the progression of bacterial infection

The health and balance of the gut microbiota is important in the progression of a bacterial infection, according to new research.

10h

Numerous boulders, many rocks, no dust: MASCOT's zigzag course across the asteroid Ryugu

Six minutes of free fall, a gentle impact on the asteroid and then 11 minutes of rebounding until coming to rest. That is how, in the early hours of 3 October 2018, the journey of the MASCOT asteroid lander began on Asteroid Ryugu – a land full of wonder, mystery and challenges. Some 17 hours of scientific exploration followed this first 'stroll' on the almost 900-metre diameter asteroid. The land

10h

Promoting bio-based products to consumers

A bioeconomy uses renewable resources and helps society meet current environmental challenges so consumers need to be aware of the benefits of bio-based products.

10h

The week in wildlife – in pictures

A rhinoceros hornbill and a white moray eel are among this week’s pick of images from the natural world Continue reading…

10h

Recycling Antarctica

How do scientists in the Antarctic minimise the waste generated by their research stations?

10h

Should vegans avoid avocados and almonds?

A video recently doing the rounds on Facebook included a segment from the BBC comedy quiz show QI. The video asks which of avocados, almonds, melon, kiwi or butternut squash are suitable for vegans. The answer, at least according to QI, is none of them.

10h

High-performance self-assembled catalyst for SOFC

A recent study affiliated with UNIST has introduced a novel catalyst that can significantly enhance the performance of perovskite electrodes in Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC).

10h

New study links common herbicides and antibiotic resistance

A new study finds that bacteria develop antibiotic resistance up to 100,000 times faster when exposed to the world's most widely used herbicides, Roundup (glyphosate) and Kamba (dicamba) and antibiotics compared to without the herbicide.

10h

Chewing gum may be effective for delivering vitamins

Nearly 15 percent of all chewing gum varieties sold promise to provide health-enhancing supplements to users, so researchers studied whether two vitamin-supplemented products were effective at delivering vitamins to the body. Their results validate the concept of gum as an effective delivery system for at least some vitamins.

10h

Study: Ketogenic diet appears to prevent cognitive decline in mice

The Ketogenic Diet, simple caloric restriction, or the pharmaceutical rapamycin appear to improve neurovascular function and prevent cognitive decline in animal models.

10h

YouTube, Reddit, and the Ever-Tightening Orthodoxy of the Rabbit Hole

Obsessive online learning can often lead to nothing but bottomless pits.

10h

To Curb Climate Change, Tax Carbon—Then Give Americans the Money

Opinion: This Big Oil-backed climate tax is something Republicans and Democrats can agree on.

10h

Fracking to start in Lancashire as legal challenge fails

Fracking for shale gas can go ahead for first time in the UK since it was linked to earthquakes in 2011.

10h

Bioethanol in diesel engines: A contribution to sustainability

Ethanol can make an important contribution to climate protection: at TU Wien, a diesel engine has been developed that can run on over 70 percent bioethanol.

10h

The Nearly Extinct Movie Tradition Filmmakers Should Bring Back

The movie overture—music set against a blank screen or still images before the drama unfolds—all but disappeared from film sometime in the 1970s. Once a Hollywood mainstay, overtures evolved naturally from their use in opera and road shows, giving moviegoers time to find their seats and settle in before the main feature. But these musical pastiches also served an important cinematic function: The

10h

How post-truth politics is sinking debate on environmental assessment reform

The past few weeks have been characterized by a growing chorus of political and media voices, many from the West, decrying the Canadian government's proposed environmental assessment legislation, Bill C-69.

10h

Leek orchids are beautiful, endangered and we have no idea how to grow them

Leek orchids don't have many friends. Maybe it's because they lack the drop-dead gorgeous looks of many of their fellow family members. Or perhaps it's because they're always the first to leave the party: as soon as sheep or weeds encroach on their territory, they're out of there. Whatever the reason, you don't see leek orchids around very often.

10h

DNA vaccine against Ebola virus shows potent and long-term efficacy in preclinical studies

A novel synthetic DNA vaccine developed based on technology pioneered and offers complete protection from Zaire Ebolavirus (EBOV) infection in promising preclinical research.

10h

Muscular men prefer an unequal society

For men, physical strength and political attitudes are linked. This is not the case for women. New research shows that ancestral human instincts affect men's political reflections.

10h

Icy moon of Jupiter, Ganymede, shows evidence of past strike-slip faulting

A recently published study reveals Ganymede, an icy moon of Jupiter, appears to have undergone complex periods of geologic activity, specifically strike-slip tectonism, as is seen in Earth's San Andreas fault.

10h

Amazon-boss får milliarder til at udvikle kæmperaket

Med kontrakten træder Blue Origin et skridt tættere på at være en del af den etablerede rumfartindustri.

10h

Farmers' climate denial begins to wane as reality bites

Australia has been described as the "front line of the battle for climate change adaptation", and our farmers are the ones who have to lead the charge. Farmers will have to cope, among other pressures, with longer droughts, more erratic rainfall, higher temperatures, and changes to the timing of seasons.

10h

Ecologists suggest it is time to rethink the modern lawn

A pair of urban ecologists, one from Australia, the other Sweden, suggests in a Perspective piece published in the journal Science that it might be time to rethink the idea of the modern lawn. In their paper, Maria Ignatieva and Marcus Hedblom note that the natural benefits of green lawns are far outweighed by negative environmental consequences, and because of that, new forms of groundcover need

10h

Debate: Mobilizing collective intelligence for the ecological transition

Rapid and massive degradation of our environment is a major threat for the future. Surprisingly, education is not mobilised worldwide to empower children. Fortunately, many initiatives explore how to make students actors of the ecological transition.

10h

New understanding of the solidification of high-pressure ice found in 'ocean world' planets

A team of theorists from Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has solved a long-standing puzzle in the nucleation of a high-pressure phase of ice known as ice VII, which is believed to exist near the core of "ocean world" planets recently detected outside of the solar system, and has recently been discovered to exist within the Earth's mantle. The findings are described in a paper publish

10h

Religious freedom laws linked to poor health in LGBT people

After Indiana's passage of a Religious Freedom Restoration Act in 2015, sexual minorities increasingly reported poor health on a national survey.

10h

YouTube Stars Are Being Accused of Profiting Off Fans' Depression

Some of YouTube’s biggest stars have found themselves embroiled in controversy over videos that critics say allow them to profit off fans struggling with depression. Over the past year, mental health and burnout have become big topics in the YouTube community. Stars like Philip DeFranco and Shane Dawson have posted heartfelt videos about their struggles with depression, encouraging fans to get he

10h

Radio Atlantic: America's Higher Education Crisis

Subscribe to Radio Atlantic: Apple Podcasts | Spotify | Stitcher | Google Play A college education has become a key asset towards success in the American economy, but for many Americans, access to higher education—especially at a prestigious university—feels increasingly out of reach. With its capricious admissions and massive debt loads, the system is struggling. So we’re sitting down this week

10h

Molecular and cellular biologist wins Eppendorf & Science Prize for Neurobiology for work on mouse brains

Johannes Kohl, a molecular and cellular biologist at Harvard University, has been awarded the grand prize in the Eppendorf & Science Prize for Neurobiology competition. He describes his work in an Essay on Science and Society piece for the journal Science. Kohl won for his work studying the mechanics of brain activity in mice as they care for their young.

10h

The tightest non-aminoglycoside ligand for the bacterial ribosomal RNA A-site

A research group at Tohoku University has made a significant discovery with positive implications for the development of bacteria-fighting drugs. The aminoacyl-tRNA site (A-site) of the 16S RNA decoding region in the bacterial ribosome looks promising for a new era of antibiotic drug development.

10h

Pioneering turbine sets new benchmark for tidal renewable energy

In its first year of testing, the world's most powerful floating tidal turbine has generated 3 GWh of electricity.

10h

Human brain cell transplant offers insights into neurological conditions

Scientists have created a 'window' into the brain, which enables researchers to watch in incredible detail how human brain cells develop and connect to each other in real time.

10h

Breakthrough in self-healing materials

Researchers have given self-healing qualities to polymers that are used in relatively inexpensive commodities, such as paints, plastics and coatings.

10h

Personality differences between the sexes are largest in the most gender equal countries

The self-rated personalities of men and women differ more in more gender-equal countries, according to recent research from the University of Gothenburg, University West and the University of Skövde.

10h

Japan delays spacecraft landing on very rocky asteroid

Japan's space agency is delaying a spacecraft touchdown on an asteroid because scientists need more time to find a safe landing site on the extremely rocky surface.

10h

US, Russian crew in Russian space center after failed launch

A U.S. astronaut and his Russian crewmate arrived Friday at the Russian space center for medical checks following a failed launch that led to an emergency landing in the steppes of Kazakhstan.

10h

Volcano decides eruptions are boring, tries sliding into the sea instead

Science Mount Etna is having trouble keeping it together. In a new study, scientists illustrate how the southeastern flank Europe’s most active volcano is sliding into the Ionian Sea.

11h

Study-Abroad Programs Enter the Israeli-Palestinian Conflict

Twice this semester, University of Michigan instructors have made headlines for their opposition to Israel. In September, John Cheney-Lippold, an associate professor in the university’s American-culture department, took back his offer to write a student a letter of recommendation after learning she planned to study in Tel Aviv. On Tuesday, a nearly identical story emerged. The Washington Post rep

11h

Letters: ‘The Supreme Court Has Always Been a Politicized Institution’

Requiem for the Court Over the weekend, Garrett Epps traced the history of partisanship in the Supreme Court. The Court that “claimed it was at least striving to transcend partisan politics,” he argued, is “gone forever.” My sense is the Supreme Court has always been a politicized institution, as conceived by the Framers and “ratified” by Chief Justice John Marshall in Marbury v. Madison , in eff

11h

What Óscar Romero’s Canonization Says About Pope Francis

“I implore you , I beg you, I order you, in the name of God: stop the repression!” When the archbishop denounced the military government for its campaign of violence against its opponents—and called on soldiers carrying out the violence to disobey orders—some men in the military decided that it was time to kill him. El Salvador was on the brink of civil war—it was March of 1980—and the archbishop

11h

Rigshospitalets vicedirektør udtrykker bekymring for Nordic Cochranes ry

Vicedirektør for Rigshospitalet Per Jørgensen frygter, at det kan bliver svært for Nordic Cochrane at genoprette sit ry efter senere tids problemer.

11h

Lektor: Vi mangler forskning til at afdække overbehandling af døende kræftpatienter

Det vides endnu ikke, om kræftpatienter med en stærkt fremskreden kræftsygdom generelt bliver for dårligt informeret om hvor slemt det står til af onkologer eller hæmatologer eller om det kun er et lokalt problem, siger forsker i rehabilitering og palliation.

11h

Rewilding: Can we really restore ravaged nature to a pristine state?

Vast tracts of land are returning to wilderness as farming retreats worldwide. But rewilding isn't an easy win – and debates rage about how to manage it

11h

We can harness algae with magnets to deliver drugs inside our bodies

If we attach tiny magnets to fast-swimming algae, we can load them up with drugs and steer them deep into the human body to deliver targeted medical therapies

11h

World's fastest camera freezes time at 10 trillion frames per second

What happens when a new technology is so precise that it operates on a scale beyond our characterization capabilities? For example, the lasers used at INRS produce ultrashort pulses in the femtosecond range (10-15 s), which is far too short to visualize. Although some measurements are possible, nothing beats a clear image, says INRS professor and ultrafast imaging specialist Jinyang Liang. He and

11h

The future of electronic devices: Strong and self-healing ion gels

Scientists at Yokohama National University and the University of Tokyo in Japan have designed an ion gel with excellent toughness and an ability to self-heal at ambient temperature without any external trigger or detectable change in the environment such as light or temperature. This new class of material has promising potential for building flexible electronic devices.

11h

Climate change: 1.5 C is worth striving for – but is it feasible?

When the Paris Agreement in December 2015 called for the IPCC to put together a "Special Report" on Global Warming of 1.5°C, scientists knew very little about the exact differences that half a degree makes (1.5°C versus 2°C). Never before have so many independent studies been conducted at such short notice, in order to meet this pressing question of the global climate negotiations community. Is a

11h

Norfolk man who illegally hoarded 5,000 rare eggs faces jail

When he was searched by police, Daniel Lingham said: "I've been a silly man, haven't I?"

11h

Parker Has His Own Ground to Dig | Gold Rush

This season, Parker Schnabel won't be mining Tony Beets' ground. Catch the Season Premiere of GOLD RUSH Friday October 12th at 9p on Discovery. Stream Full Episodes of Gold Rush: https://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/gold-rush/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/GoldRush/ https://www.facebook.com/Discovery Follow us on Twitter: http

11h

Researchers address urgent need to identify species most threatened by climate change

An international team of scientists, including researchers from the University of York, have published a set of guidelines for how to assess which species are most vulnerable.

11h

Medication you can wear

Drug-releasing textiles could, for instance, be used to treat skin wounds. Empa researchers are currently developing polymer fibers that can be equipped with drugs. The smart fibers recognize the need for therapy all by themselves and dose the active ingredients with precision and accuracy.

11h

Cells involved in allergies also play a key role in survival

Mast cells, an important group of immune cells typically associated with allergies, actually enable the body to survive fasting or intense exercise, new research shows.

11h

Overfishing and modern-day slavery

You're about to make a sandwich with canned albacore tuna today, and thinking that it's all a good thing—nutritionists talk about the health benefits of eating more seafood, after all. One thing you probably didn't think about is where exactly that tuna come from.

11h

Five in a row—the planets align in the night sky

For the second time this year, the five brightest planets can be seen at the same time. You can catch them by looking towards the western sky after sunset. The planets will form a line rising up from the horizon.

11h

How to Get Better at 'Back of the Envelope' Calculations

Estimating answers to everyday physics problems is an art form. Here's one tip: learn to ignore what you don't know.

11h

Movie Commentary Tracks Are Back—and They're a Trivia Goldmine

They nearly went extinct with the decline of the DVD, but now filmmaker commentaries are back and better than ever.

11h

Image of Day: Retinas from Scratch

Human eye organoids could help scientists develop therapies for colorblindness.

11h

Huge Iceberg Poised to Break Off Antarctica's Pine Island Glacier

Scientists are concerned the glacier is spawning icebergs more frequently than it used to — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

11h

New online toolkit to tackle modern slavery

A new online toolkit has been designed by experts to help organisations tackle modern slavery in their local communities.

11h

Archaeology can help us prepare for climates ahead – not just look back

Watching the weather for today and tomorrow is relatively easy with apps and news programs – but knowing what the climate was like in the past is a little more difficult.

11h

Scientists shine light on protein linked to fat storage

In new research that may have implications for strategies fighting obesity and diabetes, UNSW scientists have uncovered the structure of a protein believed to regulate the formation of fat in cells, as well as the formation of fat tissue in animals including humans.

11h

Researchers develop microscope to track light energy flow in photosynthetic cells

University of Michigan researchers have developed a powerful microscope that can map how light energy migrates in photosynthetic bacteria on timescales of one-quadrillionth of a second.

11h

Frances Ross discusses witnessing nanostructure formation

Professor Frances Ross joined the MIT Department of Materials Science and Engineering this fall after a career of developing techniques that probe materials reactions while they take place. Formerly with the IBM Thomas J. Watson Research Center in Yorktown Heights, New York, Ross brings to MIT her expertise in applying transmission electron microscopy to understand how nanostructures form in real

11h

Watershed groups have a positive impact on local water quality, study finds

Economists have found that in the United States, watershed groups have had a positive impact on their local water quality.

11h

Researchers quickly harvest 2-D materials, bringing them closer to commercialization

Since the 2003 discovery of the single-atom-thick carbon material known as graphene, there has been significant interest in other types of 2-D materials as well.

11h

Socialdemokratiet fremlægger sundhedsudspil: Der skal være bedre tid

Socialdemokratiet vil bruge over en mia. kr. om året på flere sygeplejersker og nærhospitaler.

12h

Hidden gapless states on the path to semiconductor nanocrystals

When chemists from the Institute of Physical Chemistry of the Polish Academy of Sciences in Warsaw were starting work on a new material designed for the efficient production of nanocrystalline zinc oxide, they didn't expect any surprises. They were thus greatly astonished when the electrical properties of the changing material turned out to be extremely exotic.

12h

When a DNA Test Reveals Your Daughter Is Not Your Biological Child

As DNA-testing companies sell millions of kits, they’ve started to rearrange families. The tests have reunited long-lost cousins and helped adoptees find their birth parents , donor-conceived kids their sperm donors . They have also, in some cases, uncovered difficult family secrets. Earlier this year, I heard from dozens of people who took a DNA test only to discover their fathers were not their

12h

Photos: The Bones of Mount Vesuvius

New research suggests that some victims of the Mount Vesuvius eruption in Herculaneum died almost instantly from heat shock.

12h

Did Vesuvius Victims' Brains Really Boil and Their Skulls Explode?

A new paper challenges the idea that many victims of Vesuvius were asphyxiated.

12h

The significance of water in a promising biomarker against cancer

The Tn antigen appears in 90 percent of cancers and is associated with metastasis. Thus, it is a promising biomarker for identifying cancer cells and has become a very attractive target in therapies to fight cancer, according to Emilio José Cocinero, member of the UPV/EHU's Department of Physical Chemistry and the Biofísika Institute, and one of the lead authors of the work. Antigens are molecules

12h

Light switch: Scientists develop method to control nanoscale manipulation in high-powered microscopes

Researchers from Japan have taken a step toward faster and more advanced electronics by developing a a better way to measure and manipulate conductive materials through scanning tunneling microscopy. The team published their results in July in Nano Letters, an American Chemical Society journal. Scientists from the University of Tokyo, Yokohama National University, and the Central Research Laborato

12h

A novel biosensor to advance diverse high-level production of microbial cell factories

A research group at KAIST presented a novel biosensor that can produce diverse, high-level microbial cell factories. The biosensor monitors the concentration of products and even intermediates when new strains are being developed. This strategy provides a new platform for manufacturing diverse natural products from renewable resources. The team created four natural products of high-level pharmaceu

12h

Happy Birthday Kelv!

On this day, October 12, many moons ago, a baby was born who would one day go on to lead hundreds of thousands of gamers in a quest to map the brain. Today we celebrate Eyewire developer Kelv ‘s birthday! Kelv’s a man of mystery, so we’ve put together this informative interview to help you get to know him. What planet would you most like to visit besides Earth? Pluto If you were an animal, what a

12h

How to Watch the WIRED25 Festival and Summit

Can’t be in San Francisco for our 25th anniversary bash? Here’s how you can join the fun, wherever you are.

12h

Why Are Bear Cams So Magical? An Investigation

The salmon-snatching grizzlies of Katmai National Park delight the internet—and obscure the big marketing business behind them.

12h

Help WIRED Track How Political Ads Target You on FacebookFacebook US Accounts

We're partnering with ProPublica to collect and analyze political ads on Facebook with a simple browser extension you can install, too

12h

'First Man' Review: Houston, We Have an Indie Blockbuster

By turns intimate and bombastic, it's the perfect film for cerebral cinephiles and IMAX-loving space odyssey lovers.

12h

Self-driving cars see better with cameras that mimic mantis shrimp vision

A new type of camera that sees in polarized light across a wide range of light intensities could help make self-driving cars safer on the road.

12h

Surgery in Space: Medicine's Final Frontier

Astronauts on long-duration flights will need access to more than just routine care — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

12h

EU-parlamentsmedlemmer slår i bordet: Kommissionen skal handle på fælles opladere

Medlemmer er skuffede over, at aktørerne i elektronik-branchen efter ti år ikke har nået til enighed om fælles standarder.

12h

Lokoførere om nye signaler: »Vores tillid til systemet hænger i en tynd tråd«

Efter næsten tre år med fejl i S-togenes nye signalsystem er lokomotivførerne ikke længere trygge ved det nye system.

12h

Lab-Grown Human Retinas Illuminate How Eyes Develop Color Vision

The mini organs may help scientists develop therapies for eye disorders such as color blindness and macular degeneration — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

12h

Tænkeboks løsning uge 40

Her får du løsningen på sidste uges tænkeboks

13h

En snert af klassekamp

Socialdemokraternes sundhedsoplæg er ikke så ringe, som man kunne have frygtet. Men det basker ikke rigtig med halen.

13h

Her er Socialdemokratiets sundhedsudspil

Socialdemokratiet har fremlagt et sundhedsudspil med 13 konkrete forslag og tre pejlemærker. Få hele overblikket her.

13h

The U.S.-Saudi Relationship Is Out of Control

Possible Saudi involvement in the disappearance—and alleged murder—of the Saudi journalist Jamal Khashoggi presents the U.S.-Saudi relationship with its greatest crisis since 9/11. If the Saudis are proven guilty of this heinous crime, it should change everything about the United States’ long-standing relationship with Saudi Arabia. Regrettably, it probably won’t. The administration’s identificat

13h

What the Black Men Who Identify With Brett Kavanaugh Are Missing

On Tuesday night, I was in an auditorium with 100 black men in the city of Baltimore, when the subject pivoted to Brett Kavanaugh. I expected to hear frustration that the sexual-assault allegations against him had failed to derail his Supreme Court appointment. Instead, I encountered sympathy. One man stood up and asked, passionately, “What happened to due process?” He was met with a smattering o

13h

The Epicenter of Republican Vulnerability in the House

Democrats’ promising prospects in the 25 Republican-held House districts that voted for Hillary Clinton in 2016 underscore the price of the electoral trade that Donald Trump’s tempestuous presidency is imposing on the Republican Party. Less than one month before Election Day, Democrats are strongly positioned to win at least 15, and perhaps more than 20, of these Clinton-Republican seats. That al

13h

The Overlooked House Battleground With Big Implications for the GOP

Updated on October 12 at 12:03 p.m. ET KANSAS CITY, Kans.— The clearest sign that Republican Representative Kevin Yoder is confronting his electoral demise came in his opening remarks at a recent luncheon of this city’s chamber of commerce. Like many other lawmakers, he boasted of his ability to work with the president. But the president Yoder mentioned first was not the leader of his party, Dona

13h

Populist psychology: How class division empowers autocratic leaders

Working-class people take rules more seriously. Upper- and middle-class people do not. Why? The latter have financial and social safety nets, so they can afford to break some rules. Research shows that, by the age of three, working-class children are primed to be more rigid about rules. Those rules help working-class people survive what sociologists call 'hard living': extreme poverty, dangerous

13h

9 heartbreaking Hurricane Michael photos remind us of nature's power

Prepare yourself: Some of these images are simply gut-wrenching The main landfall area, Mexico Beach, is almost entirely gone Take heed, folks who might face something like it in the future: Many survivors say, "We should have left." These are just some of the images left behind after hurricane Michael decimated parts of the Florida panhandle; these are from Mexico beach and Panama City, the hard

13h

Should we be working less?

Is it time to rethink how we work? Research has shown that we both work more than is good for our health and more than is useful. Numerous companies and countries have implemented 35-, 30-, and even 25-hour workweeks. None It's a little after lunch, and your struggling to keep your eyes open. Most of the important work in the day you finished in the morning. Sure, you could probably scrounge up s

13h

6 lies my English teacher told me

Sticklers correct other people's grammar, usually with a tone of haughty moral certitude. But many of the most commonly corrected errors aren't errors at all. They are misunderstandings of how the English language works. Knowing Standard English is useful, but just because a usage doesn't fit its conventions doesn't make it (or you) wrong or improper. Your English teacher hands you back your pape

13h

New infographics show how Americans cope with hurricanes

New infographics reveal how we deal with approaching hurricanes. We're ultimately defenseless, but here's how we get though it all. Among the storm prep essentials? Alcohol. As weather becomes more extreme, we can expect the intensity of hurricanes to be on the rise. As it is, according to the Congressional Budget Office , the average yearly costs are already about $28 billion. Most of that tab h

13h

Dansk ingeniør byggede bro til pingviner og havne til D-dag

Ove Arup er filosoffen, der blev verdenskendt ingeniør – ny udstilling hædrer manden bag ikoner som Sydney Operahus.

13h

Soyuz-uheld kan sætte hele rumstationens liv over styr

Rumvandringer og forsøg bliver sat på standby, og det er uvist, om ISS bliver bemandet fra januar, hvor den nuværende besætning senest skal hjem, fordi deres rumfartøj har begrænset levetid.

14h

Widespread errors in 'proofreading' cause inherited blindness

Research has shown that mistakes in 'proofreading' the genetic code of retinal cells is the cause of a form of inherited blindness, retinitis pigmentosa (RP) with splicing factor defects, which affects up to 2.5 million people worldwide.

14h

Does climate vary more from century to century when it is warmer?

Century-scale climate variability was enhanced when the Earth was warmer during the Last Interglacial period (129,000-116,000 years ago) compared to the current interglacial (the last 11,700 years), according to a new UCL-led study.

14h

Why don't we understand statistics? Fixed mindsets may be to blame

The first study of why people struggle to solve statistical problems reveals a preference for complicated rather than simpler, more intuitive solutions — which often leads to failure in solving the problem altogether. The researchers suggest this is due to unfavorable methods of teaching statistics in schools and universities, and highlight the serious consequences when applied to professional se

14h

What hurricanes mean for Red Tide

Hurricane Michael is likely to affect the Florida Red Tide bloom. What's not yet clear is how.

14h

The US wants a laser weapon that shouts at people before burning them

The US Marines are developing a laser weapon that can shout at people from 100 metres away. It can also be turned up to deafen, dazzle or cause painful burns

14h

Mice eat too much food if their great grandmother did the same

When mice are given a high-fat diet their great grandchildren are more likely to put on weight – and they show a greater than expected taste for alcohol

14h

Does climate vary more from century to century when it is warmer?

Century-scale climate variability was enhanced when the Earth was warmer during the Last Interglacial period (129-116 thousand years ago) compared to the current interglacial (the last 11,700 years), according to a new UCL-led study.

14h

The Dangers of a Neo-Nazi Woodstock

APOLDA, GERMANY —On a recent sunny October afternoon, in a verdant field in central Germany, a vast stage stood beside a cluster of tents, concession stands, and porta-potties awaiting the arrival of some 5,000 attendees. It could have been the site of a music festival practically anywhere in Europe. But this was Rock Gegen Überfremdung, or, roughly, “Rock Against Foreign Inundation,” a sort of W

14h

Hør ugens podcast: Halvhjertet klimaplan og fejl på S-togenes signalsystem

To år efter at den første S-togsstrækning fik det nye signalsystem, kører togene stadig med nedsat hastighed og konstante fejlmeddelelser fra CBTC-systemet. Den globale opvarmning kræver handling nu, ifølge FN’s Klimapanel.

14h

Russia may bring forward manned launch after rocket failure

Russia said Friday it was likely to bring forward the flight of a new manned space mission to the International Space Station but postpone the launch of a cargo ship after a rocket failure that forced two crew members to make an emergency landing.

15h

Plastic surgeon buys top S. Korea Bitcoin exchange

A consortium led by a prominent Seoul plastic surgeon purchased a controlling stake in South Korea's largest cryptocurrency exchange, reports said Friday.

15h

Onkologer giver døende kræftpatienter falske håb

Onkologerne er ikke gode nok til den svære samtale med uhelbredeligt syge patienter. Det fører til falske håb og overbehandling, siger overlæge Gitte Irene Juhl, Nordsjællands Hospitals palliative enhed.

15h

Onkolog: Ja, terminale kræftpatienter får ikke ordentlig besked

Svært metastaserede kræftpatienter får ganske rigtigt alt for ofte ikke den nødvendige information om deres tilstand til at kunne indse, om videre kemobehandling eller anden aggressiv kræftbehandling giver mening, vurderer professor Anders Jakobsen, Center Lillebælt, Vejle Sygehus.

16h

Professor: Medicinalindustri og presse nærer kræftsyges falske håb

Professor i sundhedsøkonomi Jes Søgaard revser medicinalindustrien og pressen for at give terminale patienter urealistiske forestillinger om overlevelse ved at markedsføre nye lægemidler på tvivlsomme surrogatmål frem for på den totale overlevelse.

16h

Industrien: Ansvaret for valget af kræftbehandling ligger hos lægen

Ansvaret for, at alvorligt syge kræftpatienter får den rette behandling, ligger hos lægen, pointerer Lægemiddelindustriforeningens direktør Ida Sofie Jensen. Hun påpeger, at industrien leverer dokumentation for effekt og bivirkninger i godkendte indlægssedler.

16h

Thermography is Not Approved for Breast Cancer Screening in Canada

Breast cancer thermography is being promoted across Canada as a reliable and effective way of identifying breast tumors. There is no evidence thermography is actually capable of doing so.

16h

Socialdemokratiet vil tvinge nyuddannede læger ud i almen praksis

Nyuddannede læger tvinges til i et halvt år at arbejde i en almen praksis i de dele af landet, hvor der er størst mangel på praktiserende læger, foreslår Socialdemokratiet.

16h

Russia probes ISS rocket failure

Russian investigators have launched a probe into why a Soyuz rocket failed shortly after blast-off, in a major setback for Russia's beleaguered space industry.

16h

Can most Americans be identified by a relative's DNA? Maybe soon

The remarkable technique used to identify the suspected "Golden State Killer" four decades after his crimes—genetic genealogy—could be used to identify half of all Americans from relatives' DNA samples, a new study says.

16h

'Heavenly Bodies' sets heavenly record at Met Museum

Fashion and Catholicism have trumped King Tut.

16h

Facebook says it purged more than 800 spam accounts, pages

Facebook said it has purged more than 800 U.S. pages and accounts for spamming users with politically-tinged garbage links and clickbait just weeks ahead of the U.S. midterm elections.

16h

Legacy of Biosphere 2 lives on in singular research space

They lived for two years and 20 minutes under the glass of a miniature Earth, complete with an ocean, rain forest, desert, grasslands and mangroves. Their air and water were recycled, and they grew the sweet potatoes, rice and other food they needed to survive.

16h

Banedanmark: Problemer med S-togenes nye signalsystem fortsætter i 2019

Bremseproblemer og falske fejlmeldinger i S-togenes nye signalsystem når ikke at blive løst, inden systemet skal tages i brug på de næste strækninger om en måned.

17h

Firma indsamlede online-aktivisters personlige oplysninger

Tusindvis af online-aktivisters personlige oplysninger blev indsamlet af firma, som hjalp Trump med at blive valgt.

17h

Smallest ever Tylosaurus fossil sheds light on species

The smallest Tylosaurus mosasaur fossil ever found has been revealed in a new study in the Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology and surprisingly it lacks a trademark feature of the species.

17h

Fake or real? New study finds consumers wary of manipulated photos

In the age of fake news and doctored photos, wary consumers are not nearly as gullible as one might presume—especially if they have knowledge of social media, experience with the internet and are familiar with online photo-imaging tools. But the source of the images does not matter much as people evaluate what is fake and what is real, a University of California, Davis, study suggests.

17h

Understanding the neurological code behind how flies fly

A common flesh fly takes off and maneuvers effortlessly, its head and body steadied by a hidden, miniscule gyroscope-like structure that gives it an unparalleled balance.

17h

A step in the right direction: could implants help people walk again? – Science Weekly podcast

Four people with paraplegia were recently implanted with electrodes in their lower backs. They all regained movement below their injuries, and two walked again. This week Nicola Davis investigates this technique – epidural stimulation – and other approaches for treating spinal cord injuries

17h

A step in the right direction: could implants help people walk again? – Science Weekly podcast

Four people with paraplegia were recently implanted with electrodes in their lower backs. They all regained movement below their injuries, and two walked again. This week Nicola Davis investigates this technique – epidural stimulation – and other approaches for treating spinal cord injuries Jeff Marquis was spending his day off work on his bike on a mountain trail in Montana. After he landed a ju

17h

18h

Metformins biologiske virkningsmekanisme belyst af aarhusianske diabetesforskere

Kapløbet for mere viden om diabetesmidlet metformin tager i øjeblikket fart. Forskere i Aarhus har nu påvist en af midlets virkningsmekanismer i leveren, som er et vigtigt skridt på vejen til at forstå stoffet. Men billedet er slet ikke så enkelt. Andre studier tyder nemlig på, at det er i tarmene, at metformin har den største virkning i mennesker.

18h

Blodtryksmedicin kan forebygge svanger­skabsforgiftning hos diabetikere

En del tilfælde med svangerskabsforgiftning hos gravide diabetikere kan afværges ved at sætte kvinderne i blodtrykssænkende behandling tidligt i graviditeten. Sådan lyder det fra to professorer på Rigshospitalet, som har opnået særdeles gode resultater med denne strategi.

18h

Gammel medicin beskytter muligvis mod type 1-diabetes

Forskere på Rigshospitalet har opdaget, at det kolesterolsænkende middel fenofibrat beskytter 100 pct. mod type 1 -diabetes i mus, fordi det øger mængden af fedtstoffet sulfatid i bugspytkirtlens beta-celler. Nu vil man gerne teste opdagelsen i mennesker i et stort klinisk forsøg.

18h

Region Hovedstaden skruer via screening op for forebyggelse af benamputationer

I et forsøg på at nedbringe antallet af benamputationer på grund af diabetiske fodsår intensiverer Hovedstaden via screening sin jagt på type 2-diabetikere, der har øget risiko for at udvikle dem. Regionen er inspireret af et tiltag ved Steno Diabetes Center Copenhagen.

18h

Analyse this: what Freud can teach us about Trumpism

As a psychotherapist, here’s what I’ve learned in the two years since Donald Trump moved into the White House. By Gary Greenberg It will be left to future historians, if there are any, to explain to their contemporaries why a profession came into existence in the 20th century whose well-paid practitioners sat in an office while people otherwise unknown to them talked about their unhappiness, one a

18h

Verdens første DNA-laboratorium under vand: Robot holder øje med fisk

Nu skal der holdes styr på, hvornår fisk ankommer og forlader vores farvande.

18h

Understanding the neurological code behind how flies fly

Discoveries about the neurological processes by which flies stay steady in flight by researchers at Case Western Reserve University could help humans build more responsive drones or better-balanced robots.

18h

Two seemingly opposing forces in the brain actually cooperate to enhance memory formation

The brain has a way to keep nervous activity in check as we learn new things and consolidate memories. Otherwise, it would gradually 'saturate', losing its ability to store any information at all. But doesn't such a need for stability in turn limit our memory and learning powers? A new study now sheds light on this enigma.

18h

Benzodiazepines in patients with COPD and PTSD may increase suicide risk

Long-term use of benzodiazepine medications in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, or COPD, as well as posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) may lead to increased suicide risk, according to a study published online in the Annals of the American Thoracic Society.

18h

Psykiaternes begejstring er forduftet: Regeringens plan mangler sammenhæng og penge

Regeringens nye psykiatriplan blev mødt med anerkendelse fra flere sider, da den blev fremlagt for godt to uger siden. Nu lyder vurderingen fra psykiatriens parter, at den er uambitiøs og underfinansieret.

19h

Retspsykiatrien i Middelfart skærper sikkerheden

Ekstra låse og hasper skal forhindre rømninger fra Retspsykiatri Syddanmark i Middelfart, men det kan føre til ringere sikkerhed for personalet, mener overlæge.

19h

For lidt og for sent

Strategioplæg udstiller regionernes manglende timing og selverkendelse.

19h

Reformer starter på gulvet, ikke skriveborde

En god begyndelse kunne være, at den øverste ledelse varetages af personer med faglige kompetencer i forhold til sundhedsvæsenets leverancer, diagnostik, behandling, pleje og rehabilitering.

19h

Vi kan nu sende tanker til hinanden via en computer

Amerikanske forskere er lykkedes med at koble tre menneskehjerner sammen ved hjælp af en computer, så de kan sende instrukser til hinanden.

19h

S-tog kører med konstant sikkerhedsadvarsel

På første strækning med det nye signalsystem kører togene efter to år stadig med nedsat hastighed, og computere skal genstartes konstant. Senest er togene ramt af sikkerhedskritisk fejl.

20h

For Sale! Certified Lunar Meteorite — Weight 12 Pounds — Mileage 250,000

Ever look at the moon and say, "Yeah, I want a piece of that"? Well, an online auction house has one for sale. (Image credit: Rodrique Ngowi/AP)

21h

Meet Europe's new koala clan

Five southern koalas have been flown from Australia to the UK to create a back-up population.

22h

New model mimics human tumors for accurate testing of cancer drugs

Researchers have genetically engineered a new laboratory model that enables accurate testing of anti-cancer drugs by mimicking the complexity of human cancers. Using this advanced model, researchers will be able to discover the safest and most effective ways to use promising drugs called MCL-1 inhibitors in the clinic.

22h

Nice people finish last when it comes to money

Nice people may be at greater risk of bankruptcy and other financial hardships compared with their less agreeable peers, not because they are more cooperative, but because they don't value money as much.

22h

Versatile molecular system extends the promise of light-activated switches

A newly-developed molecule is easy to make, simple to work with and may potentially be used for the development of targeted medications and high-density memory devices with the volume of a speck of a dust.

22h

Molecular mechanisms of ancient herbal remedies

Researchers have discovered the molecular basis for a therapeutic action of an ancient herbal medicine used across Africa to treat various illnesses, including epilepsy.

22h

3-in-1 vaccine against traveler's diarrhea

A professor has discovered a novel approach to developing a first-ever vaccine for three common pathogens that cause traveler's diarrhea and kill more than 100,000 children living in developing countries each year. The vaccine yokes together proteins from pathogenic E.coli with sugars from Shigella and Camplyobacter jejuni — three bugs that are major causes of bacterial diarrhea globally. Current

22h

Genetics of brain structure and description of largest human genetic study

New research describes the release of whole genome genetic data of 500,000 participants of the UK Biobank.

22h

Molecular details of protein reveal glimpse into how kidney stones form

Using the 2017 Nobel Prize-winning technique of cryo-electron microscopy to capture a high-resolution image of an ion channel protein, called TRPV5, that removes calcium from urine, researchers have found fresh clues as to how kidney stones form.

22h

Your smartphone could soon be making your commute much less stressful

Apps that can detect what mode of transport phone users are traveling on and automatically offer relevant advice are set to become a reality after extensive data-gathering research led by the University of Sussex.

23h

Bagsiden: Kikset kommunal kommunikation

Ugens metalaffaldsvejledningsfortolkning

23h

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23h

Effective ketamine doses for treatment-resistant depression

A study identifies two subanesthetic dosage levels of the anesthetic drug ketamine that appear to provide significant symptom relief to patients with treatment-resistant depression.

23h

A novel biosensor to advance diverse high-level production of microbial cell factories

A research group presented a novel biosensor which can produce diverse, high-level microbial cell factories. The biosensor monitors the concentration of products and even intermediates when new strains are being developed. This strategy provides a new platform for manufacturing diverse natural products from renewable resources. The team succeeded in creating four natural products of high-level pha

23h

PIEZO2, a molecular target for treating clinical pain

The researchers think topical application of PIEZO2 blockers could be beneficial for patients suffering from neuropathic pain.

23h

Recognizing the uniqueness of different individuals with schizophrenia

Individuals diagnosed with schizophrenia differ greatly from one another. Researchers have demonstrated that very few identical brain differences are shared amongst different patients. Therefore, insights based on research at the group level (i.e. in the 'average' patient) say little about the individual.

23h

23h

Opening communication lines between propulsion and airflow poses new questions

On the runway to more fuel-efficient aircraft, one alternative propulsion scheme being explored is an array of electrically powered ducted fans. The fans are distributed across the wing span or integrated into the wing. Researchers have gained new understanding in how the fans and especially their precise placement on the aircraft can affect the cross-conversation between propulsion and the airflo

23h

Gene variants raise risk of migraines in African-American children

Researchers have discovered common gene variants associated with migraines in African-American children. The research adds to knowledge of genetic influences on childhood migraine and may lead to future precision medicine treatments for African-American children with these intense headaches.

23h

Low copper levels linked to fatter fat cells

In studies of mouse cells, researchers have found that low levels of cellular copper appear to make fat cells fatter by altering how cells process their main metabolic fuels, such as fat and sugar.

23h

Lung cancer deaths are 28 percent lower in California

Early adoption of tobacco control efforts in California lead to fewer people ever smoking, reduced the amount used by those who do smoke and helped smokers quit at a younger age — when their risk of developing lung cancer is lowest. As a result, lung cancer deaths are 28 percent lower in California compared to the rest of the country and the gap is widening each year by almost a percentage point.

23h

Color-changing contact lens could enhance monitoring of eye disease treatments

For all the good they do, eye drops and ointments have one major drawback: It's hard to tell how much of the medication is actually getting to the eye. Now scientists report that they have developed a contact lens that changes color as drugs are released. This visual indicator could help eye doctors and patients readily determine whether these medications are where they should be.

23h

How proteins meet on the cell membrane

At last, the researchers have defined the molecular basis of the cell membrane in integrin activation.

23h

Researchers show effectiveness of new noninvasive blood glucose test

For those living with diabetes, monitoring blood glucose accurately is necessary to prevent diabetes-related complications. Researchers recently evaluated the accuracy of new technology to monitor blood glucose levels without needles or a finger prick. Early results show that the noninvasive technology measures blood glucose levels as effectively as a finger prick test — without drawing blood.

23h

Rice 'safely conserved' in Philippines gene bank

Scientists say that more than 100 thousand varieties of rice have been safeguarded for the future.

23h

Six climate questions for 'Green GB'

Cars, planes, heating, fracking and food will come under scrutiny as the UK bids to keep climate change to 1.5C.

23h

Microsoft Calls a Truce in the Linux Patent Wars

The software giant, whose former CEO once called Linux a "cancer," will let others use 60,000 patents for Linux-related open source projects.

23h

Hurricane Michael Hit the Parts of Florida Least Prepared to Flee Its Wrath

What's really scary is that as climate change brings fiercer storms, more places must learn to prepare for disaster.

23h

Confident Tone Overcomes Accent Distrust

English as-a-first-language Canadian study subjects were less trusting of statements in English spoken with a foreign accent, unless the speaker sounded confident about their assertion. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

23h

Adorable Newborn Sea Monster from the Dinosaur Age Discovered in Kansas

About 85 million years ago, when a vast sea covered Kansas, a wee, little sea monster died almost immediately after it was born.

23h

Stephen Hawking's Final Paper Was Just Released

Stephen Hawking's final paper provides a possible way to measure how black holes store information

23h

The Atlantic Daily: Who Is Still Politically Engaged?

What We’re Following Loss of Faith: In what seems to be a banner year for minority candidates running for office in the U.S., the country is still witnessing an erosion of African American participation in politics and activism. A new poll, for instance, finds that 57 percent of black respondents said that over the past two years they’ve become less likely to run for office. The same poll also fi

1d

Dramatic drop in public confidence after Philippines dengue vaccine controversy

The Philippines' highly politicised response to newly-reported risks of a dengue vaccine led to a dramatic drop in public trust in vaccines overall, according to new research published in Human Vaccines & Immunotherapeutics.

1d

Smallest ever Tylosaurus fossil sheds light on species

The smallest Tylosaurus mosasaur fossil ever found has been revealed in a new study in the Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology and surprisingly it lacks a trademark feature of the species.

1d

Age at which women experience their first period is linked to their sons' age at puberty

The age at which young women experience their first menstrual bleeding is linked to the age at which their sons start puberty, according to the largest study to investigate this association in both sons and daughters. The research is published in Human Reproduction journal.

1d

Nail polishes with 'n-free' labels are not necessarily free of toxic compounds

Consumers are growing more knowledgeable about the potential health effects of nail polish, and manufacturers have taken action. They have started removing potentially toxic ingredients and labeling their products as being free of those substances. However, these labels aren't always accurate, and reformulated products aren't necessarily safer, according to a new report.

1d

What Does a Fair Algorithm Actually Look Like?

Automated systems take into account thousands of variables to make decisions that affect our lives. People are calling for more transparency in AI, but not everyone agrees on what constitutes a fair explanation.

1d

Poor, elderly Puerto Ricans faced a persistent risk of dying after Hurricane Maria

The study found that people living in all areas of Puerto Rico faced an elevated risk of mortality during the first two months after the storm, but this risk elevation was most prominent, and prolonged, for people living in the poorest parts of the island.

1d

The Lancet: Caesarean section use has almost doubled globally since 2000

Peer-reviewed / Modelling and review**Country-level data and spokespeople available**Globally, 21 percent births are delivered via C-section, higher than the level thought required for medical purposes (10-15 percent).60 percent of countries overuse C-sections, and 25 percent underuse the procedure, suggesting wide disparities in adherence to clinical recommendations.

1d

Use of caesarean sections growing at 'alarming' rate

In some countries more than half of births now involve the procedure, experts say The use of caesarean sections to deliver babies has reached epidemic proportions, say experts, with the procedure growing in use at an “alarming” rate. While caesarean sections can be a crucial intervention for the safety of the mother and child, for example if the baby is showing distress or if the mother is bleedi

1d

Breast cancer patients use Twitter as a non-medical forum to share their experiences

Twitter is a place where many cancer patients go to share and discuss their experiences of the disease. This is the main finding of a recent exploratory study, to be presented at the ESMO 2018 Congress in Munich, which analysed the contents of over 6,000 tweets and retweets about breast cancer.

1d

Higher levels of the hormone prolactin in women are associated with protection against type 2 diabetes

New research published in Diabetologia (the journal of the European Association for the Study of Diabetes [EASD]) shows that in women, high levels of the hormone prolactin in the blood (but within the physiological range) are associated with a lower risk of developing type 2 diabetes (T2D).

1d

Antibiotics May Soon Become Useless. Now What?

Antibiotics were one of the great innovations of the last century. Will we still use them 25 years from now?

1d

New appropriate use criteria for lumbar puncture in Alzheimer's diagnosis

In preparation for more tools that detect and measure the biology associated with Alzheimer's and other dementias earlier and with more accuracy, experts have published appropriate use criteria (AUC) for lumbar puncture (spinal tap) and spinal fluid analysis in the diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease.

1d

Reconstructing human history with the help of fecal sterols

The story of human presence on Earth can be told by studying the sediment and soil accumulation of these chemical compounds in human feces.

1d

Fruit fly protein could be new tool in tackling disease-carrying mosquitoes

An insulin-binding protein in fruit flies could provide new opportunities for tackling disease-carrying mosquitoes, such as malaria and yellow fever.

1d

A genome under influence

Researchers recently discovered that 95 percent of our genome seems to be affected by selection and other genetic biases and that markers previously thought to be neutral appear to provide skewed estimates. Their study calls for the re-examination of a plethora of results and provides the tools and recommendations to correct such issues in the future.

1d

Engineers develop process to 3-D print cells to produce human tissue such as ligaments and tendons

Scientists have developed a method to 3-D print cells to produce human tissue such as ligaments and tendons to greatly improve a patient's recovery. A person with a badly damaged ligament, tendon, or ruptured disc could simply have new replacement tissue printed and ultimately implanted in the damaged area.

1d

Synergy in two-dimensional materials, membranes research clear in professor's new work

Two-dimensional materials and membranes were once separate fields, but synergistic opportunities are resulting in exciting new developments at their intersection.

1d

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